Legal and Illegal Earning in Islam: A Literature Review

Aminu Yakubu, Haruna Yawale, Yakubu Isa Abdulbari, Muhammad Salihu Abubakar – August 2019 Page No.: 01-04

Wealth is one of the immeasurable blessings of Allah (SWT) that He bestowed human being with. There are various provisions for achieving the wealth. In human life earning plays an important role in making life meaningful. Theaim of this paper is to discuss on how Islam encourages and prescribe Muslim legal earning and forbid Muslim illegal earning. Based on the literature findings this paper intends to see the Islamic rulings pertaining legal and illegal income earning. It is very common now to see a Muslim who are able to differentiate between legal and illegal earning. However, it is a shocking phenomenon and a sad fact that a large number of Muslims now do not differentiate between the legal and illegal earnings. Some people are involved in earning money and seeking employments in undesirable occupations (Khan & Halal, 2010).This paper used a basic qualitative research design. All data are analyzed by using secondary data especially from the Qur`an as well as Hadith and related literature. The findings of this paper show that there is a prohibition of illegal earning in Islam as well as the encouragement of Islam to legal earning and a punishment for a person who engage himself on illegal earning.

Page(s): 01-04                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 11 August 2019

 Aminu Yakubu
Centre for Islamic Management Development (ISDEV), University Sains Malaysia

 Haruna Yawale
Department of Islamic Studies, College for Legal Studies, Yola, Nigeria

 Yakubu Isa Abdulbari
Department of Arabic language Education, College of Continuing Education, Adamawa State, Nigeria

 Muhammad Salihu Abubakar
Department of Islamic Studies Education, College of Continuing Education, Adamawa State, Nigeria

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[13]. Science, H. (2017). Course Title : Ethics & Fiqh for Everyday Life Title : Ethics of Halal Earning In Islam, (1525621).

Aminu Yakubu, Haruna Yawale, Yakubu Isa Abdulbari, Muhammad Salihu Abubakar “Legal and Illegal Earning in Islam: A Literature Review” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.01-04 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/01-04.pdf

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From Globalization to Glocalization: Reaping the Positive Sides of Human Resource Flight for Economic Development in Nigeria

Onwunyi, Ugochukwu Mmaduabuchi, Ezeabasili, Ifeoma Ethel, Ostar, Christopher – August 2019 Page No.: 05-11

Globalisation has not only left the people of the less developing countries and indeed Africa behind in its ever-evolving technology but has also invaded their cultures and dampened their morale and aspirations for sustainable development. It is factual that Africans must continue to live and survive in a globalised world characterised by uneven and unsustainable wealth creation, there is a need for them to adopt glocalisation policies in various aspects of their economies by adapting or customising global ideas to the local needs of the people. Nigeria is one of the developing countries where globalisation has resulted in uneven wealth generation, unsustainable development and multifarious social and economic dislocations. Globalization through human capital flight has instigated the migration human resources that would have served the interest of enthroning development in Nigeria. The paper argues that globalization which necessitated human capital flight can be glocalized through ensuring that most of the migrated professionals are afforded the ample opportunity to transfer the knowledge gained as a result of the migration to local professionals or students. The study equally argues that, Nigeria in the quest for an improved economic development can as well embark on trading of local professionals to countries in need of them, hence encouraging capital repatriation. The study is qualitative in nature as data was collected from the secondary source which includes, textbooks, journals, academic periodicals, newspapers, magazine and internet sources, while the neo-classical school, which introduced a degree of refinement to classical economic theory was adopted as the analytic tool. The paper revealed that, glocalisation policies can help in the maximaization of human capital flight for enhanced economic development by reducing the scourge of globalisation in the Nigeria. The study recommends that, Nigeria should ensure that capital repatriated is properly channeled to infrastructural development; encouragement of citizens migration to developed countries as a means of empowering the people for greater knowledge acquisition; Nigeria should endeavor to properly train her human resources to make the available for the market.

Page(s): 05-11                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 13 August 2019

 Onwunyi, Ugochukwu Mmaduabuchi
Department of Political Science, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Nigeria

 Ezeabasili, Ifeoma Ethel
Department of Political Science, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Nigeria

 Ostar, Christopher
Department of Political Science, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Nigeria

[1]. Aaron, K. K. (2010), “Playing without the kits: Towards a beneficial participation of Nigeria in a globalised world,” Annals of the Social Science Academy of Nigeria, 13. January – December, pp. 19-35.
[2]. Asobie, H. A. (2001), “Globalization: A view from the South”, Annals of the Social Science Academy of Nigeria, 13. January – December, pp. 19-35.
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[5]. Khoudker, H. H. (2004), Glocalization as Globalization” Evolution of a sociological concept. Bangladesh e-journal of Sociology, 1(2), July, pp. 1-9
[6]. Hampton, k. N. (2010), “Internet use and the Concentration of disadvantages: Glocalization and the urban underclass”. American Behavioural Scientist 53(8), 1111 – 1132.
[7]. Hong, P (2010), “Glocalization of Social work practice: Global and local responses to globalization”. International Social Work, 53(5), 656- 670.
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[13]. Wellman, B, and Hampton, K. (1999), “Living Networked on and offline”, Contemporary Sociology, 28(6), 648 – 654.

Onwunyi, Ugochukwu Mmaduabuchi, Ezeabasili, Ifeoma Ethel, Ostar, Christopher ” From Globalization to Glocalization: Reaping the Positive Sides of Human Resource Flight for Economic Development in Nigeria ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.05-11 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/05-11.pdf

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The Bureaucratic Values for the Regional Development
Abdul Rahim, Zaffar Iqbal – August 2019 – Page No.: 12-15

This paper defines the definition of Bureaucracy with its academic evaluation and impact of Bureaucratic hierarchy with the power of proactive participation of Bureau in Society. it clarifies the historical background and the rule of bureaucracy in structuring the Government Policies with its implementation plan. The goals of bureaucratic values in comparison of Modern debate on bureaucracy with its components. The power of Bureaucracy is focusing point to get limit the power and its critical values which reflects the wreck of the development and it moves to the personal confliction. The maximum misuse of power for attaining the personal targets is to misconduct the power and delivers the corruption at all levels. The bureaucratic hierarchy is redefined for the attainment of purposeful effects. The prime objectives of bureaucracy I to s put forwards the theoretical value so as to be instigated.

Page(s): 12-15                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 13 August 2019

 Abdul Rahim
Alhamd Islamic University, Pakistan

 Zaffar Iqbal
Alhamd Islamic University, Pakistan

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[13]. Narendra K Singhi(1974) Bureaucracy , Positions and Persons (p-05) Shakti Malik. New Delhi
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[15]. William A. Niskanen, JR (2007) Bureaucracy & Representative Government, Bureaucracy & their Environment (p.21) United State Printing Press

Abdul Rahim, Zaffar Iqbal “The Bureaucratic Values for the Regional Development” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.12-15 August 2019 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/12-15.pdf

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Exploring Climate Change Friendly Behavior among Tertiary Students in Promotion of Sustainable Development Goal Number 13: a case of a University in Zimbabwe

Tshuma Doreen Taurai, Chatsiwa, Jaison – August 2019 Page No.: 16-20

Introduction: – Climate change and climate variability are presenting new challenges that are threating human livelihoods and sustainability across the globe. Societies therefore need to find coping strategies that work for them to reduce the effects brought by climate change. The main aim of this study was to explore climate change friendly behavior among University students, in promoting Sustainable Development Goal 13 (SDG 13), both in campus and off campus. SDG 13 deals with climate action. Climate change is real and this calls for changes in our actions, attitudes and behavior. According to Smith (2015; 29) ‘achieving change in individuals and organizational behavior to meet the challenges of global environmental change will be seen as a defining benchmark for our generation’. Research has shown that societies globally have a basic understanding of what climate change is. The question however, is that with that knowledge, are people changing their behavior to address and reduce the impacts of climate change? This paper therefore addresses climate friendly behavior if any among University students both on-campus and off-campus.

Page(s): 16-20                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 13 August 2019

 Tshuma Doreen Taurai
Great Zimbabwe University, School of Curriculum Studies, Masvingo Zimbabwe

 Chatsiwa, Jaison
University of the Witswatersrand, Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, Braamfontein, Johannesburg, South Africa

[1]. Acharya, A. Matthew, B., Maya S., 2015. Explaining Attitudes from Behavior: A Cognitive Dissonance Approach
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[3]. Bulkeley, H., 2000. Common Knowledge? Public understanding of climate change in Newcastle, Australia. Public understanding of science, 9, 313-333.
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Tshuma Doreen Taurai, Chatsiwa, Jaison “Exploring Climate Change Friendly Behavior among Tertiary Students in Promotion of Sustainable Development Goal Number 13: a case of a University in Zimbabwe” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.16-20 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/16-20.pdf

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Impact of Training and Development as a Tool for Achieving Organizational Objectives

Esther James, Collins Daniel Kwabe – August 2019 Page No.: 21-32

This study focuses on the Impact of Training and Developments as A Tool for Achieving Organizational Objectives, The objective of the study was to find out how training and development of employees contribute to the achievement of the goals, assess how reward system as a human resource management practice influences performance, established how job design as a component of human resource management practices influences performance, and to identify the roles of training and development in achieving organizational goals. Based on the literature, the study recommends Training and development should be seen not only as of the thread that ties together all human resource practices, but also as the instrument for establishing and signaling when and how work practices should change. In other words, employees should take on the role of organizational change agents.

Page(s): 21-32                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 13 August 2019

 Esther James
Department of Business Management Education, Adamawa State Polytechnic, Yola, Nigeria

 Collins Daniel Kwabe
Department of Social and Management Sciences, Adamawa State Polytechnic, Yola, Nigeria

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Esther James, Collins Daniel Kwabe “Impact of Training and Development as a Tool for Achieving Organizational Objectives” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.21-32 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/21-32.pdf

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Migration and Nigeria – South Africa Relations

Big-Alabo, Tamunopubo – August 2019 Page No.: 33-39

This study examined the Migration and Nigeria-South Africa relations. The theory that was adopted was the neoclassical theory of migration by Arango and two questions was raised. The ex-post facto research design was used while data for this study was through secondary source such as textbooks, journal articles, newspapers, magazines and internet. The findings of the study showed that Nigeria and South Africa have relations which include Nigeria – South Africa NEPAD Initiative, South African Companies as Big Players in the Nigerian Economy and The South Africa – Nigeria Bi-National Commission. In a similar manner the findings also showed that there are some factors that Nigerians to migrate to south Africa which includes; poverty, overpopulation family reunification and asylum. .Based on the findings the study recommended among others that Nigeria should provide robust and unrestricted relations with South African outside the relations that they have (NEPAD Initiative, Bi-National Commission etc) to other aspect of businesses and Nigeria must also forge strategic business alliance in South Africa to balance the unhealthy business equation. Furthermore, beyond the existing skewed bilateral and economic relations in favor of South African businesses in Nigeria, there is an urgent need for both countries to initiate a liberalized migration regime and a robust migration management capacity towards enhancing and strengthening the strategic role of Nigerians in the diaspora as development partner.

Page(s): 33-39                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 13 August 2019

 Big-Alabo, Tamunopubo
Dept of Political/Admin Studies, University of Port Harcourt, Choba, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

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Big-Alabo, Tamunopubo “Migration and Nigeria – South Africa Relations” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.33-39 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/33-39.pdf

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Taking a Stance on the Language in Education Policy and Planning in Ghana: Concept Paper

Gifty Edna Anani- August 2019 Page No.: 40-43

This paper discusses the writer’s experiences and position on language- in- education policy and planning in Ghana. It opens with an overview of language- in -education policy and planning in Ghana. It then looks at language-in-education policy situation in Ghana and a review of inconsistencies in the language-in-education policy in Ghana. The paper concludes with recommendations to aid policy makers to have effective implementation of language-in-education policy. The paper is based on a literature review and the author’s own experience.

Page(s): 40-43                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 13 August 2019

 Gifty Edna Anani
PhD Candidate, Department of Communication Studies, University of Professional Studies, Accra, Ghana

[1]. Akyeampong, K. 2004. “The Language Policy Debate in Ghana: Where Has It Gone Wrong?” Norrag News. Retrieved(http://www.norrag.org/cn/publications/norrag-news/online version/language-politics-and-the-politics-of-language-in-e
[2]. Andoh-Kumi, K. 1992, An investigation into the relationship between bilingualism and school achievement – A Case study of Akan speaking bilinguals in Ghana. Ph.D. thesis, University of Ghana, Legon.
[3]. Andoh-Kumi, K. 2000. ‘Medium of instruction at the basic education level: Does it matter?’, The legon Journal of the Humanities, pp. 18-19.
[4]. Ankrah,T.O.( 2015).Education Experts’ Perceptions of the Ghanaian Language Policy and Its Implementation Academic dissertation, University of Lapland (Published)
[5]. Ansah, G. N. (2014). Re-examining the fluctuations in language-in-education policies in post- independence Ghana. Multilingual Education, 4 (2),1-15.education/detail/the-language-policy-debate-in-ghana-where -has-it-gone-wrong.html).
[6]. Anyidoho, A. ( 2018) Shifting sands: Language policies in education in Ghana and implementations challenges. Ghana Journal of Linguistics. 7(2) pp 225-243
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[8]. Owu-Ewie, C. &Eshun, E.(2019) Language representation in Ghanaian Primary classroom and its implications: the case of selected schools in Central and Western Regions of Ghana. Journal: Current issues in language planning. Vol: 20(4) 365-388
[9]. Owu -Ewie , C. (2015). Journal of Education and Practice The Use of English as Medium of Instruction at the Upper Basic Level (Primary four to Junior High School) in Ghana: From Theory to Practice .Journal of Education and Practice 6(3).
[10]. Quarcoo, M.( 2014) Language Policy and language education in Ghana: a reality or illusion? Wisconsin journal. Vol. iv 49-59
[11]. Sekyere, D.O. (2013). Some factors influencing the academic performance of junior high school pupils in English Language: The case of Assin North Municipality, Ghana. International Journal of English and Literature. Vol. 4(5), pp. 226-235.
[12]. Wilmot, V.V.(2015) Swings in school language Policies: The case of Ghana. International Journal of English Linguistics Vol. 3(3)pp 15-25
[13]. https://www.ghanaweb.com/GhanaHomePage/NewsArchive/Ghana-to-change-English-as-medium

Gifty Edna Anani, “Taking a Stance on the Language in Education Policy and Planning in Ghana: Concept Paper” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.40-43 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/40-43.pdf

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Availability and Utilization of Library Resources on Students’ Academic Achievement in Public Day Secondary Schools

Malach Mogire Mogaka – August 2019 Page No.: 44-49

The study sought to investigate the relationship between availability and utilization of library resources and students’ academic achievement in Public day secondary schools in Kisii County, Kenya. The main objective of the study was to establish the level of availability and utilization of library resources and its relationship on students’ academic achievement in public day secondary schools in Kisii County. Correlational research design was used in this study where secondary school teachers and students were involved. Non-proportionate sampling, systematic random sampling and purposive sampling techniques were used to select the sample size for this study. Non-proportionate sampling technique was used to sample schools, systematic random sampling technique was used to sample students while teachers were sampled using purposive sampling technique. The Yamane simplified formula was used to calculate the sample size of 426 subjects which comprised 401 students and 25 teachers. Data collection was done by use of student questionnaire (SQ) and Teachers Interview Schedule (TIS). The data collected were both quantitative and qualitative. Quantitative data were analyzed using inferential statistics, Pearson’s Product Moment Correlational Coefficient analysis and multiple regression. Qualitative data were analyzed thematically and were reported as direct quotations. Findings from the analyzed data were presented as tables, figures and graphs. The study found out that most day secondary schools in the county had not availed library resources. The study concluded that availability and utilization of library resources had a relationship with students’ academic achievement. The study recommends that; libraries should be put up in every public day secondary schools to enhance students’ academic performance.

Page(s): 44-49                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 August 2019

 Malach Mogire Mogaka
Kenyatta University, Kenya

[1]. Adeyemi, T.O. &Adu, E. T. (2010): Middle-East J.SCI RE 5, 5(1):14-21
[2]. Alex G (2011). Definitions of Study Habits Retrieved on 4th February, 2013 from: www.answers.com.
[3]. Ashioya, B.W. (2012).Factors Affecting Utilization of Sec. School Libraries in Vihiga District, Western Province of Kenya.(Unpublished Thesis). Kenyatta University, Kenya
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[9]. eHow, (2011). The effects of the school library on students’ academic achievement. Retrieved from:www.ehow.com/info 7873717 effects library-students. On 5th February, 2015.
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[18]. New York Comprehensive Centre, (2011).Informational Brief: Impact of School Libraries on Student Achievement. Retrieved from http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/nyla/nycc_school_library_brief.pdf on 06/09/2015 at 12:39 pm.
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[22]. Todd, R. J. & Carol, A. G.(2010). School libraries, now more than ever: A Position of the Center for International Scholarship in School Libraries. Rutgers University, CentreforInternationalSchoolLibraries.http://www.mmm.net/storage/resoruces/Theimportance_of_School Libraries.pdf
[23]. Wanjiku et al. (20013).Availability and Utilization of Educational Resources in Influencing Students performance in Secondary Schools in Mbeere South, Embu County, Kenya.(A master of Education Thesis). Kenyatta University. Nairobi.

Malach Mogire Mogaka, “Availability and Utilization of Library Resources on Students’ Academic Achievement in Public Day Secondary Schools” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.44-49 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/44-49.pdf

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Pull factors in University Sports- The Case of Kenyan Universities

Janet Muhalia Chumba, Dr. Simon Munayi- August 2019 Page No.: 50-52

Students at the University tend to have different reasons for participating in sports. While at the international level concept such as participating in the Olympic games is a driver, in Kenya the reasons tend to be more varied and could be associate with the lower echelons of the Maslow hierarch. The study was carried out in Kenyan Universities where the researcher went out to find the factors involved in drawing student into the sports field. The study used a descriptive research design. 268 students were randomly sampled from students who participate in extramural games and 38 administrative staff of Kenyan Universities. A questionnaire was used to seek for reasons students’ participation in sports. The results indicate that public universities had more students attracted to extramural than the private universities in Kenya. Further, the students were asked to rank the reasons that attracted them to the sports fields. Fitness, recreation and enjoyment were ranked highest while national team selection was ranked lowest. The findings agreed with other findings that suggested that university students in Kenya are not driven by attributes that suggest playing at the highest level.

Page(s): 50-52                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 August 2019

 Janet Muhalia Chumba
University of Nairobi, Kenya

 Dr. Simon Munayi
University of Nairobi, Kenya

[1]. Cooper, N., Schuett, P.a, and Phillips, H, M. (2011) Examining intrinsic motivations in campus intramural sports. Recreational sports journal, 36(1), 25-36.
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[3]. Ekmekci, E, Arslan, Y, Ekmeckci AD, Agbuga, B. (2010). Universite ogrencilernin spora bakis acilarnin ve spora katilim gudulerini belirenmest E-journal of new world sciences Academy sports sciences (2010) 5(2): 104-114
[4]. Good, E.L and Brophy, J. E (2000). LOOKING INTO Classroms (5th ED.) Newyork; Longman.
[5]. Mwisukha & Wanderi, (2014), Participation and Performance of Student-Athletes at Olympic Games; Lesson for Universities in Africa, International Journal of Humanities and Social Science, Vol. 1.
[6]. Ng, R.S.K. (2011) Understanding sports participation motivation and barriers in adolescents 11-17: An introduction of rowing activity in schools. Asian Journal of physical education and recreation, 17(2) 66-74
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[9]. Weldon, J,J. and Dieser, R,B. (2010). Perspectives of fitness an health in college men and women. Journal of college student development 51, 61-78.
[10]. Woodruff, A. L., & Schallert, D. L. (2008). Studying to play, playing to study: Nine collegestudent-athletes’ motivational sense of self. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 33(1), 34-57.

Janet Muhalia Chumba, Dr. Simon Munayi” Pull factors in University Sports- The Case of Kenyan Universities” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.50-52 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/50-52.pdf

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The Relationship between Classroom Equipment and Students’ Academic Achievement in Public Day Secondary Schools

Malach Mogire Mogaka – August 2019 Page No.: 53-57

The study was set to establish the relationship between classroom equipment and students’ academic achievement in Public day secondary schools in Kisii County, Kenya. The study was triggered by the fact that most of the secondary school students’ life in public day secondary schools is spent in classrooms. Classrooms therefore play a very vital role in students’ life in school. The main objective of the study was to establish the level of availability and utilization of classroom equipment and its relationship on students’ academic achievement in public day secondary schools in Kisii County. The production function model of education guided the study. The type of classroom equipment under study included; chalk and duster, chalk board/whiteboard, students’ chairs, teachers’ desks, classroom overhead projector, cupboards, wall notice, computer work station and teaching aid displays. The study adopted a correlational research design which involved students and teachers from the 246 public day secondary schools in Kisii County. The sample size of this study was selected using non-proportionate sampling, systematic random sampling and purposive sampling techniques. The Yamane simplified formula was used to calculate the sample size of 426 subjects. Data collection was done by use of student questionnaire (SQ) and Teachers Interview Schedule (TIS). The data collected were both quantitative and qualitative. Quantitative data were analyzed using inferential statistics, Pearson’s Product Moment Correlational Coefficient analysis and multiple regression. Qualitative data were analyzed thematically and were reported as direct quotations. The finding of the study showed that there was a statistically significant positive correlation (r=.144, n=377, p=.005) between availability and utilization of classroom equipment and student’s academic achievement, with a high level of availability and utilization associated to improved academic achievement among the students and vice-versa.

Page(s): 53-57                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 August 2019

 Malach Mogire Mogaka
Kenyatta University, Kenya

[1]. Adan, A. (2011).Challenges encountered by head teachers in Implementing Subsidized day secondary education (FDSE) in Wajir District, (Unpublished master’s thesis).Kenyatta University, Kenya.
[2]. Afework, T, H. (2014). Availability of school facilities and their effects on the quality of education in Government Primary schools of Havari Regional State and East Havarghe Zone, Ethiopia. Middle Eastern & African Journal of Educational Research, Issue 11. Year 2014.59
[3]. Cohen et al. (2003).Research methods in Education, RoutledgeFalmer 11 New Fetter Lane, London. EC4P 4EE
[4]. Fisher, A. & Rush, L. (2008). Conceptions of learning and pedagogy: developing trainee teachers’ epistemological understandings. The Curriculum Journal. 19 (3): 227-238.
[5]. Hussain, I., Ahmad, M., Ahmad, S., Suleman, Q., Din, M. Q. and Khalid, N. (2012). A Study to Investigate the Availability of Educational Facilities at Secondary School Level in District Karak.Language in India, Strength for Today and Bright Hope for Tomorrow, India, 12 (10). pp. 234-250
[6]. Iqbal, M. (2005).A comparative study of organizational structure, leadership style and physical facilities of public and private secondary schools in Punjab and their effect on school effectiveness.(Unpublished Ph.D thesis).Institute of Education & Research, University of Punjab, Lahore.
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[8]. Kudari, J.M. (2016). Survey on the Factors Influencing the Student’s Academic Performance.International Journal of Emerging Research in Management and Technology, 5(6), 30-36. Retrieved April 25, 2018
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Malach Mogire Mogaka “The Relationship between Classroom Equipment and Students’ Academic Achievement in Public Day Secondary Schools” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.53-57 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/53-57.pdf

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A Review of Importance of Gender Mainstreaming in Disaster Risk Reduction

W.M.G.N. Panampitiya – August 2019 Page No.: 58-63

Main intention of this article is to analyse the importance of gender mainstreaming in Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) in in order to reduce the gap gaps and to enhance gender equality in the fields of adaptation methods, resilience actions and reduction of disaster risk. This study has used literature review method and relevant literature have been analysed based on descriptive analysis according to the purposes of the study. The purposive sampling method was used to select relevant literature. This study has been analysed under some major parts namely definitions of Disaster and its classification, Disaster risk and Disaster Risk Reduction, Mainstreaming gender for Disaster Risk Reduction. This study shows the significance of mainstreaming gender in Disaster Risk Reduction from the level of policymaking to community implementations.

Page(s): 58-63                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 August 2019

 W.M.G.N. Panampitiya
Department of Sociology, University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka

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[6]. Ginige K., Amaratunga, D. and Haigh R., (2009), “Mainstreaming gender in disaster reduction: why and how?”, Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, Vol. 18. pp. 23 – 34 Permanent link to this document: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/09653560910938510
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[18]. UNESCO (2003). UNESCO’s gender mainstreaming implementation framework: Baseline definitions of key concepts andterms. http://portal.unesco.org/es/files/11483/10649049699Definitions.doc/Definitions.doc
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W.M.G.N. Panampitiya “A Review of Importance of Gender Mainstreaming in Disaster Risk Reduction” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.58-63 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/58-63.pdf

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Climate Change and Migration in Bangladesh: Enhancing The Local Government’s Adaptive Capacity Throughout A Participatory Budgeting Process

Abul Kasem Mohammad Muksudul Alam – August 2019 Page No.: 64-78

Bangladesh is one of the most vulnerable countries to climate change. Due to the geographical location and being a riverine country, it faces various natural disasters. Migration has become an adaptation and survival strategy when natural disasters strike and peoples’ livelihoods are damaged or threatened. Black et al. (2013) predicted that in Bangladesh alone, 26 million people would be likely to be displaced by 2050 as a result of floods and storms induced by climate change. In coastal and river bank regions, poor citizens rely on government support and assistance after losing their livelihoods. The Bangladeshi local government’s lowest tier Union Parishad is closest to the poor and vulnerable people. Union Parishad is the only service delivery institution in Bangladesh where impoverished people can easily access help and support. But historically, the Union Parishad has not provided adequate support to the vulnerable citizens during natural disasters. This research aims to support climate migrants and locally resettled victims of climate change by applying the Union Parishad budgetary intervention. Participatory Budgeting is a very successful method to establish financial democracy. The Brazilian intervention has been widely exported from Latin America all over the globe. This process is exceedingly beneficial to citizens as it requires their participation and involvement in the budget planning and formulation process. Thus, the budget is people-oriented. Since Bangladesh’s budget figures are hidden within unseen documents, the introduction of Participatory Budgeting within the Union Parishad budget cycle will allow the figures to be more transparent. This research paper also reveals how the Participatory Budgeting process will have an active role in reducing climate migration through the efforts of the Union Parishad and its citizen’s active participation. The study attempts to understand this topic and tries to establish Participatory Budgeting in Bangladesh in order to reduce poverty and climate migration.

Page(s): 64-78                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 August 2019

 Abul Kasem Mohammad Muksudul Alam
Department of Geography, Environment and Population, School of Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, The University of Adelaide, South Australia, Australia

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Abul Kasem Mohammad Muksudul Alam “Climate Change and Migration in Bangladesh: Enhancing The Local Government’s Adaptive Capacity Throughout A Participatory Budgeting Process” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.64-78 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/64-78.pdf

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Prevalence Rates of Depression, Hopelessness, Emotional Stability and Suicide among Secondary School Students in Nyamira and Kisii Counties, Kenya

Callen Nyamwange, Roselyne Nyamoita & Debora Nyambane – August 2019 Page No.: 79-83

Suicide is a desperate attempt to escape suffering that has become unbearable. Blinded by feelings of self-loathing, hopelessness, and isolation, a suicidal person can’t see any way of finding relief except through death. But despite their desire for the pain to stop, most suicidal people are deeply conflicted about ending their own lives. They wish there was an alternative to suicide, but they just can’t see one. Globally, suicide rates are highest in people aged 70 years and over. In some countries, however, the highest rates are found among the young. Worryingly, suicide is the second leading cause of death in 15-29 year olds globally. Suicide has become a menace in Kenya with rates going high by the day. This study was carried out among the Gusii people of Kenya which targeted secondary school students. The purpose of this study is to establish if students of secondary school have social interactions, friends, peers, relationships and feel burdensome to parents by secondary school students as this are predictors of suicide. The study utilized a qualitative research design and data was collected by use of questionnaires and data was analyzed by use of simple percentages The study revealed that majority of the students 70% of the respondents said that they spend time with friends at home and at school and 21% do not enjoy spending time with family or even with friends whereas 9% remained neutral. On how they feel with their peers 40 (26%) feel comfortable majority 99 (66%) do not like the idea of being with peers. The study gave recommendations based on the findings of what needs to be done to reduce the predictors of suicide.

Page(s): 79-83                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 15 August 2019

 Callen Nyamwange
Kisii University, Kenya

 Roselyne Nyamoita
Kisii University, Kenya

 Debora Nyambane
Kisii University, Kenya

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Callen Nyamwange, Roselyne Nyamoita & Debora Nyambane “Prevalence Rates of Depression, Hopelessness, Emotional Stability and Suicide among Secondary School Students in Nyamira and Kisii Counties, Kenya ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.79-83 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/79-83.pdf

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The Use of Learner-Centered Approach and Materials in Teaching and Learning Social Science Subjects in Tanzania Secondary Schools

Dr. Nashir A Kamugisha – August 2019 Page No.: 84-93

Purpose: The main aim of this study was to motivate and raise interest of social science students and teachers in the use of learner centered approach and materials biased in Practical Geography topics, field research techniques in particular. Specifically, the study intended to assess the available challenges on teaching and learning social science subjects with the use of learner centered approach. And then came up with possible solution through designing materials reflecting competence based.
Methodology: Quasi-experimental design was employed. Then, both qualitative and quantitative approaches were employed during data collection and analysis. The sample of the study included two secondary schools. One as an experimental, which was a boarding school, and the second as controlled which was day school, the two schools were purposively selected.
Findings: The study revealed that the material designed and the approach used in the experimental school motivated the students in learning. Also, indicated that students of the experimental school showed considerable change in performance in the post-test compared to the students of the control school.
Unique contribution to theory, practice and policy: The study recommended; the government to consider social science teachers in the programs related to teachers’ professional development and improvement in case of any curriculum reforms. Team teaching should be encouraged so that teachers who are acquainted with the application of learner-centered approach could help those who are not. Furthermore, the study recommended other researchers use lessons from this study to improve teachers’ knowledge and skills on the use of learner-centered approach.

Page(s): 84-93                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 15 August 2019

 Dr. Nashir A Kamugisha
Lecturer: Muslim University of Morogoro-Tanzania

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Dr. Nashir A Kamugisha “The Use of Learner-Centered Approach and Materials in Teaching and Learning Social Science Subjects in Tanzania Secondary Schools” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.84-93 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/84-93.pdf

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Rhetoric and the Nigerian Education

Hamza Balarabe Muhammad – August 2019 Page No.: 94-98

The paper was divided into two parts. The first part, deal with the general terms of rhetoric and it purpose, follow by Educational system in Nigeria, like primary, secondary and tertiary institutions, then The relationship between rhetoric and Education and end with the impact and importance of rhetoric as a course of study in the Nigerian Educational system. What students need to know about rhetoric is in many ways what they know already about the way they interact with others and with the world. Teaching the connections between the words they work with in the classroom and the world outside it can challenge and engage students in powerful ways as they find out how much they can use what they know of the available means of rhetoric.

Page(s): 94-98                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 15 August 2019

 Hamza Balarabe Muhammad
Department of Arabic, UsmanuDanfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria

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[19]. Rogers, M. (2012). The people, rhetoric, and affect: On the political force of du bois’s the souls of black folk. American Political Science Review.
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Hamza Balarabe Muhammad “Rhetoric and the Nigerian Education” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.94-98 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/94-98.pdf

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Teachers Quality Education in Tanzania: The Role of In-Service Training Programme

Dr. Nashir A Kamugisha- August 2019 Page No.: 99-114

Purpose: This research was about designing an intervention to enhance the quality of Geography teachers in Tanzania. The research was skewed in this topic because teachers’ professional development is often regarded as the key factor to student achievement. With these regards, professional development through in-service training needs to be considered as an important agenda to the country as well as to researchers. The present research captured this demand, through designing the teacher professional development program named as Experience the Lacked Knowledge Content and Pedagogical Skills (EKCPS). The main aim was to provide measures to upgrade teachers’ quality in teaching by experiencing them with their lacked knowledge content and pedagogical skills of practical Geography, so they use competence based approach in their teaching processes.
Methodology: This research employed action research approach. Then, both qualitative and quantitative approaches were employed during data collection and analysis. In this research, sampling strategies were employed. Purposive non- probability sampling was used, to select the competent experts to participate in evaluating the newly designed EKCPS material. Then, randomly probability sampling was used to select 6 secondary schools out 44 secondary schools in Morogoro Municipality to participate in the workshop training. Afterward, the purposive sampling was used too to select 3 schools from those participated on the workshop training to the final cycle of field testing the designed EKCPS programme material in the classroom setting.
Findings: The study revealed that the material designed and in-service training provided to teachers have positive impact to quality teaching.
Unique contribution to theory, practice and policy: The study recommended; the government to consider social science teachers in the programs related to teachers’ professional development and improvement in case of any curriculum reforms. Team teaching should be encouraged so that teachers who are acquainted with the application of learner-centered approach could help those who are not. Furthermore, the study recommended other researchers use lessons from this study to improve teachers’ knowledge and skills on the use of learner-centered approach.

Page(s): 99-114                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 15 August 2019

  Dr. Nashir A Kamugisha
Lecturer: Muslim University of Morogoro-Tanzania

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Dr. Nashir A Kamugisha, “Teachers Quality Education in Tanzania: The Role of In-Service Training Programme” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.99-114 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/99-114.pdf

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The History of Qur’anic Revelation with Particular Reference to the Earliest and the Last Verses to Be Revealed

Dr. Muhammad Kabiru Sabo – August 2019 Page No.: 115-118

This paper is on the History of revelation reference to the first and the last verses to be reveled in the Holy Qur’an, the paper also discussed various opinions of scholars about the initial revelation end last revelation, thereby expressing the wisdom behind piece – meal descending of Qur’an, then a conclusion.

Page(s): 115-118                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 15 August 2019

 Dr. Muhammad Kabiru Sabo
Department of Islamic Studies, Faculty of Arts and Islamic Studies, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria

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[5]. Muhammad, B. Isrna’il, (1999), “Diraasah fee uloom et-Our’en”, Daar al-manaar, Publishers, Egypt, p.p 29-40.
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Dr. Muhammad Kabiru Sabo “The History of Qur’anic Revelation with Particular Reference to the Earliest and the Last Verses to Be Revealed” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.115-118 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/115-118.pdf

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Implementation of Free Primary Education Policy among the Pastoralists in Kenya” Rhetoric and Reality”

Barmaokipkorir Paul – August 2019 Page No.: 119-132

Despite various efforts by the government and development partners in ensuring Education for All in Kenya, the participation of pastoralist communities remains a challenge. It is estimated that 104 million children are not enrolled in school or are enrolled but do not complete their course in sub-Sahara (Global Monitoring Report, 2010). This study investigated the sustainability of free primary education policy implementation in West Pokot County. The donor community, nongovernmental organizations, and the Kenyan central government have been using a lot of resources towards this goal. Surprisingly, for many years pastoralist communities have lagged behind in education despite the efforts that have been put in place. This study adopted a descriptive survey research design. The target population comprised of head teachers, students, parents and the County Director of Education in West Pokot County. The study involved 401 respondents which comprised of 300 students, 50 head teachers, 50 parents and 1 County Director of Education. Purposive sampling and simple random sampling were used to select respondents. This study adopted the pragmatist philosophical paradigm. Data was coded and analyzed with the help of computer package for social scientists. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics particularly frequencies, percentages, mean and standard deviation. It is hoped that the results of this study provide an insight to the Ministry of Education, county governments, school managers, teachers and parents in West Pokot County, on the measure of emphasis to engage in to ensure a sustainable education policy for all the children of pastoralist communities in Kenya. The study recommends thatthe County Government needs to take a holistic approach to assess and address the needs of pastoralist communities, groups and individuals. Secondly County Governments should strive to put in place quality and quantity of instructional resources, regularly in-servicing teachers to improve their pedagogical skills and economically empower parents. The County Government should formulate policies and strategies that will govern financing of FPE program. Furthermore the County policy makers need to listen to the concerns and opinions of pastoralist .lastly the national government needs to increase the budgetary allocations to the schools in pastoralist counties to improve the quality and quantity of input such as instructional materials and physical infrastructure. Finally, a research of the same kind should be conducted in other Counties with similar pastoralist characteristic.

Page(s): 119-132                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 20 August 2019

 Barmaokipkorir Paul
Eldoret National Polytechnic , P. o Box 6429-30100, Eldoret Kenya

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Barmaokipkorir Paul “Implementation of Free Primary Education Policy among the Pastoralists in Kenya” Rhetoric and Reality”” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.119-132 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/119-132.pdf

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The Stance of Islam and Christianity on Gender Equality

Oluwa Moses Oluwafemi- August 2019 Page No.: 133-138

The purpose of this research paper is to examine and explore the stance of Islam and Christianity on gender equality as both religions are the predominant religions in the world. The research work critically explored the posits of the Quran and the Bible on gender equality. The magnitude of misinterpretations and misconceptions of the stance of both religions on gender equality is unimaginable. Certain religious interpretations by some patriarchal fundamentalist have masterminded the discrimination, dehumanization, and marginalization of women across the globe. Clarifying this obnoxious patriarchal-centric interpretation is the primary aim of this research work. A descriptive approach was used in data gathering. The nature of this research also warrants the use of qualitative methodology by exploring available literature that has interrogated issues on religion, gender, and patriarchy as a means of eliciting useful information on the issue under discourse. This research identified that though gender discrimination is rampant in the Islamic states but is not Islamic as it is against the teachings of Prophet Muhammed. Also, in the Western Christian stateswomen are not totally free from gender discrimination as women do not enjoy same right with their men counterparts. The teachings of Jesus as recorded in the bible has restored dignity to women which culture and traditions have equated to a domestic element. The research work concluded that the obnoxious patriarchal fundamentalist interpretations of the holy books are the rationale behind women’s marginalization, dehumanization and, victimization.

Page(s): 133-138                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 21 August 2019

 Oluwa Moses Oluwafemi
BA(Hons) History and International Relations, Obafemi Awolowo University Ile Ife, Nigeria

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Oluwa Moses Oluwafemi, “The Stance of Islam and Christianity on Gender Equality” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.133-138 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/133-138.pdf

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A Socio-Cultural Investigation of KAPs on Domestic Waste Disposal System in Sylhet City

Mohammad Mostufa Kamal – August 2019 Page No.: 139-144

Domestic waste disposal system is recognized as an essential issue for environmental purity and pollution, which is related to health and hygiene of city dwellers. Waste generation is increasing in proportion to the rise of population, urbanization, industrialization, and with the change of lifestyle of people. Safe management and disposal of household waste has become critical phenomena of urban dweller for a sustainable and liveable environment. Sylhet city is a part of it, and the diverse local culture and beliefs influence the domestic waste disposal system, which now becomes a challenging issue of the urban environment. This study strives to investigate how the city dwellers dispose the domestic waste through conventional approaches as their existing knowledge, attitudes, and practices with changing context and needs. The researcher administered this study by using the qualitative approach, and data has been collected by applying in-depth interviews, observation, and case study methods. After eliciting data, it has been analyzed as research objectives and then turned it into the theme and concept of domestic waste management system. The findings of the study show that waste management efficacy is strengthened by urban dwellers mental setting that is constructed based on prevalent local and outer influences. The awareness concepts of cleanliness derive from various effective action as well as cultural beliefs and practices.

Page(s): 139-144                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 21 August 2019

 Mohammad Mostufa Kamal
Department of Sociology, Shahjalal University of Science and Technology, Sylhet-3114, Bangladesh

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Mohammad Mostufa Kamal “A Socio-Cultural Investigation of KAPs on Domestic Waste Disposal System in Sylhet City” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.139-144 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/139-144.pdf

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Bim’manga (Smocks) for Dagomba Chiefs-Implications for Peace Promotion among Dagombas in Northern Ghana

Fusheini, M.Z., Adu-Agyem, J.- August 2019 Page No.: 145-153

The general purpose of this paper aims at educating modern producers and users of the Dagomba Bim’mangli (smock) that the Bim’mangli (smock) is the main material culture that identifies chiefs and differentiates them from the ordinary persons. It, therefore, tries to promote peace among chiefs andbetween chiefs and the ordinary persons since misappropriations in dressing in the Bim’mangli at social gatherings can trigger conflicts. This study used oral interviews among Bim’mangli sewers, weavers and traditional folk historians to bring to bear some typical examples of Bim’manga (smocks) that are worn by Dagomba chiefs for their identities.  It was revealed that Dagomba chiefs have different ranks within the chiefdom and the chiefs are symbolically differentiated among themselves and from ordinary people in social gatherings by the type, colour, number and size of Bim’manga (smocks) worn. It also depicted that wearing Bim’manga according to one’s personality promote peace since Bim’manga communicate the wearer’s personalities to the general public. Lack of knowledge and understanding of the indigenous aesthetics of the Dagomba chiefs’Bim’manga may cause some socio-cultural problems that could lead to conflicts. It has, therefore, become imperative to discuss and document the indigenous aesthetics of Dagombachiefs’ Bim’manga(smocks) and their implications for peace promotion in Dagbon.

Page(s): 145-153                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 22 August 2019

 Fusheini, M.Z.
Tutor, Department of Vocational/Technical Skills, Bagabaga College of Education-Tamale, N/R, Ghana

 Adu-Agyem, J.
Senior Lecturer, Former HOD, Department of Educational Innovations in Science and Technology, Faculty of Art and Built Environment, KNUST, Ghana

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Fusheini, M.Z., Adu-Agyem, J. “Bim’manga (Smocks) for Dagomba Chiefs-Implications for Peace Promotion among Dagombas in Northern Ghana” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.145-153 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/145-153.pdf

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The Impact of Overconfidence Bias on Investment Decisions: Mediating Role of Risk Tolerance

Dr. Muhammad Shaukat Malik, Dr. Muhammad Imran Hanif, Muhammad Zohaib Azhar – August 2019 Page No.: 154-160

Purpose: Investor’s psychology plays an important role in decision making process and actually it is the motive behind this study. The research has been conducted to check the impact of overconfidence bias on investment decisions and how risk tolerance mediates their relationship.
Design/Methodology/Approach: A survey questionnaire was adopted and validated through pilot data (α = .911). Convenience sampling was used to select the investors from Islamabad and Lahore stock exchanges. Overall 400 questionnaires were distributed, out of which 283 returns with 70% response rate. A simple regression analysis was done to predict the relationship between the concerned variables using SPSS 23.00.
Findings: The finding of the study indicates that overconfidence biashas a positive relation with investment decisions. Further it is also found that risk tolerance mediates their relationship.
Originality/Value: The behavior of investor deviates from making logical or rational decisions and get influenced by overconfidence bias. This bias influences the investor’s rationality in decision making.
Limitations/Future Research Directions: Limited sample size, the use of less advanced analytical tool, less generalizability and overconfidence biasare certain limitations of current study. For future studies, it is suggested to conduct the longitudinal research along advanced analytical techniques to achieve more rigorous and robust findings.

Page(s): 154-160                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 22 August 2019

 Dr. Muhammad Shaukat Malik
Professor and Director, Institute of Banking and Finance, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan- Pakistan

 Dr. Muhammad Imran Hanif
Assistant Professor, Institute of Banking and Finance, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan- Pakistan

 Muhammad Zohaib Azhar
MS Scholar, Institute of Banking and Finance, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan- Pakistan

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Dr. Muhammad Shaukat Malik, Dr. Muhammad Imran Hanif, Muhammad Zohaib Azhar “The Impact of Overconfidence Bias on Investment Decisions: Mediating Role of Risk Tolerance” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.154-160 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/154-160.pdf

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Evaluation of Geography Teachers’preparedness in Pedagogical Approaches for an Enhanced Instructions in Secondary Schools, Kenya

Mohamed Moses Muchiri, Iddrisu Bariham – August 2019 Page No.: 161-167

The purpose of the study was to investigate the level of preparedness of trained Geography teachers from Universities of Kenya and Diploma Colleges towards participation in pedagogical activities. The study was based on Shulman Lee, 1987, model of knowledge growth in pedagogy. It adopted descriptive cross-sectional survey design. In all, 10 heads of department, 30 Geography teachers and 160 students were drawn from a target population of 691 respondents for the study. Data were collected using questionnaires for Geography Teachers and interview schedules for the Heads of departments to investigate the feeling towards preparedness in pedagogy. An observation checklist was used to investigate the types of teaching and learning resources used in the form (3) and (4) Geography lessons. Descriptive statistics in the form of a percentage, frequencies, tables, and ranks were used to analyse data. Major findings of the study were that, most of University trained Geography teachers feltnot well prepared for classroom difficulties and also faced challenges in the procedure of utilization of instructional technology in the teaching/ learning process. It was also noted that most of diploma trained teachers had been effectively oriented in pedagogical activities and on the proper procedural use of instructional resources but follow- up mechanism like in-service training was inadequate. Based on research findings, the study recommended all personnel involved in the teacher training programme should be teachers in the profession. They should be qualified teachers especially in student-centred pedagogy and in particular in universities of Kenya if the Ministry of Education has to have competent teachers teaching in secondary schools. Therefore, there is a need to review the existing structures and practices of conducting teacher education. It further recommended, in order to manage emerging probable challenges in particular pedagogical technological issues and use of ICT in teaching and learning of Geography in secondary schools, there is a need to conduct regular in- service for all teachers, research and investing adequately in teacher education.

Page(s): 161-167                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 22 August 2019

 Mohamed Moses Muchiri
M.Ed. Social Studies Student, Department of Education Communication and Technology, School of Education, Kenyatta University, Kenya

 Iddrisu Bariham
PhD Candidate, Department of Education Communication and Technology, School of Education, Kenyatta University, Kenya

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[2]. Bariham, I. (2019). Influence of Teachers’ Gender and Age on the Integration of Computer Assisted Instruction in Teaching and Learning of Social Studies among Basic Schools in Tamale Metropolis. Global Journal of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, 7(2), 52-69.
[3]. Bariham, I., Ayot, H. O., Ondigi, S. R., Kiio, M. N., &Nyamemba, N. P. (2019). An Assessment of Basic Schools Teachers’ Integration of Computer Based Instruction into Social StudiesTeaching in West Mamprusi Municipality; Implications forFurther Development of Computer Based Instruction use in Ghanaian Schools. International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science, 3(5), 2454-6186.
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[13]. Sifuna, D. N. (1975). Observations on some aspects of non-formal education in Kenya. Education in Eastern Africa, 5(1), 95–102.
[14]. Thomas, B. (2001). Fordham Foundation. (1999). The Teachers We Need and How to Get More of Them.
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[16]. Wildavsky, B. (2012). The great brain race: How global universities are reshaping the world (Vol. 64). Princeton University Press.

Mohamed Moses Muchiri, Iddrisu Bariham “Evaluation of Geography Teachers’preparedness in Pedagogical Approaches for an Enhanced Instructions in Secondary Schools, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.161-167 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/161-167.pdf

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The Idea of Resistance by South Africans through the Fictional Characters in The Heart of The Country (1977), and Life and Times of Michael K(1983)

Jihad Jaafar Waham, Dr. Wan Mazlini Othman – August 2019 Page No.: 168-173

Survival was their first objective; testing apartheid was their actual point. Apartheid was the Afrikaans word for apartness, which implied racial isolation and segregation authorized by the white minority on the nation’s dark, hued and Asian people groups. It wasn’t right and cruel, denying opportunity and hindering and crushing lives. Utilization of the word apartheid on the planet has expanded and diminished, alluding to pretty much whatever means partition. Coetzee has held the activities of modern linguistics-the printed turn in structuralism and post structuralism yet genuinely deals with good and political stress of living in, and with explicit recorded locale, that of contemporary South Africa. Coetzee was a philosophical visionary whose fiction graphically delineated breakup of decision, pragmatist fiction graphically represented breakup of decision, realist subject of colonialism yet who proposed – based upon whether the conflict has been grounded. Coetzee’s obviously angled commitment encapsulate their very own motion of resistance, explicitly a resistance to the possibility that writing must enhancement – as be in thrall to – a concurred history ‘out there’. Coetzee chips away at the rule that the novel ought not enhance history, however build up a place of contention with it. The play of chronicled powers nor a moral remain in the sweep for a thoughtful response to colonialism and politically-endorsed racial isolation. It is fundamentally thusly, a give examination of forming a role as resistance, creating that in the long run portrays the difference in defeat into generation line.

Page(s): 168-173                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 22 August 2019

 Jihad Jaafar Waham1
Department of English Language and Literature, Faculty of Languages and Communication, University Pendidikan Sultan Idris (UPSI), Tanjong Malim Perak Darul Ridzuan, Malaysia

 Dr. Wan Mazlini Othman
Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Languages and Communication, University Pendidikan Sultan Idris(UPSI), Tanjong Malim Perak Darul Ridzuan, Malaysia

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Jihad Jaafar Waham, Dr. Wan Mazlini Othman “The Idea of Resistance by South Africans through the Fictional Characters in The Heart of The Country (1977), and Life and Times of Michael K(1983)” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.168-173 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/168-173.pdf

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Impact of Job Rotation on Staff Motivation: A Study of Senior Staff in the Registrar’s Department of the College of Technology Education, Kumasi

Akua Ahyia Adu-Oppong, Debora Dufie Tabiri, Richard Kwadwo Mprah – August 2019 Page No.: 174-182

The study investigated the perception of administrative staff on job rotation on senior staff in the Registrar’s department of a satellite campus of a multi-campus public university in Ghana. The research was to find out why some senior staff in the registrar’s department were reluctant to change to a new department after job rotation whilst others willingly agreed. The study adopted a descriptive study design. The stratified sampling technique was used to select respondents from the Registrar’s Department. The study found that staff job rotation was perceived to be enhancing the effectiveness of senior staff in the registrar’s department, and maintaining balance in staff strength among departments. Respondents also perceived that job rotation helped to maintain balance in staff quality among departments. The study found that the perception of senior staff in the Registrar’s department on job rotation influenced their drive to work.

Page(s): 174-182                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 23 August 2019

 Akua Ahyia Adu-Oppong
Centre for Competency-Based Training and Research, College of Technology Education, Kumasi- University of Education, Winneba, Ghana

 Debora Dufie Tabiri
Department of Operations, College of Technology Education, Kumasi- University of Education, Winneba, Ghana

 Richard Kwadwo Mprah
Department of Human Resource, College of Technology Education, Kumasi- University of Education, Winneba, Ghana

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Akua Ahyia Adu-Oppong, Debora Dufie Tabiri, Richard Kwadwo Mprah “Impact of Job Rotation on Staff Motivation: A Study of Senior Staff in the Registrar’s Department of the College of Technology Education, Kumasi” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.174-182 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/174-182.pdf

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The Ethical Dimension in Educational Research: A Dilemma?

Paul Makocho – August 2019 Page No.: 183-190

The paper provides a landscape of some of the main ethical concerns in educational research. The review argues that the ethical procedures not context-free but are dictated by considerable contextual judgement by the researcher. The paper therefore highlights some of the ethical dilemmas inevitably encountered when one intends to enact educational research on one hand, and reflects on some of the possible strategies to circumvent the ethical challenges, on the other. In discussing these strategies, I have illustrated that the achievement of a utopia of a fully ethical educational research is not only controversial but also an unresolved matter.

Page(s): 183-190                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 23 August 2019

 Paul Makocho
Malawi University of Science and Technology, Malawi

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Paul Makocho “The Ethical Dimension in Educational Research: A Dilemma?” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.183-190 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/183-190.pdf

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The Impacts of Introducing Biometric Verification Numbers in the Banking Sector of Nigeria: A Critical Analysis

Chief Ajugwe, Chukwu Alphonsus PhD. – August 2019 Page No.: 191-197

One of the core mandates of Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) is to promote a sound financial system in Nigeria, to this end; CBN is making consistent and well-focused policy thrusts to deepen and broaden financial system through ensuring a safety, efficient, and effective payment system. However, in performing this important task the CBN is confronted with many challenges which bedevil the banking system, more especially in the area of insider related frauds and other external ones; these have cost the banking industry billions of Naira. These fraudulent activities were exacerbated with the emergency of Information technology that revolutionaries the banking industry and ushered in electronic banking (e-banking) and electronic payment systems(e-payment) which have reduced the cost of banking transactions and increased the speed and the efficiency of transfer of funds and making payments.
It is germane to mention that e-payment has brought in a hydra-headed problem in the form of cyber related crimes. And one of the CBN initiatives to tackle this problem is the introduction of Biometric Verification Number (BVN) which will be effective parameter to alleviate the problem of cybercrimes in the banking landscape.
The paper will highlight different measures introduced in the banking sector by CBN through circular policy statements and directives to the banks with the aim to reduce to the barest minimum fraudulent activities in the banking sector, then analyze the positive impacts of BVN on the sector, the challenges being faced to implement the policies, furthermore to incisively pinpoint some of the strategic weapons deployed by CBN and other stakeholders to tackle the challenges.

Page(s): 191-197                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 23 August 2019

 Chief Ajugwe, Chukwu Alphonsus PhD.
Ajugwe Chukwu Associates

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Chief Ajugwe, Chukwu Alphonsus PhD. “The Impacts of Introducing Biometric Verification Numbers in the Banking Sector of Nigeria: A Critical Analysis” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.191-197 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/191-197.pdf

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Development of Tourism in Emerging Economies: A Literature Review

S. Damayanthi Edirisinghe & S.D.K. Kulathunga – August 2019 Page No.: 198-208

Tourism is believed that one of the most rapidly emergent fields in the world. By this study, it is expected to contribute to the body of knowledge ensuring the sustainability of any venture in relation to tourism. Through this paper, researchers try to examine how the tourism industry impacted the emerging economies in the world. Tourism can be pointed out considering two aspects as the role of tourism as a foreign exchange earner and employment provider for communities. In this study, it was considered a tourism implication for the community. By 1960s, many peripheral tourist destinations were subject to socio-economic and cultural changes of which some are beneficial but some are not. The main focus of this study is to do a critical inquiryabout the scholarly views, extracted information from useful sources such as definitions, concepts, keywords, and theories related to socio-economic and environmental impacts associated with tourism. These various experiences have turned the world tourism industry to a key position shaped by many factors. And in this investigation researchers have tried to gather the scholarly views to a certain place as to facilities other researchers to re-think the industry development in the journey of sustainable tourism development

Page(s): 198-208                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 24 August 2019

 S. Damayanthi Edirisinghe*
Faculty of Commerce & Management Studies,University of Kelaniya ,Sri Lanka

 S.D.K. Kulathunga
Faculty of Commerce & Management Studies,University of Kelaniya ,Sri Lanka

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S. Damayanthi Edirisinghe & S.D.K. Kulathunga “Development of Tourism in Emerging Economies: A Literature Review” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.198-208 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/198-208.pdf

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Non-Governmental Organisations and the Attainment of Food Security in Developing Countries: A Study of the Tolon District in Ghana

I. Dinye, G. Lambon & B. Amoateng – August 2019 Page No.: 209-217

In spite of the strides of many countries towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to end hunger, achieve food security and promote sustainable agriculture; the problem of food security still persists in sub-Saharan Africa. Food security is compounded by high food prices, natural disasters, and may even be further exacerbated by global increase in demand for food, fodder and bioenergy crops, climatic variability as well as the depletion of natural resources. Using a mixed-method approach this paper assesses the role of Non-Governmental Organisations towards attaining food security in the Tolon District of the Northern Region of Ghana. The findings suggest that while there have been conscious efforts by NGOs in relation to food security they do not align to the perceived problems of food security of the farmers. As a result, there is a problem with regards to community ownership of projects, leading to the unsustainability of these projects. It is recommended that NGOs and the local government should work together to streamline projects and interventions to the specific needs of the people.

Page(s): 209-217                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 24 August 2019

 I. Dinye
Centre for Settlement Studies, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi- Ghana

 G. Lambon
Centre for Settlement Studies, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi- Ghana

 B. Amoateng
Centre for Settlement Studies, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi- Ghana

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I. Dinye, G. Lambon & B. Amoateng “Non-Governmental Organisations and the Attainment of Food Security in Developing Countries: A Study of the Tolon District in Ghana” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.209-217 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/209-217.pdf

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Evaluating Factors Affecting Sustainable Rural Industrialisation in Nigeria

Olusola Oladapo MAKINDE, Olubukunmi Temitope MAKINDE – August 2019 Page No.: 218-228

Rural industrialisation practice, so far, lacks a comprehensive view of factors militating against rural; development, industrialisation and challenges. This study therefore evaluates the factors affecting rural industrialisation in Nigeria with a view to enhance it development. It looked at the problems and factors responsible for failure of rural industrialisation in Nigeria and analysed technical hitches of industrial development administration. The study also examined the effects of factors of identity, modernity, innovation social protection, shocks and vulnerability and sustainability on rural industrialisation and factors for industrial undertakings in rural area in Nigeria. It looked at industries in the homeland and consequences of industrialization on the home and the host regions. The study suggested measures of acceleration and sustainable rural industrialisation in Nigeria that include: improving incentives and services; investment in infrastructure, new management techniques, new technologies; good governance, human resources, and research and extension; and private sector service delivery; activation of credit, capital and land markets, development of industrial clusters and growth points, and to support urban links, stronger social protection; conflict resolution and management.
The study made recommendations and concluded that in these circumstances, if new technology is to contribute to rural industrialisation, it must meet three challenges, and these include: identifying the most efficient mechanisms for providing information to people; setting technology development policies that distinguish among different types of rural household; and identifying a clear mandate and sustainable support for public research.

Page(s): 218-228                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 24 August 2019

 Olusola Oladapo MAKINDE
Department of Architecture, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomosho, Oyo State, Nigeria

 Olubukunmi Temitope MAKINDE
Department of Estate Management, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria

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Olusola Oladapo MAKINDE, Olubukunmi Temitope MAKINDE “Evaluating Factors Affecting Sustainable Rural Industrialisation in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.218-228 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/218-228.pdf

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Relations with Foot-Eye Coordination of Shooting Football School Students

Erianti, Yuni Astuti – August 2019 Page No.: 229-232

The problem in this research is the result of shooting soccer school students asco Padang Sarai Koto Tangah District Padang City Tangah still low. Many factors lead to low hasiln shooting them is the eye-foot coordination. So the purpose of this study was to determine the relationship of eye-foot coordination with the shooting soccer school students Asco Padang Sarai Koto Tangah District Padang City. This type of research is correlational. The population in this study is a soccer school students Asco Padang Sarai Koto Tangah District Padang Citynumbering as many as 20 people. The sampling technique used total sampling. Thus the sample in this study amounted to 20 people. To obtain the data eye-foot coordination using test voley soccer wall. While the results of the test results obtained shooting shooting. Data were analyzed using product moment correlation. The research found thateye-foot coordination has a significant relationship and accepted as true by empirical results Asco shooting Football School students Padang Sarai Koto Tangah District, Padang Citywith the discovery rhitung 0.531> 0.444 rtabel and accounted for 28.20%.

Page(s): 229-232                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 24 August 2019

 Erianti
Sport Science Faculty, Padang State University, Indonesia

 Yuni Astuti
Sport Science Faculty, Padang State University, Indonesia

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Erianti, Yuni Astuti “Relations with Foot-Eye Coordination of Shooting Football School Students” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.229-232 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/229-232.pdf

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Analysis of Motivation to Learn and Motion Gymnastics Sequentially Dexterity Primary School Students

Pitnawati, Damrah, Zulbahri – August 2019 Page No.: 233-236

Based on observations by the author in the field, that gymnastic dexterity and rhythmic motion in elementary school students 12 Batang Anai, Padang Pariaman not run properly. The purpose of this study was to determine the motivation to learn gymnastic dexterity and rhythmic movement of primary school students 12 Batang Anai, Padang Pariaman. This type of research is deskriptive. The populations in this study were all fifth grade students of SDN 12 Batang Anai, Padang Pariaman, numbering as many as 38 people. Samples were taken with total sampling, thus the number of samples is as many as 38 people. The type of data in the study of primary data, data collected by the researchers by distributing questionnaires to students who are chosen to be sampled. Data were analyzed with the level of student motivation achievement percentage of respondents with technique. The study states that intrinsic motivation acquired achievement level of 74%, are in the category of “Enough”. This means that students have enough intrinsic motivation to learn gymnastic dexterity and rhythmic motion. Extrinsic motivation obtained the degree of achievement of 54%, are in the classification “Less than once”. This means that students are less once or very low extrinsic motivation in learning gymnastic dexterity and rhythmic motion. currently on the classification of “Less than once”. This means that students are less once or very low extrinsic motivation in learning gymnastic dexterity and rhythmic motion. currently on the classification of “Less than once”. This means that students are less once or very low extrinsic motivation in learning gymnastic dexterity and rhythmic motion.

Page(s): 233-236                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 24 August 2019

 Pitnawati
Sport Science Faculty, Padang State University, Indonesia

 Damrah
Sport Science Faculty, Padang State University, Indonesia

 Zulbahri
Sport Science Faculty, Padang State University, Indonesia

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[14]. Sugiyono, 2002. Education Research Methods. Bandung: Alfabeta.
[15]. Sukmadinata. et al. 2005. Teaching and Learning. Yakarta: PT. Rineka Reserved.

Pitnawati, Damrah, Zulbahri “Analysis of Motivation to Learn and Motion Gymnastics Sequentially Dexterity Primary School Students” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.233-236 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/233-236.pdf

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Capital Adequacy and Banks Performance: Evidence from Deposit Money Banks in Nigeria

Ugwuka Nkechi, Ajuzie Oluchi – August 2019 Page No.: 237-243

The paper examines the effect of capital adequacy on performance of deposit money banks in Nigeria. Banking sector is one of the most regulated sectors in any economy and the Nigeria Banking sector is not an exemption. This constant regulation is to minimize the bank failures and distresses. The study captures performance indicators and employed panel data made up of one hundred and eight observations comprising of nine cross-sectional units for period of twelve years. The collected data were estimated using Pooled regression effect estimation via Stata 2014 statistical package. Findings from the results showed a positive relationship between capital adequacy ratio (CAR) and return on assets (ROA). The study also found that there is a positive significant relationship between deposit to asset ratio and bank performance. The study concludes that capital adequacy improves performance of Nigeria deposit money banks. The paper recommends continuous monitoring of banks in line with capital adequacy for optimal performance.

Page(s): 237-243                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 25 August 2019

 Ugwuka Nkechi
Department of Banking and Finance, Faculty of Management Sciences, Lagos State University, Nigeria

 Ajuzie Oluchi
Department of Banking and Finance, Faculty of Management Sciences, Lagos State University, Nigeria

[1]. David, U., & Joy, O., (2016). Capital adequacy and Financial Performance of banks in Nigeria. European Scientific Journal, 12 (25), 295-305.
[2]. Ezike, E., & Oke, M., (2013). capital adequacy standards, Basle Accord and bank performance; The Nigerian experience. Asian Economic and Financial Review, 3(2), 146-159.
[3]. Eyo, I., & Amenawo, O., (2015). Effect of capital adequacy on performance of Access Bank Plc. (1999-2012). International Journal of Trade, Economics and Finance, 6(6), 308-313.
[4]. Ikpefan, O., (2013). Capital adequacy, management and performance in the Nigeria commercial bank African Journal of Business Management. 7 (30), 2938 – 2950.
[5]. Imeokparia, L., (2015). Capital base and performance of money deposit banks in Nigeria: Pre and post consolidation era. International Journal of Managerial Studies and Research, 3 (1), 74-82.
[6]. Ini, U., & Eze, R., (2018). The effect of capital adequacy requirements on the profitability of commercial banks in Nigeria. International Research Journal of Finance and Economics. 165, (1)80-89.
[7]. Jalloh, M., (2017). The impact of capital adequacy on the performance of banks using Basel accord framework. East African research papers in business, entrepreneurship and management EARP-BEM No. 2017: 07
[8]. Josephat, L., (2017). Does bank capital regulation affect bank value? African Journal of Business Management, 11 (10), 206 – 213.
[9]. Ndifon, O., & Ubana, U., (2014). The Impact of Capital adequacy on Deposit Money banks’ Profitability in Nigeria. Research Journal of Finance and Accounting, 5, (12), 7-15.
[10]. Obiakor, R., (2016). Capital adequacy and risk management International Journal of innovative science engineering and technology. 3 (7), 342-354.
[11]. Okafor, C., & Ikechukwu, U., (2010). The effect of capital adequacy on bank’s performance Journal of Business Research, 4 (1),93-116.
[12]. Onaolapo, A., & Olufemi, A., (2012). The effect of capital adequacy on the profitability of the Nigerian banking sector.Journal of money, investment and banking.24,(1)61-72.
[13]. Tonbira, L., & Zaagha, S., (2016). Capital adequacy measures and banks performance in Naigeria. Journal of Finance and Economic Research 3 (1), 15-34.
[14]. Reserved Bank of New Zealand (2007).
http://www.rbnz.govt.nz/finstab/banking/regulation/0091769.html 11/7/2007

Ugwuka Nkechi, Ajuzie Oluchi “Capital Adequacy and Banks Performance: Evidence from Deposit Money Banks in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.237-243 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/237-243.pdf

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An Examination of Secession and the Nigerian Civil War, 1966-2017: Lessons for the Church in Nigeria

Joseph Audu Reni – August 2019 Page No.: 244-248

Globally, attempts at secession are not new. Neither are the calls and agitations for secession new in Nigeria. The first actual instance of secession was in 1967 which led to the Nigerian civil war. There has been sustained quest for secession in our most recent history. However, such calls and agitations are seen by some as a monumental threat to the unity of Nigeria. The reason the Federal Military Government under General Gowon executed the civil war was to keep Nigeria one. Despite the unrelenting efforts of successive governments to keep Nigeria going as one, united and indivisible country, the calls and agitations for secession have been unrelenting too. There are others who hail such calls and agitations as grounded in legitimate concerns and express the hope that the leaders of Nigeria would incline their ears to critical and objective listening to such calls and agitations. And yet, the issue of secession has never been seriously considered, nor has it been adequately given scholarly investigation although much has been written on the Nigerian civil war from different perspectives.

Page(s): 244-248                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 25 August 2019

 Joseph Audu Reni
Baptist Theological Seminary, Kaduna, Nigeria

2Allen Buchanan, “Secession,” in Stanford Encyclopaedia of Philosophy, 2013, p. 2.
3Pavkovi, “Secession and Its Diverse Definitions,” pp. 6-10.
4Buchanan, “Secession,” p.2.
5Ibid.
6Ibid.
7Ibid.
8Michael Crowder, The Story of Nigeria (London: Faber and Faber, 1978), p. 234.
9Alexander A. Madiebo, The Nigerian Revolution and the Biafran War (Enugu: Fourth Dimension Limited, 1980), p. 15
10Ibid., pp. 15-18
11Ibid., p.19
12Ibid., pp. 43-44
13Ibid.
14Ibid., p.84
15 Toyin Falola and Matthew Heaton, A History of Nigeria (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008), p.174
16 Madiebo, The Nigerian Revolution and the Biafran War, p. 93.
17 Falola and Heaton, A History of Nigeria, p. 180.
18Joseph A. Reni, “A Roadmap to National Recovery: Adopting an Alternative Response Based on II Chronicles 7:14” being a paper delivered on the occasion of National Day Service of the Baptist Theological Seminary, Kaduna, on 30th September, 2016.
19Otive Igbuzor, “Nigeria’s Experience in Managing the Challenges of Ethnic and Religious Diversity through Constitutional Provisions”, Citizens’ Forum for Constitutional Reform (CFCR).
20 Daily Sun Newspaper, August 26, 2016, p. 12.
21Ibid. For a full text of the lecture, see page 34 of the above newspaper.
22Daily Sun Newspaper, June 6, 2016, p. 9.
23Ibid.
24Daily Sun Newspaper, August 26, 2016, p. 34.

Joseph Audu Reni “An Examination of Secession and the Nigerian Civil War, 1966-2017: Lessons for the Church in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.244-248 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/244-248.pdf

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Exploring and Understanding Human Ageing in Nigeria from the Eyes of African Belief System

Atumah, Oscar N., Alfa, Fatima F. – August 2019 Page No.: 249-252

This study discusses the phenomena of aging, aging-associated needs, and challenges of healthcare provision in Africa from the perspective of African belief systems. African cultural heritage presents older adults as custodians of custom, and as people who are full of wisdom, representing the mirror through which the society sees. It is believed that older adults deserve some respect and should age in their homes. However, caring for older adults were reserved for women, but we argue that such an approach is not sustainable, and alternatives are needed. Older adults have peculiar healthcare needs, and as such, moral support alone will not be sufficient, as it appears to be the only thing that the family may be able to continue to offer. Thus, the study recommends institutional poverty alleviation in Africa as it remains a stumbling block to any meaningful innovation and change to lifestyle. Policy enactment and strict implementation guidelines, in addition to private sector participation, are crucial to tackling the issues of aging in Nigeria. Sensitization on aging-related matters can be accomplished by introducing gerontology and human services courses in primary and secondary schools, and institutions of higher learning.

Page(s): 249-252                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 25 August 2019

 Atumah, Oscar N.
Department of Sociology, University of Abuja, Nigeria

 Alfa, Fatima F.
Department of Sociology, University of Abuja, Nigeria

[1]. Aboderin, I. (2017). Long-Term Care for Older Persons: Sub-Saharan African Realities. A presentation for A.U., for the meeting of the specialized technical committee on social development, labor, and employment, Algiers, Algeria. 24th-28th April 2017.
[2]. African development bank (2013). Healthcare in Africa over the next fifty years.
[3]. A.U. (2014). Fourth Session of the Au Conference of Ministers of Social Development Addis Ababa Ethiopia. Theme: “Strengthening the African Family for Inclusive Development in Africa” Draft Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights On the Rights of Older Persons in Africa.
[4]. Chan, M. (2012) Foreword: Global Population Ageing) Promise or Peril. World Economic Forum.
[5]. Ki-Moon, B. (2012). Foreword: Ageing in the Twenty-First Century: A Celebration and A Challenge Published by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), New York, and HelpAge International, London.
[6]. Chepngeno, G., & Ezeh, A.C. (2007). ‘Between a Rock and a Hard Place’: Perception of Older People Living in Nairobi City on Return-Migration to Rural Areas. Global Ageing: Ageing and Action:Journal of the International Federation on Ageing (IFA). Vol. 4 No3, 2007.
[7]. Rwezaura, B. A. (1989).Changing Community Obligations to The Elderly in Contemporary Africa. Journal of Social Development in Africa) 4,1, 5-24
[8]. Togonu-Bickersteth, F. and Akinyemi, A.I. (2014) Ageing and national development in Nigeria: Costly assumptions and challenges for the future. African Population Studies Vol 27, 2 Supp
[9]. Tosato, M., Zamboni, V. Ferrini, A. Cesari, M. (2007). The aging process and potential interventions to extend life expectancy. Clinical Interventions in Aging 2007:2(3) 401–412
[10]. UNFPA (2012). Aging in the Twenty-First Century: A Celebration and A Challenge Published by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), New York, and HelpAge International, London.
[11]. Waghid, Y. (2016). Knowledge(S), Culture and African Philosophy: An Introduction. Knowledge Cultures 4(4), 2016
[12]. WHO (2015). World report on aging and health. Genev

Atumah, Oscar N., Alfa, Fatima F. “Exploring and Understanding Human Ageing in Nigeria from the Eyes of African Belief System” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.249-252 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/249-252.pdf

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Determinants of Land Value in the University of Port Harcourt Host Communities, Nigeria

Collins H. Wizor (Ph.D), Prof. Samuel B. Arokoyu – August 2019 Page No.: 253-262

Rapid growth in suburbanization and the rapid expansion of urban population in contemporary times, especially in the global south have brought a lot of dynamic changes to urban areas and land values This study therefore focused on the determinants of land value in the University of Port Harcourt host communities.The study was purely a survey research and computation of raw data from field investigation was done. Purposive sampling techniques was used to select three host communities of the University of Port Harcourt while data analysis and testing of the validity of the research hypothesis was done through the aid of Bi-variate and multivariate analytical techniques. The student “T” test was used to test if there is significant relationship between the dependent and independent variables. The result of analysis shows that there is a strong positive relationship between land value and factors affecting land values, which are accessibility, land use, terrain and distance from nearest Central Business District (CBD). The researchers conclude that these variables contribute to land value in the study area and therefore recommends the need for government to embark on a well-thought-out sub urbanization scheme aimed at dispersing the over-crowded population of the city which will reduce rural-urban mass movement and lower the demand placed on urban land.

Page(s): 253-262                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 26 August 2019

 Collins H. Wizor (Ph.D)
Department of Geography and Environmental Management, University of Port Harcourt, P.M.B 5323, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

 Prof. Samuel B. Arokoyu
Department of Geography and Environmental Management, University of Port Harcourt, P.M.B 5323, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

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[19]. Ogbuefi, J. U. and Egbenta, R. I. (2002) Relationship between Transport Services and Property Values in Enugu, Nigeria. Journal of Science and Technology Research 1(1)
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[22]. Olayiwola, L.M.; Adeleye, O. and Ogunshakin, L. (2005)Public Housing Delivery in Nigeria: Problems and Challenges.Paper presented at the World Congress on Housing held at Pretoria, South Africa, 27th – 30th September.
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[24]. Olayiwola, L. M., Adeleye, O. and Oduwaye, A.O. (2005) Correlate of Land Value Determinants in Lagos Metropolis, Nigeria. Journal of Humanities and Ecology.17 (3)
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[31]. Udu, G. O and Egbenta, I. R. (2007) Effects of Domestic Waste on Rental Values of Residentiaal Properties in Enugu. Nigerian Journal of Development Studies 6(1)
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Collins H. Wizor (Ph.D), Prof. Samuel B. Arokoyu “Determinants of Land Value in the University of Port Harcourt Host Communities, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.253-262 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/253-262.pdf

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Emotional Intelligence as a Predictor for Successful Leadership in Education: A Case of PhD Students of Adventist University of Africa

Callen Nyamwange – August 2019 Page No.: 263-267

Emotions serve as signals in response to changing conditions and have an impact on behavioral responses to events. Emotional intelligence occurs as a result of the interaction between emotions and cognitions. . High emotional intelligence level is associated with successful leadership and intellectual capacity furthermore, maladaptive coping methods such as self-harm and also the frequency of depression are found to be higher if reparation is not utilized. The study was carried among 40 PhD students of Adventist University of Africa. The purpose of the study was to establish the student’s level of emotional intelligence as a predictor of successful leadership. The study managed to sample the whole cohort of Phd students. The results indicated that By paying attention to our feelings we learn how to get happiness and success in life, emotional intelligence matters just as much as intellectual ability does. 11(27.5%) out of 29(73%) do not usually worry about what they feel , 11 (27.5%) do not usually spend time thinking about their emotions, only 5(2.5%) do not think it pays to pay attention to their emotions. It further indicated that 8 out of 40 need to improve on clarity where as 19 out of 40 demonstrated having adequate clarity and 13 out of 40 indicated having excellent clarity in paying close attention to how they feel.

Page(s): 263-267                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 August 2019

 Callen Nyamwange
Kisii University, Kenya

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Callen Nyamwange “Emotional Intelligence as a Predictor for Successful Leadership in Education: A Case of PhD Students of Adventist University of Africa” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.263-267 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/263-267.pdf

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Flood Hazards at Alajo: Causes, Impacts and Adaptations

John Manyimadin Kusimi and Ebenezer Yeboah – August 2019 Page No.: 268-278

This is a case study on causes, impacts and adaptation to floods, and public institutions’ intervention towards reducing flood risk in the community of Alajo, a proletariat suburb of Accra in Ghana. Field data collection involved in-depth interviews and household heads questionnaire survey. Factors identified to be causing floods in Alajo include improper layout of buildings, improper waste management, lack of good drainage system etc. Flood incidents come with great cost to the community. The cost includes loss of property and human lives. Some of the adaptations and coping measures to flood disaster are temporal relocation, building of stone breakwaters, support from families and the government. Construction and de-silting of drains, clearing of buildings on waterways, public education and seminars are some flood mitigation measures being undertaken by government to curtail the problem. Good local governance and the construction of drainage systems are some sustainable approaches towards making the locality safe from floods.

Page(s): 268-278                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 August 2019

  John Manyimadin Kusimi
Dept. of Geography & Resource Development, University of Ghana, Legon, Accra – Ghana

  Ebenezer Yeboah
Dept. of Geography & Resource Development, University of Ghana, Legon, Accra – Ghana

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[18]. Chen, C.L. (2015). Regulation and management of marine litter. In Marine Anthropogenic Litter. Edited by Bergmann M, Gutow L, Klages M. Cham, Heidelberg, New York, Dordrecht, London: SpringerLink, Springer:395-428.
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John Manyimadin Kusimi and Ebenezer Yeboah “Flood Hazards at Alajo: Causes, Impacts and Adaptations” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.268-278 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/268-278.pdf

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Effect of Transactional Leadership Style on Performance of Savings and Credit Cooperative Society: A Case of Imarisha in Kericho County, Kenya

Rere Joyce Chepkoech – August 2019 Page No.: 279-281

Leadership is known globally for the most productive performance. Performance of organisations is directly affected by leadership styles. In Kenya the use of leadership styles is a major challenge in the management of Savings and Credit Cooperative Societies thus affecting performance. The study aimed at assessing effect of Transactional leadership on performance of savings and credit cooperative society: a case of Imarisha savings and credit cooperative society in Kericho County, Kenya. The study used descriptive research design. The population comprised of all staff of Imarisha savings and credit cooperative society. Simple random sampling was used. A sample of 27 management staff and 36 support staff was drawn from the purposively selected savings and credit cooperative society and used in the study. The study used two sets of questionnaires one for management staff and another for support staff. Data was collected through administration of two sets of self-administered questionnaires to the selected respondents. The data was processed and analysed using descriptive statistics with the aid of Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) Version 20 and presented using frequency distribution tables and charts. An analysis of the major findings in study indicated that coefficient of determination (R2) is 0.790 therefore about 79.0%of the variation in effect of transactional leadership styles on performance. The study recommends that management staff should be trained on new methods of leadership so as to keep up with current leadership style.

Page(s): 279-281                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 August 2019

 Rere Joyce Chepkoech
Department of Business Administration, School of Business, Kenyatta University, P.O. Box 43844-00100, Nairobi, Kenya

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[4]. Smith T.D., Eldridge F. &DeJoy D.M. (2016). Safety-specific transformational and passive leadership influences on fire-fighter safety climate perceptions and safety behavior outcomes Safety Science, 86 (2016), pp. 92-97
[5]. Odumeru, J.A. &Ifeanyi, G.O. (2013), “Transformational vs transactional leadership theories: evidence in literature”, International Review of Management and Business Research, Vol. 1 No. 2, pp. 355-361.
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[10]. Munirat, Y. & Yusuf, I. (2017). Effects of Leadership Style on Employee Performance in Nigerian Universities. Global Journal of Management and Business Research: Administration and Management Volume 17 Issue 7

Rere Joyce Chepkoech “Effect of Transactional Leadership Style on Performance of Savings and Credit Cooperative Society: A Case of Imarisha in Kericho County, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.279-281 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/279-281.pdf

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Influence of Female Teachers on Girls Performance in Biology in KCSE In Public Secondary Schools in Borabu Sub County, Nyamira County, Kenya

Dr. George K B M Sagwe, Phd – August 2019 Page No.: 282-294

Globally one single factor that decides the destiny of a nation is the quality of education that its citizens get. The process of education revolves around the teacher and the student. For ages, the teacher-student relationship has been perceived by our forefathers to have a direct impact on the learner’s performance. This study aimed at finding find out the influence of female teachers on girls’ performance in biology in KCSE in public secondary schools in Borabu Sub County. Generally, the study sought: to find out the influence of the biology teacher’ physical characteristics on girl performance in biology, to establish the influence of biology teachers teaching methodology on girl performance in biology and to investigate personal factors female students view in biology teachers that influences their performance in biology in Borabu Sub county. The study employed descriptive research design with both qualitative and quantitative research approaches. Data was collected from 104 respondents using a semi-structured questionnaire.
The population comprised of female students, and female biology teachers in public secondary schools in this area. The study targeted 20 secondary schools in the sub county. Out of the 20 schools two were purely girls’ schools and the rest were mixed schools. This research considered a sample size of 8 schools representing 40% of the entire population (20 schools a sample size of the study was 120 students and 20 teachers. This sample size was arrived at according to Toro Yamane’s Formula (1970). From the findings, majority of the respondents agreed that teacher pay attention in explaining details in a topic. Basing on the findings, the study concluded that female teachers influence girls performance in biology in KCSE in public secondary schools in Borabu Sub county and therefore there is need to employ more so as to improve girls performance in biology. The study recommends that the government through the Ministry of Education should employ more biology female teachers in order to encourage girls to work hard in the subject and do better in it and Parents should encourage their daughters to take biology and other sciences at school and consult their teachers in order to encourage them to do well in the subject.

Page(s): 282-294                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 August 2019

 Dr. George K B M Sagwe, Phd
Educational Administration And Policies Management, Borabu Teachers Training College, Kenya

[1]. American Association of University Women, 1998,”Technology Gender Gap Develops Britner, S.L., & Pajares, F. (2006). Sources of science self-efficacy beliefs of middle school students.Journal of research in science teaching, 43, 485-499.
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[6]. Frankel, J.R. & Wallen, N.E. (2003). How to Design and Evaluate Research in Education (5th Ed.). New York: McGrew Hill companies Ind. Girl Students in Biology and Biological sciences at K.C.S.E Level. A study of secondary schools in Kisumu District.
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[16]. Langen, A.V., Bosker, R. & Dekkers, H., (2006) Exploring cross-national differences in gender gaps in education. Educational Research and Evaluation, 28, 315-328.
[17]. Lenga & Mwanyky (2004), a path of Development through Science and Technology: The Dilemma of Kenyan Females. Unpublished Seminar paperBureau of Educational Research: Kenyatta University.
[18]. Magero, M (1999). Poor performance of girls in sciences explained. Daily Nation March, 29, 1999: pp. 27, Col. 1-3.
[19]. Mohammed H. & Kwamboka E. (1999). Girls’ performance in science worrying. Kenya Times (October, 02, 1999). Pp.14-15 Col. 2-6.
[20]. Mugenda, O & Mugenda, A. (2003). Research Methods: Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches.Nairobi, Kenya: Acts Press..
[21]. Nzwili F. (2007). Kenya Faces Hurdles in Boosting Female Scientists. Nairobi, We News Correspondence.
[22]. Obura, A. (1991). Changing Images: portrayal of Girls and women in Kenyan Textbooks. Nairobi: African center for Technology studies.
[23]. Phipps, A. (2007). Re-inscribing gender binaries: Deconstructing the dominant discourse around women’s equality in science, engineering, and technology. The Sociological Review, 55, 768-786.
[24]. Sadker, D. (1999). Gender Equity. Still knocking at classroom door. Educational Leadership, Vol.56. Retrieved on 11/12/2007 from http://wwwSadker. Org/PDF/gender equity. Pdf.
[25]. Selimbegovic, L., & Chattered, A (2007). Can we Encourage Girls Mobility towards Science-related careers? Disconfirming stereotype beliefthrough expert influence. European Journal of Psychology of Education, 22, 275-290.
[26]. Simpkins, S.D., Davis-Kean, P.E., & Eccles, J.S. (2006). Mathematics and science motivation: A longitudinal examination of the links between choices and beliefs.Developmental Psychology, 42, 70-83.
[27]. Stake, J.E. (2006). The critical mediating role of social encouragement for science motivation and confidence among high school girls and boys. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 36, 1017-1045.
[28]. Twoli, N.W. (1986). Sex Differences in science Achievement among Secondary school pupils in Kenya: Unpublished PhD. Thesis,Flinders University. While Gaps in Math and Science Narrow, AAUW Foundation Report Shows.”

Dr. George K B M Sagwe, Phd “Influence of Female Teachers on Girls Performance in Biology in KCSE In Public Secondary Schools in Borabu Sub County, Nyamira County, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.282-294 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/282-294.pdf

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Debunking Ageism, Myths & Right of Older Persons in Africa

Atumah, Oscar N. & Abdulazeez, Hassan – August 2019 Page No.: 295-300

Ageism has been established to be preconceived and discriminatory acts and tendencies against older adults, yet many people in Nigeria, have little or no knowledge about the meaning or the damages it can cause. This paper intended to demask ageism related attitudes while bringing the term to the forefront of the general public. The literature review method was used to outline the resultant attitudes and stereotypes of ageism, to demystify the phenomenon and to examine how it affects the well-being of the aging population. Findings revealed that ageism has personal and institutional perspectives, and are intentional or sometimes, unintentional. We also identified some age-related workplace discrimination, healthcare-related age discrimination, and may standing myths against older adults. We conclude by stating that most contemporary myths are mostly outright lies and concoctions not backed by any scientific evidence. Some of the myths originated from long-forgotten traditional folktales, and argued that such practices should be discouraged based on the established rights of elderly persons. Having debunked ageism practices and myths surrounding stereotypes against older persons, we believe that implication for practice include, but not limited to, unrelenting advocacy in citing that the rights of older persons stem from inalienable rights entrenched in international protocols and conventions. Making the general public to know that older adults have the right to independence, participation, care, self-fulfillment, and dignity. We suggest that upholding these rights are instrumental in reducing the menace of ageism, and in disrupting the standing myths against the aging population.

Page(s): 295-300                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 August 2019

 Atumah, Oscar N.
Department of Sociology, University of Abuja, Nigeria

 Abdulazeez, Hassan
Department of Sociology & Anthropology Kaduna State University, Nigeria

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[5]. Doron, I., Mawhinney, K. (2016). The Rights of Older Persons. IFA, Collection of International Documents. Gendron, T. L., Welleford, E. A., Inker, J., John T. White, J.T. (2016). The Language of Ageism: Why We Need to Use Words Carefully, The Gerontologist, Volume 56, Issue 6, Pages 997–1006, https://doi.org/10.1093/geront/gnv066
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Atumah, Oscar N. & Abdulazeez, Hassan “Debunking Ageism, Myths & Right of Older Persons in Africa ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.295-300 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/295-300.pdf

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Availability, Awareness, Use and Users’ Satisfaction with E-Resources in Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University Library Anambra State Nigeria

Muokebe, O. Bibana (CLN), Uche Enweani (CLN) – August 2019 Page No.: 301-307

The study investigated the availability, awareness, use and users’ satisfaction of library electronic resources in Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University (COOU) Anambra State Nigeria. Electronic information resources help to expand access, increase usability and effectiveness and establish new ways for students to use information to be more productive in their academic activities. Survey design adopted. Multistage and Randomly sampling technique was used since the population was large. Total population of registered fulltime students, 4, 517 and part-time students are 1,984. Out of these number, 966 copies of the questionnaires distributed, 722 copies representing 75.2% were retrieved and found valid for analysis, using frequency count, mean, and standard deviation. The findings revealed that substantial percentages of the undergraduates are only not aware of library electronic resources such as e-courseware, Internet search engines, e-books, e-reference materials, and e-past question papers, they make use of these e-resources as well as derive satisfaction with using those e-resources especially with regards to ease of use, accuracy, quality/relevance, availability and accessibility of library e-resources to mention but few. With this in mind, one could conclude that generally, awareness, use of library electronic resources has significantly influence users’ satisfaction in COOU.

Page(s): 301-307                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 August 2019

 Muokebe, O. Bibana (CLN)
Department of Library and Information Sciences, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Igbariam Campus, Anambra State Nigeria.

 Uche Enweani (CLN)
University Library, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University Anambra State, Nigeria

[1]. Adekinya, A. &Adeyemo, M. (2006). Prospects of digital libraries in Africa. Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science, 10 (1), 1-12
[2]. Adeniran, P. (2013) Usage of electronic resources by undergraduate students at the Redeemers University, Nigeria. International Journal of Library and information Science 5(10): 319-324
[3]. Adewale, T. O. (2006). Gender sensitivity as a way of boosting female use of Nigerian tertiary institutions. Gateway Library Journal 9 (1) 60-71.
[4]. Adeyemi, B. M. (2002). Problems and challenges of automating cataloguing process at Kenneth Dike Library, University of Ibadan. African Journal of Library, Archival & Information Science. 12 (2) 213 – 222.
[5]. Ajuwon, G.A (2003). Computer and Internet Use by First Year Clinical and Nursing students in a Nigerian Teaching Hospital. BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, 3 (10) Available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14498997. Accessed on 11/05/11.
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[9]. Aramide, K. A., &Bolarinwa, O. M. (2010). Availability and use of audiovisual and electronic resources by distance learning students in Nigerian Universities: a case study of National Open University of Nigeria (NOUN), Ibadan Study Centre. Library Philosophy and Practice (e-journal). Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/393/
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Muokebe, O. Bibana (CLN), Uche Enweani (CLN) “Availability, Awareness, Use and Users’ Satisfaction with E-Resources in Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University Library Anambra State Nigeria ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.301-307 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/301-307.pdf

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Accessibility and Utilization of Information Resources on Students’ Learning Outcomes in Selected Government Secondary Schools in Onitsha North Local Government Area of Anambra State

Uche Enweani (CLN), Muokebe, O. Bibana (CLN) – August 2019 Page No.: 308-313

The study was on the Accessibility and Utilization of Information Resources on Students’ Learning Outcomes in selected Government Secondary Schools in Onitsha North Local Government Area of Anambra State. The study population comprised five Government Secondary schools out of sixty teen in Onitsha North Local Government Area of Anambra State. However, related literatures were reviewed from textbooks, journals and past researches. The research questions include; what are the roles of information resources in learning? Are information resources accessible by students in private schools? The research instrument was questionnaire which was statistically analyzed with contingency tables. It was discovered that there is a significant relationship between availability, accessibility and utilization of information resources and students’ learning outcomes. Therefore, the finding revealed that the proprietors of secondary schools should procure more information resources, facilities and equipment to enhance efficiency and effectiveness of students and teachers in private secondary schools. This study suggested that proprietors of secondary schools should put more interest in the use of Information resources to guarantee effective teaching – learning process within their systems.

Page(s): 308-313                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 August 2019

 Uche Enweani (CLN)
University Library, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University Anambra State, Nigeria

 Muokebe, O. Bibana (CLN)
Department of Library and Information Sciences, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Igbariam Campus, Anambra State Nigeria

[1]. Adeoye, M. O., Popoola, S. O. (2011): Teaching Effectiveness, Availability, Accessibility and Use of Library and Information Resources among Teaching Staff of Schools of Nursing in Osun and Oyo State, Nigeria. Library Philosophy and Practices. Retrieved from http://www.webpages.uidaho.edu/~mbolin/ adeoye-popoola.htm
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Uche Enweani (CLN), Muokebe, O. Bibana (CLN) “Accessibility and Utilization of Information Resources on Students’ Learning Outcomes in Selected Government Secondary Schools in Onitsha North Local Government Area of Anambra State” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.308-313 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/308-313.pdf

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Commercialization of Fuel Wood in Bamenda II Subdivision, North West Region of Cameroon

Sop Sop Maturin Desiré, Tizih Mirabel Ngum, Kemadjou Mbakemi Deric Larey – August 2019 Page No.: 314-322

The mid-1980s’ economic crisis in Cameroon led to poverty and high rates of unemployment. This phenomenon forced many people to fuel wood exploitation as a source of income and employment. More than 3/4 of the population of Bamenda II has limited access to modern energy sources such as domestic gas and so has resorted to the use of fuel wood as their major source of cooking energy.The objective of this study is to examine the various actors involved in the marketing and consumption of fuel wood in the Bamenda II. The methodology consisted of using questionnaire, interview of stakeholders, direct observations and data collected from secondary sources; it was revealed that the fuel wood in Bamenda II is supplied more from outside the Sub- Division than local sources like Bali, Santa, amongst others. The results also show that over 128,544 tons of firewood is commercialized per annum. The beneficial aspects of firewood consumption are manifested in its socio-economic gains by vendors such as improvement in living standards and stimulation of savings. The major negative implication noted was that of loss of resources and air pollution which can be ameliorated via afforestation and the use of improved stoves.

Page(s): 314-322                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 August 2019

 Sop Sop Maturin Desiré
Department of Geography, Higher Teacher’s Training College (HTTC)-The University of Bamenda, Cameroon

 Tizih Mirabel Ngum
Department of Geography, Higher Teacher’s Training College (HTTC)-The University of Bamenda, Cameroon

 Kemadjou Mbakemi Deric Larey
Department of Geography, Faculty of Arts, Letters and Social Sciences -The University of Yaoundé I, Cameroon

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Sop Sop Maturin Desiré, Tizih Mirabel Ngum, Kemadjou Mbakemi Deric Larey “Commercialization of Fuel Wood in Bamenda II Subdivision, North West Region of Cameroon” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.314-322 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/314-322.pdf

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The United Nations Resolution of December 21, 2017: The Idealist Theoretical Perspective

Charles Chidi Eleonu, PhD – August 2019 Page No.: 323-329

The idealists face hard criticisms and blame for not focusing much on how the world really is but on how the world should be. The significance of this paper is in its ability to actually help to expand the understanding of the implications of the idealist paradigm in particular and the liberal theory for world peace. President Trump of the United States on December 6, 2017 unilaterally declared Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. The UN General Assembly with 128 nations in an emergency meeting held on December 27, 2017, pronounced President Trump’s decision null and void. This paper found that the General Assembly resolution and pronouncement stands despite the United States threat of withdrawal of funds to the United Nations and threat of denial of aid to other countries perceived as enemies of the United States. That the 14 Security Council members of the United Nations upheld the decision not to recognize Jerusalem as capital of Israel. That the unilateral decision of the United States was in violation of the Security Council Resolution 478 adopted in 1980 and the international law. In conclusion, this paper supports a framework in which relationships between countries can be analyzed and reinstates the position of the idealists in international relations that conflicts can be resolved amicably without necessarily going to war.

Page(s): 323-329                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 August 2019

 Charles Chidi Eleonu, PhD
Port Harcourt Polytechnic, Nigeria

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Charles Chidi Eleonu, PhD “The United Nations Resolution of December 21, 2017: The Idealist Theoretical Perspective” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.323-329 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/323-329.pdf

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Art Therapy As A Treatment For Depression: Case of Control Group at Langata Women’s Prison Nairobi – Kenya

Gituro Wainaina, Nyawira Kuria – August 2019 Page No.: 330-336

Objective was to assess effectiveness of art therapy as treatment for depression among incarcerated women at Langata Women Prison using Bandura’s social learning theory and cognitive behavioral theory. Unit of analysis was imprisoned women and Becks Depression Inventory (BDI-II) 21-item self-report scale was given to a sample of 217 prisoners to identify presence and severity levels of depression. Research was done with remands because prisoners had on-going programs. BDI-II (pre-test) questionnaires were distributed to determine levels of depression of 113 remands based on their levels of depression and 55 responded. Control did not get any art therapy treatment during the six sessions that treatment group underwent. After six weeks, control group was subjected again to BDI-II test and results indicated that most of incarcerated women had severe depression. From analysis, there was no significant reduction of depression among control group. Based on the results, at time of arrest, mental assessment should be done and those that require further assessment need to be referred to a psychiatrist and a psychologist; special attention should be given to new mothers; and for those who end up in prison.The results should be generalized with caution to other prisons in Kenya.

Page(s): 330-336                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 August 2019

 Gituro Wainaina
University of Nairobi, Kenya

 Nyawira Kuria
University of Nairobi, Kenya

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Gituro Wainaina, Nyawira Kuria “Art Therapy As A Treatment For Depression: Case of Control Group at Langata Women’s Prison Nairobi – Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.330-336 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/330-336.pdf

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Government Sponsorship of Pilgrimage in Nigeria: The Implication to a Challenging Economy

Charles Chidi Eleonu Phd, Madume, Winston – August 2019 Page No.: 337-343

In Nigeria, over 7.9 Billion naira concession was given by the federal government of Nigeria for sponsorship of pilgrims. This has been condemned by many Nigerians for it is viewed as a reckless spending and as wasteful in the face of the Nigerian challenging economy today. The argument is that there are roads, schools, hospitals and lacking infrastructure to be built. People of Nigeria need good, portable drinking water and good rail, water, and air transport systems. Spending on pilgrimage may have more adverse effects on the economy and on the welfare of the generality of the Nigerian people. Government wealth is for the entire Nigerian populace and such wealth must be used in a way that the entire populace will benefit. At this critical time Nigeria’s problems when solved will bring back the battered, disfigured image. Pilgrimage is about spirituality. Most people find their spiritual life intricately linked to their association with a church, temple, mosque and synagogue or in performing a pilgrimage. The paper observes that outright cancellation of government sponsorship of pilgrims may produce negative results on the citizen’s spirituality. Not sponsoring pilgrims may not be a way to improve government’s financial stand. It could be a turning away from God. The paper therefore recommends selected sponsorship of devoted clerics and religious faithful.

Page(s): 337-343                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 August 2019

 Charles Chidi Eleonu Phd
Dept. of Public Administration, Port Harcourt Polytechnic, Rivers State, Nigeria

 Madume, Winston
Dept. of Public Administration, Port Harcourt Polytechnic, Rivers State, Nigeria

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Charles Chidi Eleonu Phd, Madume, Winston “Government Sponsorship of Pilgrimage in Nigeria: The Implication to a Challenging Economy” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.337-343 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/337-343.pdf

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Use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Facilities in Collection Development in University Libraries in South East, Nigeria

Kelechi Chukwunonso Ezema, Joseph Ahemba Gbuushi – August 2019 Page No.: 344-349

The study is an examination on the use of ICT facilities in collection development among collection practitioners of three federal university libraries in South East, Nigeria. Descriptive survey research design was use for the study. The population of the study comprises of all the personnel of the university libraries’ who participated in collection development practice. Purposive sampling technique was used to select the institutional libraries for the study. Data collected through questionnaire were descriptively analysed using mean and standard deviation. Results indicated that collection practitioners utilize some of the facilities to a high extent and that the facilities are benefiting the university libraries under study. The study also revealed a significance difference in the mean response of University of Nigeria Nsukka (UNN), Federal University of Technology Owerri (FUTO), and Michael Okpara University of Agriculture Umudike(MOUAU)collection development practitioners on the extent to which ICT facilities are used in federal university libraries in South East, Nigeria; the problems affecting the use of ICT facilities as well as significance difference in the mean response of UNN, FUTO and MOUAU collection development practitioners. The study concludes that university library management need to provide an enabling environment for ICT facilities; collection development practitioners must possess good knowledge in order to enjoy efficient benefits of ICT facilities; training programme on the use of these facilities should be organized from time to time.

Page(s): 344-349                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 August 2019

 Kelechi Chukwunonso Ezema
Library and Information Science, University of Nigeria Nsukka, Nigeria

 Joseph Ahemba Gbuushi
University Library and Information Services Benue State University, Makurdi, Benue State, Nigeria

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Kelechi Chukwunonso Ezema, Joseph Ahemba Gbuushi “Use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Facilities in Collection Development in University Libraries in South East, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.344-349 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/344-349.pdf

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The Contribution of Teachers’ competencies on Enhancing Job Performance in Tanzania’s Public Secondary Schools

Emanuel Siray Mollel – August 2019 Page No.: 350-357

This study investigated the teachers’ competencies contribution to enhancing job performance among public secondary school teachers. The study was conducted in four regions in Tanzania mainland which includes Arusha, Coast, Njombe and Singida. It involved 314 respondent drawn using purposive. The resultant quantitative data was analysed using the Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) version 20 in data analysis while strategically employing a structured equation model that applied multiple regression analysis. The findings reveal that there is a statistical significant positive relationship between teachers’ skills and job performance in Tanzania’s public secondary schools. The regression results also indicate that teachers, who had attended the training, acquired relevant competencies that have significantly enhanced their job performance and contribution to the provision of quality education in the country’s pubic secondary schools. Based on these findings, the study recommends that the development of training programmes has to ensure that the contents for delivery are geared towards imparting relevant competencies likely to enhance the teachers’ performance of duties and responsibilities in the country’s public secondary schools.

Page(s): 350-357                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 August 2019

 Emanuel Siray Mollel
Agency for the Development of Educational Management (ADEM), Tanzania

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Emanuel Siray Mollel “The Contribution of Teachers’ competencies on Enhancing Job Performance in Tanzania’s Public Secondary Schools” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.350-357 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/350-357.pdf

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Understanding the Effect of Witchcraft on Church Growth in Kenya today

Rev. Dr. Peter Mamuli Nyongesa – August 2019 Page No.: 358-362

Witchcraft is a problem all over the world; however, it makes people grow colder towards God and religion. Its destructive influence can go as far as slowing down material development of a society and the entire community. This paper seeks to address this problem, why it is morally wrong, and propose ideas on how to overcome this problem. In this way, the reasons why Christians oppose witchcraft are made clear, in the hope that this dreaded activity is overpowered by the truth and love that Jesus brings.

Page(s): 358-362                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 August 2019

 Rev. Dr. Peter Mamuli Nyongesa
Kaimosi Friends University College, Kenya

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Rev. Dr. Peter Mamuli Nyongesa “Understanding the Effect of Witchcraft on Church Growth in Kenya today” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.358-362 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/358-362.pdf

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Establishing the Relationship between Basic Pay and Performance of Teachers in Primary Schools in Uganda – Ibanda District

Nuwatuhaire Benard (PhD) and Assumpta Tushabirane – August 2019 Page No.: 363-373

This study investigated the relationship between basic pay and performance of teachers in primary schools in Uganda – Ibanda District. The study adopted cross-sectional and correlational research designs on a sample of 155 using a self-administered and an interview guide. Data were analysed using both quantitative and qualitative data methods. The quantitative data analysis methods were descriptive statistics that included frequencies, percentages and means. Inferential analyses were correlation and regression. The descriptive results revealed that performance of teachers was good while basic pay was poor. Inferential results revealed that basic pay had a positive and significant relationship with performance of teachers. The study concluded basic pay is an imperative remuneration necessary for the performance of teachers. It was thus recommended that the government and school authorities should ensure that all teachers have basic pay regularly, equitably and timely

Page(s): 363-373                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 August 2019

 Nuwatuhaire Benard (PhD)
Kampala International University, Uganda

 Assumpta Tushabirane
Ibanda University, Uganda

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Nuwatuhaire Benard (PhD) and Assumpta Tushabirane “Establishing the Relationship between Basic Pay and Performance of Teachers in Primary Schools in Uganda – Ibanda District” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.363-373 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/363-373.pdf

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Effective Community Policing and Vigilante Neighborhood Watch: The Panacea to Insecurity and Sustainable Peace in Plateau State, Nigeria

Oluwa Moses, O., Ojo, Oluwaseun, O. – August 2019 Page No.: 374-394

The principal agency charged with the responsibility of internal peace and security of nations all over the world is the Police. In Nigeria today, the country is becoming more vulnerable to insecurity challenges due to several factors prominent among which are the inefficient and unprofessional policing system. Community policing could therefore be an option that can enhance the effectiveness of the Police Force for fostering internal security in Nigeria. There is a form of contention with the general public’s perception of the Nigeria Police as unfriendly, brutal, corrupt, unprofessional, and inefficient. A major problem is the public’s lack of trust of the police force, which is of importance to the community policing model and assists the community to sustain peace. This study, therefore, examined the state, challenges and prospects of the sustenance of peace in the communities on the Plateau and fostering internal security in Plateau state. The study covered the period 2010 to 2018, and is centred on the Plateau State Police Command. Data used in the study was obtained from both primary and secondary sources. Primary data was sourced through questionnaire instrument and semi-structured interviews. The study revealed that armed robbery, stealing/theft, house/store burglary, car theft, murder, ethnic conflicts, religious conflicts, political conflicts and cultism are the prevalent internal security challenges in Plateau State

Page(s): 374-394                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 August 2019

 Oluwa Moses, O.
Department of History and International Relations, Obafemi Awolowo University, Nigeria

 Ojo, Oluwaseun, O.
Center for Conflict Management and Peace Studies, University of Jos, Nigeria

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Oluwa Moses, O., Ojo, Oluwaseun, O. “Effective Community Policing and Vigilante Neighborhood Watch: The Panacea to Insecurity and Sustainable Peace in Plateau State, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.374-394 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/374-394.pdf

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Finding Out the Relationship between Employee Income Security Schemes and Performance of Teachers in Primary Schools in Uganda- Ibanda District

Nuwatuhaire Benard (PhD) and Assumpta Tushabirane – August 2019 Page No.: 395-402

This study investigated the relationship between employee income security Schemes and performance of teachers in primary schools in Uganda – Ibanda District. The study adopted cross-sectional and correlational research designs on a sample of 155 using a self-administered and an interview guide. Data were analysed using both quantitative and qualitative data methods. The quantitative data analysis methods were descriptive statistics that included frequencies, percentages and means. Inferential analyses were correlation and regression. The descriptive results revealed that performance of teachers was good while employee income security Schemes poor. Inferential results revealed that basic pay had a positive and significant relationship with performance of teachers. The study concluded that employee income security Schemes are the most probable remuneration for the performance of teachers. It was thus recommended that the government and school authorities should establish income security schemes for all teachers.

Page(s): 395-402                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 August 2019

 Nuwatuhaire Benard (PhD)
Kampala International University, Uganda

 Assumpta Tushabirane
Ibanda University, Uganda

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Nuwatuhaire Benard (PhD) and Assumpta Tushabirane “Finding Out the Relationship between Employee Income Security Schemes and Performance of Teachers in Primary Schools in Uganda- Ibanda District” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.395-402 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/395-402.pdf

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Factors Influencing Foreign Direct Investment in Nigeria (Case Study Nigerian Oil and Gas Sector)

Richard Nwachukwu – August 2019 Page No.: 403-411

This study examines the variables that influence foreign direct investment in Nigeria using the Nigerian Oil And Gas sector as case study. Noting that there is significant evidence on the link between FDIs and economic growth in the Oil and Gas sector, the results submitted by researchers in the field of FDI determinants and the impact of FDI determinants in this sector are still not clear. Following this, the study identified underlying Human capital factors that affect the flow of FDI into the sector while taking note of the infrastructural and policy factors affecting FDI flow. The study adopts a survey research design where a self-structured questionnaire was administered to senior and junior staff of the multinational oil and gas companies in Nigeria to establish the relationship that exists between FDI determinants and the growth of Nigerian oil and gas industry. Data collected was analyzed using frequency charts and percentages while Chi-square was used to test the study hypothesis. From the study findings, it was revealed that human capital factors and infrastructural factors have a significant effect on flow of foreign direct investment into the oil sector. Also the findings show that the relationship between flow of FDI into Nigeria’s oil sector and growth of the economy is significant also. Therefore FDI is an important instrument for growth of the economy. The study further recommended that MNC entering the sector should engage itself in the field where it can make a difference through quality, low cost and the Market analysis for of MNC should be geared towards obtaining competitive advantage.

Page(s): 403-411                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 August 2019

 Richard Nwachukwu
University of Uyo, Nigeria

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Richard Nwachukwu “Factors Influencing Foreign Direct Investment in Nigeria (Case Study Nigerian Oil and Gas Sector)” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.403-411 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/403-411.pdf

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The Effect of Reclamation of Lamong Bay Port toward Fishermen Livelihood in Morokrembangan, Surabaya, Indonesia

Dewi Casmiwati, Ahmad Zubir bin Ibrahim, Zawiyah Binti Mohd. Zain, Ahmad Haruna Abubakar – August 2019 Page No.: 412-414

This research aims to explore the effect of development process of Lamong Bay Port toward the fishermen livelihood in Morokrembangan, Surabaya, Indonesia. The study used primary data and analyzed by interpretive thematic method. The result shows that the development of Lamong Bay Port reduces the fishermen area for fishing significantly and the fishermen can not depend on fishing for their livelihood. They seek another job outside fishing, and based on the finding, the research recommends Lamong Bay to provide job for fishermen and for Surabaya government needs to preserve the fishermen fishing location.

Page(s): 412-414                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 August 2019

 Dewi Casmiwati
Department of Public Administration, University of Hang Tuah, Surabaya, Indonesia

 Ahmad Zubir bin Ibrahim
School of Government, College of Law, Government and International Study, Universiti Utara Malaysia

 Zawiyah Binti Mohd. Zain
School of Government, College of Law, Government and International Study, Universiti Utara Malaysia

 Ahmad Haruna Abubakar
School of Government, College of Law, Government and International Study, Universiti Utara Malaysia

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Dewi Casmiwati, Ahmad Zubir bin Ibrahim, Zawiyah Binti Mohd. Zain, Ahmad Haruna Abubakar “The Effect of Reclamation of Lamong Bay Port toward Fishermen Livelihood in Morokrembangan, Surabaya, Indonesia” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.412-414 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/412-414.pdf

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Qur’an Addresses Science and Technology

Isah Onuweh Jimoh – August 2019 Page No.: 415-424

I. INTRODUCTION
In the Name of Allah, the Most Beneficent, the Most Merciful. All praises and adornment are due to Him alone, Who, is without partner, relatives, adviser nor assistance. Who, in His infinite wisdom and mercy sent down the Qur’an as a source of guidance and mercy to humanity? Wherein, both believers and unbelievers benefits directly or indirectly. May the peace, blessing and mercy of Allah be on the Chosen Servant of Allah Muhammad, who was sent too as a Mercy to the world and also onto his household, companions and those who tread his path till the Day of Accountability?

Page(s): 415-424                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 01 September 2019

 Isah Onuweh Jimoh .
Federal College of Education, Kano, Nigeria

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Isah Onuweh Jimoh “Qur’an Addresses Science and Technology
” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.415-424 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/415-424.pdf

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Themes on Selected Kiswahili Texts on HIV and AIDS

Wasike Charles, Mosol Kandagor and Samuel Obuchi – August 2019 Page No.: 425-430

The HIV and AIDS scourge has been in our society for more than three decades and during that duration, more than 34 million people have been affected by the disease in the world. In addition, according to UNAIDS (2012) more than 18 million people have died. Initially the HIV and AIDS disease caused a lot of destruction in the history of mankind. This paper sought to assess how figures of speech and style have been used to present themes regarding HIV and AIDS in selected Kiswahili Literature works. The themes were generated from ten Kiswahili Literary works that cuts across three different genres that were used in this study namely; novels, plays and short stories. The selected works from the three genres gave the researcher appropriate data for this study. The study was carried in the library and employed content analysis as a method of data collection. This study has established that despite the differences in the genres and style, different artists have similar themes that are presented regarding HIV and AIDS.

Page(s): 425-430                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 September 2019

 Wasike Charles
Department of Kiswahili and Other African Languages, Moi University, Kenya

 Mosol Kandagor
Department of Kiswahili and Other African Languages, Moi University, Kenya

 Samuel Obuchi
Department of Kiswahili and Other African Languages, Moi University, Kenya

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Wasike Charles, Mosol Kandagor and Samuel Obuchi “Themes on Selected Kiswahili Texts on HIV and AIDS” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.425-430 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/425-430.pdf

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Gender Inequality in Nigeria Police Force

Oluwa Moses Oluwafemi – August 2019 Page No.: 431-437

This study aims to examine how the Nigeria Police Force (NPF) administrative structure, recruitment policy, and promotion criteria engendered gender inequality. The research used the Zone 4 which presently cover three states; Benue, Nasarawa and Plateau State Commands with the Zonal Headquarters at Makurdi, Benue State as a case study. Primary data was obtained through administered questionnaires. A quantitative empirical approach was chosen for the study because it provided a numerical measurement and reliable statistical predictably of the results to the total target population. The study discovered that the gender discriminatory policies and promotion criteria of the NPF has deterred the career progression of the female police officers. The female police officers are often victims of sexual harassment, bully from superior male officers and lack of equal employment opportunities. Hence the recommendation that the recruitment policy should be revisited for reforms to encourage more to close the existing gap, women should be assigned roles and duties aside bookkeeping, clerical secretary and police matron. The Inspector-General of Police in collaboration with the government should ensure strict implementation of laws safeguarding the female police officers from sexual harassment and bullying from the superiors.

Page(s): 431-437                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 September 2019

 Oluwa Moses Oluwafemi
Department of History and International Relations, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile Ife, Nigeria

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[14]. UN WOMEN (2009) Report of the Two-Day Sensitization Workshop organised for Senior Police Officers on Police Response to Violence against Women and Human Trafficking (Abuja, Nigeria, 25 to 26th November, 2009).
[15]. Woolsey, S. (2010). Challenges for women in policing. Law and Order, 58(10), 78-82. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/docview/
[16]. Young, W.p., 2006. Women striving in the masculine workplace: a study on the career path of female police officers in Taiwan. Thesis, Graduate Institute of Social Transformation Studies, Shi Hsin University.

Oluwa Moses Oluwafemi “Gender Inequality in Nigeria Police Force” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.408-413 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/431-437.pdf

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Availability and Utilization of Physics Laboratory Equipment on Academic Achievement of Students in Public Day Secondary Schools

Malach Mogire Mogaka – August 2019 Page No.: 438-441

The purpose of paper was to investigate the correlation between availability and utilization of physics laboratory equipment and the academic achievement of students in Public day secondary schools. The study was necessitated by the continuous decline in students’ academic achievement in public day secondary schools in Kisii County, Kenya. The objective of the study was to establish the level of availability and utilization of physics laboratory equipment and how it relates to students’ academic achievement in public day secondary schools. Correlational research design was used in this study which involved students and teachers from the 246 public day secondary schools in the county. Non-proportionate sampling, systematic random sampling and purposive sampling techniques were used to select the sample unit size of schools and sample size of students and teachers. Non-proportionate sampling technique was used to sample schools, systematic random sampling technique was used to sample students while teachers were sampled using purposive sampling technique. Student questionnaire (SQ) and Teachers Interview Schedule (TIS) were used to collect data. The study yielded both quantitative and qualitative data. Quantitative data were analyzed using inferential statistics, Pearson’s Product Moment Correlational Coefficient analysis and multiple regression. The findings from the study revealed that availability and utilization of physics laboratory equipment had a relationship with students’ academic achievement. It was concluded that the relationship was statistically significant [F (4, 372) =39.203, R2=.297, sig. <.05]. A respectable variability (≈30%) in student academic achievement was explained by the physics laboratory equipment.

Page(s): 438-441                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 03 September 2019

 Malach Mogire Mogaka
Kenyatta University, Kenya

[1]. Adebisi, T. A. (2014).Effectiveness of explanatory based concept strategy on Physics practical achievement in secondary school.Lagos Education Review 14(2).1-10
[2]. Akçayir, et al., (2016). Augmented reality in science laboratories: The effects of augmented reality on university students’ laboratory skills and attitudes toward science laboratories. Computers in Human Behavior, 57, 334–342. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2015.12.054
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[6]. Lawal, F. K. (2013).Resource Utilization for Teaching Biology towards Achieving Millennium Development Goal’s Objective in Selected Secondary Schools in Zaria Metropolis.54th Annual Conference Proceedings of Science Teachers Association of Nigeria.197-202.
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[8]. Olufunke, B. T. (2012). Effect of availability and utilization of physics laboratory equipment on students’ academic achievement in senior secondary school physics.World Journal of Education 2(5) 1-7.
[9]. Oluwasegun, et al. (2015). The impact of physics laboratory on students’ offering physics in Ethiope West local Government Area of Delta State. Journal of Educational Research and Review.10(7), 961-956.
[10]. Tekalign, K. G. (2016). The upshot of availability and utilization of science laboratory inputs on students’ academic achievement in high school Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Ilu Abba Bora Zone. Southwestern Ethiopia.
[11]. Zenda, R. (2016) Factors affecting the academic achievement of learners in Physical Sciences in selected Limpopo rural secondary schools. Doctor of Education Thesis.University Of South Africa

Malach Mogire Mogaka “Availability and Utilization of Physics Laboratory Equipment on Academic Achievement of Students in Public Day Secondary Schools” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.438-441 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/438-441.pdf

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The Impact of Collaborative Learning on Pupils’ Attitude and Performance in Earth Geometry: A Case of Kitwe District, Zambia

Evans Musonda, Athanasius Lunjebe – August 2019 Page No.: 442-450

This study was conducted in order to show the impact of Collaborative Learning on pupils’ attitude and performance in Earth Geometry by grade 12 pupils in Kitwe District exploring the following research questions; (i) Does Collaborative Learning have an impact on pupils’ performance in Earth Geometry? (ii) Does Collaborative Learning method have an impact on pupils’ performance by gender? (iii)Does Collaborative Learning have an impact on pupils’ attitude towards Earth Geometry? The problem of poor performance of the Grade 12 pupils in Mathematics, especially in Earth Geometry has been a thorny issue. To improve the performance in Earth Geometry, a study was conducted on grade 12 pupils of Mukuba Secondary School and Helen Kaunda School of Kitwe District. The study population included 155 pupils from Mukuba and Helen Kaunda Secondary Schools of Kitwe District. The study was based on the three research questions and two hypotheses. The research method used was a Quantitative research. The sample size was 155 pupils comprising 80 male and 75 female pupils. Experimental Design and a Mathematics Attitude Questionnaire were used. The two groups were made from two classes picked at random from 7 classes of Mukuba Secondary School and another pair was picked at random from 6 classes of Helen Kaunda Secondary School. Particularly, 40 pupils were randomly assigned to the Experimental Group and 40 pupils to Control Group from Mukuba Secondary School. Furthermore, 35 pupils were randomly assigned to the Experimental Group and 40 to Control Group from Helen Kaunda Secondary School. These two pair of groups were subjected to pre-test. The Experimental Groups were taught using Collaborative Learning Approach while the Control groups were taught using Conventional Approach. The analysis of data was done using SPSS version 16, considering the mean and standard deviation. Also, the Independent sample t-test was conducted at alpha (α) = 0.05 to analysis the results of the pre-test and post-test scores. The study revealed that there was statistically significant mean difference in the post-test scores for Experimental groups (Mean = 63.3, standard = 16.9) and the Control group (Mean = 48.7, standard deviation = 18.4), p = .000 for Mukuba Secondary School and Experimental groups (Mean = 65.5, standard deviation = 19.8) and the Control groups (Mean = 51.9, standard deviation = 21.2), p = .005 for Helen Kaunda Secondary School. Furthermore, the study showed that there was no statistically significant mean difference in the Pre-test scores for Experimental group (Mean = 26.7, standard deviation = 17.9) and the Control group (Mean = 26.6, standard deviation = 17.2), p = .980 for Mukuba Secondary School and Experimental group (Mean = 24.8, standard deviation = 15.7) and the control group (Mean = 25.2, standard deviation = 15.9), p = .902 for Helen Kaunda Secondary School. The study also revealed that post-test scores mean of female and male pupils were statistically insignificant (P-Value=0.640>α=0.05,t=0.470).Then analysis of the MAQ indicated that most pupils had a positive attitude towards Earth Geometry and it amounted to 80.7% while 11.3% showed no effect on the attitude after the post-test from both Schools. Therefore, teaching Earth Geometry using Collaborative Learning Approach was found to have a positive impact on pupils understanding of Earth Geometry because of the high marks after its administration. The study further revealed that pupils had challenges in calculation of the surface area between two meridians and the shortest distance between points on the same latitude which are not diametrically opposite but non the less were solved with more emphasis on them.

Page(s): 442-450                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 03 September 2019

 Evans Musonda
Mukuba University, School of Mathematics and Natural Science, P.O BOX 20382, Kitwe, Zambia

 Athanasius Lunjebe
School of Mathematics and Natural Science, Copperbelt University, P.O BOX 21692, Kitwe, Zambia

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Evans Musonda, Athanasius Lunjebe ” The Impact of Collaborative Learning on Pupils’ Attitude and Performance in Earth Geometry: A Case of Kitwe District, Zambia” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 8, pp.442-450 August 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-8/442-450.pdf

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Availability of School Facilities and their Influence on Students’ Academic Achievement in Public Day Secondary Schools in Kisii County, Kenya

Malach Mogire Mogaka – August 2019 Page No.: 451-455