Impact of Personal Remittances on Monetary Policy Variables in Nigeria: An Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) Approach

James Tumba Henry, Enam Pagiel Abalis – May 2019 Page No.: 01-08

Nigeria is one of the countries with high personal remittances inflows in the world. However, these inflows have serious implications for the effectiveness or otherwise of the CBN’s objective of price stability. This is because they are not properly tracked and captured when designing monetary policy targets. Thus, this study was conceived to investigate the impact of personal remittances on monetary policy variables within a linear Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) model. Three equations were developed and secondary data from 1980 to 2016 was assembled for this study. The hypotheses stated in this study were tested at 10% and 5% levels of significance. The result obtained revealed that personal remittances and consumer price index have a positive and significant impact on broad money supply in the long and short runs within the period of study. It was therefore recommended that the CBN should keep track of all remittances inflow into the country by enacting laws that will encourage the transfer of remittances through financial institutions and prohibits transfer through other means.

Page(s): 01-08                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 13 May 2019

 James Tumba Henry
Department of Economics, Faculty of Social and Management Sciences, Adamawa State University, Mubi, Nigeria

 Enam Pagiel Abalis
Department of Economics, Faculty of Social and Management Sciences, Adamawa State University, Mubi, Nigeria

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[11]. World Bank Group. (2016). Migration and remittances factbook (3rd Ed.). Retrieved from https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/23743/9781464803192.pdf

James Tumba Henry, Enam Pagiel Abalis “Impact of Personal Remittances on Monetary Policy Variables in Nigeria: An Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) Approach” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.01-08 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/01-08.pdf

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Analysis of Human Influence and Physical Influence of Road Accidents in the State of Terengganu: Enforcement Agency Perspective

Lokman Abdullah, Ramle Abdullah – May 2019 Page No.: 09-14

Injuries and deaths that are caused by road accidents are the world’s most major factor beside of chronic diseases such as heart disease, stroke, lung infections, and respiratory difficulties. The purpose of this study is to explore the element of road accidents caused by human influence from the point of view of enforcement agencies. This study will analyse the human impacts on the accidents for all types of vehicles in all districts in Terengganu. The data were collected using qualitative methods involving two techniques, namely follow-up observation and interviews with five main respondents representing the implementing agencies and enforcement agencies. The data is then will be analysed using NVivo QSR computer software to get the exact details and explanation pertaining to the issues being studied. The findings show that human influence is one of the main factors in causing road accidents which include negligence and carelessness, the attitude and habits of road users and the constraints of the enforcement agency’s role. While physical influence is also one of the causes for the occurrence of road accident cases. These factors include surface and road geography, vehicle conditions, seasons, weather, nature, and solid waste. In conclusion, the trend of road accidents in the state of Terengganu shows that human influence is more dominant than the physical influence in cases of road accidents.

Page(s): 09-14                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 13 May 2019

 Lokman Abdullah
Faculty of General Studies and Advance Education, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Kuala Nerus, 21300 Terengganu, Malaysia

 Ramle Abdullah
Faculty of General Studies and Advance Education, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Kuala Nerus, 21300 Terengganu, Malaysia

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[17]. Mosedale, J., Purdy, A., & Clarkson, E. (2004). Contributory factors to road accidents. London: Department of Transportation.

Lokman Abdullah, Ramle Abdullah ” Analysis of Human Influence and Physical Influence of Road Accidents in the State of Terengganu: Enforcement Agency Perspective ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.09-14 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/09-14.pdf

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“The Effect of Risk Taking Behavior in Gender and Educational Level (Secondary and Higher Secondary)”
Nahid Hasan, Sabrien Sobnom, Shakib Uzzaman – May 2019 – Page No.: 15-21

The objective of the present study was to investigate the risk taking behavior in gender and educational level (secondary and higher secondary). There were 800 students as a sample of the present study. The respondents were equally divided into two groups male 400 and female 400. Each group was also divided into secondary and higher secondary student. They were purposively selected from Puran Tahirpur high school, Mohongonj High School and Mohongonj Degree College. Demographic and personal information sheet, Bengali version of risk taking behavior scale was used for data collection. The obtained data were analyzed through t-test. Results showed that effect of gender was statistically significant in risk-taking behavior and male students have higher score of risk-taking behavior in comparison to their female counterpart. The result also showed that the effect of educational level was statistically significant in risk-taking behavior and higher secondary student have higher score than secondary student.

Page(s): 15-21                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 16 May 2019

 Nahid Hasan
Department of Psychology, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh

 Sabrien Sobnom
Department of Pharmacy, Varendra University, Rajshahi, Bangladesh

 Shakib Uzzaman
Department of Pharmacy, Varendra University, Rajshahi, Bangladesh

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[17]. Özbay, H. E. (2016). Investigation of association among scientific epistemological beliefs, intellectual risk taking and science achievement of middle school students. Unpublished PhD thesis, Institute of Educational Sciences, İnönü University, Malatya, Turkey.
[18]. Tay, B., Özkan, D. & Tay, B. A. (2009). The effect of academic risk taking levels on the problem solving ability of gifted students. Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences, 1(1),1099-1104. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sbspro.2009.01.198
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[22]. Akça, B. (2017). Determination of the relationship between the science anxiety and science related intellectual risk-taking behaviours of middle school students. Unpublished MSc thesis, Institute of Science, Adnan Menderes University, Aydın, Turkey.
[23]. Tay, B., Özkan, D. & Tay, B. A. (2009). The effect of academic risk taking levels on the problem solving ability of gifted students. Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences, 1(1), 1099-1104. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sbspro.2009.01.198
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Nahid Hasan, Sabrien Sobnom, Shakib Uzzaman ““The Effect of Risk Taking Behavior in Gender and Educational Level (Secondary and Higher Secondary)”” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.15-21 May 2019 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/15-21.pdf

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The Relevance of Laissez-Faire and Fabian Social Policy Theorizing in Explaining and Addressing Social and Developmental Problems of Nigeria

Abubakar JIBRIL and Muddassir AHMAD GADO – May 2019 Page No.: 22-26

Social policy entails the provision of social welfare services by the government to the people. Laissez-faire and Fabianism are models of social policy which seek to explain how a policy of a state on the provision of social needs of the population should be. The Laissez-faire model advocates that social policy should exclude government intervention in the economic affairs of the country and emphasized on the private ownership of property and virtue of individualism. The Fabian model was a model which favoured gradual development of socialism by peaceful means rather than revolutionary change. It emphasized on government intervention, abolition of private property and the perfectibility of the welfare state in which the government provides for the basic needs of the population. This paper therefore attempts to focus on these two models of social policy. The paper examined the historical emergence of the models. The paper compared and contrasted the major theoretical postulates of the two models and looked at their possible shortcomings. The Laissez-faire model was found relevant in explaining Nigerian social policy and the Fabian model was found to be the best in addressing Nigerian social problems.

Page(s): 22-26                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 16 May 2019

 Abubakar JIBRIL
Department of Sociology, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria

 Muddassir AHMAD GADO
Department of Sociology, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria

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[3]. Burden, T. (1998): Social Policy and Welfare: A Clear Guide. London: Pluto Press.
[4]. Clasen, J. (1999): Comparative Social Policy: Concepts, Theories and Methods. United States of America: Blackwell.
[5]. Drover, G. and Kearns, P. (1993): New Approaches to Welfare Theory. London: Prentice Hall.
[6]. Edaward, P. (1916): A History of the Fabian Society. New York: E. P. Dutton and Company.
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[16]. World Bank, (2005): World Development Report.

Abubakar JIBRIL and Muddassir AHMAD GADO “The Relevance of Laissez-Faire and Fabian Social Policy Theorizing in Explaining and Addressing Social and Developmental Problems of Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.22-26 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/22-26.pdf

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Compatibility between Indigenous Healing and Biomedical Therapy for Mental Disorders in Zimbabwe

Lazarus Kajawu, Dr Chiweshe, M., Prof Mapara, J. – May 2019 Page No.: 27-37

There is an increasing demand for collaboration between the Indigenous Healing Practitioners (IHPs) and the Biomedical Therapists (BTPs) to mitigate barriers in the delivery of mental health service in resource poor countries, including Zimbabwe. In Africa, many countries have resorted to different models of collaboration between IHPs and BTPs, but there is little or no studies on their compatibility in Zimbabwe. This study sought to examine the perceptions of health service providers and IHPs on the compatibility of IHPs and BTPs in the treatment of mental disorders in a settlement north-east of Harare using an exploratory qualitative methodology in order establish compatibility between IH and BT. Thirty key informant interviews with IHPs and one focus group discussion with nurses were conducted. Gathered data were coded using the Constant Comparison Method with multiple members of the research team, enhancing the validity and the reliability. The results of the study show that IHPs and BTPs were ready to collaborate, with potential benefits in the partnership. IHPs mainly treated common mental disorders, social problems and culturally specific problems perceived to have supernatural causality, which BTPs did not address and IHPs provided supportive and palliative care to BTPs’ patients who had chronic conditions. However, the study also found some IHPs’ practices with either health risks or were counterproductive to the partnership. For example, the IHPs ordered patients to stop taking BTPs’ medication and they changed the diagnosis which patients were given by BTPs. Although they viewed some IHPs had flaws in the delivery of mental health care, the participants suggested that the partnership would resolve the problems. The study found IHPs and BTPs compatible and therefore should redistribute the tasks in mental health treatment in Zimbabwe. The IHPs should be integrated with the BTPs in order to increase the coverage of mental health care in resource poor countries. Policies on collaboration of IHPs and BTPs must be drawn and published in national guidelines. This is expected to initiate a wider, holistic, therapy. More research is needed to establish how the two approaches may collaborate in Zimbabwe.

Page(s): 27-37                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 16 May 2019

 Lazarus Kajawu
Chinhoyi University of Technology, Chinhoyi, Zimbabwe

 Dr Chiweshe, M.
Chinhoyi University of Technology, Chinhoyi, Zimbabwe

 Prof Mapara, J.
Chinhoyi University of Technology, Chinhoyi, Zimbabwe

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Lazarus Kajawu, Dr Chiweshe, M., Prof Mapara, J. “Compatibility between Indigenous Healing and Biomedical Therapy for Mental Disorders in Zimbabwe” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.27-37 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/27-37.pdf

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An Assessment of Influence of Teachers’ Discipline Management Strategies on Kenya Certificate of Secondary Examination in Public Secondary Schools in Tharaka Nithi County, Kenya

Jacob Kinoti Nkarichia, Dr. Jepkemboi Choge – May 2019 Page No.: 38-48

Discipline in schools is about positive behavior change in order to create conducive environment for learning. When discipline is achieved in secondary schools, it becomes instrumental in students academic performance. This study focused on assessment of the influence of teachers’ discipline management strategies on KCSE performance in public secondary schools in Tharaka Nithi County, Kenya. The objective of this study was to establish the influence of guidance and counseling, on KCSE performance. The county has had a trend of grade wastage from KCPE to KCSE. The study adopted descriptive survey research design which used mixed method approach. The study targeted 104 public secondary schools in Tharaka Nithi County, with 10 boys schools, 17 girls schools and 77 mixed schools. Stratified random, purposive sampling method and Krejcie & Morgan population sample table was used to determine the sample size. Principals and teachers were the respondents in this study. Interview schedule for 21 principals and 346 questionnaires for teachers were used as tools for data collection. The study sampled 42 schools, which constituted 40% of the total population size. The researcher prepared the instruments with expert judgment by supervisors. Cronbach’s Alpha Coefficient (α) was employed in determining the reliability of the instruments. A pilot study of 10% of the sample schools and respondents was carried out from each of school category. Alpha index of 0.869 was obtained for the teachers’ questionnaires. The reliability of the interview schedule was ensured by the consistency of the questions and the order in which they were administered. The study used descriptive statistics which included frequencies, measures of central tendencies (mean) and measures of dispersion (standard deviation). Inferential statistics Pearson r was used to test the relationships of the hypotheses with the aid of Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) in analyzing the data. The data from the interview guide was arranged thematically, transcribed and then presented verbatim in order to triangulate the results. The results revealed that teachers’ discipline management strategy influence KCSE Performance. Guidance and counseling influenced KCSE performance positively. The findings of this study are expected to be of benefit to different stake holders, who are sensitized with new information on alternative disciplinary strategies to be used on students’ discipline in schools, the policy makers are assisted to come up with a new policy on use of alternative disciplinary methods in schools.

Page(s): 38-48                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 18 May 2019

 Jacob Kinoti Nkarichia
Doctorate Student, Department of Educational Management, Policy and Curriculum Studies, School of Education, Maasai Mara University, Kenya

 Dr. Jepkemboi Choge
Senior Lecturer, Department of Educational Management, Policy and Curriculum Studies, School of Education, Maasai Mara University, Kenya

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Jacob Kinoti Nkarichia, Dr. Jepkemboi Choge “An Assessment of Influence of Teachers’ Discipline Management Strategies on Kenya Certificate of Secondary Examination in Public Secondary Schools in Tharaka Nithi County, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.38-48 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/38-48.pdf

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Synergy of Team Guards, Security Administration and Regional Development (Tim Pengawal Dan Pengaman Pemerintah Dan Pembangunan Daerah) of Bojonegoro District Attorney and Development Program of Bojonegoro District in Corruption Action Prevention Efforts

Dodik Mahendra, Prof. Dr. Hartiwiningsih, S.H., M.Hum, Dr. Muhammad Rustamaji, S.H., M. Hum- May 2019 Page No.: 49-56

This research discusses the effectiveness of Team Guards, Security Administration and Regional Development (Tim Pengawal Dan Pengaman Pemerintahdan Pembangunan Daerah/TP4D) and Bojonegoro District attorney Development Program in an effort to prevent corruption. Bojonegoro TP4D district attorney was formed based on Decree of head of Bojonegoro District Attorney Number: Kep-23 / O.5.16 / Dps.1 / 11 in accordance with the Decision of the Attorney General of the Republic of Indonesia Number: Kep-152 / A / JA / 10/2015.
This research is an empirical legal research with a sociological approach to law and constiturtion. The place of the study subject was in Bojonegoro District Attorney and Bojonegoro Regency Government. Data collection techniques used were interviews and document studies. The data analysis technique used is qualitative methods.
The results of this study indicate that there has not been an optimal synergy between BojonegoroTP4D District Attorney and the respective owners of activities at each office, the relationship between the two parties was still a formality (fulfilling the needs of each agency), resulting in action of corruption prevention had not been effective. This was influenced by law enforcement factors, namely human resources who were members of Bojonegoro TP4D district attorney and Factors limiting budget support from both Bojonegoro District Prosecutor’s Office and from the Regional Work Unit (Satuan Kerja Perangkat Daerah/SKPD) within Bojonegoro Regency Government as the job owner. However, the presence of Bojonegoro TP4D District Attorney Office was able to provide a sense of security and comfort, confidence and being able to change the way of thinking and acting patterns of Commitment Making Officer (Pejabat Pembauat Komitmen/PPK) and Event Technical Officer (Pejabat Pelaksana Teknis Kegiatan/PPTK) and team.
Bojonegoro TP4D District Attorney needs to involve experts from trusted and independent institutions of higher education or laboratory institutions, so that the results of their assistance can be accounted for, and more intensive and pro-active in building communication with Regional Work Units (SKPD) in Bojonegoro Regency Government to foster trust and openness in providing data and reports needed by both parties and need to allocate adequate budget to further improve the work effectiveness of Bojonegoro District Attorney’s TP4D in guarding and securing the government and development in Bojonegoro Regency in actualizing clean development from practice corruption.

Page(s): 49-56                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 18 May 2019

 Dodik Mahendra
Master Degree in Law Sciences, Sebelas Maret University, Indonesia

 Prof. Dr. Hartiwiningsih, S.H., M.Hum
Masters in Law Sciences, Sebelas Maret University, Indonesia

 Dr. Muhammad Rustamaji, S.H., M. Hum
Masters in Law Sciences, Sebelas Maret University, Indonesia

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[63]. Regulation Attachment LampiranPeraturanMinistry of Administrative and Bureaucratic ReformNumber PER/15/M.PAN/7/2008 regarding General Guideline of Bureaucratic Reformation.
Further Publication
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[65]. https://www.cnnindonesia.com/nasional, accessed 25 June 2017.

Dodik Mahendra, Prof. Dr. Hartiwiningsih, S.H., M.Hum, Dr. Muhammad Rustamaji, S.H., M. Hum, “Synergy of Team Guards, Security Administration and Regional Development (Tim Pengawal Dan Pengaman Pemerintah Dan Pembangunan Daerah) of Bojonegoro District Attorney and Development Program of Bojonegoro District in Corruption Action Prevention Efforts” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.49-56 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/49-56.pdf

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Effect of Integrating Production Skills and Equipment Technology Transfer on the Growth of Micro and Small Catering Enterprises in Kenya

Bancy Muthoni Ngwiri, Phd. – May 2019 Page No.: 57-64

In the last few decades, both developed and developing countries, micro and small enterprises (MSEs) have been used to trigger economic development. However, there has been lack of accelerated investment in new technology in this subsector. This study thus examined to what extent the technology transfers of production skills and equipment technology transfers are integrated and what is the influence of such integration on the growth of micro and small catering enterprises in, Kenya. This study employed the descriptive research method with a mixed model approach combining both qualitative and quantitative data collection approaches. The subject for the study was all catering MSEs in Nairobi County, Kenya with a population of 11,162 respondents. Stratified and simple random sampling methods were used in the selection of the samples. The total sample size from the total population was 384 catering respondents. Secondary and primary data were collected for this research. Primary data was obtained from owners of MSEs through self-administered questionnaires. Both the validity and reliability of research instruments were tested. Descriptive statistics was used to describe the population characteristics numerically. Descriptive statistics such as measures of central tendency was used to describe levels of dispersion. The relationship between independent variables and the Dependent was determined based on hypothesis testing and regression analysis. The study used the Logistic (or Logit) regression to establish the effects of the independent variables to enterprise growth. Qualitative analytic reasoning process was used to interpret and structure the meanings that could be derived from the data. The results of findings indicated that the combined effect of production skills and technology transfer of equipment/object is much greater than the effects of the individual predictors, production skills or technology transfer of equipment/object.

Page(s): 57-64                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 18 May 2019

 Bancy Muthoni Ngwiri, Phd.
Lecturer, Department of Entrepreneurship and Innovation Technology, School of Business Management Studies, Technical University of Kenya

[1]. Bozeman, B. (2000). Technology transfer and public policy: a review of research and theory. Research Policy.29 (4), 627–655.
[2]. Cantillon, R. (1775).Essaisur la nature du commerce en general, as quoted in Entrepreneurship in the Hospitality, Tourism and Leisure Industries. Allison, M., Mike. R., & Claire, W. (1979).
[3]. Cohen, W. M. (2004).The Economics of Innovation and Technical Change. Oxford: Basil Blackwell.
[4]. Dedrick, J., Gurbaxani, V., & Kraemer, K. (2003).IT and Economic Performance: A Critical Review of Empirical Evidence ACM Computing Services, arch.Document.113.pdf. (n.d.).Retrieved September, 2015 from http://www.idisc.net/en/Document.113.html.
[5]. Grimes, R.N. (2009).Tough times call for revenue-generating technology. Nation’s Restaurant News, 20 (1) 42.
[6]. Ikiara, M, Moyi E. &Ogbu, O. (n.d).Technology transfer and economic growth in Africa. Retrieved September, 2015, from http:// www.unescap.org/tid/publication/indupub 2306_chap3.pdf.
[7]. Kathuria, V. (1999).Role of externalities in inducing technical change: A case study of the Indian machine tool industry. Technological. Forecasting and Social Change, 61(1), 25–44.
[8]. Kathuria, V. (2000). Productivity spillovers from technology transfer to Indian manufacturing firms. Journal of International Development, 12(3), 343–369.
[9]. Kothari, C.R. (2004). Research Methodology, Methods and Techniques (Revised Edition), Delhi: New Age International Publishers.
[10]. Liddle, A.J. (2009).Latest transaction tech gains traction as operators explore POS possibilities. Nation’s Restaurant News, 1(2), 4.
[11]. Phillips, R. G. (2002). Technology business incubators: how effective as technology transfer mechanisms? Technology in Society, 24(3), 299–316.
[12]. Schumpeter, J. A. (1961). The theory of economic development: An inquiry into profits, capital, credit, interest, and the business cycle (Vol. 55). Transaction Books. Retrieved from September,
[13]. Ramanathan, K. (1994).The polytrophic components of manufacturing technology. Technological Forecasting and Social Change, 46(3), 221–258.
[14]. Ramanathan, K. (2001). E-strategies for technological capability development. In Management of Engineering and Technology, 2001.PICMET’01. Portland International Conference on (1) 10, 147–150.
[15]. Republic of Kenya.(2005).Development of Micro and Small Enterprises for Wealth and Employment Creation for Poverty Reduction (Sessional Paper No. 2). Nairobi: Government Printer.

Bancy Muthoni Ngwiri, Phd., “Effect of Integrating Production Skills and Equipment Technology Transfer on the Growth of Micro and Small Catering Enterprises in Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.57-64 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/57-64.pdf

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Design and Development of Chair Back /Armrest Covers: Implication for Home Economics Graduates in Makurdi Metropolis, Benue State, Nigeria

Alidu, Maryam, Agbo, Diana A, Akpan, E A, Igbua, Zashachia Francis- May 2019 Page No.: 65-71

The study sought to Design and Develop Standard Chair Back and Armrest Covers for Home Users in Makurdi Metropolis, Benue State, Nigeria. The Study employed Survey Research Method to collate the data needed for Analysis. The population of the study comprised of 200 Married Women and 200 Single Ladies. A sample of 100 Married Women and 100 Single Ladies was proportionally selected from the population. The findings of the study revealed that most chair covers were cut without considering the shapes and sizes of the chairs and hence did not fit comfortably around the chairs, but were found lying on the floor or squeezed into the chair. The study also identified poor quality of embroidery or designs on the chairs covers as a major factor which resulted to the short life span of the items. The study concluded that if chair covers were cut to standard sizes in proportion to the sizes and shapes of the chairs, the chair covers would be prevented from slipping off position or been squeezed into the chair. Additionally, the findings showed that in the production of chair covers, cotton fabrics were preferable to chiffon and satin fabrics.

Page(s): 65-71                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 18 May 2019

 Alidu, Maryam
Department of Home Science and Management, College of Food Technology, University of Agriculture, Makurdi, Nigeria

 Agbo, Diana A
Department of Home Science and Management, College of Food Technology, University of Agriculture, Makurdi, Nigeria

 Akpan, E A
Department of Home Science and Management, College of Food Technology, University of Agriculture, Makurdi, Nigeria

 Igbua, Zashachia Francis
Department of Home Science and Management, College of Food Technology, University of Agriculture, Makurdi, Nigeria

[1]. Anyakoha, E. U. (2006). Practical Tips for Survival. Nsukka: AP Press.
[2]. Lyons, G.H. (2008). Ten Common Home Decorating Mistakes and How to Avoid Them. Blue Sage Press.
[3]. Lytle S. (2018). Best Table Cloth. Retrieved from http://thoroughlyreviewed.com/home-kitchen/best-tablecloth/
[4]. Standard Arm Cap. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.amazon.com/Harvard-Decorative-Standard-Design-Furniture/dp/B00kG7WCLW
[5]. Stevenson, H. (2007). A Perspective on Entrepreneurship. Harvard Business Review, Aug. –Sept., pp103 –108.
[6]. Unemployment and Underemployment Report (2017). National Bureau of Statistics. Retrieved from https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://nigerianstat.gov.ng/do wnload/694&ved=2ahUKEwih_Ku_J3eAhXMXCwKHU1nBBUQFjAAegQIBBAB&us g=AOvVaw2QyrrXrO9NdCrSj7-osvBE
[7]. Ward, L. (1999). Use What You Have Decorating. Penguin Group.

Alidu, Maryam, Agbo, Diana A, Akpan, E A, Igbua, Zashachia Francis” Design and Development of Chair Back /Armrest Covers: Implication for Home Economics Graduates in Makurdi Metropolis, Benue State, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.65-71 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/65-71.pdf

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An Assessment of Basic Schools Teachers’ Integration of Computer Based Instruction into Social Studies Teaching in West Mamprusi Municipality; Implications for Further Development of Computer Based Instruction Use in Ghanaian Schools

Iddrisu Bariham, Professor Henry Okello Ayot, Professor Samson Rosana Ondigi, Dr Mueni Ngungui Kiio, Nyakundi Patrick Nyamemba – May 2019 Page No.: 72-82

This quantitative study was conducted in West Mamprusi Municipality to explore the integration of Computer Based Instruction in Social Studies instructional processes among basic schools; opportunities, challenges and implications for policy reforms. The study forms part of an ongoing PhD research which focuses schools preparedness for the integration of Computer Based Instructions in teaching and learning of Social Studies in Northern Region of Ghana. Three research questions and one hypothesis were formulated to guide the study. The research was anchored on the technology acceptance model developed by Davis, Bagozzi and Warshaw, (1989). The correlational research design was employed for the research. The design enabled the researchers to observe two or more variables at a point in time and alsouseful for describing a relationship between two or more variables in the study. Ten (10)Junior High Schools and 15 primary schools were randomly sampled for the study using proportional allocation formula developed by Yamane (1967).Data were collected by means of structured survey questionnai reconstructed with close-ended questions. The questionnaires were pre-tested to ensure reliability using Cronbach’s Alpha formula.The questionnaires yielded an alpha of 0.79 which was within the acceptable standard and hence was adopted for the study. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The t-test was used to test the hypothesis to determine whether there was a significant relationship between teachers’ gender, age, experience and location in their application of ICT resources during Social Studies instruction.The findings discovered that teachers’ had positive attitudes towards the application of Computer Based Instructions CBIs) as tools for teaching and learning of Social Studies. However, teachers’ do not incorporate CBI in instructions due to lack of digital infrastructure, lack of internet, poor teachers’ ICT skills, limited time, lack of technical support for the teachers’, unstable power supply and lack of school based ICT policies. Teachers’ variables such as age, gender, experience and location were found to have significance mean difference on the extent of integration of Computer Based Instruction in instructional processes. This means that the null hypothesis of no influence of teachers’ characteristics on their level of CBI integration should be rejected. However, teachers’ qualification did not significantly influence the extent to which they incorporated CBI in Social Studies instructions. Based on the findings, the study recommends the Government of Ghana to supply basic schools with appropriate digital infrastructure including internet, in-service training for teachers and increasing budgetary support for schools to operate and sustain the CBI innovation in schools to improve on students’ learning outcomes.

Page(s): 72-82                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 19 May 2019

 Iddrisu Bariham
PhD Student, Department of Educational Communication & Technology, Kenyatta University
Lecturer, Bagabaga College of Education, Tamale

 Professor Henry Okello Ayot
Department of Educational Communication & Technology, Kenyatta University

 Professor Samson Rosana Ondigi
Department of Educational Communication & Technology, Kenyatta University

 Dr Mueni Ngungui Kiio
Department of Educational Communication & Technology, Kenyatta University

 Nyakundi Patrick Nyamemba
Department of Food Nutrition and Dietetics, Kenyatta University

[1]. Adel, B. U. &Mounir, D. (2014).The Impact of ICT on Student Performance in Higher Education: Direct Effects, Indirect Effects and Organizational Change.In: “The Economics of E-learning”[onlinemonograph].Vol.5, no.1.UOC.[Accessed:http://www.uoc.edu/rusc/5/1/dteng/benyoussef_dahmani.pdfISSN 1699-8154.
[2]. Anderson, R. E., & Dexter, S. L. (2000). School Technology Leadership: Incidence and Impact (Teaching, Learning, and Computing: 1998 National Survey Report No. 6). Irvine, CA: Center for Research on Information Technology and Organizations, University of California, Irvine.
[3]. Bariham, I. (2015). Influence of Teachers’ Variables for the Utilization of Fieldtrips for Environmental and Social Studies Instruction in Colleges of Education in Northern Ghana. International Journal of Education, Learning and Development Vol.3, No.6, pp.13- 35, July 2015.
[4]. Bariham, I. (2019). Influence of Teachers’ Gender and Age on the Integration of Computer Assisted Instruction in Teaching and Learning of Social Studies among Basic Schools in Tamale Metropolis. Global Journal of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, 7(2), 52-69.
[5]. Cannon, G. C. (2017). Teacher and Student Perceptions of Computer-Assisted Instructional Software to Differentiate Instruction. Published PhD Thesis: Walden University.
[6]. Davis, F. D., Bagozzi, R. P., &Warshaw, P. R. (1989). User Acceptance of computer Technology: A comparison of two theoretical models. Management Science. 35(8). 982-1003.
[7]. Demetriadis, S., Barbas, A., Molohides, A., Palaigeorgiou, G., Psillos, D., Vlahavas, I., Tsoukalas, I., & Pombortsis, A. (2003). Cultures in negotiation: teachers’ acceptance/resistance attitudes considering the infusion of technology into schools. Computers & Education, 41, 19-37.
[8]. Dubey, D. L. &Berth, J. C. (1980).Social Studies: The enquiry Method Approach. Lagos: Thomas Nelson (Nig.) Ltd.
[9]. Ghana Education Service. (2010). Social Studies Syllabus for Junior High Schools. Accra: Curriculum Research and Development Division.
[10]. Hakksrinen, K. (2001). Teachers’ Information Communication Technology Skills and Practices of using ICT.Journal of Technology and Teacher Education.
[11]. Martorella, P. (1997). Technology and the Social Studies: Which way to the sleeping giant? Theory and Research in Social Education, 25(4), 511-514.
[12]. Mugenda, M. (2006). University Roles in Meeting Aspirations for ICT and Economic Development Frontiers of Knowledge.Cape Town: University Leaders Forum.
[13]. Ngatia, P. K. (2015). Preparedness of Public Secondary Schools on the use of ICT in Teaching and Learning in Mukurweini, Nyeri County-Kenya. Unpublished Master Thesis.
[14]. Obonyo, S. O. (2013). Use of Information Communication Technology in teaching and learning processes in Secondary Schools in Rachuonyo South District, Homa-bay County, kenya. Published master’s thesis. University of Nairobi.
[15]. Ogange, B. O. (2011). An Analysis of ICT Policy Development and Practice in Teacher Education in Kenya, 1997-2007. Center for Research in Education and Educational Technology. The Open University-UK.
[16]. Pascopella, A. (2001). Laptop or Textbook? District Administrators.
[17]. Potosky, D and Bobko, P. (2001).A model for predicting computer experience for Attitudes towards computers. Journal of Business and Psychology.
[18]. Rogers, E. M. (1995). Diffusion of innovations (4th Ed.). New York: The Free Press.
[19]. Taylor, J., & Duran, M. (2006). Teaching Social Studies with technology: New research on collaborative approaches. History Teacher, 40(1), 9-25. Retrieved September 14, 2008, from ERIC database.
[20]. Todman, J. (2000). Gender differences in computer anxiety among university entrants since 1992. Computers &Education, 34(1), 27-35. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0360-1315(99)00036-6.
[21]. Veen, W. (1993).The Role of Beliefs in the use of Information Technology: Implication for Teachers’ Education or Teaching the Right Things at the Right time. Journal of Information Technology in Teacher Education.
[22]. Wajcman, J. (2006).Feminist perspectives on technology in Teich, A. H. (ed). Technology and the Future. Pg 67-79. Thomson Ward worth.
[23]. Wang, T. (2008). The Difficulties and Challengesof Teachers’ Integrating Computer Assisted Instruction into Teaching. The Journal of Human Resource and Adult Learning, 4(2), 134-141.
[24]. World Bank Report. (2012).Ghana Partnership for Education Grant Project. Report No. 72949- Gh.
[25]. Yamane, T. (1997). Statistics, An introductory Analysis, 2nd Ed., New York: Harper and Row Young, J. (2002). The 24-hour professor. The Chronicle of Higher Education, 48(38), p. 31-33.
[26]. Zhao, Y. &Cziko, G. A. (2001). Teacher adoption of technology: a perceptual control theory perspective. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 9 (1), 5-30.

Iddrisu Bariham, Professor Henry Okello Ayot, Professor Samson Rosana Ondigi, Dr Mueni Ngungui Kiio, Nyakundi Patrick Nyamemba “An Assessment of Basic Schools Teachers’ Integration of Computer Based Instruction into Social Studies Teaching in West Mamprusi Municipality; Implications for Further Development of Computer Based Instruction Use in Ghanaian Schools” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.72-82 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/72-82.pdf

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Institutional Characteristics as the Key Predictor of Alumni Donations

Emma Darkoaa Aikins, Akua Ahyia Adu-Oppong and Goddana Mensima Darko – May 2019 Page No.: 83-86

Alumni support for institutions of learning has gained much attention. A lot of views exist about the relationship between donation by alumni and the factors that induce donation. This article provides insight into the various determinants of donation and the key factors that prompt willingness to donate, readiness to donate and the actual act of donation. The views of several authors were examined, based on which the internal characteristics of institutions were found out as the most predominant determinant of donation. This article therefore recommends the solicitation of alumni donation through improvement of institutional characteristics that have a lasting and strong inducement on alumni’s propensity to donate to their alma mater.

Page(s): 83-86                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 20 May 2019

 Emma Darkoaa Aikins
College of Technology Education, Kumasi, University of Education, Winneba, Ghana

 Akua Ahyia Adu-Oppong
College of Technology Education, Kumasi, University of Education, Winneba, Ghana

 Goddana Mensima Darko
College of Technology Education, Kumasi, University of Education, Winneba, Ghana

[1]. Baldwin, K. M. (2008). How Reciprocity influences Alumni Giving: A qualitative study.Unpublished Doctoral Dissertation.. University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL
[2]. Boney, R. (2008). Corporate Donors adjust to Economic Slump. Philanthropy Journal. Retrieved September 11th, 2018 from http://www.philanthropyjournal.org/
[3]. Cunningham, B. M., & Cochi-Ficano, C. K. (2002). The determinants of Donative Revenue flows from Alumni of Higher Education: An Empirical Inquiry. The Journal of Human Resources 37(3): 540-569.
[4]. Gaier, S. (2005). Alumni Satisfaction with their Undergraduate Experience and the Impact on Alumni Giving and Participation. International Journal of Educational Advancement, 5(4), pp. 278-288.
[5]. Gallo, P. J., & Hubschman, B. (2003). The Relationships between Alumni Participation and Motivation on Financial Giving. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Chicago, IL.
[6]. Hawk, L.C. (2012). An Analysis of the Variables Associated with Alumni Giving and Employee Giving to a Mid-Sized Southeastern University. Electronic Theses and Dissertations. Paper 1216. Retrieved September 10th, 2018 from http://dc.etsu.edu/etd/1216
[7]. Holmes, J., Meditz, J., & Sommers, P. (2008). Athletics and Alumni Giving. Journal of Sports Economics 9(5), 538–52.
[8]. Hoyt, J.E., (2004). Understanding Alumni Giving: Theory and Predictors of Donor Status. Institutional Research and Management Studies. West University Parkway, Utah
[9]. McAdoo, A.D. (2010). Factors Affecting the Institutional Perception of Alumni of the University of Arkansas. A Dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Doctor of Education in Higher Education, University of Arkansas, U.S.
[10]. McAlexander, J. H., & Koenig, H. F. (2001). University Experiences, the Student-College Relationship, and Alumni Support. Journal of Marketing for Higher Education, 10(3), pp. 21-43.
[11]. McDeamon, J. T., & Shirley, K. (2009). Characteristics and Institutional Factors related to Young Alumni Donors and Non-Donors. International Journal of Educational Advancement, 9(2), pp. 83-95.
[12]. Monks, J. (2003). Patterns of Giving to One’s Alma Mater among Young Graduates from selective institutions. Economics of Education Review, 22
[13]. Radcliffe, S., (2011). A Study of Alumni Engagement and Its Relationship to Giving Behaviors. Master’s Thesis presented to Faculty of Bucknell University in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in Education
[14]. Schmidt, J. C. (2001). Mining Philanthropic Data: Models for Predicting Alumni Giving at a Medium-sized Public Master’s University. Dissertation, University of Minnesota
[15]. Shelby, R. (2011). A Study of Alumni Engagement and Its Relationship to Giving Behaviors. Retrieved September 10th, 2018from https://digitalcommons.bucknell.edu/masters_theses
[16]. Shim, J. (2001). Relationship of selected Alumni Characteristics to Alumnae Financial Support at a Women’s College. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Florida
[17]. Singer, T. S., & Hughey, A. W. (2002). The role of the Alumni Association in Student Life.
[18]. Student Affairs and External Relations: New directions for student services, number 100 (pp. 51-68). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
[19]. Taylor, Alton L. & Martin, Joseph C. Jr. (1995). Characteristics of Alumni Donors and Nondonors at a Research Public University. Research in Higher Education, 36(3), pp. 283-302.
[20]. Twum-Ampomah, M.K. & Danso, H. (2013). Alumni Perception of their Alma Mater of a Public University in Ghana. Journal of Education and Practice Vol. 4, No 6
[21]. Tyson L. P., (2016). Factors that Influence Alumni Giving at Three Private Universities A Thesis submitted to the Graduate Faculty of the University of Toledo as partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Education.
[22]. Wastyn, M. L. (2009). Why Alumni Don’t Give: A Qualitative Study of What Motivates NonDonors to Higher Education. International Journal of Educational Advancement, 9(2), pp. 96-108.
[23]. Weerts, D. J. (2007). Toward an Engagement Model of Institutional Advancement at Public Colleges and Universities. International Journal of Educational Advancement, 7(2), pp. 79 -103.
[24]. Weerts, D. J., & and Ronca, J. M. (2009). Using Classification Trees to predict Alumni Giving for Higher Education. Education Economics, 17(1), pp. 95-122

Emma Darkoaa Aikins, Akua Ahyia Adu-Oppong and Goddana Mensima Darko “Institutional Characteristics as the Key Predictor of Alumni Donations” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.83-86 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/83-86.pdf

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Multi Hazards Risk in the Imbulpe Divisional Secretariat Division (Application of Participatory Rural Appraisal Method – PRA)

Dananjaya P.K.V.S, Edirisooriya K.V.D – May 2019 Page No.: 87-95

Sri Lanka is a continental island which covers the 65,000 Km2 of land. Last few decades denoted an incensement of multi hazards in the country. As a developing country, should be paid an attention on the disaster risk mitigation. This study was focused on identification of multi hazard risk in the selected area of the Imbulpe Divisional Secretariat Division (DSD). Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA) method was used to analyze disaster risk. The area has risk of landslide, forest fire, animal attack, drought, flood, elephant attack and high wind. Area could be named as a multi hazard risk area and animal attack could be named as the severe hazard condition in the area.

Page(s): 87-95                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 21 May 2019

 Dananjaya P.K.V.S
Department of Geography & Environmental Management, Sabaragamuwa University of Sri Lanka.

 Edirisooriya K.V.D
Department of Geography & Environmental Management, Sabaragamuwa University of Sri Lanka.

[1]. Ahmed I,;Fuenfgeld,H;McEvoy,D and Salkeld,A. (2012). Intergrated Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change: Participatory Capacity and Vulnerability Analysis (PCVA) Toolkit. Carlton: Jocelyn Tan.
[2]. Chamber, R. (1994). The Origins and Practice of Participatory Rural Appraisal. World Development, 953-969.
[3]. Cronin,S., Gaylord,D.,Charley,D., Alloway,B., Wallez,S. and Esau,J. (2004). Participatory methods of incorporating scientific with traditional knowledge for volcanic hazard management on Ambae Island, Vanuatu. Bulletin of Volcanology, 652-668.
[4]. EthletChiwaka and Roger Yates. (n.d.). Participatory Vulnerability Analysis : A Step by Step Guid for Field Staff. ActionAid International.
[5]. KKU. (1987). Rural Systems Research and Farming Systems Research Projects. Proceedings of ihe 1985 Inrernarional Conference on Rapid Rural Appraisal (p. 17). KhonKaen, Thailand: University of KhonKaen.
[6]. McCracken, J. A. (1988). Participarory Rapid Rural Appraisal in Gujarar: A Trial Model for rhe Aga Khan Rural Support Programme (India). London: IIED.
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Dananjaya P.K.V.S, Edirisooriya K.V.D “Multi Hazards Risk in the Imbulpe Divisional Secretariat Division (Application of Participatory Rural Appraisal Method – PRA)” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.87-95 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/87-95.pdf

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Orang Asli Hulu Terengganu in Adaptation of Nature Changes in the Economic Perspective

Nik Nizam Hamdan, Ramle Abdullah, Atirah Rambli& Iqbal Jumaat – May 2019 Page No.: 96-99

Orang Asli in Peninsular Malaysia is known for the community that has a close relationship with nature. However, in the era of development which leads to the destruction of habitat for varieties of flora and fauna, it makes Orang Asli harder and harder to live by. Development that is meant for Orang Asli or not, had changed their natural ecology and jeopardize their traditional way of living. Thus, the aim for this research is to analyse Semaq Beri in Hulu Terengganu in adaptation on changes of nature in their daily activities of economy and gathering food resources. Research Method: qualitative through ethnography approach. Research data are acquired via participant observation, interview and research documents. Researchers used QSR Nvivo to analyze data that are collected. Findings: From the research, we can conclude that Semaq Beri in Hulu Terengganu still has high dependency towards nature especially in terms of economic returns. Nevertheless, their manifestation changes to other methods of searching for side revenues such as searching for woods in new territory, subsistence agriculture, re-planting of Agarwood (gaharu) and manufacturing of economic equipment. For access to foods, on the other hand, compared to previously, they are 90 percent rely upon outside food resources. Hence, the degree of the dependency of Semaq Beri adaptation process with nature is decreasing. This shows that Semaq Beri is going through modern lifestyle transformation.

Page(s): 96-99                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 21 May 2019

 Nik Nizam Hamdan
Faculty of Applied Social Science, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, 20300, Kuala Nerus, Terengganu, Malaysia

 Ramle Abdullah1
Faculty of Applied Social Science, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, 20300, Kuala Nerus, Terengganu, Malaysia

 Atirah Rambli
Faculty of Applied Social Science, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, 20300, Kuala Nerus, Terengganu, Malaysia

 Iqbal Jumaat
Faculty of Applied Social Science, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, 20300, Kuala Nerus, Terengganu, Malaysia

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Nik Nizam Hamdan, Ramle Abdullah, Atirah Rambli& Iqbal Jumaat “Orang Asli Hulu Terengganu in Adaptation of Nature Changes in the Economic Perspective” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.96-99 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/96-99.pdf

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Study on the Impact of Transportation Cost to Communities Living in the Island of Semporna in the Eastern Cost State of Sabah, Malaysia

Kasim Mansur, SidahIdris, Raman Nordin, Rini Sulung & M. Shyafiq Ezzat – May 2019 Page No.: 100-104

The economic impact of transport facilities and the potential for transport facilities affected poor communities living in the island in Samporna, Sabah has received little attention. Thus, in the contact of Malaysia in general it is desirable and timely to assess prevailing views of the role of sea transport facilities in poverty alleviation. In this study a comprehensive analysis of transport operations from island to the nearest town is undertaken to comprehend existing practices and to identify innovative approaches. In this preliminary study, 20 head of the household were interviewed representing 20 villages located in the island around Semporna district. Half of these respondents are also head of the village and approximately 110 number of population inhabiting in the island under study and majority of them are fishermen. The primary objective in this study is to establish a sound conceptual framework for identifying, examining, and shaping the full potential role of transport operations in reducing poverty among residents residing in the islands of Samporna districts in the eastern cost of Sabah state. On average each household spend roughly RM70 per day on cost of transportation include cost of drinking water which is about 45 percent of their total income. Based on these finding of the study there is a need to strengthen the role of sea transport facilities provided by the authority to the island communities as majority of the communities living in the island are in dire need of water resources. The main contribution of this paper is the generation of a blend of policies to overcome high transportation cost confronted island communities and growing threats to water security and to attain sustainable development in Samporna, the eastern cost state of Sabah, Malaysia.

Page(s): 100-104                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 22 May 2019

 Kasim Mansur
Faculty of Business, Economics & Accountancy, Universiti Malaysia Sabah

 SidahIdris
Faculty of Business, Economics & Accountancy, Universiti Malaysia Sabah

 Raman Nordin
Faculty of Business, Economics & Accountancy, Universiti Malaysia Sabah

 Rini Sulung
Faculty of Business, Economics & Accountancy, Universiti Malaysia Sabah

 M. Shyafiq Ezzat
Faculty of Business, Economics & Accountancy, Universiti Malaysia Sabah

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Kasim Mansur, SidahIdris, Raman Nordin, Rini Sulung & M. Shyafiq Ezzat “Study on the Impact of Transportation Cost to Communities Living in the Island of Semporna in the Eastern Cost State of Sabah, Malaysia” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.100-104 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/100-104.pdf

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Impact of Fiscal Policy on Inflation Expectations in Nigeria

Asemota Georgina (Ph.D), Dibie, Kashiari Esther (Ph.D) – May 2019 Page No.: 105-112

Recent theoretical position is that monetary policy alone is not sufficient to stabilize prices and that the traditional macroeconomic roles of policies can be reversed such that monetary policies are used for debt stabilization while fiscal policies are used to stabilize prices. This study therefore investigates the impact of fiscal policy on inflation expectations in Nigeria. The study began by investigating the causal relationship between inflation and inflation expectations in Nigeria and confirmed the existence of a bi-causal relationship. Basing its theoretical position on the rational inflation expectations theory, the study sourced data spanning from 1981(Q1) to 2018(Q2) for sixteen variables. These variables were separated into four groups and the principal component of each group of data was used as explanatory variables while the Hodrick-Prescott filtered inflation rate data was used as proxy for inflation expectations. The study applied the Vector Error Correction Mechanism (VECM) and established a negative relationship existing between inflation expectations and fiscal policy in Nigeria. However,the result was not significant. The study then recommends more in-depth studies on inflation expectations related issues generally and specifically, a disaggregated study of the impact of fiscal policy variables on inflation expectations for Nigeria for effective control of inflationary trends in Nigeria.

Page(s): 105-112                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 22 May 2019

 Asemota Georgina (Ph.D)
Department of Economics, Benson Idahosa University, Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria

 Dibie, Kashiari Esther (Ph.D)
Department of Economics, College of Education, Agbor, Delta State, Nigeria.

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Asemota Georgina (Ph.D), Dibie, Kashiari Esther (Ph.D) “Impact of Fiscal Policy on Inflation Expectations in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.105-112 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/105-112.pdf

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ASEAN Fiscal and Taxation Policy: Comparative Studies between Malaysian Taxation System and Selected ASEAN Countries towards a Sustainable Economic Development

Kasim Mansur- May 2019 Page No.: 113-120

In general taxes play a repressing role in an economy. Any new forms of taxation, changes in tax regime or rates results in greater economic activities, change consumption pattern, influence jobs market and therefore effect on economic growth. In most ASEAN countries the element of competition among member countries are visible by lowering corporate tax rates and each try to attract FDI in boosting economic growth. On the other hand ASEAN member countries are also trying to make personal tax rates lower in order to fulfill their political agenda at home. It is evident that in most ASEAN countries having lower tax rates have better prospects for economic growth. However, small tax revenue is limiting governmental spending and might cause imbalances in the economy. In the contact of Malaysian taxation system taxes play a very important factors for a sustainable growth of the economy. Thus, there is a positive relationship between taxation and economic development. This conceptual paper aimed to review the efficiency of taxation in terms of sustainable economic development and to discuss the factors that contribute to economic growth. This paper is also attempt to do comparative analysis among Malaysia and selected ASEAN countries how tax system have impacted the growth particularly on GDP. In general the results suggest that the tax rates implemented as well as tax revenue collected in the past years could have impacted the growth and synergized the phase of development.

Page(s): 113-120                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 22 May 2019

  Kasim Mansur
Universiti Malaysia Sabah

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Kasim Mansur, “ASEAN Fiscal and Taxation Policy: Comparative Studies between Malaysian Taxation System and Selected ASEAN Countries towards a Sustainable Economic Development” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.113-120 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/113-120.pdf

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Correlation between Parental Involvement and Students’ Commitment toward Learning: A Case of Secondary Schools in Arusha District, Tanzania

Baraka Manjale Ngussa, PhD and Goodluck Nzowa – May 2019 Page No.: 121-128

The present study investigated on the role of parental involvement on students’ commitment toward learning among secondary schools in Arusha District, Tanzania. A sample of 150 form three students was randomly selected from five schools to fill the questionnaire whose validity was established by expert judgment and reliability of above 0.7 Cronbach’s Alpha was established through statistical analysis before data was collected from the field. Data was analyzed through descriptive statistics in terms of mean scores and correlation of variables was established through Pearson product Moment Correlational Coefficient. The study established that the rate of students’ commitment toward learning was high. This was reflected by the fact that their attitude toward schooling is positive, their school attendance is good enough and they actively collaborate with fellow learners at school in academic matters. The rate of parental involvement was high as parents follow up their educational progress, they encourage them to set academic goals and objectives, they guide and counsel them on academic matters and they make follow up on academic reports. The more the parental involvement, the higher the rates of students’ commitment toward learning. The researchers recommend thatteachers in the schools under investigation should devote their time and energy to teach effectively so that when students’ commitment, parental involvement and teachers’ efforts are combined, big results will be achieved and desirable academic performance will be realized. Since parental involvement significantly influences students’ commitment, school administrators need to inform parents on the importance of their full involvement to support their children’s academic affairs.

Page(s): 121-128                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 26 May 2019

 Baraka Manjale Ngussa, PhD
Senior Lecturer of Curriculum and Teaching, University of Arusha, Tanzania

 Goodluck Nzowa
MA Student, University of Arusha, Tanzania

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Baraka Manjale Ngussa, PhD and Goodluck Nzowa “Correlation between Parental Involvement and Students’ Commitment toward Learning: A Case of Secondary Schools in Arusha District, Tanzania” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.121-128 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/121-128.pdf

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Methods in Conserving Flora and Fauna through Traditional Knowledge of the Semaq Beri in Hulu Terengganu

Iqbal Jumaat, Ramle Abdullah & Nik Nizam Hamdan – May 2019 Page No.: 129-133

The forest area around Lake Kenyir contains a variety of biodiversity as well as a habitat for various types of flora and fauna. However, the recent forest area around Lake Kenyir has been explored for various purposes such as opening of commercial farms, logging and for tourism purposes. Incidences of poachers exploiting forest products like exotic gaharu(gharuwood) and exotic fauna is increasingly worrying. These have not only affect the forest ecosystem around Lake Kenyir but also affect the indigenous people who are highly dependent on the forest and other natural resources in the area. The Semaq Beri tribe have been trying to help in conserving flora and fauna in the forest area around Lake Kenyir through the methods of practicing their traditional knowledge in everyday activities. Their traditional knowledge is seen to be very effective in the conservation process as well as to reduce damage in the forest area in their daily activities. Thus, this study was conducted to identify the traditional knowledge methods used by the Semaq Beri tribe in the process of conservation of flora and fauna. This study was conducted on the Semaq Beri tribe who are settled at Sungai Berua Village, Hulu Terengganu. This study applies the techniques of participating observation, interviews and document analysis to obtain data in meeting the objectives of this study. The findings found five traditional knowledge methods used by the Semaq Beri tribes in continuing their efforts to conserve the flora and fauna in the forest area around Lake Kenyir. To highlight this method, there should be initiatives from related agencies to expose their traditional knowledge to the public.

Page(s): 129-133                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 May 2019

 Iqbal Jumaat
Fakulti Sains Sosial Gunaan, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, 20300 Kula Nerus, Terengganu, Malaysia

 Ramle Abdullah
Fakulti Sains Sosial Gunaan, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, 20300 Kula Nerus, Terengganu, Malaysia

 Nik Nizam Hamdan
Fakulti Sains Sosial Gunaan, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, 20300 Kula Nerus, Terengganu, Malaysia

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Iqbal Jumaat, Ramle Abdullah & Nik Nizam Hamdan “Methods in Conserving Flora and Fauna through Traditional Knowledge of the Semaq Beri in Hulu Terengganu” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.129-133 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/129-133.pdf

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Impact of Climate Change on Farmers Livelihood in Oluyole Local Government Area of Oyo State, Nigeria

O.O.Adetola, D.S Muritala, M.A Adebisi, O.M Onofurume- May 2019 Page No.: 134-137

The study aimed to examine the effects of climate change on the livelihood of farmers in Oluyole Local Government area of Oyo state. The objectives of this work was to determine the socio-economic characteristics, source of income of the farmers, determine the level of awareness of climate change and the effects of climate change on health of the farmers. The study used primary data through a well-structured questionnaire and scheduled interview, fifty respondents were randomly sampled. The use of frequency count and simple percentage were used to analyze the data.
The study revealed that male farmer’s population was 76% o while female population was 24%. 70% of the farmers are married, 10% are divorced and 20% widowed. The study also indicated that 54% had non-formal education, 20% of the farmers had quranic education while 12% and 8% of the farmers had secondary and tertiary education respectively. 90% of the forest zone has been degraded as a result of deforestation. The respondent’s major source of information on climate change includes (Research institute-60%, radio/Television station-30% and newspaper-0%). The ailments experienced by respondents are malaria (66%) and headache 12%. Major source of water supply during dry season is stream 76%, which is scarce during dry season (68%).The farmers main livelihood activities is trading of forest products (firewood & bush meat-58%), sales of farm products and medicinal herbs represent 30% of their source of income. This study recommends that more awareness strategies on climate change should be opened-up to the farmers to curb the effect of deforestation. Good water supply should be provided in the area to eradicate the effects of prolong drought.

Page(s): 134-137                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 May 2019

 O.O.Adetola
Forestry Research Institute of Nigeria, P.M.B 5054, Jericho Hills Ibadan, Nigeria

 D.S Muritala
Forestry Research Institute of Nigeria, P.M.B 5054, Jericho Hills Ibadan, Nigeria

 M.A Adebisi
Forestry Research Institute of Nigeria, P.M.B 5054, Jericho Hills Ibadan, Nigeria

 O.M Onofurume
Forestry Research Institute of Nigeria, P.M.B 5054, Jericho Hills Ibadan, Nigeria

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O.O.Adetola, D.S Muritala, M.A Adebisi, O.M Onofurume, “Impact of Climate Change on Farmers Livelihood in Oluyole Local Government Area of Oyo State, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.134-137 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/134-137.pdf

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Environmental Factors Influencing Churches to Sponsor Public Schools in Turbo Division, Uasingishu County

Philip Kipkorir Matutu – May 2019 Page No.: 138-144

The purpose of the study was to investigate environmental factors influencing churches to sponsor public schools in Turbo Division, Uasin Gishu County. The specific objective focused on establishing environmental roles that influence churches to sponsor public schools. The study adopted descriptive survey research design and a target population drawn from 97 public schools. The respondents involved were from 41 church sponsored schools of which 23 were public primary schools and 18 were public secondary schools. The respondents were school management committee, Head Teachers and Board of Management. Data was collected using questionnaires, oral interviews and observations. The data was analyzed using both qualitative and quantitative techniques and presented using tables and figures .The results indicated that the environmental roles that influence churches competition to sponsor public schools include- the competition for more religious influence, recognition and fame as well as autonomy over decision making and use of resources. On the other hand the sponsor is perceived in the public eye to be contributing less to schools in terms of provision of infrastructure and supporting the human resource. It is recommended that the sponsors’ role should be re-defined to take an active part in environmental infrastructural development of schools in order to maintain the sponsors’ status and schools’ expectations in Kenyan’s public schools irrespective of their key mandate or locality.

Page(s): 138-144                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 May 2019

 Philip Kipkorir Matutu
Faculty of Education Kisii University, Kenya.

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Philip Kipkorir Matutu “Environmental Factors Influencing Churches to Sponsor Public Schools in Turbo Division, Uasingishu County” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.138-144 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/138-144.pdf

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Infrastrural Access Challenges and Their Effects on Enrolment of Physically Challenged Learners Integrated Into Public Primary Schools In Uasin Gishu County, Kenya

Joseph Kiprono Lelan, PhD, Yagan Kibet Rono, James Kimeli Sang, PhD- May 2019 Page No.: 145-155

The Kenyan government has put in place deliberate awareness policies and strategies to integrate learners with special needs in regular learning settings. This is to open doors for All and hence enrolment rates. Despite this learners with physical impairment continue to face specific challenges that hinder their enrolment in one way or another. People with physical disabilities have poorer health outcomes, lower education achievements, less economic participation and higher rates of poverty than people without disabilities”(WHO, 2011).The objective of the study was to establish the infrastructural access challenges and their effects on enrolment of physically challenged learners integrated in public primary schools in Uasin Gishu County, Kenya. The study employed descriptive survey design in collecting data. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics that involved frequency and percentages, with the help of computer Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS). Documentary review was used to examine infrastructure situation in public primary schools Uasin-Gishu County. Major findings revealed that (75.8%) of learning institution had inadequate or total lack of infrastructure that directly support learners with physical impairments. Eighty five percent (85.3%) of infrastructure was accessible but with difficulty to learners with physical disabilities whereby (35.4) and (25.2) respectively were reported as being average and poor conditions. These findings have a great implication on enrolment rates of these learners. The study recommends that the Ministry of Education should enforce the relevant policies and impose stiff penalties for stakeholders who do not provide for accessibility leeway for all as they do constructions. Exististing School infrastructural facilities should be re inspected and evaluated with the aim of promoting access for learners with physical challenges.

Page(s): 145-155                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 May 2019

 Joseph Kiprono Lelan, PhD
School of Education, Moi University- Eldoret, Kenya

 Yagan Kibet Rono
School of Education, Moi University- Eldoret, Kenya

 James Kimeli Sang, PhD
School of Education, Moi University- Eldoret, Kenya

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Joseph Kiprono Lelan, PhD, Yagan Kibet Rono, James Kimeli Sang, PhD “Infrastrural Access Challenges and Their Effects on Enrolment of Physically Challenged Learners Integrated Into Public Primary Schools In Uasin Gishu County, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.145-155 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/145-155.pdf

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Women’s Access to Income and Its Effect on Spousal Violence – Experience of Microcredit Borrowers in Bangladesh

ATM Jahiruddina, Tania Afroze, Mir Sohrab Hossain, Nusrat Zahan Lopa – May 2019 Page No.: 156-166

The study investigates microcredit borrower women’s experiences about violence on them by their husbands, with a particular focus on the differences among the women of different poverty groups in this regard. Furthermore, this study investigates the underlying socio-economic circumstances that might have resulted in differential experiences pertinent to spousal violence of the women of different. The study was conducted in the western part of rural Bangladesh with 640 microcredit borrower women with the help of a structured questionnaire survey and a series of unstructured in-depth interviews. The findings suggest that women close to the poverty line (just above or below) experienced significant improvement with regards to spousal violence. Direct involvement of women in managing microcredit funded venture, and at the same time, significant improvement in the household’s living standard resulting from the income of microcredit investment have been found as the main reasons for this improvement. The findings also suggest that violence on women is likely to reduce with longer duration of borrowing period. This study also suggests that participation in microcredit programs, in some instances, has aggravated spousal violence. In most cases, a section of absolute poor borrowers were victim of such situations.

Page(s): 156-166                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 May 2019

 ATM Jahiruddina
Business Administration Discipline, Khulna University, Khulna 9208, Bangladesh

 Muddassir AHMAD GADO
Business Administration Discipline, Khulna University, Khulna 9208, Bangladesh

 Mir Sohrab Hossain
Business Administration Discipline, Khulna University, Khulna 9208, Bangladesh

 Nusrat Zahan Lopa
Business Administration Discipline, Khulna University, Khulna 9208, Bangladesh

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ATM Jahiruddina, Tania Afroze, Mir Sohrab Hossain, Nusrat Zahan Lopa “Women’s Access to Income and Its Effect on Spousal Violence – Experience of Microcredit Borrowers in Bangladesh” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.156-166 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/156-166.pdf

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Relationships between Organizational Climate and Organizational Commitment: A Literature Review in the Asian Context

Gesca Sonarita, Sudjarwo Sudjarwo, Hasan Hariri – May 2019 Page No.: 167-171

The importance of organizational climate in an organization attracts researchers to investigate it, and this paper is to examine the relationship between organizational climate and organizational commitment. There are a few articles about review of the relationship between organizational climate and organizational commitment, especially in Asia context, that can be found. The purpose of this review is to examine the relationship between organizational climate and organizational commitment in Asia. Based on the results of literature review from various countries and organizations in Asia, we found that organizational climate and organizational commitment has a positive and significant relationship.

Page(s): 167-171                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 May 2019

 Gesca Sonarita
Faculty of Teacher Training and Education, Universitas Lampung, Indonesia

 Sudjarwo Sudjarwo
Faculty of Teacher Training and Education, Universitas Lampung, Indonesia

 Hasan Hariri
Faculty of Teacher Training and Education, Universitas Lampung, Indonesia

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[3]. Ahmad Hashemi, Seyed. (2014). Investigating the relationship between organizational climate and organizational commitment and organizational effectiveness among school managers: A case study in Fars province in Iran. European Online Journal of Natural and Social Sciences: Proceedings, 2(3 (s)), pp. 1665-1671.
[4]. Arabaci, İ Bakır. (2011). Organizational Climate of Fırat University. International Online Journal of Educational Sciences, 3(1).
[5]. Ardakani, Samad Ranjbar, Ansari, Ahmad, & Ardakani, Mostafa Ranjbar. (2012). Organizational Climate And Commitment.
[6]. Ariyani, Emma Dwi. (2013). Organizational climate towards job satisfaction and organizational commitment at workplace. Paper presented at the Interdisciplinary Behavior and Social Sciences: Proceedings of the 2013 International Conference on Innovation, Communication, and Engineering (ICICE 2013), 26 Oktober – 1 November 2013, Qingdao, Shandong, P.R. China.
[7]. Ariyani, Emma Dwi. (2015). The mediating roles of job satisfaction in the relationship between organizational climate and organizational commitment. Paper presented at the Interdisciplinary Behavior and Social Sciences: Proceedings of the 3rd International Congress on Interdisciplinary Behavior and Social Science 2014 (ICIBSoS 2014), 1–2 November 2014, Bali, Indonesia.
[8]. Arora, Nitin, Nuseir, Mohammed T, Nusair, Talal T, & Arora, Rumy. (2012). Study-based moderators influencing the relationship between organizational climate and employee’s organization commitment: A meta-analysis. EuroMed Journal of Business, 7(2), 201-220.
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[12]. Danish, Rizwan Qaiser, Draz, Umar, & Ali, Hafiz Yasir. (2015). Impact of organizational climate on job satisfaction and organizational commitment in education sector of Pakistan. American Journal of mobile Systems, Aplications and Service, 1(2), 102-109.
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[14]. Feizi, Somayeh. (2014). A study on the relationship between organizational climate with organizational commitment at the Ministry of labor and Social Affairs from the operating experts’ perspective of that ministry. International SAMANM Journal of Marketing and Management, 2(2).
[15]. Fu, Weihui, & Deshpande, Satish P. (2014). The impact of caring climate, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment on job performance of employees in a China’s insurance company. Journal of Business Ethics, 124(2), 339-349.
[16]. Gheisari, Farhad, Sheikhy, Ayyub, & Derakhshan, Rostam. (2014). Explaining the relationship between organizational climate, organizational commitment, job involvement and organizational citizenship behavior among employees of Khuzestan Gas Company. Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences, 5(20), 2986.
[17]. Hellriegel, Don, & Slocum, John W. (1974). Organizational climate: Measures, research and contingencies. Academy of management Journal, 17(2), 255-280.
[18]. Henry, IG. (2017). Organizational climate and organizational commitment of deposit money banks in rivers state. International Journal of Advanced Academic Research, 3, 18-30.
[19]. Hosseini, Maryam, & Talebian, Nia H. (2015). Correlation between organizational commitment and organizational climate of physical education teachers of schools of Zanjan. Int J Sport Stud, 5(2), 181.
[20]. Idrus, S., Omar, S., Noordin, F., Naziman, Y. H. N. M., Masnan, A., & Baistaman, J. (2012, June). Notice of Retraction Organizational climate and its influence on organizational commitment: Case in Jakarta. In Humanities, Science and Engineering Research (SHUSER), 2012 IEEE Symposium on (pp. 1445-1449). IEEE.
[21]. Iqbal, Adnan. (2008). Organizational climate and employees’ commitment: a study of the pakistani knitwear industry. Paper presented at the Estableciendo puentes en una economía global.
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[23]. Noordin, Fauziah, Omar, Safiah, Sehan, Syakirarohan, & Idrus, Shukriah. (2010). Organizational climate and its influence on organizational commitment. The International Business & Economics Research Journal, 9(2), 1.
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[26]. Permarupan, P Yukthamarani, Saufi, Roselina Ahmad, Kasim, Raja Suzana Raja, & Balakrishnan, Bamini KPD. (2013). The impact of organizational climate on employee’s work passion and organizational commitment. Procedia-Social and Behavioral Sciences, 107, 88-95.
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[29]. Rostami, Reza, Veismoradi, Akbar, & Akbari, Peyman. (2012). The Study Relationship between Organizational Climate, Organizational Commitment and Innovation in Cement Industry of Iran (Case Study: Cement West Co. of Kermanshah). Technical Journal of Engineering and Applied Sciences, 2.
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[31]. Schneider, Benjamin, Ehrhart, Mark G, & Macey, William H. (2013). Organizational climate and culture. Annual review of psychology, 64, 361-388.
[32]. Shanker, Meera. (2015). Organizational climate an antecedent to organizational commitment: An Empirical Study. Aweshkar Research Journal, 19(1).
[33]. Shirzadi, Reza, Shad, Jafar Ravan, Nasiri, Mohammad, Abdi, Hasan, & Khani, Shahrookh. (2013). The relation of organizational climate and job motivation with organizational commitment of new employed teachers of physical education of educations and training administration in Kermanshah Province. Advances in Environmental Biology, 4084-4089.
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[35]. Zakari, Nazik MA. (2012). The influence of academic organizational climate on nursing faculty members’ commitment in Saudi Arabia. Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice, 12(1), 66.
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[37]. Zobaidi, Karim, & Bavarsad, Belghais. (2016). Relationship of simple and multiple between communication skills and organizational climate with organizational commitment of employee grain and commerce in Khuzestan Province. Paper presented at the International Conference on Modern Research’s in Management, Economics, & Accounting, 9 July 2016, Berlin, Germany.

Gesca Sonarita, Sudjarwo Sudjarwo, Hasan Hariri “Relationships between Organizational Climate and Organizational Commitment: A Literature Review in the Asian Context” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.167-171 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/167-171.pdf

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Teachers Beliefs and Practices on the Implementation of Performance Assessment in Higher Education

Lukluk Argita Munif, Endang Fauziati, Sri Marmanto – May 2019 Page No.: 172-178

The ultimate goal of education is that students can participate in real-world activities and assessment systems help them to understand the real situations and to know their abilities and skills development. Thus, in this paper, the main aim is to describe teachers beliefs and practices about the implementation of performance assessment in public college under The Ministry of Industry in Indonesia. Interviews, observation, and document analysis were used to find the beliefs of the two teachers. The researcher used the components from Ruiz-Primo and Shavelson (1996) as the framework in analyzing the findings. Each of these components has its own big points to explain participants beliefs. Results indicate that their beliefs created based on their knowledge and experiences. It also influences what they say and what they do in creating and directing the performance assessment. However, the differences also found between the findings, the theories, and previous studies results.

Page(s): 172-178                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 May 2019

 Lukluk Argita Munif
Magister English Department, Sebelas Maret University, Indonesia

 Endang Fauziati
Magister English Department, Sebelas Maret University, Indonesia

 Sri Marmanto
Magister English Department, Sebelas Maret University, Indonesia

[1]. Adair-Hauck B. & Troyan F.J. 2017. A descriptive and co-constructive approach to integrated performance assessment feedback. Foreign Language Annals, Vol. 46 (1), pp. 23-44.
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[28]. Wren, D.G. 2015. Assessing 21st-century skills with performance tasks: The five-year journey of a large school division. Virginia educational leadership, Vol. 12, pp. 37-55.

Lukluk Argita Munif, Endang Fauziati, Sri Marmanto “Teachers Beliefs and Practices on the Implementation of Performance Assessment in Higher Education” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.172-178 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/172-178.pdf

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Undergraduate Student Research Experiences: A Call for ICT-Aided Supervision

Efiritha Chauraya, Annah Moyo – May 2019 Page No.: 179-185

This paper makes an analysis of undergraduate students’ experiences of their research supervision at a state university in Zimbabwe. Undergraduate students’ research supervision experiences during their studies varied, mostly dichotomously. While some students experienced rewarding and gratifying experiences, others, however, underwent frustration, constringent and stressful experiences. Faculties did not show any significant variations, but mode of entry did. Most visiting/block students recorded more negative than positive experiences about their supervisory process. The study concludes with suggestions to reduce student vulnerability and enhancement of the quality of the supervision process. Key suggestions included that: faculties set up research project monitoring focal persons, supervisors be trained in research supervision, and also that both supervisors and students be trained in ICT.

Page(s): 179-185                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 May 2019

 Efiritha Chauraya
Department of Gender Studies, Midlands State University, Zimbabwe

 Annah Moyo
Department of Gender Studies, Midlands State University, Zimbabwe

[1]. Abiddin, Z.N., Hassan, A.and Ahmad, R.A., (2009) Research Student Supervision: An approach to good supervisory practice. The Open Education Journal, 2, pp.11-16. [online]www.bentamscience.com/…/toeduj/articles/002/11 [Accessed 9 July 2012].
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Efiritha Chauraya, Annah Moyo “Undergraduate Student Research Experiences: A Call for ICT-Aided Supervision” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.179-185 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/179-185.pdf

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Compensation and Employee Performance of Bank in Port Harcourt, Nigeria

Fubara, Ibim Favour – May 2019 Page No.: 186-192

This study was designed to examine the relationship between compensation and Employee Performance of banks operating in Port Harcourt. Among the statement of the problem is the need to explore how banks could leverage on compensation as a strategy to remain competitive in business by retaining high performing staff. This is at a time when there exist other lucrative industries both locally and globally capable of absorbing such staff, especially with the ongoing advocacy and support programmes aimed at encouraging creative young minds to become their own boss. It was based on this backdrop that the reinforcement and expectation theory was adopted as the theoretical foundation for this study. Then utilized a cross sectional survey design as the research methodology as structured questionnaire was distributed to one hundred and forty nine staff of five selected banks and one hundred and twenty were retrieved from the field. With the aid of mean, standard deviation and Pearson Product Correlation Coefficient were utilized as the analysis technique, aided by statistical package for social sciences. Findings from the research revealed that compensation relates positively and significantly with employee performance, as it has significant impact on job satisfaction, employee productivity and employee efficiency. Therefore, it was recommended that compensation is a strategic tool management can leverage on to enhance employee performance and it should be positively utilized as a veritable tool to improve motivation to work better.

Page(s): 186-192                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 01 June 2019

 Fubara, Ibim Favour
Department of Management, Faculty of Management Sciences, Rivers State University, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

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Fubara, Ibim Favour “Compensation and Employee Performance of Bank in Port Harcourt, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.186-192 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/186-192.pdf

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Rethinking the Role of Human Resource: Assessing Student Retention in Kenyan Public University

Dr. James K. Sang (Ph.D.) – May 2019 Page No.: 193-196

The major dynamic of university education is to develop the people, society and the economy which are central to most National mission and visions. This study sought to investigate the determinants of Retention to public university education in Kenya. The objectives of the study were to determine the effects human resource on retention to public university education in Kenya. This study was modeled on the education production theory. The study used a case study research design. The research targeted 16 heads of departments and 1201 final students. Simple random sampling technique was used in choosing the sample size. The research instruments used to collect data were questionnaire students of University of Eldoret. Data collected was analyzed quantitatively. Inferential and descriptive statistics specifically play an important role in the presentation and interpretation of analyzed data. The study findings indicated that there was a significant relationship between human resources on Retention to education (p=0.000). The study concluded that rapid expansion of university education has strained the existing facilities and adversely affected the quality of learning. The number of human resources in the university determines Retention of the education. The study recommends that there is need plan well for university education e.g. admitting students based on carefully done projections since lack of this may certainly result into challenges related to quality education. The findings of the study were found to be significant and benefit in the streamlining of Retention of public university in Kenya.

Page(s): 193-196                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 June 2019

 Dr. James K. Sang (Ph.D.)
Department of Educational Management and Policy Studies, School of Education, Moi University, P.O Box 3900, Eldoret, Kenya

[1]. Altbach, P.G., Reisberg, L. and Rumbley, L.E. (2015) Trends in Global Higher Education Tracking an Academic Revolution. UNESCO 2015 World Conference on Higher Education, Paris, 5-8 July 2015.
[2]. Ayot and Briggs (2012). Does Students’ Loan Amount affect Choice of Program of Study? Evidence from Privately Sponsored Undergraduate HELB Loan Recipients in Kenyan Public Universities.
[3]. Becker, S. A., Cummins, M., Davis, A., Freeman, A., Hall, C. G., & Ananthanarayanan, V. (2017). NMC horizon report: 2017 higher education edition (pp. 1-60). The New Media Consortium.
[4]. Jowi, J. (2013). Governing Higher Education in the stakeholder society: Rethinking the role of the state in Kenya’s higher education. Paper presented at the CHEPS Summer School, June 29 – July 4 2013, University of Maribor, Slovenia
[5]. Kombo, D. K., & Tromp, D. L. (2009). Introduction to thesis writing. Nairobi: Pauline publications.
[6]. Kothari, C.R (2098). Research methodology: methods and technique: New Delhi: New age international publishers 2nd revised edition
[7]. Odhiambo, M., Mitullah, W. V., & Akivaga, S. K. (2015). Management of Resources by Local Authorities: The Case of Local Authority Transfer Fund in Kenya. Claripress.
[8]. Oketch, K. (2012). The transformation of higher education in Kenya: challenges and opportunities. In Mijadala on Social Policy, Governance and Development in Kenya Forum, Nairobi Safari Club (Vol. 9).
[9]. Onyango, G. A. (2011). Competences needed by secondary school head teachers and implications for pre-service and in-service education: a case of Nairobi and Kakamega district (Kenya) (Doctoral dissertation).
[10]. Scutters, V. (2011). The Right to Higher Education for National Development And Equal Opportunity In Nigeria: The Major Challenges Of Our Time. European Scientific Journal, ESJ, 10 (10).
[11]. Wolf, A. (2016). Women, lifelong learning, and transitions into employment. Work, Employment, and Society, 20, 309–328.
[12]. Xinhua, X. (2011). Turning around low-performing private universities in China: A perspective of organizational ecology. International Review of Education, 58(6), 735-758.

Dr. James K. Sang (Ph.D.) “Rethinking the Role of Human Resource: Assessing Student Retention in Kenyan Public University” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.193-196 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/193-196.pdf

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Understanding Bursary Allocation and the Internal Efficiency of Secondary Schools Students in Kenya

Prof. S.O. Odebero and Namachanja Edwin Wafula – May 2019 Page No.: 197-202

Secondary school education is very critical in any education system because of the crucial role it plays in catalyzing national development. Consequently, maintaining a high student enrolment at this level should be a priority for all countries. The study was guided by classical liberal theory of equality of opportunities. The study was designed to determine equity implications in bursary awards on the internal efficiency of secondary schools. The objective of the study was to examine the relationship between the types of bursary allocated and the internal efficiency of secondary schools students. This study employed a mixed methods design. The participants comprised of secondary schools, banks offering bursaries, Constituency bursary committees and County Government Bursary Committees. Both probability and non-probability sampling designs were employed to determine sample size. Data was collected through questionnaire. Quantitative data were analyzed for descriptive statistics and inferential statistics. The study established that there is positive and significant relationship between the types of bursary allocated and participation rates. The output of the study will provide information to all stake holders in the management of secondary schools and help in formulation of relevant policies that will be useful in improving the management of secondary schools.

Page(s): 197-202                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 June 2019

 Prof. S.O. Odebero
Department of Education Planning and Management, Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology, Kenya

 Namachanja Edwin Wafula
Department of Education Planning and Management, Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology, Kenya

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[4]. Macharia, K.N. (2011). Influence of principal leadership styles on teachers’ career commitment in secondary schools in Imenti South District in Kenya. Unpublished Thesis, Chuka University College.
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[6]. Onuko, M.O. (2012). Affording the unaffordable: Cost sharing in higher education in sub-Saharan Africa. Peabody Journal of Education. 78: 88-106.
[7]. Odebero, O.S, Bosire, N.J, Sang, A.K, Ngala, B..J. &Ngware, M.W (2007). Equity in Access to School Education in Kenya through HELB Loans in Relation to Demand, Supply and Effectiveness in Loan Recovery. Unpublished PhD Thesis, submitted to Egerton School, Kenya.
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[11]. Njeru, E. and Orodho, J.A. (2003). Access and Participation in Secondary School Education in Kenya: Emerging Issues and Policy Implications, IPAR DP 037/2003, Regal Press Kenya Ltd., Nairobi.

Prof. S.O. Odebero and Namachanja Edwin Wafula “Understanding Bursary Allocation and the Internal Efficiency of Secondary Schools Students in Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.197-202 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/197-202.pdf

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Intervention Measures On: Access and Equity to Subside Public Secondary in Eldoret West

Dr. Joseph F.K. Tuitoek & David Kibet Biwot – May 2019 Page No.: 203-205

This study sought to evaluate determinants of access and equity to subsidized public secondary education in Eldoret West. The study was done in Eldoret West. The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of intervention measures by the government and other stakeholder on access and equity to subside public secondary in Eldoret West. The study was modeled on the Education Production Functions Really Theory, proposed by (Lant Pritchett & Seon Filmer, 1997). The mathematical relationship between inputs was referred to as the educational production function by economists; descriptive survey design was employed. The target population for the study was the Sub-County Educational Officer and 16 Head teachers, simple random sampling and purposive sampling technique ware employed in choosing the sample size. The research instruments used to collect data was questionnaire for head teacher and teachers while the interview Schedule was used in SEO Eldoret west. A Pilot study was done to determine the reliability of the research instruments in 3 public secondary schools in Bungoma North Sub-County. Data collected was analyzed both quantitatively and qualitatively. The descriptive statistics used was the frequencies, mean. The study established that lack of support was the biggest challenge affecting effective implementation of subsidized secondary education in public secondary schools the researcher recommends that the government should build more schools and employ more teachers to accommodate all those qualifying for secondary education from the primary schools.

Page(s): 203-205                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 June 2019

 Dr. Joseph F.K. Tuitoek
Department of Educational Management and Policy Studies, School of Education, Moi University, Kenya

 David Kibet Biwot
Department of Educational Management and Policy Studies, School of Education, Moi University, Kenya

[1]. Adan,J.(2008). “Good and bad of Subsidized School” East African Standard 6.02.2008 Nairobi: The Standard group
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[7]. Kilel, C.F. (2007). Primary School Teachers perception of the Effects of class size on teaching effectiveness: A case of Kapsabet Division, Nandi North Sub-County of Kenya, unpublished M. Phil thesis, Moi University Eldoret.
[8]. Kirui, K. (2008). The implementation of the physical education curriculum in secondary schools:
a case of Bomet Sub-County in the Rift Valley Province- Kenya, Unpublished M. Phil thesis, Moi University, Eldoret.
[9]. MOE. (2008) “Interim Guidelines for the Implementation of Subsidized Secondary School Education, Nairobi: Ministry of Education.
[10]. Mugenda, O. M & Mugenda, A. G. (1999) Research Methods: Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches. Nairobi: Acts press.
[11]. Okwach, A.&Abagi. (1998). Public and private investment in Education in Kenya. An Agenda for Action. IPAR CDP No. 005/1997.
[12]. Oyaro, K. (2009). Education-Kenya: Students pour in, Teachers drain Away. Interpress News Agency.http://ipsnews.net/africa/nota.asp?idnews=422667
[13]. Republic of Kenya.(2005). Sessional Paper No.1 on Education and Training. Nairobi: Government Printers.
[14]. Republic of Kenya. (2007) Report of the task force on affordable secondary education. Nairobi: Government printer.
[15]. Shikanda, F.C. (2008). Managing Subsidized Secondary Education: A paper presented to Kericho Sub-County Head teachers in Uasin-Gishu on 4th April 2008.
[16]. UNESCO. (2007). Education for All issue 12, http://www.efa.Nairobi-Unesco.org/efaxii/
[17]. World Declaration on Education for All. (1990). Development of Education in Africa: The Kenya Experience Nairobi: Initiative Ltd.
[18]. Abagi, O.andOdipo, G., (1997) Efficiency of Primary Education in Kenya: Situational analysis and implication for Educational reform. Discussion paper No. DP0004/97. Nairobi: IPAR.
[19]. Kothari, C.R (2008) Research Methodology: Methods and techniques: New Delhi: New age International publishers 2nd revised edition.
[20]. Mugenda and Mugenda (2003).Research methods: Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches: Nairobi: Act press.
[21]. Okwach, A., and Odipo, (1997).Public and private investment in primary education in Kenya: An agenda for action.IPRA (DP N0.005/1997).
[22]. Republic of Kenya, ( 1964). The Kenya commission report( The Ominde report). Nairobi: government printers.

Dr. Joseph F.K. Tuitoek & David Kibet Biwot “Intervention Measures On: Access and Equity to Subside Public Secondary in Eldoret West” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.203-205 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/203-205.pdf

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Role of School Administration on Access and Equity to Subside Public Secondary in Eldoret West

Dr. John k. Njoroge & David Kibet Biwot – May 2019 Page No.: 206-210

This study sought to evaluate determinants of access and equity to subsidized public secondary education in Eldoret West. The study was done in Eldoret West. The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of intervention measures by the government and other stakeholder on access and equity to subside public secondary in Eldoret West. The study was modeled on the Education Production Functions Really Theory, proposed by (Lant Pritchett & Seon Filmer, 1997). The mathematical relationship between inputs was referred to as the educational production function by economists; descriptive survey design was employed. The target population for the study was the Sub-County Educational Officer and 16 Head teachers, simple random sampling and purposive sampling technique ware employed in choosing the sample size. The research instruments used to collect data was questionnaire for head teacher and teachers while the interview Schedule was used in SEO Eldoret west. A Pilot study was done to determine the reliability of the research instruments in 3 public secondary schools in Bungoma North Sub-County. Data collected was analyzed both quantitatively and qualitatively. The descriptive statistics used was the frequencies, mean. The study established that lack of support was the biggest challenge affecting effective implementation of subsidized secondary education in public secondary schools the researcher recommends that the government should build more schools and employ more teachers to accommodate all those qualifying for secondary education from the primary schools.

Page(s): 206-210                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 June 2019

 Dr. John k. Njoroge
Department of Educational Management and Policy Studies, School of Education, Moi University, Kenya

 David Kibet Biwot
Department of Educational Management and Policy Studies, School of Education, Moi University, Kenya

[1]. Adan,J.(2008). “Good and bad of Subsidized School” East African Standard 6.02.2008 Nairobi: The Standard group
[2]. Archilles, C.M. (1990). Small classes, biog Possibilities. The school Administrator, New York: Longman Inc.
[3]. Bette J.K& Shkolnik, JK. (1999).The Behavioral Effects of Variations in class size; the case Maths Teachers. Educational Evaluation and policy Analysis, 21, (2), 193-213
[4]. Borg, R.W&M.D.Gall. (1989).Educational research: An Introduction. New York: Longman Inc.
[5]. G. O. K. (2008) President Kibaki Launches Subsidized Secondary Education, Nairobi: Office of the public communications.
[6]. Kerlinger, F.N. (1983).Foundation of Behavioral Research .Delhi: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.
[7]. Kilel, C.F. (2007). Primary School Teachers perception of the Effects of class size on teaching effectiveness: A case of Kapsabet Division, Nandi North Sub-County of Kenya, unpublished M. Phil thesis, Moi University Eldoret.
[8]. Kirui, K. (2008). The implementation of the physical education curriculum in secondary schools:
a case of Bomet Sub-County in the Rift Valley Province- Kenya, Unpublished M. Phil thesis, Moi University, Eldoret.
[9]. MOE. (2008) “Interim Guidelines for the Implementation of Subsidized Secondary School Education, Nairobi: Ministry of Education.
[10]. Mugenda, O. M & Mugenda, A. G. (1999) Research Methods: Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches. Nairobi: Acts press.
[11]. Okwach, A.& Abagi. (1998). Public and private investment in Education in Kenya. An Agenda for Action. IPAR CDP No. 005/1997.
[12]. Oyaro, K. (2009). Education-Kenya: Students pour in, Teachers drain Away. Interpress News Agency. http://ipsnews.net/africa/nota.asp?idnews=422667
[13]. Republic of Kenya. (2005). Sessional Paper No.1 on Education and Training. Nairobi: Government Printers.
[14]. Republic of Kenya. (2007) Report of the task force on affordable secondary education. Nairobi: Government printer.
[15]. Shikanda, F.C. (2008). Managing Subsidized Secondary Education: A paper presented to Kericho Sub-County Head teachers in Uasin-Gishu on 4th April 2008.
[16]. UNESCO. (2007). Education for All issue 12, http://www.efa.Nairobi-Unesco.org/efaxii/
[17]. World Declaration on Education for All. (1990). Development of Education in Africa: The Kenya Experience Nairobi: Initiative Ltd.
[18]. Abagi, O.and Odipo, G., (1997) Efficiency of Primary Education in Kenya: Situational analysis and implication for Educational reform. Discussion paper No. DP0004/97. Nairobi: IPAR.
[19]. Kothari, C.R (2008) Research Methodology: Methods and techniques: New Delhi: New age International publishers 2nd revised edition.
[20]. Mugenda and Mugenda (2003). Research methods: Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches: Nairobi: Act press.
[21]. Okwach, A., and Odipo, (1997). Public and private investment in primary education in Kenya: An agenda for action. IPRA (DP N0.005/1997).
[22]. Republic of Kenya, ( 1964). The Kenya commission report ( The Ominde report). Nairobi: government printers

Dr. John k. Njoroge & David Kibet Biwot “Role of School Administration on Access and Equity to Subside Public Secondary in Eldoret West” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.206-210 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/206-210.pdf

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Household Level on Retention: Focus on Opportunities in Kenya Public University Education

Erastus Muchimuti & Alice Limo (PhD) – May 2019 Page No.: 211-213

The major dynamic of university education is to develop the people, society and the economy which are central to most National mission and visions. This study sought to investigate the effects of household levels on retention to public university education in Kenya. This study was modeled on the education production theory. The study used a case study research design. The research targeted a total of 1219 respondents including. The sample size of the study was calculated using the formula below as recommended by Fisher et al. The desired sample size was therefore comprised of 292 respondents. Purposive sampling and simple random sampling technique was used in choosing the sample size. The research instruments used to collect data were questionnaire for University students. Interview schedules were administered to deputy vice chancellor, heads of departments, dean of students and. The questioner was made up of open ended and closed ended items. Data collected was analyzed both quantitatively and qualitatively. The findings of the study were found to be significant and benefit in the streamlining of Retention of public university in Kenya. The study findings indicated that there was a significant relationship between household levels on Retention to education. The study concluded that farming activities determine access to public university education. The rapid expansion of university education has strained the existing facilities and adversely affected the quality of learning. There are funds provided by government for expansion to cater for high enrolment.

Page(s): 211-213                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 June 2019

 Erastus Muchimuti
School of Education, University of Eldoret, P.O Box 2500, Eldoret, Kenya

 Alice Limo (PhD)
School of Education, University of Eldoret, P.O Box 2500, Eldoret, Kenya

[1]. Albert, A. (2010). Women, lifelong learning, and transitions into employment. Work, Employment, and Society, 20, 309–328.
[2]. Becker, S. A. NMC horizon report: 1985 higher education edition (pp. 1-60). The New Media Consortium.
[3]. Budría, S., & Moro-Egido, A. I. (2016).Overeducation and wages in Europe: Evidence from quantile regression. EstudiosSobre La Economía Española, 229, 509-531.
[4]. Carpenter, B.& Hayden M. (2013). Funding patterns and their effects on quality of higher education in Kenya.In Kenyatta University.Conference paper. Nairobi.
[5]. Kombo, D. K., & Tromp, D. L. (2009). Introduction to proposal writing. Nairobi: Pauline publications.
[6]. Kothari, C.R (2008). Research methodology: methods and technique: New Delhi: New age international publishers 2nd revised edition
[7]. Salas, K. C., &Velasco, W. (2010). The human core of the shared socioeconomic pathways: Population scenarios by age, sex and level of education for all countries to 2100. Global Environmental Change, 42, 181-192.
[8]. Sean, T. (2013). Family assets, postsecondary education, and students with disabilities: Building on progress and overcoming challenges. Studentren and Youth Services Review, 35(7), 1078-1086.

Erastus Muchimuti & Alice Limo (PhD) “Household Level on Retention: Focus on Opportunities in Kenya Public University Education” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.211-213 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/211-213.pdf

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An Examination of Classroom Practices of Social Studies Teachers at the Senior High School Level in the Asante Akim North Municipality to Find Whether their Knowledge of the Goals and General Objectives Have Any Influence on their Selection of Contents and Activities

Aning Boadu Nicholas – May 2019 Page No.: 214-219

I. INTRODUCTION
Education in any part of the world is seen as the bedrock for national development and the key factor in human resource development. It is increasingly obvious that the world is becoming more complex. In response to this situation, governments all over the world are committed to providing education to meet the changing challenges of the complex economic and political system confronting them. In all developing countries such as Ghana, there is a widespread desire to change the structure and system of education to meet the new needs. In these countries, the tendency for high rate of school drop-outs, indiscipline and unemployment of school leavers have also posed new treats to education (Blege, 1986:7).

Page(s): 214-219                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 June 2019

 Aning Boadu Nicholas
Vice Principal-Agogo Presbyterian College of Education

Reference are not available

Aning Boadu Nicholas “An Examination of Classroom Practices of Social Studies Teachers at the Senior High School Level in the Asante Akim North Municipality to Find Whether their Knowledge of the Goals and General Objectives Have Any Influence on their Selection of Contents and Activities” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.214-219 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/214-219.pdf

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Techniques for Enhancing Students Participation in Automobile Mechanical Works in Technical Colleges in Rivers State, Nigeria

Ochogba, Chukwumela Obulor and Ordu Charles Ndu – May 2019 Page No.: 220-224

This study investigated the Techniques for enhancing student’s participation in automobile mechanical works in technical colleges in Rivers State. A descriptive survey design guided this study. The population of the study comprised 40 automobile mechanical works teachers in four technical colleges in Rivers State. The study population was manageable therefore the entire population was adopted as the sample size for this study. Two research questions were answered and tested at a 0.05 level of significance. The instrument of the study was a survey questionnaire that was partitioned into two sections, structured in the pattern of 5 point Likert rating scale of agreement. The instrument for this study was validated by two experts and was tested for reliability using Cronbach Alpha reliability coefficient. The reliability coefficient achieved was 0.74. Mean and Standard Deviation were used to answer the research questions, while t-test statistical tool was used to test the hypotheses. The study found that the use of real life materials, regular practical assignment to students, regular evaluation of students, using concept map to aid learning, grouping students during instruction, relating lessons to real life situations and students personal experience, taking students on field trip, adoption of multimedia for teaching, individualized teaching, motivation of teachers, motivation of students, regular supervision of school activities, effective planning of school activities and regular probing of students to ascertain the achievement of school goals are the techniques that can enhance student’s participation in automobile mechanical works in technical colleges in Rivers State. Therefore, this study recommends that school administrators should cultivate good relationship with parents so that students welfare and performance can be ascertain and possible solutions proffered for better participation in automobile mechanical works.

Page(s): 220-224                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 June 2019

 Ochogba, Chukwumela Obulor
Department of Vocational and Technology Education, Rivers State University, Nigeria

 Ordu Charles Ndu
Department of Vocational and Technology Education, Rivers State University, Nigeria

[1]. Dodi, W. I. (2014). University of Brawijaya, Faculty of Economics and Business, Management Department, Jl. M.T. Haryono No. 165, Malang, 65145 East Java, Indonesia presentation n report.
[2]. Fadairo, O.O. (2009). Strategies for improving the interest of automobile technology students in technical colleges in Ogun State. A thesis presented to the department to vocational teacher education, University of Nigeria, Nsukka.
[3]. Ochogba, C.O. & Amaechi, O.J. (2018). The influence of technical skills acquisition in curbing insecurity challenges in Rivers State. International Journal of Education and Evaluation, 4(2), 19-26.
[4]. Ogwo, B.A. & Oranu, R.N. (2006). Methodology in formal and non-formal technical and vocational education. Enugu: University of Nigeria Press.
[5]. Okafor, I. P. (2002). Affective influences that affect the study of electrical installation in technical colleges in Imo State. An unpublished B. Sc project, University of Nigeria Nsukka.
[6]. Okoro, O. M. (2006). Measurement and evaluation in education. Obosi: Pacific Publishers.
[7]. Swanso, R.A. & Torraco, R.J. (1994). Technical Trainings: Challenges and goals. Technical and Skills Training 5(8), 18-22.
[8]. Tumba, I. & Shuaibu, H. (2016). Strategies for improving students’ acquisition of practical skills in electrical installation and maintenance work trade in technical colleges in Kano State. The International Journal of Engineering And Science, 5(10), 30-40.
[9]. Udofia, A.E., Ekpo, A.B., Nsa, S.O. & Akpan, E.O. (2012). Instructional variables and students’ acquisition of employable skills in vocational education in Nigerian technical colleges, International Journal of Engineering and Social Science, 2 (7), 13-15.
[10]. Udoutin, M.P. (2001). Individualizing pre-vocational education programme in secondary school. International Journal of Educational Development, 4 (11), 1-5.
[11]. Ukoha, U.A. & Eneogwe, U.N. (1996). The instructional process in B.A. Ogwo (ed). Curriculum development and educational technology. Markudi: Onaivi Printing & Publishing Co.

Ochogba, Chukwumela Obulor and Ordu Charles Ndu “Techniques for Enhancing Students Participation in Automobile Mechanical Works in Technical Colleges in Rivers State, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.220-224 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/220-224.pdf

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Epistemological Challenges of Security–Driven Diplomacy in Executing Counterintelligence Operations along Nadapal Belt, Kenya–South Sudan Border

Ochieng Mark Oduor, Professor Pontian Godfrey Okoth – May 2019 Page No.: 225-234

The nomenclature surrounding the study of security-driven diplomacy in executing counterintelligence operations ‘clandestine’ operations, is loaded with varied understanding, thus, the very nature of covert counterintelligence exhibit an inherent epistemological challenge. Epistemology of security-driven diplomacy is an area that has not been explored sufficiently and reliably and consequently, how it influences the execution of counterintelligence operations along Nadapal belt. The objective of this study was to analyze the epistemological challenges of counterintelligence operations emanating from security-driven diplomacy along the belt. The study established that there were epistemological challenges of security driven diplomacy in executing counterintelligence operations. These challenges include: understanding epistemic communities, integration of epistemic communities, inadequate personnel, and lack of political good will and coordination of epistemic communities. In an attempt to address these challenges, this study delved into the measures to address these challenges, such as, re-conceptualizing epistemic communities, conducting selection and training, transnational policy coordination and community dialogue. The reality is that, these challenges can only be addressed if the measures mooted are put into account. The study recommends stringent measures tailored in understanding better, the epistemiccommunities. Additionally, the study recommends the establishment of sub-epistemic communities along the belt.

Page(s): 225-234                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 June 2019

 Ochieng Mark Oduor
Department of Peace and Conflict Studies, Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology, P.O BOX, 190-50100 Kakamega, Kenya

 Professor Pontian Godfrey Okoth
Department of Peace and Conflict Studies, Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology, P.O BOX, 190-50100 Kakamega, Kenya

[1]. Atta-Asamoah, A. (2015a). East Africa Report; the Nature and Drivers of Insecurity in Kenya.Institute for Security Studies.
[2]. Bloodgood,E.(2008). Epistemic Communities, Norms, and Knowledge, International Studies Association Annual Conference, San Francisco, CA.
[3]. Combs,N.(2017). Deconstructing the epistemic Challenges to Mass Atrocity Prosecution; posted in “Doing Justice &Truth in International criminal Courts and Tribunals, Washington and Lee Law Review’Vol.75, Issue.no.6, page 16.
[4]. Chumba, C. (2016). ‘Security-Based Diplomacy influencing Transnational Terrorism Management between Kenya and Somalia, Unpublished Ph.D Thesis in Diplomacy and International Relations, MasindeMuliro University of Science and Technology.
[5]. De Waal, A (2015). The Real Politics of the Horn of Africa: Money, War and the Business of Power, Cambridge Polity Press, p. 17.
[6]. Dunlop, C.A. (2007). ‘Up and Down the Pecking Order, What Matters and When in Issue
[7]. Definition: The Case of RBST in the EU’, Journal of European Public Policy 14, 1:39–58.
[8]. Haas, P.M. (1992a). ‘Introduction: Epistemic Communities and International Policy Coordination’ in International Organization Vol.46, 1: 1-36.
[9]. Haas, P.M. (1992b). ‘Banning Chloroflurorcarbons: Epistemic Community Efforts to Protect Stratospheric Ozone’ in International Organization Vol. 46, 1: 187-224.
[10]. Haas, P. M., (ed.) 1992}1997 Knowledge, Power, and International Policy Coordination. University of South Carolina Press, Columbia, SC (originally published in International Organization 46(1) (Winter 1992).
[11]. Haas, P.M(2007).Epistemic Communities. In: Daniel Bodansky/JuttaBrunnée/Ellen Hey (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of International Environmental Law. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 791–806.
[12]. Luhmann, N. (1975) Macht, Stuttgart: Ferdinand EnkeVerlag.
[13]. Matkin, David and Frederickson, George. (2009). “Metropolitan Governance: Institutional Roles and Interjurisdictional Cooperation”. Journal of Urban Affairs 31(1): 45-66.
[14]. McCandless ,E. (2018) “Reconceptualizing the Social Contract In Contexts of Conflict, Fragility and Fraught Transition”. Wits School of Governance Working Paper Series ISBN: 978-0-620-75998-4, University of the Witwatersrand School of Governance ,Johannesburg.
[15]. Moseti,J.(23,January ,2019) “War on terror: Launch National Campaign to help Counter Violent Extremism”. Daily Nation.pg.15
[16]. Okoth P.G.(2016).” Transnational Insurgencies and Challenges of Diplomatic Relations in Africa’s Great Lakes Region “ .International Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences (IJHSSS),Vol.3,Issue No.3,pages 2349-6711,India:Scholar Publications.
[17]. Ransley, P. (2009). Report of the National Task Force on Police Reforms Kenya.Dares Saalam,MkukinaNyota publishers.
[18]. Salehyan,I.(2010).Rebels Without Borders:Transnational Insurgencies in World Politics.Ithaca:Cornel University Press.
[19]. Salvador, Miquel and Ramio, Carles. (2011). Institutionalizing Participatory Democracy and The Emergence of an Epistemic Community in Spanish Local Government. Journal of Urban Affairs 33(5): 491-510.
[20]. Sikkink, Keck, Margaret E.Kathryn (1998): Activists Beyond Borders: Advocacy Networks in International Politics. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
[21]. Tilly,C.( 2004) Social Movements, 1768–2004. Boulder: Paradigm Publishers.
[22]. Wasike S. & Okoth, P.G.& Were, E. (2016). “Processes of Track Three Diplomacy In The Management Of Cross-Border Security Relations Between Kenya And Somalia”. The International Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities Invention.10.18535/ijsshi/v3i7.03.
[23]. Yu, H. S.(2008) . The Role of Epistemic Community in Regional Security Institution Building: ASEAN-ISIS and the Establishment of ARF. Paper prepared for the WISC Conference, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. July 23-26. http://www.wiscnetwork.org/ljubljana2008/papers/WISC_2008-403.doc Accessed 14 August, 2018.

Ochieng Mark Oduor, Professor Pontian Godfrey Okoth “Epistemological Challenges of Security–Driven Diplomacy in Executing Counterintelligence Operations along Nadapal Belt, Kenya–South Sudan Border” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.225-234 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/225-234.pdf

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Technical Efficiency and Its Determinants on Irish Potato Farming among Small Holder Farmers in Trans-Nzoia County-Kenya

Augustine Wafula Barasa, Paul Okelo Odwori, Josephine Barasa, Steven Ochieng – May 2019 Page No.: 235-238

Increased pressure on land brought about by increased population in the highlands of Western Kenya such as Trans Nzoia County has led to increased land fragmentation and forced farmers to diversify their crops to alternative value chains that are more profitable and take less time to mature. An example of an innovation being promoted is the adoption of Irish potato as an alternative to maize farming. However, in determining farm productivity, onlyfew studies have looked at the efficiency of the Irish potato production. This has prompted this study to determine the technical efficiencies of smallholder farmers’ Irish potato production in the study area by providing empirical evidence on smallholder resource use efficiency. The objective of the study was todetermine the technical efficiency and factors affecting it among smallholder Irish potato farmers in Trans Nzoia County.Exactly, 384 farmers were selected through a multi stage random sampling in Trans Nzoia County. The respondents were interviewed with the help of open and closed ended questionnaires. Data was analyzed using stochastic frontier models.The mean technical efficiency index was estimated at 0.65 indicating an opportunity of 35% for farmers to attain full efficiency. Technical efficiency was positively influenced by age of farmers (0.01); Education years (0.06); Years of farming experience (0.05); Frequency of extension services (0.05); Land Size (0.02) and negatively influenced byHousehold size. To achieve full efficiency of production, this study recommended the policy makers to factor in the socio economic characteristics of farmers while promoting alternative crop value chains and strengthen the extension services to potato growers.

Page(s): 235-238                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 June 2019

 Augustine Wafula Barasa
Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development, University of Eldoret, P. O. Box 1125-30100, Eldoret, Kenya

 Paul Okelo Odwori
Department of Economics, University of Eldoret, P. O. Box 1125-30100, Eldoret, Kenya.

 Josephine Barasa
Department of Soil Science, University of Eldoret, P. O. Box 1125-30100, Eldoret, Kenya.

 Steven Ochieng
Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development, University of Eldoret, P. O. Box 1125-30100, Eldoret, Kenya

[1]. Chepkwony, C. E. K. E. (2014). Analysis of Technical Efficiency of Irish Potato Production in Eldoret East Sub County, Kenya(Doctoral dissertation, MOI UNIVERSITY).
[2]. Chirwa E. W. 2007. Sources of Technical Efficiency among Small holder Maize Farmers in Southern Malawi, AERC Research Paper 172, African Economic Research Consortium, Nairobi November 2007.
[3]. Coelli, T. J., D. S. P. Rao and G. E. Battese, 2005. An introduction to efficiency and productivity analysis. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston.
[4]. Jayne, T. S., Chamberlin, J., & Headey, D. D. (2014). Land pressures, the evolution of farming systems, and development strategies in Africa: A synthesis. Food Policy, 48, 1-17.
[5]. Kassie, M., Teklewold, H., Jaleta, M., Marenya, P., & Erenstein, O. (2015). Understanding the adoption of a portfolio of sustainable intensification practices in eastern and southern Africa. Land Use Policy, 42, 400-411.
[6]. Kibaara B. 2005. Technical Efficiency in Kenyan’s Maize Production: An Application of the Stochastic Frontier Approach. Thesis, Colorado State University.
[7]. Kimhi A.2003. Plot size and Maize Productivity in Zambia: The Inverse Relationship Re-examined. Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Department of Agricultural Economics, Discussion Paper no 10.03.
[8]. Kothari, C.R. (2004). Research Methodology. Methods and techniques, 2nd Ed. New Delhi: New Age International (P) Ltd.
[9]. Ministry of Agriculture (MoA) (2004). National Policy on Potato Industry. Nairobi: Government printer.
[10]. Ministry of Agriculture (MoA) (2007). Economic Review of Agriculture 2007. Prepared by the Central Planning and Monitoring Unit. Nairobi: Ministry of Agriculture
[11]. Muzungu Paul, G. (2011). Technical Efficiency of Smallholder Irish Potato Production in Nyabihu District, Rwanda (No. 243460). Collaborative Masters Program in Agricultural and Applied Economics.
[12]. Otieno, S. B., Jayne, T. S., & Muyanga, M. (2015, October). Effect of soil pH on accumulation of native selenium by Maize (Zea mays var. L) grains grown in Uasin Gishu, Trans-Nzoia Kakamega and Kisii counties in Kenya. In Global Advances in Selenium Research from Theory to Application: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Selenium in the Environment and Human Health 2015 (Vol. 4, No. 2, p. 117). CRC Press.
[13]. Simtowe, F. & Zeller, M. (2006). The Impact of Access to Credit on the Adoption of hybrid maize in Malawi: An Empirical test of an Agricultural Household Model under credit market failure. MPRA Paper No. 45
[14]. Valbuena, D., Groot, J. C., Mukalama, J., Gérard, B., & Tittonell, P. (2015). Improving rural livelihoods as a “moving target”: trajectories of change in smallholder farming systems of Western Kenya. Regional Environmental Change, 15(7), 1395-1407.
[15]. Vanlauwe, B., Descheemaeker, K., Giller, K. E., Huising, J., Merckx, R., Nziguheba, G., & Zingore, S. (2015). Integrated soil fertility management in sub-Saharan Africa: unravelling local adaptation. Soil, 1(1), 491-508.
[16]. Zulu B., T.S. Jayne and M. Beaver, 2007. Smallholder Maize Production and Marketing Behaviour in Zambia and its Implications for Policy. Working Paper No. 22 Food Security Research Project, Lusaka, Zambia.

Augustine Wafula Barasa, Paul Okelo Odwori, Josephine Barasa, Steven Ochieng “Technical Efficiency and Its Determinants on Irish Potato Farming among Small Holder Farmers in Trans-Nzoia County-Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.235-238 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/235-238.pdf

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Enhancing Curriculum Quality Assurance as a Prerequisite to Higher Education Graduate’s Employability

Fossimock B. Tendongmoh – May 2019 Page No.: 239-244

The purpose of this study is to demonstrate how curriculum quality assurance can improve Higher Education (HE) graduate’s employability. The state and individuals spend colossal sums yearly to educate citizens, upon graduation; they hardly procure or create jobs. This demise has plunged the youths into theft, cyber criminality, migration, hopelessness, disillusionment and misery. This work therefore stands to ascertain the relationship between curriculum quality assurance and HE graduates employability. Our population was made up of graduates from the University of Yaoundé I and through a homogenous sampling technique; we had a sample population of 203 students and 23 employers. Questionnaires were used for data collection. Data was analysed using cross-tabulation analysis through SPSS statistical tool. Our main findings were: curriculum quality assurance improves graduates’ employability 92.6%, 91.1% employers are never invited during curriculum conception, 74.3% people are dissatisfied with the present curriculum, 76.5% people confirmed that the absence of employers from curriculum conception kills graduates employability, among others. Based on these, we recommend that; experts should prioritise the socio-political and economic state of our society during curriculum conception, modify the present curriculum and involve economic operators. Encourage internship, ensure syllable is drown from the curriculum, Evaluate teacher’s quality program coverage. Curriculum quality enhancement is the brain-child behind knowledge, skills, competences and abilities possess by the graduates which facilitate employability and boost Economic growth.

Page(s): 239-244                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 June 2019

 Fossimock B. Tendongmoh
Faculty of Science of Education (FSE),University of Yaounde 1, Yaounder-Cameroon

[1]. Amin, M. (2005). Social science research: Conception, methodology and analysis. Kampala-Uganda:MakerereUniversity press.
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Fossimock B. Tendongmoh “Enhancing Curriculum Quality Assurance as a Prerequisite to Higher Education Graduate’s Employability” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.239-244 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/239-244.pdf

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Influence of Culture on the Operations of Entrepreneurial Family Business in Nigeria

Olaore Rafiu Akinpelu, Olakunle Modupe, Ajayi Olayemi O. – May 2019 Page No.: 245-252

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of culture on the operation of an entrepreneurial family business in Nigeria. Using a multiple case approach, we explore the contributions of family values, manners and customs, funding, education, traditions and ethics in relation to a family-owned business. This study enables us to deepen our understanding of cultural influence on the entrepreneurial family business. The results reveal that the operation and sustainability of family-owned businesses are ascribable to family culture.

Page(s): 245-252                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 June 2019

 Olaore Rafiu Akinpelu
Directorate of Entrepreneurship Education, Osun State Polytechnic, Iree, Nigeria

 Olakunle Modupe
School of Vocational and Technical Education, Osun State Polytechnic, Iree, Nigeria

 Ajayi Olayemi O.
School of Vocational and Technical Education, Osun State Polytechnic, Iree, Nigeria

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Olaore Rafiu Akinpelu, Olakunle Modupe, Ajayi Olayemi O. “Influence of Culture on the Operations of Entrepreneurial Family Business in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.245-252 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/245-252.pdf

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Project Management and Sustainability of Microfinance Institutions in Ghana: An Empirical Assessment

Dankwa, Ernest Akwasi Adom – May 2019 Page No.: 253-262

The rampant collapse of several microfinance companies in Ghana is a worrying phenomenon that needed thorough investigations. Due to the fact that project management enables businesses to plan and execute tasks and responsibilities effectively, within time and budgetary constraints, it has become an important management tool for successful enterprises. However, literature gap with regards to project management tools application on MFIs sustainability exist, motivating the author to investigate the role of project management in ensuring the sustainability of microfinance institutions in Ghana. Using a quantitative research method, data were collected from 10 MFIs in Western and Ashanti regions of Ghana. 30 respondents were purposively sampled to enable inclusion of microfinance companies deemed to be thriving and those perceived to be on the brink of failure. A simple linear regression model, coefficient and chi-square test were used. The paper documents that using project management principles and techniques has significant positive impact on business management, business expansion and business sustainability and therefore recommended that managers of MFIs must adopt project management principles in the management of firms and task themselves to ensure prudent economic management in all facets of their endeavors.

Page(s): 253-262                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 05 June 2019

  Dankwa, Ernest Akwasi Adom
Faculty of Business Studies, Garden City University College, P.O. Box 12775 Kumasi-Ghana

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Dankwa, Ernest Akwasi Adom “Project Management and Sustainability of Microfinance Institutions in Ghana: An Empirical Assessment” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.253-262 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/253-262.pdf

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Acquiring English Language Proficiency through Written Corrective Feedback: Is it Possible?

Steven Chimpunga Banda, Dr. Peter Chomba Manchishi – May 2019 Page No.: 263-270

This study investigated Written Corrective Feedback (WCF) on whether or not it helped language acquisition in Second language (L2) teaching among grade elevens. The study sought to: establish the nature of WCF teachers gave and to find out challenges involved in providing WCF. Four secondary schools were sampled in Kasama district. Grade Eleven (11) learners were used to assess their perceptions towards written corrective feedback. Twenty (20) learners were picked from each school and made a sample of eighty (80). Five (5) teachers were picked from each school making a sample of twenty (20). Various research instruments were used for both teachers and learners. These included: A test, interviews guide, Focus Group Discussion guide, questionnaires and document review guides. The findings showed it was possible to acquire proficiency through written corrective feedback. The study concluded that, teachers as well as learners had unique perceptions about the practice of written corrective feedback and appreciated it differently. The study drew two major recommendations. Firstly, a teacher needs to use corrective feedback which learners are familiar with and can interpret with ease. Secondly, a culture of encouraging learners to attend to their errors must be up held among teachers of English language. This can be utilized as a scaffolding tool to help learners appreciate written corrective feedback.

Page(s): 263-270                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 05 June 2019

 Steven Chimpunga Banda
University of Zambia, Zambia

 Dr. Peter Chomba Manchishi
University of Zambia, Zambia

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Steven Chimpunga Banda, Dr. Peter Chomba Manchishi “Acquiring English Language Proficiency through Written Corrective Feedback: Is it Possible?” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.263-270 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/263-270.pdf

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Effect of Metaconceptual Teaching Approach on Students’ Achievement in Physics

NWANKWO, Madeleine Chinyere, ACHUFUSI, Ngozi N, ORAFU, Ikenna Onyeka, AGHADO, Innocent – May 2019 Page No.: 271-277

Considering students’ poor achievement in physics, this study investigated the effect of interactive and learner-friendly Metaconceptual teaching approach on students’ achievement in Physics. Two research questions and three hypotheses provided a focus for the study which adopted a quasi-experimental, control group design. The sample for the study consisted of 68 SS2 physics students from two intact classes of two co-educational secondary schools in Awka South Local Government Area of Anambra State. A multi-stage sampling was used to compose the sample. The instrument used for data collection was a researcher constructed test tagged Thermal Physics Achievement Test (T-PAT). The test with their model answers was validated by experts. The reliability of the T-PAT was established using Kuder-Richardson formula 20 (KR-20) which yielded a reliability index of 0.89. The research questions were answered using mean while the hypotheses were tested at 0.05 level of significance using Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA). The findings of the study showed significant effect of metaconceptual teaching approach (MTA) on students’ achievement in physics. This implies that MTA is capable of enhancing students’ achievement in physics. However, the result showed no gender influence on students’ achievement in physics when MTA was used as a method of instruction. Educational implications of this study were highlighted and recommendations made which included among others, that MTA should be incorporated in teaching of sciences especially physics in secondary schools.

Page(s): 271-277                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 June 2019

 NWANKWO, Madeleine Chinyere
Department of Science Education, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka.

 ACHUFUSI, Ngozi N
Department of Science Education, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka.

 ORAFU, Ikenna Onyeka
Department of Science Education, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka.

 AGHADO, Innocent
Department of Science Education, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka.

NWANKWO, Madeleine Chinyere, ACHUFUSI, Ngozi N, ORAFU, Ikenna Onyeka, AGHADO, Innocent “Effect of Metaconceptual Teaching Approach on Students’ Achievement in Physics” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.271-277 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/271-277.pdf

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Effects of Liquidity and Investment Policies on Financial Growth of Savings and Credit Cooperative Societies in Kenya: A Case of Deposit Taking Saccos in Nairobi County

Dr John Cheluget (PhD), Gitonga Mirigo Loise – May 2019 Page No.: 278-285

Financial growth of savings and credit cooperatives in Kenya has an effect on the welfare of citizens in Kenya. This is because SACCOs encourage their members to save since they are readily accessible. The main objective of the study was to assess the determinants of financial growth in the savings and credit cooperative societies in Nairobi County. The specific objectives of the study were; to determine the effect of liquidity on financial growth in the SACCO industry in Nairobi County and to find out the effect of investment policies on financial growth in the SACCO industry in Nairobi County. The study adopted a descriptive research design. The target population of the study consisted of 42 licensed SACCOs in Nairobi County. The study used a formula of Kothari (2004) to determine the sample size that was 38 SACCOs in Nairobi County. The study collected both primary and secondary data. Primary data was collected using questionnaires. Secondary data was collected from annual reports of the SACCOs and the SASRA Annual Reports covering the period 2010-2014. The collected data was coded into SPSS software version 24 for analysis. The findings were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The descriptive statistics entailed use of means and standard deviations while inferential statistics included use of regression analysis. The findings were presented using Graphs and Frequency Distribution Tables. Based on correlational results, liquidity and investment policies all have significant influence on financial growth of SACCOs. The study concludes that liquidity was a significant determinant of financial growth of SACCOs with a strong positive correlation on financial growth. Investment policy was a critical determinant of financial growth of SACCOs in Kenya. The study recommends that the management of all SACCOs in Kenya should strengthen their liquidity levels by effective management of trade payables, receivables, inventories and cash. The management of SACCOs should improve on their investment policies by incorporating Specific Measurable Attainable Realistic and Time (SMART) bound goals and objectives.

Page(s): 278-285                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 June 2019

 Dr John Cheluget (PhD)
Deputy Vice-Chancellor of The Management University of Africa

 Gitonga Mirigo Loise
EMBA, The Management University of Africa

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Dr John Cheluget (PhD), Gitonga Mirigo Loise “Effects of Liquidity and Investment Policies on Financial Growth of Savings and Credit Cooperative Societies in Kenya: A Case of Deposit Taking Saccos in Nairobi County” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.278-285 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/278-285.pdf

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The Power of Internet and the Security Implication for the Transformation of Political Power in the Arab Spring Crises

David Oluwafemi, BODUNDE, Goodluck Tamarameiye, LAYEFA, Noah Opeyemi, BALOGUN – May 2019 Page No.: 286-290

The spread of information through internet source in the Arab Spring issues has unsalutory effects on their governments to the advantages of the masses. It made power to be more distributed with undercut monopoly of traditional bureaucracy, robbed the government of their absolute control of agendas in the crisis, and made political leaders enjoy fewer degrees of freedom before responding to events by sharing the crisis stage with more participating actors. Using Persuasive Communication Theory and Unified Theory of Acceptance in the Use of Technology as theoretical framework, this study evaluates the power of information technology with special reference to internet in the transformation of political power in the Arab Spring. It also examines the historical antecedent of the Arab Spring crisis along the factors that led to the crisis viz a viz the implication for the Arab spring and global security in general. It concludes that the power of internet which influenced agitation for political transformation in the Arab spring, causing political instability, agitation for regime change with enthronement of democracy could as well serve as catalyst for revolution in other climes and contexts.

Page(s): 286-290                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 08 June 2019

 David Oluwafemi, BODUNDE
Department of Peace, Security and Intelligence Studies, Afe-Babalola University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria

 Goodluck Tamarameiye, LAYEFA
Department of Peace, Security and Intelligence Studies, Afe-Babalola University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria

 Noah Opeyemi, BALOGUN
Department of Peace, Security and Intelligence Studies, Afe-Babalola University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria

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David Oluwafemi, BODUNDE, Goodluck Tamarameiye, LAYEFA, Noah Opeyemi, BALOGUN “The Power of Internet and the Security Implication for the Transformation of Political Power in the Arab Spring Crises ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.286-290 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/286-290.pdf

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Hate Speech and the Challenges of Nation Building in Nigeria

Yahaya Yakubu – May 2019 Page No.: 291-294

The study set out to explore the plausible existence of a correlation between prevalence of hate speech and the current state of nation building in contemporary. Conceiving hate speech as prejudicial and derogatory comments aagisnt persons of different ethnic origin, the study hinging on the theoretical pedestal of ethnicity holds that; primordial ethnic identity and affiliations remains a major driving force behind widespread prevalence of hate speech in the Nigerian polity. Furthermore, it also holds that the incidence of hate speech is particularly more pronounced in period leading to and after national and local elections. Accordingly, it is of the view that a lot needs to be done legislative wise in terms of enacting legislations geared towards classifying and combating hate speech. Secondly, it also claims that regional and tribal elites should be cautious of their utterances so as not to incite one group against another. While on the side of the government, reasonable amount of political will is required to sensitize and educate the mass as well as inculcation of policies that will strengthen ties across rival groups in Nigeria.

Page(s): 291-294                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 08 June 2019

 Yahaya Yakubu
Department of Political Science & International Relations, Nile University of Nigeria

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[9]. Yakubu, Y. (2017). Ethnicity, Federal Character Principle and National Development in Nigeria: A Critical Evaluation, Journal of Nation Building and Policy Studies, Vol. 1, No. 1 & 2, pp. 7-23.

Yahaya Yakubu “Hate Speech and the Challenges of Nation Building in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.291-294 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/291-294.pdf

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Interface Design Assessment of Museum Permanent Exhibition at the National Museum of Malaysia

Norfadilah Kamaruddin – May 2019 Page No.: 295-300

At a museum, the interface design between the visitor and the museum is devoted to the exhibition. In this sense, the exhibition works as a medium with an effective interface design for the museum collections and researches. Moreover, a visit to an exhibition counts as a good use of leisure time, however some exhibitions are almost overrun with visitors. Thus, this paper describes what is interface design meaning from the design perspectives and the museum professionals view. Consisting of four different types of interface design, this paper presents the results of a broad validation study on the literature, as well as Malaysian National Museum specific documents. The paper concludes with a discussion of what types of interface design currently be applied on the permanent exhibition at Malaysian National Museum and how the future interface design can be improve towards the presentation of museum-collections and future aims to strengthening and refining the quality of interface design for use by museum professionals.

Page(s): 295-300                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 08 June 2019

 Norfadilah Kamaruddin
Faculty of Art & Design, University Teknologi MARA (UiTM) Cawangan Selangor, Malaysia

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Norfadilah Kamaruddin “Interface Design Assessment of Museum Permanent Exhibition at the National Museum of Malaysia” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.295-300 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/295-300.pdf

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Islamic Perspective towards Deradicalising Some Extremist Conducts among Muslims in Contemporary Nigeria

Mukhtar Umar Dagimun, Salihi Ashiru Musa – May 2019 Page No.: 301-306

The Life of a Muslim is fully regulated and guided by the teachings of Islam. These teachings are clearly based on the principles of moderation. A Muslim is expected to conduct himself in line with the teachings of his religion according to his ability. He must neither exceed the limit nor draw back himself in the practice of religion. However, there are certain extremist conducts that have manifested among Muslims in the contemporary period. Some of these features include: Intolerance, bigotry, excessiveness, harshness, overburdening oneself among others. In fact, a number of some extremist conducts have manifested in the actions and attitudes of some Muslims now a days. This paper intends to examine this trend in the following key components. Apart from the introduction and conclusion, it defined the key concepts, discusses some extremist conducts among Muslims and the position of Islam on them. The paper further examines the causes and the method of deradicalising them from Islamic perspective.To achieve this aim, the researchers employ analytical method in writing this paper.

Page(s): 301-306                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 10 June 2019

 Mukhtar Umar Dagimun
Department of Islamic Studies, Faculty of Arts and Islamic Studies, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria

 Salihi Ashiru Musa
Department of Arts and Humanities, School of Continuing Education, Bayero University, Kano- Nigeria

Reference are not available.

Mukhtar Umar Dagimun, Salihi Ashiru Musa “Islamic Perspective towards Deradicalising Some Extremist Conducts among Muslims in Contemporary Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.301-306 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/301-306.pdf

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Prospect of Secularism and the Muslim Society of Zanzibar

Mohamed, Makame Soud – May 2019 Page No.: 307-313

Secularism is a political situation which is being followed in Tanzania including Zanzibar as a part of Tanzania. Due to its interpretation, secularism brings ambiguity in the overall implication in the country. It is referred to the form of life that does not rely on any religious belief. Therefore, this paper is intended to examine the prospect of secularism in Zanzibar along with its implications within the Islamic society of Zanzibar. This is a descriptive and analytical type of study; in that respect, it proposes to use a qualitative approach, in which observation techniques, written documents, and internet sources were applied to collect the data, which were analyzed and presented in the form of thematic descriptions of secularism in the context of Zanzibar. The finding of this study revealed that Zanzibar is a semi secular state and that Islamic religion is dominant in the government institutions. It is the author’s hope that the study provides the readers with a good perception of the nature of secularism as experienced in the Islamic context of Zanzibar. The study recommends that the people of Zanzibar should opt for a political system that is in need of them without intervening with their Islamic culture while observing the ethics of other beliefs despite their minority.

Page(s): 307-313                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 10 June 2019

 Mohamed, Makame Soud
(MA Religious Studies)
ZANZIBAR – TANZANIA

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Mohamed, Makame Soud “Prospect of Secularism and the Muslim Society of Zanzibar” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.307-313 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/307-313.pdf

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Technological Innovation and Economic Performance in Developing Countries: Evidence from Nigeria

Samuel B. Adewumi, Ngozi B. Enebe – May 2019 Page No.: 314-319

This study examines technological innovation and economic performance of developing countries with evidence from Nigeria. The study employed data from 1981 to 2016, and with variables such as gross domestic product, stock of physical capital, technology – proxy by total factor productivity, foreign direct investment, labour force and trade openness. The result yield support to the theoretical postulation of Solow and Swan (1986) that technological innovation is the driving force of growth; and for a state/country to move beyond the steady state, advancement in technology is equally the motivating factor. We conclude that for LDC’s to achieve a meaningful economic growth, greater attention must be given to technological development, which could be through innovation or technological transfer.

Page(s): 314-319                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 11 June 2019

 Samuel B. Adewumi
Department of Economics, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria

 Ngozi B. Enebe
Department of Economics, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria

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Samuel B. Adewumi, Ngozi B. Enebe “Technological Innovation and Economic Performance in Developing Countries: Evidence from Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.314-319 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/314-319.pdf

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Globalization and Industry 4.0: A Theoretical Review of Their Impact on Training and Retraining of Employees in Developing and Underdeveloped Countries

WOBODO, Chinonye Chris, Dr. L.I. Nwaeke – May 2019 Page No.: 320-327

The state of business operations’ method is changing rapidly and assuming a new dimension and organizations that fail to synchronize these changes with potent strategies risk speedy entropy. Technology is changing the world and its impact on virtually every aspect of human life is unfathomable. Therefore this paper looked at how globalization and industry 4.0 will affect training and retraining of employees in the developed and underdeveloped countries. After careful extant literature review, it proved that both globalization and industry 4.0 are phenomena driven by increased growth of technology in the West over the years. However, the study showed that developing and underdeveloped nations have not fared well in the midst of globalization movement as the losses incurred has exceeded the much promised benefits and a new era is about to be born which will entirely change manufacturing dynamics. In this circumstance, we deduced that for organizations operating in developing and underdeveloped countries to transit to the new era, training and retraining of their workforce must be on top gear so as to upscale their skills to meet the new challenges ahead. In line with that we recommend that organizations operating in developing and underdeveloped world should be conscious of the revolutionary and evolutionary nature of global business environments and ensure that they adapt appropriately without losing sight of the imperialistic tendencies of the West; that before the adoption of industry 4.0 system, there is need for a proper identification of the required skills set before following it up with adequate training and retraining programs to upscale their skills in that direction and also reduce the tendency for resistance and failure.

Page(s): 320-327                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 11 June 2019

 WOBODO, Chinonye Chris
Doctoral Student, Department of Management, Faculty of Management Sciences, Rivers State University, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

 Dr. L.I. Nwaeke
Lecturer, Department of Management, Faculty of Management Sciences, Rivers State University, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

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WOBODO, Chinonye Chris, Dr. L.I. Nwaeke “Globalization and Industry 4.0: A Theoretical Review of Their Impact on Training and Retraining of Employees in Developing and Underdeveloped Countries” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.320-327 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/320-327.pdf

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Educational Expenditure and Human Capital Development in West Africa, the Challenge to Developing Countries

Samuel B. Adewumi – May 2019 Page No.: 328-331

It has been established in literature that education contributes majorly to human capital development, societal development and prospective tool in boosting the performance of the labour force, it is also a strong base for effective and efficient performance of world economies (UN, 2003). Also, many authors had linked the role of human capital – through education – in economic development (World Bank, 2003; Anyanwu, 1996, 1998), promoting economic growth (Levine and Renelt, 1992; Mankiw et al., 1992; Anyanwu, 1998); promoting income redistribution and poverty reduction (Ravallion and Chen, 1997; Sen, 1999; and Schultz, 2002) and other aspect of the economy to mention but few.
Moreover, government educational spending, which is a tool in enhancing human capital development no doubt had been on the increase in West African countries and other African countries at large (Rajkumar and Swaroop 2008). Different educational programme and policies had also been enacted to boost the performance of the sector. Some empirical findings also yield support that government expenditure has improved education enrolment rate in the Middle East and other middle income countries. But in spite the noticeable increase in education expenditure in West African countries, its impact in building strong workforce or human capital development in the region is still questionable (Schultz, 1999; Moja, 2000 Bloom, Canning and Chan, 2006).

Page(s): 328-331                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 11 June 2019

 Samuel B. Adewumi
University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria

References are not available

Samuel B. Adewumi “Educational Expenditure and Human Capital Development in West Africa, the Challenge to Developing Countries” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.328-331 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/328-331.pdf

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Assessment of Effects of Forest Resources Exploitation and Utilization Activities on the Livelihood of Rural Households in Benue State, Nigeria

Unongo, E. A., Musa, M. W. and Akinola, M. O. – May 2019 Page No.: 332-335

The study was carried out to assess the effects of forest resources exploitation and utilization activities on the livelihood of rural households in Benue state Nigeria. Multiple regression model was used to empirically quantify the 11 livelihood variables that were tested for their effects on the livelihood of rural households in the study area to achieve the objective of the study. The results of the study revealed that some livelihood variables such as: improved procurement of food items; increased households assets; improved expenditure on on-farm activities; improved households expenditure; improved expenditure on cultural festivals/ceremonies and ease of sponsoring wards in schools have significant effects on the livelihood of rural households in the study area at 1%, 5% and 10% level of significance respectively. The study concluded that the forest resources exploitation and utilization activities have positive effects on the rural households in the study area. It was recommended that: rural households should pool financial and available human resources at their disposal to establish and manage processing industries in the rural areas for processing the abundant exploited forest resources for generating households income as well as to meet national consumption and exportation; forest guards should be employed from the rural communities and be paid monthly by government to safeguard forest resources against irrational exploitation by exploiters; and rural communities should be mobilized to engage in self-help efforts for the rehabilitation of rural roads, construction of new roads and bridges for easy transportation of forest resources exploited to points of sale.

Page(s): 332-335                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 13 June 2019

 Unongo, E. A.
Department of Agriculture Extension and Communication, Federal University of Agriculture Makurdi, Benue State, Nigeria

 Musa, M. W.
Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology Ahmadu Bello University Zaria, Nigeria

 Akinola, M. O.
Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology Ahmadu Bello University Zaria, Nigeria

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[18]. Townson, I. M. (2012).Forest Products and Household. Incomes: A Review and Annotated Bibliography. OFI-CLFOR, Oxford: 201-250.

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Unongo, E. A., Musa, M. W. and Akinola, M. O. “Assessment of Effects of Forest Resources Exploitation and Utilization Activities on the Livelihood of Rural Households in Benue State, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.332-335 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/332-335.pdf

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Effects of Social Media on Students of American University of Nigeria

Achoda, Nicholas Achoda, Steve Wordu (PhD) – May 2019 Page No.: 336-340

This research paper looks at the effects of social media on students of American University of Nigeria. The study area is the American University of Nigeria located in Yola, Adamawa State, Nigeria. The study structured a questionnaire to extract information from respondents which consisted of selected students. A total of 100 questionnaires were distributed and 80 of these questionnaires were retrieved. This number forms the crust of findings for this study; the 80 questionnaires retrieved and the interpretation of results therein, can be considered a justifiable sample size considering the fact that the university has a total of less than one thousand students. The simple percentage was used to analyze the research questions. The descriptive survey research design was adopted for the study and systematic random sampling was used to select the population sample. Findings revealed that social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat and Instagram are highly used by students of American University of Nigeria. The study also revealed that over 99% of the students owned mobile phones with internet facilities and have a good knowledge of the use of social media. The phone brands used by the students include Apple (iPhone), Samsung, Nokia and Huawei. Findings from the research revealed that social media use can have a negative effect on students, as well as hamper their academic performance. Nevertheless, social media also plays an important role in the lives of students as it provides a convenient medium for information dissemination, research and instant communication. The study recommends that students should minimize the time they spend on social media. Moderation is key. Excessive use of social media can result in mental issues, anxiety, decreased self-esteem, poor academic performance and depression.

Page(s): 336-340                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 13 June 2019

 Achoda, Nicholas Achoda
Department of Sociology, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria.

 Steve Wordu (PhD)
Department of Sociology, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria.

[1]. Akram, W and R Kumar. “A Study on Positive and Negative Effects of Social Media on Society.”International Journal of Computer and Engineering V.10 (2017): 347-354.
[2]. Chatfield, Tom. What Does it mean to be Human in the Age of Technology? 20 January 2016. Accessed 2 May 2019.
[3]. El Badawy, Tarek and Yasmin Hashem. “The Impact of Social Media on the Academic Development of School Students.” International Journal of Business Administration 6.1 (2015): 46-52.
[4]. Gaitho, Maryanne. What is the real Impact of Social Media? 12 September 2018. 18 April 2019 http://www.digitalvidya.com/real-impact-social-media-article
[5]. Kakkar, Garima. What are the Impacts of Social Media? 24December 2018. 18 April 2019 http://www.digitalvidya.com/blog/impact-of-social-media/
[6]. Zhukova, Anya. Numerous studies have shown that increased use of social media has a negative effect on your sleep quality. 31 October 2018. 31 April 2019. https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/negative-effects-of-social-media/
[7]. Questionnaires distributed and responses gotten from students of American University of Nigeria.
[8]. Victoria Government. What is Bullying? 22 February 2019. 15 April 2019 https://www.education.vic.gov.au/about/programs/bullystyoppers/Pages/what.aspx

Achoda, Nicholas Achoda, Steve Wordu (PhD) “Effects of Social Media on Students of American University of Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.336-340 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/336-340.pdf

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The Impact of Audit Committees’ Meetings and Audit Fees on the Financial Performance of Listed Banks in Ghana

Armstrong Ephraim Awinbugri, Gyimah Prince – May 2019 Page No.: 341-346

The study adopted quantitative research approach and descriptive research method to assess the impact of Audit committee on financial performance of banks listed on the Ghana Stock Exchange. Audit committee variables used were: Audit Committee Meetings, Audit Committee Size, and Audit fees. Financial performance was examined using Return on Asset (ROA) and Return on Equity (ROE). The researcher found that listed banks financial performance with respect to ROA was positively influenced by audit committee size and audit fees whilst ROE was negatively skewed by audit committee meetings. Though negative relations were found between ROA, ROE and some Audit committee variables as used in this study, the regression model used indicated that over 60% of variability in financial performance of the listed banks was due to Audit committee and fees.

Page(s): 341-346                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 13 June 2019

 Armstrong Ephraim Awinbugri
Assistant Lecturer, Kessben University College, Ghana.

 Gyimah Prince
Assistant Lecturer, University of Education, Winneba-Kumasi, Ghana

[1]. Abbott, L. J., Parker, S., and Peter, G.F. (2004).Audit committee characteristics and restatement.Auditing: Journal of Practice and Theory, 23(1), 69-87.
[2]. Abbott, L. J., S. Parker., and G. Peters.(2003). Audit committee characteristics and restatements. Auditing: AJournal of Practice and Theory 23 (1): 69- 87
[3]. Al-Matari, Y.A., Al-Swidi, A.K., BtFadzil, F.H., and Al-Matari, E.M. (2012). Board of Directors, Audit Committee Characteristics and Performance of Saudi Arabia Listed Companies. International Review of Management and Marketing, 2(4), 241-251
[4]. Amer , M., Ragab, A.A., and Shehata, E.S. (2014). Audit Committee Characteristics and Firm Performance: Evidence from Egyptian Listed Companies. Proceedings of 6th Annual American Business Research Conference, 9 – 10, Sheraton LaGuardia East Hotel, New York, USA, ISBN: 978-1-922069-52-8
[5]. Aryan, L.A. (2015). The Relationship between Audit Committee Characteristics, Audit Firm Quality and Companies’ Profitability. Asian Journal of Finance & Accounting, 7(2), 215-225
[6]. Baxter, P., and J. Cotter. (2009). The audit committee and earnings quality. Accounting and Finance 49 (2): 267-290.
[7]. Bhagat, S.,and Bolton, B. (2008).Corporate governance and firm performance.Journal of Corporate Finance, 14, 257-273.
[8]. Brown, L. D., and Caylor, M. L. (2009).Corporate governance and firm valuation. Journal of Accounting and Public Policy, 25(2), 409-434.
[9]. Carcello, J.V., Hermanson, D.R., Raghunandan, K., (2005). Factors associated with US public companies’ investment in internal
auditing. Accounting Horizons, 19 (2), 65–80.
[10]. Channar, Z.A., Khan, M., Shakri, .I.H. (2015).Internal Control Effectiveness and its relationship with Financial Performance.IBT Journal of Business Studies, 11(2), 92-107.
[11]. Cohen, J., Moorthy, G., Wright, A., (2002). Corporate governance and the audit process.
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[12]. Creswell, J. W. (2014). The selection of a research approach.Chapter, 1, 3-21
[13]. Feng, M., Ge, W., Luo, W., Shevlin, T., (2011). Why do CFOs become involved in material
accounting manipulations? Journal of Accounting and Economics 51 (2011),
21–36
[14]. Glover-Akpey, I., and Azembila, A.B. (2016). The Effect of Audit Committees on the Performance of Firms Listed on the Ghana Stock Exchange. Journal of Business and Management (IOSR-JBM), 18(11),55-62.
[15]. Goodwin-Stewart, J., Kent, P., (2006).Relationship between external audit fees, internal audit and the audit committee.Accounting and Finance 46, 387–404.

[16]. Habbash, M. (2015).Audit Committee Effectiveness and Audit Quality: Evidence From Saudi Arabia. International Journal of Management and Applied Science, 1(7), 5-14.
[17]. Hindle J, (2005). HR outsourcing in operation: critical success factors. Human Resource Management International Digest, 13(3), 39-41.
[18]. Hosseini, S.J.F., Mohammadib, F., Mirdamadia, S.M., (2010).Factors Influencing the
Economic Aspects of Sustainable Agriculture in Iran. African Journal of Agricultural
Research 6 (2), 451–457
[19]. James, O., Izien, O.F. (2014).Audit firm characteristics and audit quality in Nigeria. International Journal of Business and Economics Research, 3(5): 187-195
[20]. Kikhia, H.Y. (2014). Board Characteristics, Audit Committee Characteristics and Audit Fees: Evidence from Jordan. International Business Research, 7(12), 98-110.
[21]. Merriam, S. B. (2002). Introduction to qualitative research.Qualitative research in practice: Examples for discussion and analysis, 1, 1-17.

[22]. Mitra, S., Hossain, M., Deis, D.R., (2007). The empirical relationship between owner-ship characteristics and audit fees.Review of Quantitative Finance & Accounting 28 (3), 257–285.

[23]. Rustam, S., Rashid, Zaman, K. (2013).The relationship between audit committees, compensation incentives and corporate audit fees in Pakistan.Economic Modeling, 31, 697-716.
[24]. SEC, (1999). NYSE Rulemaking: Order approving Proposed Rule Change Amending the Audit Committee Requirements and Notice of Filing and Order Granting Accelerated Approval of Amendments No. 1 and No. 2 Thereto. SEC Release No. 34–42233; File No. SR-NYSE-99-39.Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office.
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[26]. Collier, P. and Gregory, A. (1996) ‘Audit committee effectiveness and the audit fee’, European Accounting Review, 5(2), pp. 177–198.doi: 10.1080/09638189600000012.
[27]. Goodwin-Stewait, J. and Kent, P. (2006) ‘Relation between external audit fees, audit committee characteristics and internal audit’, Accounting and Finance, 46(3), pp. 387–404.doi: 10.1111/j.1467-629X.2006.00174.x.
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[29]. Ittonen, K., Miettinen, J. and Vähämaa, S. (2010) ‘Does Female Representation in Audit Committees Affect Audit Fees ?’,Quarterly Journal of Finance and Accounting, 49(3–4), pp. 113–139. doi: 10.2307/23074633.
[30]. Karim, K., Robin, A. and Suh, S. (2016) ‘Board structure and audit committee monitoring: Effects of audit committee monitoring incentives and board entrenchment on audit fees’, Journal of Accounting, Auditing and Finance, 31(2), pp. 249–276. doi: 10.1177/0148558X15583412.
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[33]. Zaman, M., Hudaib, M. and Haniffa, R. (2011) ‘Corporate Governance Quality, Audit Fees and Non-Audit Services Fees’, Journal of Business Finance & Accounting, 38(1–2), pp. 165–197. doi: 10.1111/j.1468-5957.2010.02224.x.

Armstrong Ephraim Awinbugri, Gyimah Prince “The Impact of Audit Committees’ Meetings and Audit Fees on the Financial Performance of Listed Banks in Ghana” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.341-346 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/341-346.pdf

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Effect of Utilization of Whatsapp Social Media Platform on Spiritual Growth of Church Members a Case of New Life Church Kenya

Paul Kamau, Dr. John Kamau, Nicholas Mwaura, Mary Njau – May 2019 Page No.: 347-351

The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of utilization of social media on spiritual growth of church members. The study focused on use of the most popular platform (WhatsApp) on the particular target population.
The study was anchored on technology acceptance model and collected data from 278 church members. The study utilized a questionnaire which was pretested to ensure its validity and reliability.The findings indicate that utilization of WhatsApp social media contributes significantly to spiritual development of church members. The study recommends that church leaders and members should be sensitized on importance of using social media not only for social interactions but also to enhance spiritual growth of church members.

Page(s): 347-351                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 13 June 2019

 Paul Kamau
Pan African Christian University, Kenya

 Dr. John Kamau
Africa Nazarene University, Kenya

 Nicholas Mwaura
Pan African Christian University, Kenya

 Mary Njau
Africa Nazarene University, Kenya

[1]. Buffardi, L. and Campbell, K (2008).Narcissism and Social Networking Websites. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. 34(10), 1303-1314. Retrieved from http:// www.people.vcu.edu/ ~jldavis/ readings/ Buffardi_&_Campbell_(2008).pdf
[2]. Campbell, A. &Lövheim, M. (2011) Introduction, Information, Communication & Society, 14:8, 1083-1096, DOI: 10.1080/1369118X.2011.597416: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2011.597416
[3]. Cheung, C. Chiu, P. and Lee, M. (2010). Online Social Networks: Why do students use Facebook? Computers in Human Behaviour. Article in Press.pp.1-4.
[4]. Chun-Ming Chang &Meng-Hsiang Hsu (2016): Understanding the determinants of users’ subjective well-being in social networking sites: an integration of social capital theory and social presence theory, Behaviour& Information Technology, DOI: 10.1080/0144929X.2016.1141321
[5]. Gibbs and Grey (2011). Five Foundations of Human Development: A Proposal for Our Survival in the Twenty-First Century and the New Millennium. Author House USA
[6]. https://buffer.com/library/social-media-sites
[7]. Hutchings, T. (2011) Contemporary Religious Community and the Online Church, Information, Communication & Society, 14:8, 1118-1135, DOI: 10.1080/1369118X.2011.591410:
[8]. International telecommunication Union (2010). The rise of social networking. Retrieved November 20 2015 from http://www.itu.int/net/itunews/issues/2010/06/35.aspx
[9]. Kim. C. K., (2010). Biblical strategy and shift to spiritual driven church growth. Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary. Retrieved 20 April 2016 from http:// digital commons .liberty.edu/cgi/ view content. cgi? article=1355&context=doctoral
[10]. Lundby, K. (2011) Patterns of belonging in online/offline interfaces of religion, Information, Communication & Society, 14:8, 1219-1235, DOI: 10.1080/1369118X.2011.594077:
[11]. United Nations Development Program (UNDP), 2014. Mobiles for Human Development 2014 Trends and Gaps.
[12]. United Nations Development Program (UNDP), 2015. Human Development Reports. Retrieved November fromhttp://hdr.undp.org/en/humandev
[13]. Woodroffe, N. (2011, July). The Ethos of Global Leadership Interlink. The opening ceremony of the launch of the Global Leadership Interlink (GLI) Jamaica Chapter. Kingston Court leighon

Paul Kamau, Dr. John Kamau, Nicholas Mwaura, Mary Njau “Effect of Utilization of Whatsapp Social Media Platform on Spiritual Growth of Church Members a Case of New Life Church Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.347-351 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/347-351.pdf

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Sporadic Violence Amongst Communities: The implications of Inter-ethnic Conflicts in Nyakach and Sigowet Sub-Counties of Western Kenya

James Omondi Juma – May 2019 Page No.: 352-358

The recurrence of inter-ethnic conflicts in Nyakach and Sigowet sub-counties has had major implications for almost three decades now. The two main ethnic groups in the area namely the Luo and Kipsig is ethnic groups have been involved in sporadic incidences of violent conflicts over the years. This study puts into perspective some of the major impacts of this conflicts and how they affect intercommunity relations in the two sub-counties. The study utilized descriptive research design. Both primary and secondary data were used during the study. The findings of the study were based on the social, economic and institutional impacts of inter-ethnic conflicts between the two major communities living in the two sub-counties. The implications of these conflicts have been such that they created a vicious cycle of violence that has strained intercommunal relations.

Page(s): 352-358                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 13 June 2019

 James Omondi Juma
Department of Peace and Conflict Studies, Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology, P.O BOX, 190-50100 Kakamega, KENYA

[1]. Akinyi-Dar N. P., Kabongah G. O., Otieno O., Leo P., Kamau M., Onyango, M., Wepundi, M. & Obiri, J. (2011). The Invisible Violence in Kenya: A Case Study of Rift Valley and Western Regions,Nairobi Kenya: Konrad Adenauer-Stiftung
[2]. Gurr, T. (1970). Why Men Rebel. Princeton.
[3]. Ikejiaku B. V. (2012.) Poverty-Conflict nexus. The Contentious issue revisited. European Journal of Sustainable development 1,2 127-15 ISSN: 2239-5938.
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[5]. Klopp, J. M., (2002). Can Moral Ethnicity Trump Political Tribalism? The Struggle for Land and Nation in Kenya. African Studies, 61 (2), 269-294.
[6]. KNCHR. (2014).Are we under Siege? The state of Security in Kenya. An Occasional Report (2010-2014). Retrieved from http://www.ke.undp.org/content/dam/kenya/docs/Democratic%20Governance/State%20of%20Security%20in%20Kenya%20-Occassional%20Report.pdf
[7]. KNHCR (2001). The right to return: the Internally Displaced Persons and the Culture of I mpunity in Kenya. Kenya Human Rights Commission: Nairobi.
[8]. Kothari, C. R. (2004). Research Methodology: Methods and Techniques. Delhi: Dahmesh Printers.
[9]. Mair, S. (2009). Conflict Management in Africa. Who Cares? ISPI Policy Brief. [email protected] accessed on 13/3/2016
[10]. Masaka O.W., Ratemo D.M., Ongaga, E. (2017) Effects of Interethnic Conflicts on Rural People’s Livelihoods in Kenya – Case of Kenyenya and Rongo Sub-Counties in the Lake Victoria Basin. Arts Social Science Journal 8: 253.
[11]. Mugenda, A. &Mugenda, O. (2003). Research Methods: Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches. Acts Press: Nairobi
[12]. Musau B. (2008). Ethnic Conflicts and Transition to democracy in Africa. Recurrence of inter-ethnic conflicting Kenya (1991-2008). UnpublishedMasters Thesis. University of Vienna. Austria
[13]. Nyukuri, B. K., (1997). The Impact of Past and Potential Ethnic Conflicts on Kenya’s Stability and Development. Paper prepared for the USAID Conference onConflict Resolution in the Greater Horn of Africa June, 1997. Retrieved on 15 November 2015 at http://payson.tulane.edu/conflict/Cs%20St/BARASFIN1.html
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[15]. Oucho, J.O. (2008). Undercurrents of Post-Election Violence In Kenya: Issues In The Long- Term Agenda. School of Journalism Press and Population Studies and Research Institute: University of Nairobi.
[16]. Oyugi, W. O. (2000). Politicised Ethnic Conflict in Kenya: A Periodic Phenomenon.Addis Ababa. http://unpan1.un.org/intradoc/groups/public/documents/CAFRAD/UNP AN010963.pdf. (accessed, November 30, 2015).
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[18]. Silverman, D. (2009) Doing Qualitative Research. London: Sage

James Omondi Juma “Sporadic Violence Amongst Communities: The implications of Inter-ethnic Conflicts in Nyakach and Sigowet Sub-Counties of Western Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.352-358 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/352-358.pdf

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Understanding Cultural Causes of Corruption: The Case of Bangladesh

Nurul Huda Sakib – May 2019 Page No.: 359-368

Corrupt culture influenced significantly people living in society, which they practised intentionally or unintentionally. To some extent, these practices patronise corruption and make a significant impact on society in several ways. Thus, this paper has tried to analyse these cultural causes and cost of corruption in the context of Bangladesh. Based on empirical data collected through Bangladesh Citizens Survey,elite interview in the 2015-2016 period and participation observation, the paper identified five principal cultural causes of corruption in Bangladesh; patron-client (neo-patrimonial) networks, creating a corruption friendly environment in the society, use of ‘religion’ as a tool, low awareness and illiteracy and building corrupt culture through wrong messages in the curriculum. The paper also analyses how these factors contribute to the ‘iron triangle’ in shaping corruption and the impact of these factors in Bangladeshi society.

Page(s): 359-368                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 19 June 2019

 Nurul Huda Sakib
Associate Professor, Department of Government and Politics, Jahangirnagar University, Dhaka, Bangladesh

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[2]. Bertrand, M., Kramarz, F., Schoar, A., & Thesmar, D. (2007). Politicians, firms and the politicalbusiness cycle: evidence from France. Unpublished Working Paper, University of Chicago. Retrieved from https://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/www/external/labor/seminars/adp/pdfs/2006_bertrand.pdf
[3]. Della Porta, D.&Vannucci, A. (2012). The hidden order of corruption: an institutional approach. Burlington,VT; Union Road, Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate Publications.
[4]. Disch, A., Vigeland, E., Sundet, G., & Gibson, S. (2009). Anti-corruption approaches: A literature review. Norway: Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation. Retrieved fromhttps://www.sida.se/contentassets/3f5c8afd51a6414d9f6c8f8425fb935b/anti-corruption-approaches-a-literature-review_3153.pdf
[5]. Graycar, A., & Prenzler, T. (2013). Understanding and preventing corruption. UK: Palgrave Macmillan.
[6]. Hallak, J., & Poisson, M. (2001). Ethics and corruption in education. International Institute for EducationalPlanning (IIEP) Policy Forum (No. 15). Paris: International Institute for Educational Planning.Retrievedfromhttps://www.researchgate.net/profile/Muriel_Poisson/publication/44829662_Ethics_and_corruption_in_education_results_from_the_experts_workshop_held_at_the_IIEP_-_Paris_28-29_November_2001/links/56de068e08aeb8b66f94a4eb.pdf
[7]. Hakim, M. A. (1998). The use of Islam as a political legitimization tool: The Bangladesh experience, 1972-1990. Asian Journal of Political Science, 6(2), 98-117. doi:10.1080/02185379808434127
[8]. Haque, A. S. M., A. Julfikar. (2013). Grafts reign supreme in import trade. In TransparencyInternational Bangladesh (Ed.) TIB’s award winning investigative report collection (pp. 149-165). Dhaka: Transparency International Bangladesh.
[9]. Hough, D. (2013). Corruption, anti-corruption and governance. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.
[10]. Huberts, L. (2014). The integrity of governance: What it is, what we know, what is done and where to go. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.
[11]. Huntington, S. P. (2002). Modernization and corruption. In A. J. Heidenheimer & M. Johnston (Eds.), Political corruption: Concepts and contexts (pp. 253-264). USA: Transaction Publishers.
[12]. Kaufmann, D., & Kaufmann, D. (1997). Corruption: the facts. Foreign Policy, 114–131. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/59771431/
[13]. Khan, M. H. (1996). A typology of corrupt transactions in developing countries. Institute of Development Studies (IDS) Bulletin, 27(2), 12-21.
[14]. Khan, M. H. (1998). The role of civil society and patron-client networks in the analysis of corruption. In OECD/UNDP (Ed.), Corruption and integrity improvement initiatives in developing countries (pp. 111-127). New York: United Nations Development Programme, Management Development and Governance Division.
[15]. Khan, M. H. (2005). Markets, states and democracy: Patron–client networks and the case for democracy in developing countries. Democratisation, 12(5), 704-724.
[16]. Khan, T. H. (2016). The revival of Islam-based politics in Bangladesh: An outcome of militaryregimes’ legitimacy crisis or not?. Asian Studies, 35(1), 81-94.
[17]. Khan, Z. I. (2014, December 23). Padma claimants being robbed by government staff. Dhaka Tribune. Retrieved fromhttp://www.dhakatribune.com/bangladesh/2014/dec/23/padma-claimants-being-robbed-government-staff
[18]. Kim, S., Kim, H. J., & Lee, H. (2009). An institutional analysis of an e-government system foranti-corruption: The case of OPEN. Government Information Quarterly, 26(1), 42-50.
[19]. Klitgaard, R., Abaroa, R. M., & Parris, H. L. (2000). Corrupt cities: a practical guide to cure and prevention. Washington, D.C. : World Bank Institute.
[20]. La Porta, R., Lopez-de-Silanes, F., Shleifer, A., & Vishny, R. (1999). The quality of government. The Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, 15(1), 222-279.
[21]. Legg, K. R. (1969). Politics in modern Greece. USA: Stanford University Press.
[22]. Mashreque, S. (2012). Paradox of rural development in Bangladesh: A focus on poverty alleviation and triangular policy manipulation. Humanomics, 28(3), 187-199.
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[43]. Weber, M. (2009). From Max Weber: Essays in Sociology. UK: Routledge. Retrieved from https://ebookcentral-proquest-com.ezproxy1.library.usyd.edu.au/lib/usyd/detail.action?docID=1111791.
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Nurul Huda Sakib “Understanding Cultural Causes of Corruption: The Case of Bangladesh” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.359-368 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/359-368.pdf

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Poverty and Social Equality in Buton Regency – South East Sulawesi Indonesia

Yohanis Boni – May 2019 Page No.: 369-371

Poverty and social equality have attracted much attentions governmental or non- governmental organizations. One of the possible program to alleviate poverty and increase equality is deploying suitable governmental budgeting program. This manuscript will give an overview of poverty alleviation and social equality in form of government budgeting programs in Buton Regency – South East Sulawesi, Indonesia. Data was collected using extensive literature review on budgeting programs in South East Sulawesi and interview several keys government officers and society leaders. The collected data then analyzed descriptively and interpreted in form of lorenz curve.

Page(s): 369-371                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 19 June 2019

 Yohanis Boni
Economics Department, Haluoleo University, South-East Sulawesi – Indonesai

[1]. Akita, T. (2002) ‘Regional Income Inequality in Indonesia and the Initial Impact of the Economic Crisis’,Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies 38.2, 201–22
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Yohanis Boni “Poverty and Social Equality in Buton Regency – South East Sulawesi Indonesia
” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.369-371 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/369-371.pdf

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Re-Defining Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration in Nigeria: Towards Achieving Security in the North-East Region

Chukwuzitara Juliet Uchegbu – May 2019 Page No.: 372-378

The proliferation of SALW and their central role in conflict have made Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration (DDR) an essential component of peace building. In Nigeria, the nature of the Boko Haram insurgency in the Northeast of Nigeria has attracted series of efforts to respond and curb Boko Haram terrorists’ activities and secure communities from sporadic attacks. This line of actions further demands more than rehabilitation and de-radicalization of ex-combatant but requires an intervention to include effective DDR strategies. Also, re-defining DDR strategies will further drive the stabilization and recovery processes that will restore security in the Northeast region.

Page(s): 372-378                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 19 June 2019

 Chukwuzitara Juliet Uchegbu
Department of Defence and Security Studies, Centre for Strategic Research and Studies, National Defence College, Nigeria

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Chukwuzitara Juliet Uchegbu “Re-Defining Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration in Nigeria: Towards Achieving Security in the North-East Region” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 5, pp.372-378 May 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-5/372-378.pdf

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