Motocyling Operation in Nigeria: Implication for Good Governance, Socio-Political and Economic Development of Ekiti State. A Case Study of Ado Ekiti Local Government Area

BABATOLA, Adeleye Marcus (Ph.D), IMOUKHUEDE, Benedict Kayode, AJAKAYE, Olabode Felix – October 2019 Page No.: 01-06

The activities of commercial motorcyclists popularly known as okada riders in Nigeria cannot be over-emphasized. The okadas have become the most fastest means of transportation due to most places that cars cannot reach are easily reached. Equally, okada serves as means of employment and of livelihood for its operators. As a result, people gradually accept okada as viable means of conveying goods and persons particularly in Ekiti State. The study however fund out that this means of transportation has both merits and demerits. The also found out that majority of commercial motorcyclists are mostly graduates from high institutions of learning as a result of high level of unemployment. It is discovered that the system is characterized with evil activities which have become so rampant in most states of the federation. These criminal activities are also found in other states where commercial motorcyclists operate including Ekiti State. Besides, reckless speeding and traffic violation consequent upon taking of alcohols are characteristic features of okada riders. The menace of these motorcycle operators are noticeable in Ekiti State. In view of the above, this study examines the synopsis of impact of commercial motorcycle operators famously known as okada riders in Nigeria with a view to emphasizing the Implication for good governance, socio-economic integration of Ado Ekiti Local Government Area, Ekiti State.The study adopts both primary and secondary sources of data collection to accomplish its actual goals. The study therefore concludes that the age bracket involved in okada operation are commonly youths as are subjected to being used as political thugs by the politicians.

Page(s): 01-06                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 October 2019

 BABATOLA, Adeleye Marcus (Ph.D)
Department of Political Science, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria

 IMOUKHUEDE, Benedict Kayode
Department of Public Administration, Rufus Giwa Polytechnic, Owo, Ondo State Nigeria

 AJAKAYE, Olabode Felix
Department of Public Administration, Crown Polytechnic, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria

[1]. AU (2017) What is Political Economy? CANADA’S OPEN UNIVERSITY, Faculty of Humanities & Social Science Centre for Social Sciences ( 5th Dec,) www.cssscal.org/programmes.php accessed on 13/04/2018
[2]. Ani. E, (2017) Over 5,000 graduates ride ‘Okada, Keke’ in Ekiti – Association Published on October 26, By http://dailypost.ng/2017/10/26/ accessed on 12/04/2018
[3]. Ani. E (2018) The evils of ‘Okada,’ in Ekiti Land. Published on April, 21, By Emmanuel Ani http://dailypost.ng/2018/04/21/ accessed on 11/05/2018
[4]. The Punch, (2017), Suffering, anger as Lagos task force declares war on okada riders Published November 11th By Kunle Falayi http://punchng.com/ accessed on 23/04/2018
[5]. The Pointer News onlines “The Fading Glory Of ‘Okada’ Riding” By Ruth Okwumbu thepointernewsonline.com/?p=14152 accessed on 20/04/2018
[6]. Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
[7]. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okada_%28motorcycle_taxi%29 accessed on 17/04/2018
[8]. Chaudhary.S. (2013) The Applicability Of The Modernization Theory In Achieving Development In The Least Developed Countries Like Tanzania. https://www.bartleby.com/essay/relevancy-of-the-modernization-theory-in-achieving-fkfg2n936zys
[9]. Collinson (ed) (2003), Defining characteristics of political economy. Available at https://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep-demos/000_P527_PEPP_K3736-Demo/unit1/page_13.htm
[10]. Giz.A. (2010). Urban Mobility for Indonesia. Indonesia.
[11]. Guillen, M.D. and Ishida, H.( 2004). Motorcycle propelled public transport and local policy development. IATSS Research 28(1), pp.56-66.
[12]. Guillen, M.D. et al. (2013). Is the use of informal public transport modes in developing countries habitual? An empirical study in Davao City, Philippines. Transport Policy.26, pp.31-42.
[13]. Huntington, S. (1971), The Change to Change: Modernization, development and politics. (New York: Free Press,), pp. 30-31; 45-52. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_P._Huntington
[14]. Henderson .T. (2015) Why Study Political Economy? by on February 24.
[15]. Júnior, J. and Filho, M. (2002). “The Brazilian Motorcycle Taxi Phenomenon”. International Conference on Traffic and Transportation Studies, Guilin, China. American Society of Civil Engineers, pp.1566-1572.
[16]. Konings, P. (2006). Solving Transportation Problems in African Cities: Innovative Responses by the Youth in Douala, Cameroon. Africa Today.53(1), pp.35-50.[24]
[17]. Konings, P.J.J. ed.( 2006). ‘Bendskin’ drivers in Douala’s New Bell neighbourhood: Masters of the road and the city neighbourhood. Brill, Leide
[18]. The Punch, (2017), Suffering, anger as Lagos task force declares war on okada riders Published November 11th By Kunle Falayi http://punchng.com/ accessed on 23/04/2018
[19]. Smelser, N. (1964), Toward a Theory of Modernization. (New York: Basic Books,), pp. 268-274.
[20]. Tipps, D. (1973), Modernization. Theory and the Comparative Study of Societies: A critical perspective. (New York: Free Press,), pp. 65-77.
[21]. Guillen, M.D. and Ishida, H.( 2004). Motorcycle propelled public transport and local policy development. IATSS Research 28(1), pp.56-66.

BABATOLA, Adeleye Marcus (Ph.D), IMOUKHUEDE, Benedict Kayode, AJAKAYE, Olabode Felix “Motocyling Operation in Nigeria: Implication for Good Governance, Socio-Political and Economic Development of Ekiti State. A Case Study of Ado Ekiti Local Government Area” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.01-06 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/01-06.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Elections’ Monetization as the Fundamental Crossroad to Good Governance in Nigeria: A Case Study of Ekiti 2018 Gubernatorial Poll

BABATOLA, Adeleye Marcus (Ph.D), OLUWASANMI, L.A (Ph.D), IFEYINWA, Arum (Ph.D) – October 2019 Page No.: 07-12

This paper examines the monetization of elections in Nigeria which has become undesirable omen to democratic consolidation in Africa especially Nigeria. Regrettably, indicators of good governance such as, service delivery, transparency, accountability, responsiveness, efficiency and effectiveness, popular participation have always suffered due to electoral manipulations. Indeed, every Nigerian is imbibed with the culture of buying of votes. As a corollary, monetization of elections is nothing but a rape on democracy. It is noteworthy that once electioneering processes are politicized, the resultant effect would be non-performance of whoever emerges through the processes. Thus, it is not uncommon for masses to start scouting for money during elections since this has been the order of the day in Nigerian political system. The work relies on both primary and secondary sources of data collection. The data sources were complemented with the administration of questionnaires and oral interview with relevant stakeholders and members of the public to elicit more information about the effects of monetized election. The study raises fundamental question about the place of money in politics and its effect on future elections in Nigeria.

Page(s): 07-12                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 October 2019

 BABATOLA, Adeleye Marcus (Ph.D)
Department of Political Science, Ekiti State University, P.M.B 5363 Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria

 OLUWASANMI, L.A (Ph.D)
Department of Sociology, Ekiti State University, P.M.B 5363 Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria

 IFEYINWA, Arum (Ph.D)
Department of Political Science, Ekiti State University, P.M.B 5363 Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria

[1]. Adigun.A.B.A,Larry.D.and Ebere.O.(2004) “Nigeria’s Struggle For Democracy And Good Governance-A Festschrift For Oyeleye Oyediran” Ibadan University Press.UI.Nigeria. . ISBN978-121-400-7
[2]. Awosanya.S.O (2012) “Practical politics in an emerging Democracy” Supreme Mandate Consultancy Services. Ogun State.ISBN:978-978-927-521-2
[3]. Akpeninor J.O(2007) “Democracy and Issues of governance in African politics: The Nigerian Perspectve” Book Wright Nigeria(Publishers).Bodija ,Ibadan. ISBN978-978-088-928-9
[4]. Akinbosade.A.(2007), “The Legislature. Law-Making Organ of Government” O&A Publishers.Akure. Ondo State. Nigeria. ISBN978-37982-7-8
[5]. Akintide.W,(2018)”ElectionFraud InNigeriaAndTheWayOut”http://www.gamji.com/article8000/NEWS8950.htm
[6]. Dipo.K. and Mimiko.N.O (2002)“Political Democratisation And Economic Deregulation in Nigeria under the Abacha administration 1993-1998” Published by Department Of Political Science, University Of Ado Ekiti. ISBN978-33562-0-8
[7]. Fabrice Lehoucq ,(2003),“Electoral Fraud: Causes, Types, and Consequences”https://www.researchgate.net/publication/228913438_Electoral_Fraud_Causes_Types_and_Consequences
[8]. Levy.C,(2018)“SupervisorsofElectionsandElectionFraud”https://www.votelevy.com/Registration-Information/Election-Fraud
[9]. PeterboroughCityCouncil(2018)“Electoralfraud”https://www.peterborough.gov.uk/council/elections/electoral-fraud/
[10]. Ozoemenam.M. and Chukwudi.M.E(2009), “Democracy and National Security: Issues, Challenges And Prospects” Medusa Academic Publishers.Kaduna,Nigeria.ISBN978-38491-8-2
Newspapers/Journals/Government Documents
[11]. The Punch, (2018), “Ekiti election: Police deploy 30,000 personnel, two choppers, others”http://punchng.com/ekiti-election-police-deploy-30000-personnel-two-choppers-others/
[12]. The Punch, (2018), “INEC colluded with security operatives to rig Ekiti election – Gov’s aide”
Punchng.com/inec-colluded-with-security -operatives-to-rig-ekiti-election-govs-aidee/ July 22,
[13]. The Punch, (2018),“Unpaid salaries responsible for Fayemi’s victory, says NLC”
Punchng.com/unpaid -salaries -responsible -for-fayemi-victory -says –nlc July 22,
[14]. The Punch , (2018), “Vital takeaways from the Ekiti election”http://punchng.com/vital-takeaways-from-the-ekiti-election/ July 17,
[15]. The Punch,(2018), “Ekiti ‘see and buy’ election bazaar” http://punchng.com/ekiti-see-and-buy-election-bazaar/# July 18,
[16]. The Punch , (2018),“Ekiti election: I was paid N3,000 to vote for PDP — AP candidate”punchng.com/i-was-paid-n3000-to-vote-for-pdp-ap-candidate/July 18
[17]. The Punch , (2018),“Ekiti election: Vote-buying as bad as rigging, says UK”http://punchng.com/ekiti-election-vote-buying-as-bad-as-rigging-says-uk/July 21,
[18]. The Punch , (2018), “Ekiti TV, radio shut after Fayose announced poll results”punchng.com/ekiti-tv-radio-shut-after-fayose-announced-poll-results/ July 15,
[19]. The Premium Times (2018), “Ekiti: INEC result is correct – Group”https://www.premiumtimesng.com/regional/ssouth-west/276700-ekiti-inec-result-is-correct-group.html 16th July,
[20]. The vanguard,(2018), “EKITI 2018:Factors, issues that will shape poll”
https:// www.vanguardngr.com/2018/03/ekiti-2018-factors-issues-will-shape-poll
[21]. The vanguard,(2018), INEC commends security agencies on Ekiti Governorship election
https://www.vanguardngr.com/2018/07/inec-commends-security-agencies-on-ekiti-governorship-election/ July 17, 2018.
[22]. EKITI STATE INEC OFFICE, ADO-EKITI, EKITI STATE “Ekiti 2018 Election Results At A Glance”.

BABATOLA, Adeleye Marcus (Ph.D), OLUWASANMI, L.A (Ph.D), IFEYINWA, Arum (Ph.D) ” Elections’ Monetization as the Fundamental Crossroad to Good Governance in Nigeria: A Case Study of Ekiti 2018 Gubernatorial Poll ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.07-12 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/07-12.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Effect of Organizational Structure, Organizational Strategy, and Change Management on Firm Performance with Organizational Commitments As Mediation Variables in Manufakturing Industries

Muhammad Donal Mon, Farida Jasfar, Willy Arafah – October 2019 – Page No.: 13-20

The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship of organizational structure, strategy, and change management to firm performance with organizational commitment as mediation. The design used is hypothesis testing using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) because the variables used in this study use mediating variables. The population and respondents in this study were Supervisor / Engineer, Manager, General Manager, and Director of manufacturing companies. The results of the study show that the organizational structure does not significantly affect to firm performance, organizational strategy and change management has significant effect on firm performance, organizational commitment has significant effect on firm performance. The results also show that organizational commitment does not mediate the organizational structure of firm performance, organizational commitment is mediation between organizational strategies and management changes in organizational commitment are mediation in performance. The results can be a reference for management and companies in making decisions that determine strategic steps in planning the company’s future work plans. Future research model can explain the role of organizational commitment in organizational structure, organizational strategy and management changes to firm performance.

Page(s): 13-20                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 October 2019

 Muhammad Donal Mon
Corresponding Author and Doctoral Candidate of Strategic Management, Faculty of Economics, Universitas Internasional Batam, Batam, Indonesia

 Farida Jasfar
Professor of Sustainability Development Management, Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Trisakti, Jakarta, Indonesia

 Willy Arafah
Professor of Marketing Management, Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Trisakti, Jakarta, Indonesia

[1]. Agwu, M. E. (2018). Analysis of the impact of strategic management on the business performance of SMEs in Nigeria. Academy of Strategic Management Journal, 17(1), 1–20.
[2]. Ajagbe, M. A., Maduenyi, S., Oke, A. O., & Olatunji, F. (2015). Impact of Organisational Structure on Organisational Performance. International Conference on African Development Issues, pp. 354–358.
[3]. Alawamleh, M., Bani Ismail, L., Aladwan, K., & Saleh, A. (2018). The influence of open/closed innovation on employees’ performance. International Journal of Organizational Analysis, 26(1), 75–90. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJOA-08-2017-1207
[4]. Alexiou, A., & Khanagha, S. (2018). Productive organizational energy mediates the impact of organizational structure on absorptive capacity. 1–18. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lrp.2018.02.001
[5]. Ali, G., Mehrpour, M., & Nikooravesh, A. (2016). Organizational Structure. Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences, 230(May), 455–462. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sbspro.2016.09.057
[6]. Allen, D. G., & Shanock, L. R. (2012). Perceived organizational support and embeddedness as key mechanisms connecting socialization tactics to commitment and turnover among new employees. Journal of Organizational Behavior. https://doi.org/10.1002/job
[7]. Anh, K., Thi, V., Vu, T. D., & Hoang, K. Van. (2018). Using the Balanced Scorecard to Measure the Performance of Small and Medium- Sized Garment Enterprises in Vietnam. Accounting and Finance Research, 7(3). https://doi.org/10.5430/afr.v7n3p251
[8]. Antunes, M. G., Quirós, J. T., & Justino, M. do R. F. (2017). The relationship between innovation and total quality management and the innovation effects on organizational performance. International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, 34(9), 1474–1492. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJQRM-02-2016-0025
[9]. Arikan, C., & Kirci, S. (2015). Effects of Organizational Structure At Outsourcing Companies To Operational Performance : a Practice in. International Journal of Arts & Sciences, 08(04), 263–272.
[10]. Berberoglu, A. (2018). Impact of organizational climate on organizational commitment and perceived organizational performance: empirical evidence from public hospitals. BMC Health Services Research 2018 18:1, 18(1), 399. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-018-3149-z
[11]. Bouckenooghe, D., Devos, G., & Broeck, H. Van Den. (2014). Organizational Change Questionnaire – Climate of Organizational Change Questionnaire – Climate of Change , Processes , and Readiness : Development of a New Instrument. The Journal of Psychology, 6(December), 559–599. https://doi.org/10.1080/00223980903218216
[12]. Dessler, G., Paulo, S., & Town, C. (2015). Resource management thirteenth editionTH EDITION.
[13]. Fred C. Lunenburg. (2010). Forces for and Resistance to Organizational Change. National Forum of Educational Administration and Supervision Journal, 27(4), 1–10. Retrieved from https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&ved=0CDYQFjAA&url=http://www.nationalforum.com/Electronic Journal Volumes/Lunenburg, Fred C. Forces For and Resistance to Change NFEASJ V27 N4 2010.pdf&ei=XQSIUeL-MtGzrAfV2IE4&usg=AFQ
[14]. Frese, M. (2017). Chapter 1 Performance Concepts. (January 2005). https://doi.org/10.1002/0470013419.ch1
[15]. García-sánchez, E., & García-morales, V. J. (2017). Analysis of the influence of the environment , stakeholder integration capability , absorptive capacity , and technological skills on organizational performance through corporate entrepreneurship. Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11365-017-0436-9
[16]. Ghozali, I. (n.d.). Structural Equation Modeling.
[17]. Hakim, A. (2015). Effect of Organizational Culture , Organizational Commitment to Performance : Study In Hospital Of District South Konawe Of Southeast Sulawesi. The International Journal Of Engineering And Science (IJES), 4(2012), 33–41.
[18]. Hosseini, S. M., Ooshaksaraie, M., & Kiakojory, K. (2014). Examine the relationship between formality, gomplexity with entrepreneurship (Case study). Journal of Educational and Management Studies, 4(3), 677–683.
[19]. Inanlou, Z., & Ahn, J. (2017). The Effect Of Organizational Culture On Employee Commitment : The Journal of Applied Business Research, 33(1), 87–94.
[20]. Irefin, P., & Mechanic, M. A. (2014). Effect of Employee Commitment on Organizational Performance in Coca Cola Nigeria Limited Maiduguri , Borno State. IOSR Journal Of Humanities And Social Science (IOSR-JHSS), 19(3), 33–41.
[21]. Jalagat, R. (2016). The Impact of Change and Change Management in Achieving Corporate Goals and Objectives: Organizational Perspective. International Journal of Science and Research (IJSR), 5(November), 1233–1239. https://doi.org/10.21275/ART20163105
[22]. Janicijevic, N. (2013). The mutual impact of organizational culture and structure. Economic Annals, 58(198), 35–60. https://doi.org/10.2298/EKA1398035J
[23]. Jenatabadi, H. S. (2015). An Overview of Organizational Performance Index : Definitions and Measurements. Researchgate, (May). https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.4298.3849
[24]. Kalowski, A. (2015). Structure Determining Factors of Business Organization. International Journal of Innovation, Management and Technology, 6(3), 206–212. https://doi.org/10.7763/IJIMT.2015.V6.603
[25]. Kaygusuz, İ., Akgemci, T., & Yilmaz, A. (2016). The impact of HRIS usage on organizational efficiency and employee performance: A research in industrial in industrial and banking sector in Ankara Istanbul Cities. International Journal of Business & Management, IV(4), 14–52. https://doi.org/10.20472/BM.2016.4.4.002
[26]. Khairiah, H. J. (2017). Pengaruh struktur organisasi ( Organizational structure), kepuasan kerja ( job satisfaction) terhadap komitmen organisasi ( organizational komitmen) pada Institut Agama Islam Negeri ( IAIN ) Bengkuu. Nuansa, X(1), 49–60.
[27]. Kiani, M. P., & Kahnoog, N. H. (2013). Organizational Structure and Organizational Effectiveness. Journal of Basic and Applied Scientific Research, 3(6), 1071–1076.
[28]. Kristanto, H. (2015). Keadilan organisasional, komitmen organisasional, dan kinerja karyawan. Jurnal Manajemen Dan Kewirausahaan, 17(1), 86–98. https://doi.org/10.9744/jmk.17.1.86
[29]. Muscalu, E., Iancu, D., & Halmaghi, E.-E. (2016). The influence of the external environment on organizationans. Journal of Defense Resources Management, 7(13), 133–138. Retrieved from http://journal.dresmara.ro/issues/volume7_issue2/13_muscalu_iancu_halmaghi.pdf
[30]. Musselman, Vernon A & Jackson, J. H. (1989). Business: Concepts and Practice (Edition 10). Prentice-Hall, Inc.
[31]. Nazarian, A., Soares, A., & Lottermoser, B. (2017). Inherited organizational performance? The perceptions of generation Y on the influence of leadership styles. Leadership and Organization Development Journal, 38(8), 1078–1094. https://doi.org/10.1108/LODJ-05-2016-0119
[32]. Nikpour, A. (2016). The Impact of Organizational Culture on Organizational Performance – The Mediating Role of Employee’s Organizational Commitment. International Journal of Organizational Leadership, 6(1), 65–72. https://doi.org/10.19236/IJOL.2017.01.05
[33]. Nwinyokpugi, P. N. (2018). Organisational Change Management and Employees Productivity in the Nigeria Banking Sector. Journal of Business and Management, 20(1), 11–20. https://doi.org/10.9790/487X-2001081120
[34]. Ogbo, A. I., Chibueze, N. F., Christopher, O. C., & Anthony, I. A. (2015). Impact of structure on organizational performance of selected technical and service firms in Nigeria. Corporate Ownership & Control, 13(1), 1278–1284.
[35]. Oyewobi, L. O., Windapo, A. O., & Rotimi, J. O. B. (2016). Environment, competitive strategy, and organizational characteristics: A path analytic model of construction organizations’ performance in South Africa. Canadian Journal of Administrative Sciences / Revue Canadienne Des Sciences de l’Administration, 33(3), 213–226. https://doi.org/10.1002/cjas.1384
[36]. Pradhan, R. K., & Jena, L. K. (2017). Employee Performance at Workplace : Conceptual Model and Empirical Validation. Business Perspectives and Research, (March 2018). https://doi.org/10.1177/2278533716671630
[37]. Qarashay, D. M. S. Q., & Alzu’bi, F. A. (2018). The Effect of Strategic Management on the Organizational Performance Using the Balance Scorecards Approach to Measure Performance : A Case Study in the Nursing Department at Al-Khalidi Hospital and Medical Center. International Journal of Business and Management, 13(4), 259–270. https://doi.org/10.5539/ijbm.v13n4p259
[38]. Rachmayanthy. (2017). Pengaruh Struktur Organisasi dan Kepuasan Kerja Terhadap Kinerja Pegawai (Studi Kausal Pada Pegawai Direktorat Jenderal Pemasyarakatan). Jurnal Ilmiah Ilmu Manajemen, 4(1), 1–14.
[39]. Razia, M., Damiannah, K., & Maru, P. L. (2015). The Moderating Effect of Organizational Processes on the Relationship between Organizational Structure and Organizational Effectiveness in Universities in Kenya. IOSR Journal of Business and Management Ver. II, 17(9), 2319–7668. https://doi.org/10.9790/487X-17927988
[40]. Ridwan, M., & Putra, W. E. (2016). Pengaruh komitmen organisasi gaya kepemimpinan dan struktur organisasi terhadap hubungan antara partisipasi anggaran dengan kinerja manejerial. Jurnal Penelitian Universitas Jambi Seri Humaniora, 18(2016), 10–26.
[41]. Rizescu,&Tileaga, C. (2016). Factors Influencing continous organizational change. Journal of Defense Resource Management, 7(2), 139–144. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.annals.2004.01.010
[42]. Rzepka, A. (2017). Inter-organizational relations as a one of sources of competitive advantage of contemporary enterprises in the era of. Procedia Engineering, 174, 161–170. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.proeng.2017.01.195
[43]. Santos, J. B. (2012). Toward a Subjective Measurement Model for Firm Performance. Brazilian Administration Review, (May), 95–117.
[44]. Seitio-Kgokgwe, O., Gauld, R. D. C., Hill, P. C., & Barnett, P. (2016). Redesigning a Ministry of Health’s organizational structure: exploring implementation challenges through Botswana’s experiences. The International Journal of Health Planning and Management, 31(2), 191–207. https://doi.org/10.1002/hpm.2275
[45]. Shabbir, M. S. (2017). Organizational Structure and Employee’s Performance: A Study of Brewing Firms in Nigeria. American Research Journal of Business and Management, 3(1), 1–16.
[46]. Shahriari, J. E., Maleki, J., Koolivand, P., & Meyvand, M. (2013). The study of the relationship between organizational structure and psychological empowerment among the staffs in Ministry of Economic Affairs and Finance. European Online Journal of Natural and Social Sciences, 2(3), 330–338.
[47]. Shahzad, I. A., Farrukh, M., Ahmed, N. O., Lin, L., & Kanwal, N. (2018). The role of transformational leadership style, organizational structure and job characteristics in developing psychological empowerment among banking professionals. Journal of Chinese Human Resources Management, JCHRM-01-2018-0002. https://doi.org/10.1108/JCHRM-01-2018-0002
[48]. Sugiyono. (2015). Metodologi Penelitian Bisnis. ALFABETA Bandung.
[49]. Susanty, A., & Miradipta, R. (2013). Employee ’ s Job Performance : The Effect of Attitude toward Works , Organizational Commitment , and Job Satisfaction. Jurnal Teknik Industri, 15(1). https://doi.org/10.9744/jti.15.1.13-24
[50]. Szierbowski-Seibel, K. (2018). Strategic human resource management and its impact on performance – do Chinese organizations adopt appropriate HRM policies? Journal of Chinese Human Resources Management, JCHRM-07-2017-0017. https://doi.org/10.1108/JCHRM-07-2017-0017
[51]. Tran, Q., & Tian, Y. (2013). Organizational Structure: Influencing Factors and Impact on a Firm. American Journal of Industrial and Business Management, 03(02), 229–236. https://doi.org/10.4236/ajibm.2013.32028
[52]. Unam, M. J. (2017). Strategic management and corporate performance: A resource base approach. Journal of the Humanities and Social Studies, 2(February).
[53]. Unam, M. J., & Akinola, G. O. (2015). Strategic Management and Firm Performance : A Study of Selected Manufacturing Companies in Nigeria. European Journal of Business and Management, 7(January).
[54]. Wagner, C. M. (2007). Organizational commitment as a predictor variable in nursing turnover research: literature review. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 60(3), 235–247. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2648.2007.04421.x
[55]. Wahudi, T. (2017). Pengaruh struktur organisasi terhadap efektifitas kerja karyawan pada PT Inti Karsa Persada (Kalla Hospital). Jurnal Organisasi Dan Manajemen, (September).
[56]. Yogantara, K. K., & Wirakusuma, M. G. (2013). Pengaruh komitmen organisasi dan gaya kepemimpinan pada hubungan antara partisipasi anggaran dan kinerja manajerial BPR. Jurnal Akuntansi Universitas Udayana, 2, 261–280.
[57]. Zhou, Y. U., Hong, Y., & Liu, J. U. N. (2013). Internal commitmen or external collobaration? the impact of human resource management system on riem innovation and performance. Human Resource Management, March−April, 52(2). https://doi.org/10.1002/hrm

Muhammad Donal Mon, Farida Jasfar, Willy Arafah “The Effect of Organizational Structure, Organizational Strategy, and Change Management on Firm Performance with Organizational Commitments As Mediation Variables in Manufakturing Industries” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.13-20 October 2019 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/13-20.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Content and Statistical Analysis for Computing Respondents’ Feedback in the Social Sciences: The Case of Political Science and Public Administration Departments

BABATOLA, Adeleye Marcus (Ph.D), OLAKEKE,Olateru-olagbegi – October 2019 Page No.: 21-22

Content analysis has become one of the fundamental mechanisms to determine the presence of certain concepts as employed within sets of texts. Researchers quantify and analyze the presence, meanings and relationships of such words and concepts, then make inferences about the messages within the texts, the writer(s), the audience, and even the culture and time of which these are a part. Texts can be defined broadly as books, book chapters, discussions, newspaper headlines and articles, historical documents, speeches, conversions, etc it is qualitative in nature. For instance, if a researcher is interested in studying the behavioural pattern of the certain citizens before, and after the creation of either state or local government, existing literatures on the study may be consulted in order to come up with established facts about history of state and local government creation in the selected area of his/her research.

Page(s): 21-22                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 October 2019

 BABATOLA, Adeleye Marcus (Ph.D)
Department of Political Science, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria

 OLAKEKE,Olateru-olagbegi
Department of Public Administration, Rufus Giwa Polytechnic, Owo, Ondo State Nigeria

[1]. Panneerselvam. P. (2003), Research Methodology, published by Asoke K. Ghosh, PHI Learning private Limited, Rimijhim House, III. Patparganj Industrial Estate, Delhi-110092.
[2]. Kolawole, E. B, (2002), Statistical Methods Revised Edition. Bolabay Publications (Academic Publishing Consultants) 15, Obafemi Awolowo way. Ikeja Lagos Nigeria.
[3]. Babatola, A.M (1998), Local Government and State Creations Implications for National Integration. (Unpublished) B.Sc Long essay submitted to the Department of Political Science Ondo State University Ado-Ekiti. Davies Binders & Printers, No 9, Ogbon Obia, Ado Ekiti, Ekiti State.
[4]. Johnson R.A. (2002), Miller & Freand’s Probability and Statistics for Engineers, 6th ed, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi.
[5]. Montgomery, DC (1984), Design and Analysis of Experiments, John Wiley & Sons, New York.

BABATOLA, Adeleye Marcus (Ph.D), OLAKEKE,Olateru-olagbegi “Content and Statistical Analysis for Computing Respondents’ Feedback in the Social Sciences: The Case of Political Science and Public Administration Departments” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.21-22 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/21-22.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Diplomatic and Administrative Contributions in Peace Building on the Cameroon – Nigeria Border Conflict: From Colonial to Post Colonial Era

René NGEK MONTEH – October 2019 Page No.: 23-31

Border conflicts in Africa especially during the post-colonial era have become too recurrent and have significantly affected the daily activities of individuals and the States. The cases opposing Cameroon and Nigeria over the disputed areas of Bakassi and Darak became recurrent during the early 1990s despite colonial early attempts to demarcate the borders. From this period, regular border skirmishes attracted international attention when the two sides became involved in a protracted war over the ownership and control of the Bakassi Peninsula and Darak located at the banks of Lake Chad, all rich in oil reserves. This paper thus examines the role played by diplomatic and administrative agreements in the resolution of border conflicts between Cameroon and Nigeria. In this paper, we used the historical approach, taking cognizance of existing scholarly works and researches. We equally used the model of a simple descriptive collation and analysis of historical data for objective precision so as to determine the authenticity of data and their relevance. Resulting from our findings, we noticed that diplomacy and administrative efforts were major tools in the realization of these agreements, treaties and declaration between all the actors involved in the conflict. The International Court of Justice (ICJ) looked at both the political and socio-economic impact of the border conflict before passing it final verdict in order to insure diplomatic continuity amongst the contesting States. The study ends by proposing to Cameroon government the way forward for rehabilitation or therapy needed for the restoration of peace and the development of the area. Infrastructural development and effective presence are considered to be essential elements in border management policies.

Page(s): 23-31                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 19 October 2019

 René NGEK MONTEH
University of Yaoundé

[1]. Ambona R.A., “Le conflit de Bakassi vu par Cameroun Tribune, 1993-2002”, DIPES II Dissertation in History, ENS-University of Yaoundé I, 2005.
[2]. Anyu J. & Enow Ayuk M., “The Role Played by Diplomacy in the Resolution of the Bakassi Conflict”, International Journal of Social Science and Economic Research, Vol: 01, Issue: 10, 2016.
[3]. Asiwaju A.I. (ed.), Partitioned Africans-Ethnic Relations across Africa’s International Boundaries 1884-1984, New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1985.
[4]. Babatola Jadesola, “Nigerian-Cameroon boundary dispute: the quest for Bakassi Peninsular”, IISTE Journal of International Affairs and Global Strategy, 4. 81-95, 2012.
[5]. Bekker P.H.F., “Land and maritime boundary between Cameroon and Nigeria (Cameroon v. Nigeria: Equatorial Guinea intervening)”, The American Journal of International Law, 97 (2), 2003.
[6]. Commission of the African Union, Demarcation of Borders in Africa: General Considerations and Case Studies, Department of Peace and Security, Addis Ababa, September 2013.
[7]. Commission of the African Union, Demarcation of Borders in Africa: General Considerations and Case Studies, Department of Peace and Security, Addis Ababa, September 2013.
[8]. Efande P., “Bakassi exhibits potentials in fish production”, Cameroon Tribune (Yaoundé), 20 April 2010.
[9]. Halirou Abdouraman, «Le conflit frontalier Cameroun-Nigeria dans le Lac Tchad : les enjeux de l’ile de Darak, disputée et partagée», Cultures & Conflits [en ligne] 72 / Winter 2008, posted on May 19, 2009, URL : http // conflicts-revues.org / 17311, accessed November 08, 2017.
[10]. International Court of Justice, Case Concerning the Land and Maritime Boundary between Cameroon and Nigeria, Order of 15 March 1996, ICJ website at http://www.icj/cij.org/icj; February 2000.
[11]. Kendemeh E., “Bakassi: Projects worth CFAF 12 billion executed”, Cameroon Tribune (Yaoundé), March 15, 2010.
[12]. Konings P., “The Anglophone Cameroon-Nigeria boundary: Opportunities and conflicts”, African Affairs, 104 (415), 2005, pp. 275-301.
[13]. Njeuma M. Z., “Diplomatic and administrative contributions to peace on the border between Cameroon and Nigeria”, Boundaries in Africa from the 15th to the 20th century, Paris, UNESCO/ICHS, 2005.
[14]. Olinga A.D., L’accord de Greentree du 12 juin 2006 relatif à la presqu’ile de Bakassi, Paris, l’Harmattan, 2009.
[15]. Olinga Alain Didier, l’accord de Greentree du 12 juin 2006 relatif à la presqu’ile de Bakassi, Paris, l’Harmattan, 2009.
[16]. Omoigui N., “The Bakassi story”, 2006, Available from: http://www.omoigui.com, Accessed October 18, 2018.
[17]. Onana Mfege Andre Hubert, Cameroun Nigeria, ONU: Entre la force de la palabre et la primauté du droit, Paris, l’Harmattan, 2011.
[18]. Price F., “The Bakassi Peninsula: The border dispute between Nigeria and Cameroon”, ICE Case Studies, No. 163, November 2005.
[19]. Zang L., “Les frontières en Afrique centrale : barrières, limites ou ponts ?”, Mutations, n°1155 of mars 24, 2004.

René NGEK MONTEH “Diplomatic and Administrative Contributions in Peace Building on the Cameroon – Nigeria Border Conflict: From Colonial to Post Colonial Era” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.23-31 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/23-31.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Recognition of States: The Matters Still Unresolved

K.A.A.N. Thilakarathna – October 2019 Page No.: 32-37

The question relating to recognition of states is a growing concern whereas new states under current state of things could only be created through breaking away from an already established state. Since there is no universally accepted legal document nor a guideline to properly recognizes an entity’s claim for statehood, recourse has been often made to Articles 1 of the Montevideo Convention on the Rights and Duties of States which has become a customary international norm pertaining to the subject. However, the Montevideo Convention was not drafted to be used at a universal level and it was agreed upon by the American States to make their respective claims for their newly gained independence. The Montevideo Convention is outdated since the political realities have changed since its enactment. and this is also evident from the efforts of the European Union when they tried to establish new grounds for recognition of the entities making claims for statehood in the Eastern Europe which became a futile endeavor. Matters were further complicated by the International Court of Justice’s judgment regarding the unilateral declaration of Kosovo where the ICJ failed to either decide or comment on the international law relating to recognition of states. Therefore, this article attempts to bring into context the issues related to recognition of states and where the international legal community stands regarding building up a proper mechanism to recognize statehood of entities making such claims.

Page(s): 32-37                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 19 October 2019

 K.A.A.N. Thilakarathna
Attorney-at-Law, Institute of Human Resource Advancement, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka

[1]. Abass, A.Complete International Law: Text, Cases and Materials (2nd edn, Oxford 2014)
[2]. Berlin, H. ‘Recognition as Sanction: Using International Recognition of New States to Deter, Punish, and Contain Bad Actors’ (2009) 31 U. Pa. J. Int’l L. 531
[3]. Burns, J and Hart, H.L.A (ed), Jeremy Bentham: An Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation (1st edn, Athlone Press 1970).
[4]. Caspersen, N. ‘The Pursuit of International Recognition after Kosovo’ (2015) 21 Global Governance 393,
[5]. Crawford, J. The Creation of States in International Law (2nd edn, Oxford University Press 2006).
[6]. Denza, E.A Commentary: Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Immunities (4th edn, Oxford 2016)
[7]. Dold, B. ‘Concepts and Practicalities of the Recognition of States’ (2012) 22 Swiss. Rev. Int’l & Eur. L.81
[8]. Dugard, J. International Law (3rd edn, Juta 2006).
[9]. Evans, M. International Law (4th edn, Oxford University Press 2014).
[10]. Grant, T. ‘Defining Statehood: The Montevideo Convention and its Discontents’ [1999] 37 Colum. J. Transnat’l L 403
[11]. Hart, H.L.A.Concept of Law (3rd edn, Oxford 2012).
[12]. Hillgruber, C. ‘The Admission of New States to the International Community’ (1998) 9 European Journal of International Law 491,
[13]. Kelsen, H. ‘Recognition in International Law: Theoretical Observations’ (1941) 35 The American Journal of International Law 605, 606.
[14]. Kelsen, H.Principles of International Law (1st edn, The Lawbook Exchange 1952)
[15]. Klabbers, J. International Law (2nd edn Cambridge 2017)
[16]. Lauterpacht, H.Recognition in International Law (1st edn, Cambridge 1947)
[17]. McNair, D. ‘Stimson Doctrine of Non-Recognition’ (1933) 14 Brit. Y.B. Int’l L 65, 68.
[18]. Rebecca, W. International Law (7th edn, Sweet & Maxwell 2011).
[19]. Rich, R. ‘Recognition of States: The Collapse of Yugoslavia and the Soviet Union’ (1993) 4 Eur. J. Int’l L. 36
[20]. Rumble, W. (ed), John Austin The province of jurisprudence determined (1st edn, Cambridge 1995).
[21]. Ryngaert, C and Sobrie, A. ‘Recognition of States: International Law or Realpolitik? The Practice of Recognition in the Wake of Kosovo, South Ossetia, and Abkhazia’ (2011) 24 LJIL 467
[22]. Shaw, N. International Law (6th edn, Cambridge University Press 2008).
[23]. Starke, J.International Law (11th edn, Butterworths 1994) 3.
[24]. Terry, P. ‘The Recognition of New States in Times of Secession: Is State Recognition Turning into Another Means of Intervention?’ (2014) 20 Asian Year Book of International Law 53

K.A.A.N. Thilakarathna “Recognition of States: The Matters Still Unresolved” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.32-37 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/32-37.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Employing Actor Network Theory to Explore the Implementation of ICT in the Ghanaian Public Sector: The Case of DVLA

Albert Akanlisikum Akanferi, Isaac Asampana, Hannah Ayaba Tanye, Henry Akwetey Matey, James Ami-Narh- October 2019 Page No.: 38-50

Public sector organizations in Ghana have been grappled with reforms over the decades to make them efficient, reliable and effective and also to ensure efficient delivery of goods, works, and services to the general public. This research uses the case study methodology to explore the role of information technology in the public sector reforms at the Drivers Vehicle and Licensing Authority (DVLA) of Ghana. The study employed a qualitative research technique of the four moments of translation of the Actor-Network Theory in the context of New Public Management to analyse the data. The findings of the study recommended that managers of public organisations and other stakeholders in Ghana improve on ICT and IT infrastructure to ensure their operational excellence and efficiency for enterprise collaborations.

Page(s): 38-50                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 20 October 2019

 Albert Akanlisikum Akanferi
Information Technology Studies Department, University of Professional Studies, Accra. Ghana

 Isaac Asampana
Information Technology Studies Department, University of Professional Studies, Accra. Ghana

 Hannah Ayaba Tanye
Information Technology Studies Department, University of Professional Studies, Accra. Ghana

 Henry Akwetey Matey
Information Technology Studies Department, University of Professional Studies, Accra. Ghana

 James Ami-Narh
Information Services and Technology Directorate, University of Professional Studies, Accra. Ghana

[1]. Abekah-Nkrumah, G., Guerierro, M., & Prohuit, P. (2013). ICTs and Utilisation of maternal health services in Ghana. Retrieved from http://197.255.68.203/handle/123456789/6536.
[2]. Booth, D., Crook, R., Gyimah-Boadi, E., Killick, T., Luckham, R., & Boateng, N. (2005). What are the drivers of change in Ghana. A CDD-Ghana Publication. https://doi.org/CDD/ODI Policy Brief No. 1
[3]. Kraev, E. (2004). Structural Adjustment Policies in Ghana in the 1990s: an empirical analysis and policy recommendations, (UNDP commissioned paper).
[4]. Wiggins, S., & Leturque, H. (2011). Ghana’s Sustained Agricultural growth: Putting Underused Resources to Work’ Development Progress.
[5]. Li, Q., & Abdalla, E. O. (2014). The E-Government in Sudan: Challenges, Barriers and Prospects. Commerce and Service Science. https://doi.org/(GECSS 2014).
[6]. Amoah, L. G. A. (2013). Grey Hair , Grey Matter , and ICT Policy in the Global South : https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-4666-1909-8.ch015
[7]. Mensah, I. K. (2016). Overview of E-government Adoption and Implementation in Ghana. International Journal of Social, Behavioral, Educational, Economic, Business and Industrial Engineering, 10(1). https://doi.org/10004987
[8]. Nkwe, N. (2012). E-Government : Challenges and Opportunities in Botswana, 2(17), 39–48.
[9]. Ashaye, Olusoyi Richard, and Zahir Irani. “E-Government Implementation Benefits, Risks, and Barriers in Developing Countries: Evidence from Nigeria.” US-China Education Review 4, no. 1 (2014): 13-25.
[10]. Patrick, O. (2016). 5 . Aiding Corruption through Governance Structures in sub-Saharan Africa : What Role for E-Government ? Abstract : Aiding Corruption through Governance Structures in sub-Saharan Africa : What Role for E-Government ? Introduction :, 4(58), 58–78.
[11]. Schuppan, T. (2009). E-Government in developing countries : Experiences from sub-Saharan Africa. Government Information Quarterly, 26(1), 118–127. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.giq.2008.01.006
[12]. Guma, P. K. (2013). Public-Sector Reform , E-Government and the Search for Excellence in Africa : Experiences from Uganda, 11(2), 241–252.
[13]. Sorrentino, M. (2004). eGlobal The Implementation Of ICT In Public Sector Organisations . Analysing Selection Criteria For eGovernment Projects, 1–11.
[14]. Stake, R. E. (2000). The art of case study research: Perspectives on practice (2nd ed.), (Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.).
[15]. Bisman, J. E., & Highfield, C. (2012). he Road Travelled: An Overview and Example of constructivist Research in Accounting.
[16]. Public Sector and Government Board. (2012). The World Bank’s Approach to Public Sector Management 2011-2020: Better Results from Public Sector Institutions. Retrieved from http://siteresources.worldbank.org/EXTGOVANTICORR/Resources/3035863-1285601351606/PSM-Approach.pdf
[17]. Ohemeng, F. L. K., & Ayee, J. R. A. (2016). The ‘ New Approach ’ to Public Sector Reforms in Ghana : A Case of Politics as Usual or a Genuine Attempt at Reform ?, 34(2), 277–300.
[18]. Pearce, J. A., & Robinson, R. B. (2005). Strategic management: formulation, implementation, and control. Chicago, IL: McGraw-Hill.
[19]. Serpa, R. (2005). Creating a candid corporate culture. Journal of Business Ethics, 8(4), 425-430.
[20]. Daft, R. L. (2010). Organization Theory and Design: Thomson.
[21]. Boada-Grau, J., & Gil-Ripoll, C. (2010). Strategic human resource management as an antecedent to the balanced scorecard. Psychology in Spain, 14(1), 64-73.
[22]. Rus, M., & Rusu, D. (2015). The Organizational Culture in Public and Private Institutions. Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences, 187, 565-569.
[23]. Khanh, N. (2014). The critical factors affecting E-Government adoption: A Conceptual Framework in Vietnam. arXiv preprint arXiv:, 1401-4876.
[24]. Al-Shafi, S., & Weerakkody, V. (2010). Factors affecting e-government adoption in the state of Qatar. In European and Mediterranean Conference on Information Systems (Emcis) (pp. 12-13). Abu Dhabi, UAE.
[25]. Boyne, G. (2003). What Is Public Service Improvement? Public Administration, 81, 211-227. doi:10.1111/1467-9299.00343
[26]. Srivastava, C. S., & Teo, T. (2010). E-Government, E-Business and National Economic Performance. Communications of the AIS, 26. doi:10.17705/1CAIS.02614
[27]. Altaany, F., & Al-zoubi, M. I. (2013). A Comparison between E-Government Ranks in Jordan and Malaysian Government. International Journal of Advanced Computer Research, 3(13).
[28]. Jooste, S. F. (2008). A New Public Sector in Developing Countries, (March).
[29]. OECD. (1995). Governance in transition: public management reforms in OECD countries, (Paris: OECD).
[30]. Gruening, G. (2001). Origin and theoretical basis of New Public Management, 4, 1–25.
[31]. Hood, C. (1991). A PUBLIC MANAGEMENT FOR ALL SEASONS ?, 69, 3–20.
[32]. Parker, R., Bradley, L., Parker, R., & Bradley, L. (2004). Organisational culture in the public sector : evidence from six organisations.
[33]. Haque, S. M. (n.d.). New public management: Origins, dimension, and critical implications, (Public Administration and Public Policy), 1, 1-8.
[34]. Batley, R., & Larbi, G. A. (2004). pd. (n.d.). the changing role of government:the reform of public services in developing countries. Basingstoke, UK; New York, USA: Palgrave Macmillan.
[35]. Schedler, K., & Proeller, I. (2007). public management as a cultural phenomenon . revitalizing societal culture in international public management research, 8(1).
[36]. De Haes, S., Huygh, T., Joshi, A., & Van Grembergen, W. (2016). Adoption and impact of IT governance and management practices. International Journal of IT/Business Alignment and Governance (IJITBAG). https://doi.org/10.4018/IJITBAG.2016010104
[37]. Heeks, R., & Bailur, S. (2007). Philosophies , Theories , Methods and Practice, 24(2), 1–45.
[38]. Truex, D., & Keil, M. (2006). Theorizing in information systems research : A reflexive analysis of the adaptation of theory in information, 7(12), 797–821.
[39]. Orlikowski, B. W. J. (2001). Technology And Institutions : What Can Research On Information Technology And Research On Organizations Learn From Each Other ? ^, 25(2), 145–165.
[40]. Orlikowski, W. J., & Yates, J. (2006). APPLIED BEHAVIORAL SCIENCEMarch 2006 A Commentary, 42(1), 127–134. https://doi.org/10.1177/0021886305285130
[41]. Gronlund, A. (n.d.). What’s in a field-exploring the egoverment domain. Proceedings of the 38th Annual Hawaii International Conference on system sciences. Retrieved from ake.gronlund@esi.oru.se
[42]. Callon, M. (1984). Some elements of a sociology of translation: domestication of the scallops and the fishermen of St Brieuc Bay. The Sociological Review, 32(S1), 196–233.
[43]. Walsham, G., Sahay, S., Quarterly, S. M. I. S., & Mar, N. (2016). GIS for District-Level Administration in India : Problems and Opportunities Mmmsnn GIS For District-Level Administration In India : Problem and Opportunities, 23(1), 39–65.
[44]. Latour, V. B., & Rip, L. (2015). On actor-network theory, 4(1996), 369–381.
[45]. Law, J. (1992). Notes on the theory of the actor-network: Ordering, strategy, and heterogeneity. Systemic practice and action research, 5(4), 379-393.
[46]. Cresswell, K. M., Worth, A., & Sheikh, A. (2010). Actor-Network Theory and its role in understanding the implementation of information technology developments in healthcare. BMC medical informatics and decision making. https://doi.org/1472-6947/10/67
[47]. Callon, M. (1987). Society in the making: The study of technology as a tool for sociological analysis. London: MIT Press.
[48]. Lee, N., & Hassard, J. (1999). Organization unbound: actor-network theory, research strategy and institutional flexibility, 6(3), 391-404.
[49]. Callon, M. (1986). The sociology of an actor-network: the Case of the electric vehicle. London: Macmillan.
[50]. Law, J. (1987). ‘Technology and Heterogeneous Engineering: The Case of Portuguese
Expansion’. The Social Construction of Technological Systems: New Directionsin theSociology and History of Technology. Bijker, W. E.,Hughes, T. P. and Pinch, T. J. (Eds).MIT Press, Cambridge, Ma: 111-134.
[51]. Monteiro, E. (1999). “Monsters”. Planet Internet. K. Braa, B. Dahlbom and C. Sørensen. Lund, Studentlitteratur: 239 – 249
[52]. Heeks, R., & Stanforth, C. (2015). Development Studies Research : An Open Access Technological change in developing countries : opening the black box of process using actor – network theory, (September). https://doi.org/10.1080/21665095.2015.1026610
[53]. Elbanna, A., 2010. Rethinking IS project boundaries in practice: a multiple-projects perspective. The Journal of Strategic Information Systems 19 (1), 39–51
[54]. Haque, A. & Mantode, K. L. 2013. Governance in the Technology Era: Implications of Actor Network Theory for Social Empowerment in South Asia. In: Yogesh K. Dwivedi, H. Z. H., David Wastell, Rahul De’ (ed.) Grand Successes and Failures in IT. Public and Private Sectors. Springer.
[55]. Heeks, R., & Stanforth, C. (2007). Understanding e-Government project trajectories from an actor-network perspective, (March 2006), 165–177. https://doi.org/10.1057/palgrave.ejis.3000676
[56]. Broer, T., Nieboer, A. P., & Bal, R. A. (2010). opening the black box of quaality improvement collaboratives: an Actor- network theory aooroach. BMC Health Services Research. https://doi.org/1472-6963/10265
[57]. Papadopoulos, T., & Wongkaew, M. (2008). The role of inscriptions as interessement devices in the translation of innovative management ideas. implementing Lean Thinking in the UK NHS: The European Institute for Advanced Studies in Management. Retrieved from https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/65139/
[58]. Sarker, S., Sarker, S., Sidorova, A., & Taylor, P. (2016). Understanding Business Process Change Failure : An Actor-Network Perspective Understanding Business Process Change Failure : An Actor-Network Perspective, 23(1), 51–86.
[59]. Walsham, G. (2006). Doing Interpretive Research. EJIS, 15, 320-330. doi:10.1057/palgrave.ejis.3000589
[60]. Devinder Thapa. (2011). THE ROLE OF ICT ACTORS AND NETWORKS IN DEVELOPMENT: THE CASE STUDY OF A WIRELESS PROJECT IN NEPAL, 1–16. https://doi.org/10.1002/j.1681-4835.2011.tb00345.x
[61]. Munir, Kamal and Matthew Jones, 2004 ‘Discontinuity and after: The social dynamics of technology evolution and dominance’. Organization Studies 25/4: 561-581.
[62]. Whittle, A. & Spicer, A. (2008) Is Actor Network Theory Critique? Organization Studies 29(4): 611-629.
[63]. Gad, C., & Jensen, C. (2010). On the consequences of post-ANT. Science Technology & Human Values – SCI TECHNOL HUM VAL, 35, 55-80. doi:10.1177/0162243908329567
[64]. Callon, Michel and Bruno Latour, 1992 ‘Don’t throw the baby out with the Bath School! A reply to Collins and Yearly’ in Science as practice and culture. A. Pickering (ed), 343-368. London: University of Chicago Press.
[65]. Latour, Bruno, 1999 ‘On Recalling ANT’ in Actor network theory: And after. J. Law and J. Hassard (eds), 15-25. Oxford: Blackwell
[66]. Collins, H., & Yearley, S. (1992). Epistemological chicken. In Pickering A, editor. Science, Practice and Culture. . Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.
[67]. Sayes, E. (2014). Actor–Network Theory and methodology: Just what does it mean to say that nonhumans have agency? Social Studies of Science, 44(1), 134-149.
[68]. Alcadipani, R., & Hassard, J. (2010). Actor-Network Theory, organizations and critique: towards a politics of organizing. Organization, 17(4), 419-435.
[69]. Reed, Michael I., 1997 ‘In Praise of duality and dualism: Rethinking agency and structure in organizational analysis’. Organization Studies 18/1: 21-42.
[70]. Pickard, J. A. (2007). Research methods in information. . London: Facet Publishing.
[71]. Larsson, H. (2011). Evolving Structure in the Implementation of Healthcare Information Systems: An Actor-Network Analysis. Electronic Journal of E-Government, 9(1), 30–40.
[72]. Onwuegbuzie, A. J., & Leech, N. L. (2007). Sampling Designs in Qualitative Research : Making the Sampling Process More Public Sampling Designs in Qualitative Research : Making the Sampling Process, 12(2), 238–254.
[73]. Babbie, E. (2006). The basics of social research. Thomson Wadsworth. Belmont, California.
[74]. Neuman, W. (2005). Social Research Methods (6th ed.). London: Pearson.
[75]. Kimaro, H., & Sahay, S. (2007). An institutional perspective on the process of decentralization of health information systems: A case study from Tanzania. Information Technology for Development, 13, 363-390. doi:10.1002/itdj.20066
[76]. Kumar, R., & Best, M. L. (2006). Impact and Sustainability of E-Government Services in Developing Countries : Lessons Learned from Tamil Nadu , India, 1–12. https://doi.org/10.1080/01972240500388149
[77]. Osborne, M. J., & Osborne, M. J. (2000). An Introduction to Game Theory by Please send comments to Department of Economics This version :
[78]. Ciborra, C. (2005). Interpreting E-Government and Development: Efficiency, Transparency or Governance at a Distance? Information Technology & People, 18(3), 260-279.
[79]. Ciborra, C., & Navarra, D. D. (2005). Good governance, development theory, and aid policy: Risks and challenges of e‐government in Jordan. Information Technology for Development banner. doi:https://doi.org/10.1002/itdj.20008
[80]. Salamon, L. M., & Elliott, O. V. (2002). The Tools of Government: A Guide to the New Governance. Oxford University Press.
[81]. Hirschmann, D. (1993). Institutional development in the era of economic policy reform : concerns , contradictions and illustrations from Malawi, 13, 113–128.
[82]. Cunningham, S. D. D. J. B. (2016). Underlying values and competencies of public and private sector managers Introduction. https://doi.org/http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/AEDS-09-2015-0050
[83]. Awiah, D. M. (2017). DVLA automates operations. Retrieved from http://www.graphic.com.gh/news/general-news/dvla-automates-operations.html
[84]. Chronicle, G. (2017). Ghana: Suspension of road toll and new driver’s license timely. Retrieved from http://allafrica.com/stories/201706220862.html

Albert Akanlisikum Akanferi, Isaac Asampana, Hannah Ayaba Tanye, Henry Akwetey Matey, James Ami-Narh, “Employing Actor Network Theory to Explore the Implementation of ICT in the Ghanaian Public Sector: The Case of DVLA” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.38-50 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/38-50.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Counterfactual Thinking and Gender Difference Effect on Voting Decision

Larry Okechukwu Awo, Christopher Agha Oko, Abubakar Yahaya, Perpetua Chinyere Chukwu – October 2019 Page No.: 51-56

General elections globally have been characterized by large or low turnout of voters. Numerous reasons has been suggested as plausible explanations of voting decision during elections. We adopted a 2×2 factorial design to test the effects of counterfactual thinking and gender differences in the voting decision of Nigerian voters during the 2019 general election. One hundred and twenty (60 male, 60 female) National Diploma 1 students of a Federal Polytechnic (age range = 19-27, mean age = 22.37, SD =2.85) participated in the study. Counterfactual thinking was varied into downward and upward counterfactual conditions, while gender was categorized into male and female electorates. The counterfactual voting thought, and the reasons to vote questionnaire were the stimulus materials used to assess counterfactual thinking and voting decision respectively. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) result revealed significant main effects for counterfactuals and gender on voting decision. The interaction of counterfactual thinking and gender had nosignificant effect on voting decision, (p>.05). The implications and limitations of these findings were discussed and suggestions were made for future studies

Page(s): 51-56                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 20 October 2019

 Larry Okechukwu Awo
Citizenship Education Unit, School of General Studies, Federal Polytechnic of Oil and Gas, Bonny Island, Nigeria

 Christopher Agha Oko
Citizenship Education Unit, School of General Studies, Federal Polytechnic of Oil and Gas, Bonny Island, Nigeria

 Abubakar Yahaya
Citizenship Education Unit, School of General Studies, Federal Polytechnic of Oil and Gas, Bonny Island, Nigeria

 Perpetua Chinyere Chukwu
Citizenship Education Unit, School of General Studies, Federal Polytechnic of Oil and Gas, Bonny Island, Nigeria

[1]. Abendscho, A., &Steinmetz, S. (2014). The gender gap in voting revisited: Women’s party preferences in a European context. Social Politics, 21(2), 315-344.
[2]. Acevedo, M., & Krueger, J. I. (2004). Two egocentric sources of the decision to vote: The voter’s illusion and the belief in personal relevance. Political Psychology, Vol. 25, 115- 134.
[3]. Almond, G. A., and Verba, S (1963). The civic culture: Attitudes and democracy in five nations. An analytical study. Boston: Little, Brown and Company.
[4]. Alvarez, R.M. & Nagler, J. (1998). When politics and models collide: Estimating models of multiparty elections. American Journal of Political Science, 42, 55-96.
[5]. Ashley, D. (2003). Factors that Influence voter’s decision during elections: “2015 study.com”. Retrieved: August 17, 2015.
[6]. Bartels, L.M. (1986). Issue voting under uncertainty: An empirical test. American Journal of Political Science, 30, 42-57.
[7]. Bergh, J. (2007). Explaining the gender gap: A cross-national analysis of genderdifferences in voting. Journal of Elections, Public Opinion and Parties, 17(3), 235-61.
[8]. Billiet, J. & De Witte, H. (1995). Attitudinal dispositions to vote for a ‘new’ extreme right-wing party: The case of Vlaams Blok. European Journal of Political Research 27, 181-202.
[9]. Blais, A. & Turgeon, M. (2004). How good are voters at sorting out the weakest candidate in their constituency? Electoral Studies, 23, 455-461.
[10]. Blais, A., Gidengil, E., &Nevitte, N. (2004). Where does turnout decline come from? European Journal of Political Research, 43(2), 221-236.
[11]. Brunell, T.L. &DiNardo, J. (2004). A propensity score reweighting approach to estimating the partisan effects of full turnout in American presidential elections. Political Analysis, 12, 28-45.
[12]. Ebube, O. (2014). The Nigerian Voter’s Choice. “Icpsr-unmich.edu”. Retrieved: August 20, 2015.
[13]. Eijk, C. V., &Egmond, M. V. (2007). Political effects of low turnout in national and
[14]. Engelen, B. (2007). Why compulsory voting can enhance democracy. ActaPolitica, 42, 23-39.
[15]. Epstude, K., &Roese, N. J. (2008). The functional theory of counterfactual thinking. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 12, 168-192.
[16]. Franklin, M.N. (1999). Electoral engineering and cross-national turnout differences: What role for compulsory voting? British Journal of Political Science, 29, 205-224.
[17]. Giger, N. (2009). Towards a modern gender gap in Europe? A comparative analysisof voting behaviour in twelve countries. The Social Science Journal, 46(3), 474-92.
[18]. Glasgow, G. & Alvarez, R.M. (2000). Uncertainty and candidate personality traits. AmericanPolitical Science, 30, 709-728.
[19]. Haider,K.S. (2014). Punjab caste-system and voting behaviour.Pakistan Vision, 15(1),144-179.
[20]. Highton, B. &Wolfinger, R.E. (2001). The political implications of higher turnout. British Journal of Political Science, 31, 179-223.
[21]. HRCP.(2008). Human right commission of Pakistan.State of human rights: An annual report. Lahore, Pakistan. 144.
[22]. Inglehart, R., &Norris, P. (2000). The developmental theory of the gendergap. Women’s and men’s voting behaviour in global perspective. International Political Science Review, 21(4), 441-63.
[23]. Inglehart, R., &Norris, P. (2003). Rising tide: Gender equality and cultural change around the world.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
[24]. Iversen, T., &Rosenbluth, F. (2006). The political economy of gender.Explaining cross-national variation in the gender division of labor and the gendervoting gap. American Journal of Political Science, 50(1), 1-19.
[25]. Kahneman, D. &Tversky, A. (1982). The simulation heuristic. In D. Kahneman, P. Slovic,
[26]. Kahneman, D., & Miller, D. T. (1986). Norm theory: Comparing reality to its alternatives. Psychological Review, 93, 136-153.
[27]. Kai-Yu, W., Minli, L., & Laura, P. (2010). Does thinking make it so? The effect of counterfactual thinking on product evaluations. Advances in Consumer Research, 37, 588-590.
[28]. Knutsen, O. (2001). Social class, sector employment, and gender as party cleavagesin the Scandinavian countries: A comparative longitudinal study, 1970–95.Scandinavian Political Studies, 24(4), 311-50.
[29]. Kolawole, A. (2016). Analysis of the influence of opinion leaders on voting decision of rural voters: An evidence from Ayetoro, Ogun state of Nigeria. Journal of Humanities and Social Science, 21, 46-53.
[30]. Kray, L. J., George, L. G., Berkeley, K. A., Gallinsky, A.D., Tetlock, P. E., &Roese, N. J. (2010). From what might have been to what must have been: Counterfactual thinking creates meaning. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 98, 106-118.
[31]. Kray, L.J., George, L.J., Liljenquist, K.A., Galinsky, A.D., Tetlock, P.E., &Roese, N.J. (2010).From what might have been to what must have been: Counterfactual thinking createsmeaning. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 98, 106-118.
[32]. Lockwood, N. J. (2013). International vote buying. Harvard International Law Journal, 54, 97-156.
[33]. Luskin, R.C. (2002). From denial to extenuation and finally beyond: Political sophistication and citizen performance. In J. H. Kuklinski (ed.), Thinking about political psychology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
[34]. Manow, P., &Emmenegger, P. (2012). Religion and the gender vote gap. Women’s changed political preferences from the 1970s to 2010.Working Paper No.01/2012. Bremen: ZeS.
[35]. Markman, K. D., & McMullen, M. N. (2003). A reflection and evaluation model of comparative thinking. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 7, 244-267.
[36]. Markman, K. D., Gavanski, I., Sherman, S. J., & McMullen, M. N. (1995). The impact of perceived control on the imagination of better and worse possible worlds. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 21, 588-595.
[37]. Markman, K. D., McMullen, M. N., &Elizaga, R. A. (2008). Counterfactual thinking, persistence, and performance: A test of the Reflection and Evaluation Model. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 44, 421-428.
[38]. McGraw, K.M. &Pinney, N. (1990). The effects of general and domain-specific expertise on political memory and judgment. Social Cognition, 8, 9-30.
[39]. Muhammad, H. J. (2013). Psychosocial factors involved in voting decision making (unpublished Mphil Dissertation).Department of Psychology Government College University Lahore.
[40]. Muhammad, H. J., &Hasan, S. S. (2016). Development of the decision to vote scale. Pakistan Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 14(2), 10-14.
[41]. Petrocelli, J. V., & Harris, A. K. (2011). Learning inhibition in the Monty Hall problem: The role of dysfunctional counterfactual prescriptions. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 37, 1297-1311.
[42]. Roese, N. J. (1994). The functional basis of counterfactual thinking. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 66, 805-818.
[43]. Roese, N.J., & Olson, J.M. (1995). What might have been: The social psychology of counterfactual thinking.N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum.
[44]. Roese, N. J., Epstude, K., Fessel, F., Morrison, M., Smallman, R., Summerville, A. (2009).Repetitive regret, depression, and anxiety: Findings from a nationally representative survey. Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 28, 671-688.
[45]. Schacter, D, L., Benoit, R. G., De Brigard, F., &Szpunar, K. K. (2013). Episodic future thinking and episodic counterfactual thinking: Intersections between memory and decisions. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, 7427, 263-273.
[46]. Shawar,D.E. &Asim, M. (2012). Voting behavior of people towards different political parties in district Faisalabad, Pakistan.Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences, 3(2), 85-91 doi:10.5901/mjss.2012.v3n2.85
[47]. Sherman, S. J. & McConnell, A. R. (1996). The role of counterfactual thinking in reasoning. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 10, 113-124.
[48]. Smallman, R., &Roese, N. J. (2009). Counterfactual thinking facilitates the formation of intentions: Evidence for a content-specific pathway in behavioral regulation. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 45, 845-852.
[49]. Studlar, D. T., McAllister, I., &Hayes, B. C. (1998). Explainingthe gender gap in voting: A cross-national analysis. Social Science Quarterly, 79(4), 779-98.
[50]. Venzke, I. (2014). What If? Alternative Realities of International Law. ESIL Reflections, 3, 1-5.

Larry Okechukwu Awo, Christopher Agha Oko, Abubakar Yahaya, Perpetua Chinyere Chukwu, “Counterfactual Thinking and Gender Difference Effect on Voting Decision” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.51-56 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/51-56.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Absolute Power Does Not Corrupt Leadership: A Critical Study of Thomas Hobbes’ Political Theory in Leviathan

Callistus Kahale Kabindama- October 2019 Page No.: 57-64

AUTHORITY AND POWER IN LEADERSHIP

INTRODUCTION

This is chapter has outlined how we can use Hobbes’ political philosophy into today’s political world. The arguments given by Hobbes show their relevance even to the challenges and struggles of the politics exercised in the contemporary world. The use of power and authority by leaders today has come under much scrutiny and judgment. This is why the arguments of some scholars such as Hobbes, Locke and Rousseau can guide our search for a good leader. In this chapter we are going to explain how diversifying the use of power and authority can be a great benefit to the roles of governance and leadership. The use of power is to enforce the social contract; and authority is there because the social contract mandates a leader to be in office. Therefore, power and authority is equivalent to making sure the leader is effective in his or execution of state duties.
In addition, the concepts of power and authority cannot be exercised in the absence a society. There will be need for people to experience a reign of a sovereign when the contract is signed. This calls for the observance of the rule of law and respect of human rights. In this chapter, we are going to discuss on how a leader should be ready to apply the rule of law and respect of rights in his or her reign whilst executing the principles of authority and power. When a leader applies the rule of law he or she promotes justice, and when she or he respects human rights he or she dignifies humanity. This aspect leads us to have a good leader with qualities such empowering, leading, inspiring and sharing his or her vision with the citizens. The chapter ends with a critique highlighting how power a leader with power has control over the state of affairs.

Page(s): 57-64                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 20 October 2019

 Callistus Kahale Kabindama
The Catholic University of Eastern Africa

References are not available.

Callistus Kahale Kabindama “Absolute Power Does Not Corrupt Leadership: A Critical Study of Thomas Hobbes’ Political Theory in Leviathan” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.57-64 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/57-64.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Relationship Between Leadership and Employee Performance in Indonesia

Ria Silvita Tanum, Sudjarwo – October 2019 Page No.: 65-67

The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between the leadership on employee performance of the Academic Bureau and student affairs at the University of Lampung, Lampung Province, Indonesia. This research was a quantitative study with an associative method. The data collection was carried out by using a questionnaire with 167 student samples at 100% response rates. The hypothesis was tested by using simple linear regression analysis through the t-test to find out the relationship of the independent variable to the dependent variable at the 95% confidence level (α = 0.05). The results showed that there was a significant influence of leadership on employee performance.

Page(s): 65-67                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 20 October 2019

 Ria Silvita Tanum
Faculty of Teacher Training and Education, Universitas Lampung, Indonesia

 Sudjarwo
Faculty of Teacher Training and Education, Universitas Lampung, Indonesia

[1]. Basna, Frengky. (2016). Analisis Gaya Leadership, Kepuasan Kerja, Komitmen Organisasi dan Kompetensi terhadap Kinerja Pegawai. Jurnal Riset Bisnis dan Manajemen, 4(3).
[2]. Behroozi, Mohammad. (2012). Survey on university role in preparation graduated students in to entrepreneurs universities towards a conceptual framework: Iran’s Perspective. Procedia-Social and Behavioral Sciences, 46, 2414-2418.
[3]. Byrne, Zinta S, Stoner, Jason, Thompson, Kenneth R, & Hochwarter, Wayne. (2005). The interactive effects of conscientiousness, work effort, and psychological climate on job performance. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 66(2), 326-338.
[4]. Dharma, Cipta. (2007). Analisis Pengaruh Penerapan Sistem Manajemen Mutu ISO 9001: 2000 Terhadap
[5]. Kolzow, David R. (2014). Leading from within: Building organizational leadership capacity. International Economic Development Council, 1-314.
[6]. Mathis, Robert L, & Harold, John. (2002). Jackson. Human resource management, 13.
[7]. Mintzberg, Henry. (2004). Leadership and management development: An afterword. Academy of Management Perspectives, 18(3), 140-142.
[8]. OECD. (2017). OECD Higher Education Programme: State of higher education 2015-16. Paris: OECD.
[9]. Prajogo, Daniel. I., and Brown, A. 2004. “The Relationship Between TQM Practice and Quality Performance and the Role of Formal TQM Programs: An Australian Empirical Study”. Quality Management Journal. 11 (4), pp. 31-42.
[10]. Quinn, A., Lemay, G., Larsen, P., & Johnson, D. M. (2009). Service quality in higher education. Total Quality Management, 20(2), 139-152.
[11]. Zehir, Cemal and Esin Sadikoglu. (2009). The relation-ship between total quality management (TQM) practices and organizational performance: An empirical investigation, International Journal of Production Economics, Vol. 11, No. 3, pp. 140-156.

Ria Silvita Tanum, Sudjarwo “The Relationship Between Leadership and Employee Performance in Indonesia” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.65-67 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/65-67.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Relationship between the Financing of Education and Quality of Primary Schools in Indonesia

Tri Ardila, Riswanti Rini – October 2019 Page No.: 68-70

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between quality of education financing at school from elementary schools in the city of Bandar Lampung, Lampung province, Indonesia. This is a quantitative research methods asosiative. Data was collected by using a questionnaire with a sample of 127 teachers in the response rate of 100%. The hypothesis was tested using simple linear regression analysis through the t test to determine the relationship of the independent variables on the dependent variable at 95% confidence level (α = 0.05). The results showed that no significant effect on the financing of the quality of schools.

Page(s): 68-70                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 20 October 2019

 Tri Ardila
Faculty of Teacher Training and Education, University of Lampung, Indonesia

 Riswanti Rini
Faculty of Teacher Training and Education, University of Lampung, Indonesia

[1]. Baker, B. D., Sciarra, D. G., &Farrie, D. (2014). Is school funding fair? A national report card. Education Law Center.
[2]. Callahan, Rebecca M. 2005. Tracking and high school English learners: Limiting opportunity to learn. American Educational Research Journal, 42(2), 305-328.
[3]. Gibbons, S., Machin, S., & Silva, O. (2013). Valuing school quality using boundary discontinuities. Journal of Urban Economics, 75, 15-28.
[4]. Goddard, Roger D, Hoy, Wayne K, & Hoy, Anita Woolfolk. 2000. Collective teacher efficacy: Its meaning, measure, and impact on student achievement. American Educational Research Journal, 37(2), 479-507.
[5]. Good, B., Vermeulen, N., Tiefenthaler, B., & Arnold, E. (2015). Counting quality? The Czech performance-based research funding system. Research Evaluation, 24(2), 91-105.
[6]. Hall, Katharine, & Giese, Sonja. 2009. Addressing quality through school fees and school funding: Children’s Institute.
[7]. Hanushek, E. A. (2005). The economics of school quality. German Economic Review, 6(3), 269-286.
[8]. Heck, R. H. (2000). Examining the impact of school quality on school outcomes and improvement: A value-added approach. Educational administration quarterly, 36(4), 513-552.
[9]. Hoy, WK, & Miskel, CG. 2008. Theory, research and practice in educational administration. Translated to Persian by: Abaszadeh S. Urmia: Urmia University pub, 2008, 88-46.
[10]. Itegi, F. M. (2016). Financing Secondary Education in Kenya: Exploring Strategic Management Approach for Improving Quality of Education. Universal Journal of Educational Research, 4(5), 949-955.
[11]. Sugiyono, PD 2010. Pendidikan Metode Penelitian. Pendekatan kuantitatif.
[12]. Vincent, J. M. (2012). California’s K-12 educational infrastructure investments: Leveraging the state’s role for quality school facilities in sustainable communities.

Tri Ardila, Riswanti Rini “The Relationship between the Financing of Education and Quality of Primary Schools in Indonesia” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.68-70 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/68-70.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Factors Militating Against Effective Management of Public Secondary Schools in Lagos State, Nigeria

Gbesoevi Emmanuel Semako – October 2019 Page No.: 71-76

This study investigated the factors militating against effective management of public senior secondary schools with special reference to Lagos State public senior secondary schools in education district II of Lagos State. The purpose of the study was to determine the impact of adequate funding on the effective management of public secondary schools in order to achieve the set educational goals and objectives. The population sample of the study was randomly drawn from sixteen (16) public senior secondary schools in education district III of Lagos State. 150 teachers took part in the study. Three hypotheses were formulated and tested. The researcher developed a questionnaire titled Factors Militating Against Effective Management of Public Senior Secondary Schools Teachers’ Questionnaire (FMAEMPSSSTQ) that was used to collect data from respondents. The reliability of the research instrument was obtained by application of the test-retest method using Pearson Product Moment Correlation to establish reliability coefficient of 0.74.The data collected were analyzed using Pearson Product Moment Correlation Coefficient Formula (PPMCC) to determine the relationship between these factors and effective management. Results were held at sign of 0.05 probability level. Overall findings indicated that there were sign relationships between well-equipped laboratory at r = 0.663; N=150; p<0.0, adequate funding and effective management at r 0.492; N= 150; p<0.05, adequate funding and academic performance at r = .172; N= 150; p<0.05, and schools’ physical facilities, and effective management at r = .463; N= 150; p<0.05. Conclusion drawn from the findings suggests that well equipped laboratory, adequate funding and schools’ physical facilities are significant to and effective management of public secondary schools. This study recommends for the government and all stake holders to give necessary financial and professional support to the secondary schools toward ensuring proper funding of secondary school education. This will facilitate good academic performance of the students. The relatively high level of school facilities and students’ academic performance in senior secondary schools should be improved upon by the school administrators and other stakeholders.

Page(s): 71-76                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 21 October 2019

 Garba Ahmed Gusau
Department of Educational Management, Lagos State University, Ojo Faculty of Education, Nigeria

[1]. Adesina, O. B. (2011): School Plant Planning as Correlated of Students‟ Academic Performance in South West Nigerian Secondary Schools. International Journal of Business Administration: Vol.2 No 2; Retrieved from www.sciedu.ca/ijba
[2]. Ajayi, I. A. & Yusuf, M. A. (2009). Instructional space planning and students’ academic performance in Southwest Nigerian Secondary Schools. International Journal of Science Education Kamla-Raj ,1 (1) 73-77
[3]. Akinsolu, R. A., 2014 “Provision and Management of Facilities in Nigerian Primary Schools,” In E.O. Fagbemiye, J. B. Babalola, M. Fabunmi & Ayeni (eds), Management of Primary and Secondary Education in Nigeria, NAEAP publications (2004).
[4]. Akintayo, M.O. (2014) Public Finance and the Problems of Access to University Education. International Journal of Literacy Education (UNESCO Chair). 2(1), 1-23
[5]. Akomolafe, C. O. & Adesua, V. O., “The Impact of Physical Facilities on Students‟ Level of Motivation and Academic Performance in Senior Secondary Schools in South West Nigeria,” Journal of Education and Practice, vol.7, no.4, pp. 39-42 (20
[6]. Asiabaka, I. P. (2008). The Need for Effective Facility Management in Schools in Nigeria. New York Science Journal, 1(2), 10-21.
[7]. Ayeni A. O. (2004); Maintaining school facilities for the achievement of the objectives of the Universal Basic Education (UBE): Retrieve from edu.ui.edu.ng/AOAyeni
[8]. Federal Republic of Nigeria (2004) National policy on education Abuja: Federal Ministry of Information.
[9]. Fenker, M. (2004).Organizational Change, Representations and Facilities. In Facilities Management: Innovation and Performance. Alexander , K. (ed.) U.K. Taylor Francis
[10]. Fuller, B. (1985). Raising school quality in developing countries: what investments Boost learning (Education and Training series, Discussion paper number (EDT) Washington DC.World Bank.
[11]. Ijaduola, K. O. et al, (2011): Empirical Analysis of School Plant Planning as a determinant of Secondary School Students‟ AcademicPerformance.http://www.academicleadership.org/article/empirical-analysis-of-school-plant- planning.
[12]. Khan, P., and Iqbal, M. (2012). Interdisciplinary journal of contemporary research in business. Vol. 4, No.3 P. 211
[13]. Nwokike, S. C. (2012). Management of School Plant by Principals in Nsukka Education Zone of Enugu State.Med, Thesis, Unpublished, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria.
[14]. Oduyemi, O., “Meeting the challenges of the 21ST Century in Technical and Vocational Education,”Presented at a National Seminar on Technical and Vocational Education in Nigeria, Abuja, November (2000).
[15]. Ogie, L. I. (2015). Influence of Principals’ Management Styles on Secondary School Facilities in Rivers State Nigeria. The International Journal Of Humanities & Social Studies, 3(11), 26 – 30.
[16]. Okoiye, O. and Uche, A.C. (2004). Book Care, Users Services and Basic Infrastructures in Primary School Libraries Owerri: Imo State Library Board.
[17]. Olakoya, O. K. (2004): Effective Instructional Materials in Teaching of Business Studies. Education Today 5 (1 and 2), 51-5
[18]. Olaniyonu, S. O. A. and Gbenu, J. P. (2017). School plant planning and facility maintenance. Lagos: Laideb printers
[19]. Oluchukwu (2000). Challenges of Educational Planning in the 21st Century: In Olagboye, A.A. Fadipe, J.O. (Eds) Management of Nigerian Education: School Project Monitoring and School Plant Maintenance. NIEPA, Ondo.
[20]. Onwurah, C. (2004). School plant management. In T.O. Mgbodile (Ed.). Fundamentals of educational administration and planning Enugu: Magnet Business Enterprises
[21]. Turupere, K. (2016). The influence of school physical environment on secondary school students’ academic performance in Bayelsa State. Asian Journal of Educational Research 4, (2) 104-123.
[22]. Usen, O.M. (2016). Teachers’ utilization of school facilities and academic achievement of student nurses in human biology in schools of nursing in Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria.Journal of Education and Practice. 7, (16) 57-66.
[23]. Uya, C. E. (2004). Strategies for promoting good reading habits among junior secondary school students. Literacy Reading in Nigeria, 10 (1), 177-183.
[24]. Yusuf, M.A. & Oluwarotimi, I. A. (2011). Towards Optimal Utilization of School Facilities in Secondary Schools. JORIND (9) 1www.ajol,info/journals/jorind retrieved 29th June2017

Gbesoevi Emmanuel Semako “Factors Militating Against Effective Management of Public Secondary Schools in Lagos State, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.71-76 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/71-76.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Effect of Cognitive Restructuring in Reducing Aggressive Behaviour of Secondary School Students in Gombe Local Government Area of Gombe State

Anyamene, Ada and Ngwakwe, Chinyere Catherine – October 2019 Page No.: 77-83

This paper examined the effect of Cognitive Restructuring Technique in reducing Aggressive behaviour among secondary school students in Gombe State. Two research questions were posed and two hypotheses were tested at 0.05alpha levels. The study was carried out using quasi-experimental research design of pre-test, post-test and control non randomised group. The Experimental group was treated using Cognitive Restructuring (CR) for eight weeks while the control group was treated with conventional counselling for the same period of eight weeks. The population of students with aggressive behaviour was 245 in Gombe Local Government of Gombe State. A sample of 81 students with very high aggressive behaviour was selected from three schools through purposive sampling technique. The instrument for data collection was Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BPAQ) which was developed and validated by Buss and Perry in 1992, but was revalidated in Nigeria. The reliability coefficient of 0.80 as reported by Onukwufor (2013) was adopted for this study. Data was collected and subjected to analysis. Data relating to research questions were answered using statistical mean while data relating to hypotheses were tested using Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA). Findings from the study revealed that among others that Cognitive Restructuring Technique was effective in reducing secondary school students’ aggressive behaviour. The findings further revealed among others that the difference in the effectiveness of cognitive restructuring technique in reducing aggressive behaviour of secondary school students is significant. Based on the findings, it was recommended that cognitive restructuring technique is an effective therapeutic technique for modifying the aggressive behaviour of secondary school students. The practicing counsellors and therapist should adopt the use of the technique in counselling and in administering therapy on aggressive behaviour of secondary school students to treat and modify their aggressive behaviour.

Page(s): 77-83                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 21 October 2019

 Anyamene, Ada
Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Nigeria

 Ngwakwe, Chinyere Catherine
Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Nigeria

[1]. Anagbogu, M.A. (2008). Foundation of Guidance and Counselling for Colleges and Universities. Enugu: Academic Publishing Company.
[2]. Buss, A.H., & Perry, M. (1992). The aggression questionnaire. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology,63, 452-459.
[3]. Chujor, J. & Kennedy, M. C. (2014) Effects of counselling in curbing persistent lateness to school. International journal of innovative research and development, 3(4) 472-480.
[4]. Egenti, U. P. & Ebenebe, R. C. (2018). Effects of cognitive restructuring on social adjustment of maladjusted in-school adolescence in secondary schools.Journal of Emerging Trends in Educational Research and Policy Studies (JETERAPS), 9(1), 29-33.
[5]. Ezeokana, J, O., Obi-Nwosu, H. & Okoye, C. A. F. (2014). Influence of street life and gender on aggression and self esteem in a sample of Nigerian children. International Review of Management and Business Research, 1(2), 949-959. Retrieved from https://www.irmbrjournal.com/papers/
[6]. Gasa, C. (2011). Cognitive behavioural therapy in anxiety disorders: current state of the evidence. Dialogues ClinNeurosci, 13(4),413–21.
[7]. Kpolovie, J.P. (2010). Advance Research Methods. New Owerri: Springfield Publishers Ltd.
[8]. Nwaoba, C. N. (2013). Efficacy of cognitive behaviour modification strategy in curbing aggression. Journal of the Nigeria Society of Educational psychologists, 11(1), 95-103.
[9]. Nwaolisa, F. A. & Olisakin, A. M. (2013). Effects of cognitive behaviour and social learning therapies on managing adolescents’ aggressiveness .The Counselling Approach. Paper Presented at the 37th Annual Conference of the CASSON in Benue State.
[10]. Nworgu, B. G. (2015). Educational research basic issues and methodology. Nsukka, Enugu: University Trust Publishers.
[11]. Ogilive, J. M. (2011). Neuropsychological measures of executive function and anti-social behaviour: A meta-analysis. Criminology, 49, 1063-1107.
[12]. Okoro, C. C., Adunonye, J. O.& Egwuasi, P. I. (2015).Aggressive tendencies and academic performance among students in public secondary schools in Uyo urban. Multidisciplinary Journal of research Development, 17 (3), 62-74.
[13]. Onukwufor, J.N. (2013). Fundamentals of social psychology. Uyo: Abigab Associates Ltd.
[14]. Onyije, A.C. & Ojedapo, D.O. (2010). Guidance and Counselling Services for Achieving Skills Development in Nigerian Secondary School System: The Problems. Journal of Technical Education Research and Development, 3(1), 49-56.
[15]. Paul-Cookey, N. R. & Iwuama, B.C. (2011). Comparison of forms and incidence of compulsive disorder? Journal of American Academy, Child Adolescent Psychiatry, 33, 795-804.
[16]. Zirpoli, T.J. (2014). Behaviour Management: application for teachers. Pearson Allyn Bacon Prentice Hall.

Anyamene, Ada and Ngwakwe, Chinyere Catherine “Effect of Cognitive Restructuring in Reducing Aggressive Behaviour of Secondary School Students in Gombe Local Government Area of Gombe State ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.77-83 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/77-83.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Impact of Financial Literacy on Business Performance

Khadijah Muhammad Usama, Wan Fauziah Wan Yusoff – October 2019 Page No.: 84-91

The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of financial literacy financial on business performance of entrepreneurs in Bauchi metropolis Nigeria. The study was clasped on a resource-based theory which postulates that given resource heterogeneity immovability and contentment of the requirement of value rareness, flawed imitability and non-substitutability, a firm’s resource can be a source of sustained competitive advantage. The study revealed that financial literacy had a statistical influence on the performance of entrepreneurs. The paper advances the argument and general view that financial literacy is a major contributing factor in entrepreneurial business performance.

Page(s): 84-91                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 21 October 2019

 Khadijah Muhammad Usama
Faculty of Technology Management and Business, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn, Malaysia

 Wan Fauziah Wan Yusoff
Faculty of Technology Management and Business, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn, Malaysia

[1].Abdullah, A. H. (2017). Technology , Engineering and Mathematics ( STEM ) Education from the Cognitive , Affective and Behavioural Aspects. IEEE International Conference on Teaching, Assessment, and Learning for Engineering (TALE) Page, 6–12.
[2]. Abdullah, M. A., & Azam, S. M. F. (2015). Mediating Relationship of Financial Practice between Financial Knowledge and Business Success: An Empirical Study on Malaysian Small Enterprises. Australian Academy of Business and Economics Review Volume, 1, 1–23.
[3]. Atkinson, A. (2017). Financial Education for MSMEs and Potential Entrepreneurs. OECD Working Papers on Finance, Insurance and Private PensionsOECD Publishing, Paris. doi:10.1787/bb2cd70c-en
[4]. Barte, R. (2012). Financial literacy in micro-enterprises: the case of Cebu fish vendors. Philippine Management Review, 19.
[5]. Begonja, M., Cicek, F., Balboni, B., & Gerbin, A. (2016). Innovation and business performance determinants of SMEs in the Adriatic region that introduced social innovation. Economic Research-Ekonomska Istrazivanja, 29, 1136–1149.
[6]. Brinckmann, J., Salomo, S., & Gemuenden, H. G. (2011). Financial management competence of founding teams and growth of new technology–based firms. Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, 35, 217–243.
[7]. Chepkemoi, M., Patrick, E., & Njoroge, C. (2017). The Effect of Financial Literacy Training on Business Profotability in Coastal Region: A Case of Kwale County SMEs. Strategic Journal of Business & Change Management, 4, 684–703.
[8]. Cherugong Patrick. The Effect of Financial Literacy on Performance of Small and Medium Enterprises in Transzoia County (2015).
[9]. Covin, J. G., & Slevin, D. P. (1989). Strategic management of small firms in hostile and benign environments. Strategic Management Journal, 10, 75–87.
[10]. Cresswell, J. W. (2014). Research Design. Qualitative, Quantitative and Mixed methods approaches. Research Design Qualitative Quantitative and Mixed Methods Approaches.
[11]. Dahmen, P., & Rodríguez, E. (2014). Financial literacy and the success of small businesses: An observation from a small business development center. Numeracy, 7, 3.
[12]. Engström, P. and, & McKelvie, A. (2017). Financial literacy, role models, and micro-enterprise performance in the informal economy. International Small Business Journal: Researching Entrepreneurship, 35, 855–875.
[13]. Eniola, A. A., & Entebang, H. (2015). SME Firm Performance-Financial Innovation and Challenges. Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences, 195, 334–342.
[14]. Eniola, A. A., Entebang, H., & Abiodun, A. (2016). Financial literacy and SME firm performance. International Journal of Research Studies in Management, 5, 31–43.
[15]. Eresia-Eke, C. E., & Raath, C. (2013). SMME Owners’ Financial Literacy and Business Growth. Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences, 4, 397–406.
[16]. Fatoki, O. (2014). The Financial Literacy of Micro Entrepreneurs in South Africa. Journal of Social Sciences, 40, 151–158.
[17]. Feng, H., Morgan, N. A., & Rego, L. L. (2017). Firm capabilities and growth: the moderating role of market conditions. Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 45, 76–92.
[18]. Gentry, R. J., & Shen, W. (2010). The relationship between accounting and market measures of firm financial performance: How strong is it? Journal of Managerial Issues, 514–530.
[19]. Gielnik, M. M., Zacher, H., & Schmitt, A. (2016). How Small Business Managers ’ Age and Focus on Opportunities Affect Business Growth : A Mediated Moderation Growth Model. Journal of Business Management, 00, 1–24.
[20]. Hazlina Ahmad, N., Ramayah, T., Wilson, C., & Kummerow, L. (2010). Is entrepreneurial competency and business success relationship contingent upon business environment? A study of Malaysian SMEs. International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, 16, 182–203.
[21]. Hieltjes, E. H., & Petrova, E. (2013). The impact of financial literacy and transaction costs on bank account uptake and use: A Randomized Controlled Trial in Ethiopia. Master’s Thesis in Economics, Fall.
[22]. Huston, S. J. (2010). Measuring Financial Literacy. Journal of Consumer Affairs, 44, 296–316.
[23]. Ibrahim, W. N. A., Bakar, A. R., Asimiran, S., Mohamed, S., & Zakaria, N. S. (2015). Impact of Entrepreneurship Education on the Entrepreneurial Intentions of Students in Technical and Vocational Education and Training Institutions (TVET) In Malaysia. International Education Studies, 8, 141.
[24]. Jacqueline Siekei, J. W. & A. K. (2013). An Assessment of the role of financial literacy on Performance of Small and Micro Enterprises: Case of Equity Group Foundation Training Program on SMES in Njoro district, Kenya. World Academic Journal of Business & Applied Science Journal of Economics & Finance (JEF), 1, 250–261.
[25]. Javed Mahmood Jasra , Muhammad Asif Khan, A. I. H. (2011). Determinants of Business Success of Small and Medium Entreprises. Journal, International Vol, Social Science, 2, 274–280.
[26]. Joseph, M., Dhanuraj, P., & Joseph, K. A. (2017). Influence of Financial Inclusion and Financial Self Efficacy on the Credit Behaviour of BPL households. International Journal of Research in Economics and Social Sciences (IJRESS), 7, 52–66.
[27]. Klapper, L. F., Lusardi, A., & Panos, G. (2012). Financial Literacy and the Financial Crisis. National Bureau of Economic Research, 1–55.
[28]. Lusardi, A. (2008). Financial Literacy: An Essential Tool For Informed Consumer Choice? (Nber Working Paper Series No. 14084). Cambridge, MA 02138.
[29]. Lusardi, A., Michaud, P.-C., & Mitchell, O. S. (2015). Using a Life Cycle Model to Evaluate Financial Literacy Program Effectiveness. The Pension Research Council Working Papers, 41.
[30]. Lusardi, A., & Mitchell, O. S. (2013). The economic importance of financial literacy. Journal of Economic Literature, 52, 65.
[31]. Lusardi, A., & Tufano, P. (2015). Debt literacy, financial experiences, and overindebtedness. Journal of Pension Economics and Finance (Vol. 14). doi:10.1017/S1474747215000232
[32]. Mabhungu, I., & Van Der Poll, B. (2017). A Review of Critical Success Factors Which Drives the Performance of Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises. International Journal of Business and Management, 12, 151.
[33]. Matewos, K. R., Navkiranjit, K. D., & Jasmindeep, K. (2016). Financial literacy for developing countries in Africa: A review of concept, significance and research opportunities. Journal of African Studies and Development, 8, 1–12.
[34]. Mayer, R. C., & Schoorman, F. D. (1992). Predicting participation and production outcomes through a two-dimensional model of organizational commitment. Academy of Management Journal, 35, 671–684.
[35]. Mbabazi, M., & Daniel, T. (2017). Effect of Financial Literacy on Stock Market Participation By Small and Medium Enterprises in Rwanda: a Case Kimironko Market. European Journal of Business and Social Sciences, 6, 246–259.
[36]. Md. Noor, H., Kamaruddin, N. K., Mohd Adi, M. N., Ahmad, A. R., Wan Saidi, W. N. S., & Abdul Rahman, A. G. (2013). Small medium Entreprises ( SME ) Readiness to Participate in Workforce Skills Development. 2nd International Conference on Technology Management , Business and Entrepreneurship, 539–554.
[37]. Miller, D., Lee, J., Chang, S., & Breton-miller, I. Le. (2009). Filling the institutional void : The social behavior Filling and performance of family vs non-family in emerging markets technology firms. Journal of International Business Studies, 40, 802–817.
[38]. Morrison, J. L. (2006). Financial intelligence: A manager’s guide to knowing what the numbers really mean. Journal of Education for Business, 81, 346.
[39]. Mugenda, O. M., & Mugenda, A. G. (1999). Research methods: Quantitative and qualitative approaches. Acts press.
[40]. Mwithiga, E. M. Financial Literacy and Enterprise Performance among Owner – Managed ICT SMEs in Nairobi County (2016).
[41]. Njoroge, R. M. (2013). Relationshipm between Financial Literacy and Entrepreneurial Success in Nairobi County Kenya. School of Business University of Nairobi.
[42]. Noorhayati, N. (2016). The impact of employee indirect participation channel on decision making process in department of irrigation and drainage head quarters (JPS HQ) and Federal Territory of Kuala Lumpur (JPS WPKL). Universiti Utara Malaysia.
[43]. Nunoo, J., & Andoh, F. K. (2011). Sustaining small and medium enterprises through financial service utilization: does financial literacy matter?
[44]. Omair, A. (2015). Selecting the appropriate study design for your research: Descriptive study designs. Journal of Health Specialties, 3, 153.
[45]. Remund, D. L. (2010). Financial literacy explicated: The case for a clearer definition in an increasingly complex economy. Journal of Consumer Affairs, 44, 276–295.
[46]. Richard, P. J., Devinney, T. M., Yip, G. S., & Johnson, G. (2009). Measuring organizational performance: Towards methodological best practice. Journal of Management, 35, 718–804.
[47]. Sabana, B. (2014). Entrepreneur Financial Literacy, Financial Access, Transaction Costs and Performance of Micro Enterprises in Nairobi City County, Kenya. International Journal of Research in Management, Economics and Commerce, 1, 25–30.
[48]. Schuhen, M., & Schürkmann, S. (2014). Construct validity of financial literacy. International Review of Economics Education, 16, 1–11.
[49]. Simpson, M., Padmore, J., Newman, N., Simpson, M., Padmore, J., & Newman, N. (2012). Towards a new model of success and performance in SMEs. International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour, 18, 264–285.
[50]. Sulaiman, N. (2016). The Impact Of Financial Knowledge And Capabilities On Sme Firm Performance. Universiti Teknologi MARA.
[51]. Szilagyi, A. D. (1980). Causal inferences between leader reward behaviour and subordinate performance, absenteeism, and work satisfaction. Journal of Occupational Psychology, 53, 195–204.
[52]. Treptow, E. (2014). Financial Intelligence: A Manager’s Guide to Knowing What the Numbers Really Mean by Karen Berman and Joe Knight with John Case: Boston, MA: Harvard Business Review Press, 2013, 304 pp., $27.00, ISBN 978-1-4221-4411-4. Taylor & Francis.
[53]. Van Rooij, M., Lusardi, A., & Alessie, R. (2011). Financial literacy and stock market participation. Journal of Financial Economics, 101, 449–472.
[54]. Vincent Sebikari, K. (2014). Entrepreneurial Performance and Small Business Enterprises in Uganda. International Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship Research, 2, 1–12.
[55]. Williams, P., & Naumann, E. (2011). Customer satisfaction and business performance: a firm-level analysis. Journal of Services Marketing, 25, 20–32.
[56]. Yadav, M. P. (2015). Model of Entrepreneurial Success : A Review and Research Agenda. Journal Of Advanced Academic Research,2, 40–58.
[57]. Zabri, S. M., & Lean, J. (2014). SME Managers ’ Financing Preferences : The Case of Successful SMEs in Malaysia, 1–13.
[58]. Zuhair, S., Wickremasinghe, G., & Natoli, R. (2015). Migrants and self-reported financial literacy: Insights from a case study of newly arrived CALD migrants. International Journal of Social Economics, 42, 368–386.

Khadijah Muhammad Usama, Wan Fauziah Wan Yusoff “The Impact of Financial Literacy on Business Performance” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.84-91 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/84-91.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Ragging; Its Evolution and Effects: A Literature Review with a Special Reference to Sri Lanka

Hemamalie Gunatilaka – October 2019 Page No.: 92-99

Ragging in basic sense consists of use of humiliation to socialise new comers who enter in to educational institutions. It is an international phenomena dates back to hundreds of years. The article attempts to bring together literature relevant to ragging, paying more attention to the Sri Lankan context. Although it is an act of humiliation, in extreme conditions it can cause physical, behavioural, emotional and social problems among victims. In Sri Lanka state universities are known as a common place of ragging and currently more attention is paid due to the incidents reported regarding extreme conditions that are highly traumatic. Literature highlights that ragging is associated with student politics in Sri Lankan universities. There are many negative outcomes of ragging and stress is of the significant negative outcomes. However, according to existing literature ragging has positive effects such as socialising students coming from deprived backgrounds.

Page(s): 92-99                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 21 October 2019

 Hemamalie Gunatilaka
Department of Business Administration, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Sri Lanka

[1]. Chitkara University Himachal Pradesh, (2009), Anti Ragging Policy. Available from: http://chitkarauniversity.in/dnn/Admissions/AntiRagging/tabid/94/Default.aspx
[2]. Chopra, M., (2009) Ragging in Educational Institutes: A Human Rights Perspective, Guru Gobind Singh Indrap rastha University, Delhi. Available from: http://www.legalserviceindia.com
[3]. Department of Census and Statistics, (2017). Available from: www.statistic.gov.lk/chap13
[4]. Gamage, Siri, (2017), Psychological, Sociological and Political Dimensions of Ragging in Sri Lankan Universities, Article in Social Affairs: A Journal for the Social Sciences. Available from: www.socialaffairsjournal.com
[5]. Garg, Rajesh, (2009), Ragging: A Public Health Problem in India, Article in Indian Journal of Medical Sciences. Available from: http://www.indianjmedsci.org
[6]. Kim Y.S., Leventhal B.L., Koh Y.J., Boyce W.T., (2009), Bullying Increased Suicide Risk: Prospective Study of Korean adolescents. Available from: http://www.noragging.org
[7]. Nalapu, Samson S. R., (2013), Students Perceptions and Feedback on Ragging in a South Indian Medical College, Article in South East Asian Journal of Medical Education. Available from: http://www.mciindia.org
[8]. Panditharatne B. L., (2008), Life and Times of Our University Days: The Universities of Ceylon (Colombo/Peradeniya) and University of Peradeniya and Beyond, Godage International Publishers, Colombo 10
[9]. Premadasa I. G., Wanigasooriya N. C., Thalib L., Ellepola A. N. B., (2011), Harassment of newly admitted undergraduates by senior students in a Faculty of Dentistry in Sri Lanka, Article in Medical Teacher, https://www.tandfonline.com/loi/imte20
[10]. Shinde, V. G., (2017), The Menace of Ragging in Educational Institutes: A Human Right Perspective, Article in International Journal of Advanced Research and Development. Available from: www.advancedjournal.com
[11]. Srabstein J., Piazza T., (2008), Public health, Safety and Educational Risks Associated with Bullying Behaviors in American Adolescents. Available from: http://www.noragging.org
[12]. University Grant Commission, (2010). Available from www.ugc.ac.lk (Accessed 10 January 2019)
[13]. University Grants Commission, Federation of University Teachers’ Associations, CARE International Sri Lanka, 2015, Preventing Sexual and Gender- based Violence. Available from: http://www.care.org/
[14]. Wajahat, Ayesha, (2014), Harassment due to Ragging, Article in Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences. Available form: www.sciencedirect.com
[15]. Wanasundera, L., (2000), Country Report on Violence Against Women in Sri Lanka, Centre for Women’s Research, Colombo
[16]. http://www.nhrep.gov.lk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=120&Itemid=59&lang=en
[17]. https://www.yas.nic.in/sites/default/files/National-Youth-Policy-Document.pdf
[18]. https://www.lawnet.gov.lk/1946/12/31/prohibition-of-ragging-and-other-forms-of-violence-in-educational-institutions-3/

Hemamalie Gunatilaka “Ragging; Its Evolution and Effects: A Literature Review with a Special Reference to Sri Lanka” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.92-99 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/92-99.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

An Investigation of Corporate Governance Challenges Facing Indigenous Banks in Zimbabwe

Dr David Foya, Garainesu Changunda- October 2019 Page No.: 100-115

The Indigenous banks in Zimbabwe have gone through many challenges in observing the internationally accepted best practice in corporate governance. These challenges remain pertinent despite the initiation of several mechanisms by both the government and the regulatory board, RBZ. Hence the purpose of this study was to explore the challenges faced by indigenous banks in corporate governance best practices. In view of the above, the objective of the study were to as certain challenges that indigenous banks are facing with respect to the role, composition and accountability of their boards of directors, determine the level of compliance with best practice in risk management with special focus on compliance with the Banking Act and National Code of Corporate Governance in Zimbabwe (ZIMCODE), scrutinize challenges on disclosure and transparency in indigenous banking institutions and establish problems arising from the ownership structure and the role indigenous shareholders play in engendering compliance with principles of corporate governance. The methodology applied in this study was a mixed research approach which is both quantitative and qualitative. Questionnaire and interviews were used to collect primary data from the participants who were mainly from the indigenous banks’ board, senior, middle and lower management. The study population were 95 participants that comprised of 85 for questionnaires and 10 for in-depth interviews. Purposive and convenient sampling techniques were used to select the participants. The major findings of the study were that indigenous banks were dominated by males. Most of the board members and other senior appointee were found to be working contrary to the principles of good Corporate Governance. Results also revealed that many indigenous banks were not complying with standards required by the regulatory authority in Zimbabwe, RBZ. It was concluded that several indigenous banks’ compliance with best practice in CG leaves a lot to be desired as Zimbabwe’s economy continue to face challenges. It is therefore recommended that indigenous banks should be required to comply with ZIMCODE to promote sustainability in their operations. Further areas of study would include eexamination of the challenges of corporate governance in the entire financial institutions in Zimbabwe and the investigation of the extent to which bank supervision is vital in protecting depositor’s funds and prevent bank failure.

Page(s): 100-115                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 21 October 2019

  Dr David Foya
Department of Business Management, National University of Science & Technology, Bulawayo, Zimbabwe

  Garainesu Changunda
Chief Finance Officer People Own Saving Bank, of Zimbabwe

[1]. Ahmad,S , Omar,R. (2016), “Basic corporate governance models: a … 58 Issue: 1, pp.73-107, https://doi.org/10.1108/IJLMA-10-2014-0057.
[2]. Alder, H J, Mellenbergh, G J,.& Hand, D. J. (2008).Advising on research methods: a consultant’s companion. Huizen: Johannes van Kessel Publishing ISBN 978-90-79418-01-05
[3]. Al-Tamimi, H. (2002), Risk Management Practices: An Empirical Analysis of the UAE. Commercial Banks. Finance India, 16(3), 1045-1057.
[4]. Beck, T., Demirgüç-Kunt, A., & Levine, R. (2009). Financial institutions and markets across countries and over time-data and analysis. World Bank Policy Research Working Paper Series, Vol.1.
[5]. Boolaky, P.K. (2008), corporate governance in the financial services sector of small island economies: a case study of Mauritius Volume 4, Issue 3, Spring 2007.
[6]. Cadbury, S. A. (1992), Report of the Committee on the Financial Aspects of Corporate Governance. London: Gee Publishing
[7]. Chinamasa , P. (2013), The 2014 National Budget Statement – Towards an empowered society and a growing economy. Presented to the Parliament of Zimbabwe on 19 December 2013. Available at: http://www.zimtreasury.gov.zw/ .
[8]. Chinamasa, P. (2014), Corporate Governance and Remuneration Policy Framework for Chief Executive Officers of Parastatals, State Enterprises and Local Authorities..
[9]. Claessens,S. (2006), Current Challenges in Financial Regulation. World Bank Policy Research Working Paper 4103. Hague: World Bank.
[10]. Creswell, J. W. (2012), Educational Research: Planning, conducting and evaluating quantitative and qualitative research. Upper Saddle, NJ: Prentice Hall
[11]. GoZ, (2015), Ministry of Economic Planning & Investment (2011), Zimbabwe Medium Term Plan
[12]. 2011- 2015. GoZ, Ministry of Environment Water and Climate, 2013, Monetary Quantification of the Ecosystem Products and Services in Protected Areas.
[13]. Lofland, J., Snow, D. A. Anderson, L., & Lofland, L. H. (2006). Analysing social settings: A guide to qualitative observation and analysis (4thed p 304). Wadsworth.
[14]. Maimbo, S.(2002),The Design, Development and Implementation of Bank Licensing
[15]. Makori G.O.(2015), Effects of credit risk management practices on profitability of deposit taking Sacco’s in Nairobi county, Unpublished MBA research project, Management University of Africa, Nairobi.
[16]. Mangudya, J.P.(2017), Monetary Policy Statement: “Economic transformation through transparency and accountability” Harare : RBZ.
[17]. Menkulasi, J., Erasmus, L., & Leichter, J. (2009). Dedollarization in Liberia-lessons from cross-country experience: International Monetary Fund.
[18]. Menkulasi, J., Erasmus, L., & Leichter, J. (2009), Dedollarization in Liberia-lessons from cross-country experience: International Monetary Fund.
[19]. Miles, M.B, Huberman, A.M & Saldana, J (2014), Qualitative Data Analysis: A Methods Sourcebook (3rded p 48), Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications
[20]. Mugova, S & Sachs, P.R (2016) , Corporate governance structure and accountability as affected by national governmental infrastructure in developing countries Corporate Ownership & Control Vol 13 Issue 4
[21]. Mugova, S & Sachs, P.R. (2016), Corporate governance, structure and accountability as affected by national government infrastructure in developing countries.
[22]. Muzwembiri, P.T. (2015), Credit risk management and profitability of commercial banks in Zimbabwe. Unpublished research project.
[23]. Mwangi, G.N. (2010). “The effect of Credit Risk Management on financial performance of commercial banks in Kenya. Unpublished MBA research project, University of Nairobi.
[24]. Mwangi, K, M, (2012), “The effect of risk management on financial performance of Commercial Banks in Kenya, Unpublished MBA research project, University of Nairobi.
[25]. Nduku, N.R. (2016), The effect of credit risk management on financial performance of commercial banks in Kenya. A dissertation. Nairobi: University Of Nairobi.
[26]. Nyamutowa C. and Masunda S. (2013), An Analysis of credit risk management practices in commercial banking institutions in Zimbabwe, Volume 4 online@www.ijeronline.com
[27]. Oke, M.O (2012), Credit Risk and Financial Performance in Nigeria Unpublished research project, Ekiti State University.
[28]. Opondo, M (2014), “The effect of credit risk management on the financial performance of commercial banks in Kenya, Unpublished MBA research project, University of Nairobi.
[29]. Government of Zambia (2000), Procedures in Zambia (1980 – 2000) “International Conference on Development and Business Finance Policy and Experience in Developing Countries, University of Manchester.
[30]. Ragin, C. C. (2008), Redesigning Social Inquiry: Fuzzy Sets and Beyond, Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press.
[31]. RBZ (2012), Monetary Policy Statement. Harare: RBZ .
[32]. Reinhart, C. M., Rogoff, K. S., & Savastano, M. A. (2003), Addicted to dollars. Retrieved from Schneider, F., & Enste, D. (2000), Shadow Economies around the World Size, Causes, and Consequences.

Dr David Foya, Garainesu Changunda, “An Investigation of Corporate Governance Challenges Facing Indigenous Banks in Zimbabwe” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.100-115 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/100-115.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Labour Migration: Causes and Patterns in Nigeria

John, Wajim – October 2019 Page No.: 116-123

This paper examined labour migration: causes and patterns in Nigeria. Labour migration simply connotes migration for the main purpose of employment. Those who are moving from one place to another in search of green pasture or job and those who secured jobs as the result of the movement are called labour migrants or migrant workers. Labour migrants lack legal protection, and insufficient information about their rights makes them vulnerable to exploitation and abuse from recruiters, employers, and authorities. Labour migrants who often work in the informal sector are usually exposed to abuses resulting from xenophobia or fear of strangers and racism especially the international migrants. Findings of this research work revealed that unemployment, poverty and insecurity are the basic causes of labour migration in Nigeria. Unemployment is regarded as the root of poverty in Nigeria. In Nigeria predominantly the graduate unemployment is phenomenally prominent in the recent decades, the state which is essentially as a result of the sharp increase in the tertiary institution turnout. Unemployment, on the other hand, is a situation in which people are actively in need of pay work, they have the requisite skill and ability to do the work but they cannot find it due to some structural factors, seasonal or cyclical. Secondary sources of data were used for the purpose of this paper; and two theories were also reviewed and adopted which include Neo-classical theory of migration and New economic theory of migration. Amongst other recommendations, it’s recommended that entrepreneurship centres should be established within the thirty six states of the federation including FCT Abuja that will be responsible for training the unemployed youths in order to reduce the level of migration within and outside the country so that we shouldn’t lose our labour force.

Page(s): 116-123                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 21 October 2019

 John, Wajim
Department of Sociology, Federal University, Wukari, 200 Katsina-Ala Road, P.M.B 1020 Wukari, Nigeria

[1]. Abdu, P. S. (1982). Dry Season Migration in Sokoto State. Abdu, P. S. and Swindell, K. (ed.), Ibadan University Press Limited
[2]. Adekanye, B. J. (1998) ‘Conflicts, loss of State capacities and migration in contemporary Africa, in Appleyard Reginald (ed.) Emigration Dynamics in Developing Countries, Vol 1, Sub-Saharan Africa. Pp 165-206.
[3]. Adepoju, A (1991) South-north Migration. The African Experience’ International Migration Review, Vol.29, No 2, pp. 205-222.
[4]. Adepoju, A. (1996) ‘International migration in and from Africa: Dimensions, Challenges and Prospects. Population, Human, Resources and Development in Africa (PHRDA), Dakar.
[5]. Afolayan, A. A. (1976). Behavioural approach to the study of migration into, and mobility within the metropolitan of Lagos. PhD Thesis, Department of Geography, University of Ibadan
[6]. Afolayan, A. A. (2000). Trans-border Movement and Trading: A Case Study of a Borderland in Southwestern Nigeria. Trans-border Studies, No 13, pp33-48.
[7]. Afolayan, A.A. and Afolayan, A.A. and Ikwuyatum,G.O. et al (2011). Dynamics of Internal and International Mobility of Traders in Nigeria. University of Ibadan Press. May, 2011.
[8]. Amrevurayire E.O. and Ojeh V.N. (2016). Consequences of rural-urban migration on the source region of Ughievwen clan Delta State Nigeria. European Journal of Geography, 7 (3), 42-57
[9]. Arango, J. (2000). Explaining migration: a critical view. International Social Science Journal 52 (165): 283-296.
[10]. Auclair, C. (2005). Environmental and Socio-Economic Impact of Armed Conflicts on Urban Areas. United Nations Environmental Programme. African Environment 2.
[11]. Awaritefe, O. D. (2000), The Spatial Pattern of Turnout’s Preferences and Demand in Nigeria, (Unpublished PhD Thesis) Department of Geography and Regional Planning University of Benin, Nigeria.
[12]. Aworemi J.R., Abdul-Azeez I.A. and Apoola N.A. (2011). An Appraisal of the factor influencing ruralurban migration in some selected local government areas of Lagos State, Nigeria. Journal of Sustainable Development, 4 (3), 84-86
[13]. Bakewell, O. and de Haas (2007), ‘African migrations: Continuities, discontinuities and recent transformations’. In L. De Haan, U. Engel and P. Chabal (eds), African Alternatives (Leiden: Brill, 2007).
[14]. Castles, S. (2012). Methodology and Methods- Conceptual Issues’ in African Migrations Research Innovative Methods and Methodologies. Edited by Mohamed Berriane and Hein de Haas, African World Press. Pp 31-70
[15]. De Haas, H (2010) Migration and development: A theoretical perspective. International Migration Review, Vol. 44 (1), Spring 2010: 227–264.
[16]. Deshingkar, P. 2004. Understanding the Implications of Migration for Pro-poor Agricultural Growth. A paper prepared for the Dac Povnet Agriculture Task Group Meeting, Helsinki, 17 – 18 June, 2004.pp1-20.
[17]. Ekong, E.E (2003) An introduction to rural sociology. Uyo, Nigria: Dove Education Publishers.
[18]. Eze B.U. (2016). The underlying factors of rural-urban migration in southeastern Nigeria: A study in Nsukka region of Enugu state. IOSR Journal Of Humanities And Social Science, 21 (7), 46-54
[19]. Fadayomi, T.O (1998) Rural development and migration in Nigeria: impact of the Eastern Zone of Bauchi State Agricultural Development Project. Ibadan Nigeria: Institute of Social and Economic Research.
[20]. Faist, T. (2000). The Volumes and Dynamics of International Migration and Transnational Social Spaces. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
[21]. Freund, W. M. (1981). “Labour Migration to the Northern Nigerian Tin Mines, 1903-1945.” The Journal of African History 22(1): 73-84.
[22]. Gautam, T.R (1999) Labour migration in India: A case of Kandebash VDDC, Bagling. A dissertation submitted to T.U, Kirtipur.
[23]. Grainger, A (1990). The Threatening Desert: Controlling Desertification. London; Earthscan.
[24]. Grove, A. T. (1971). Africa South of the Sahara. London: Open University Press Human Development Report 2004 ‘Selected indicators of human poverty for Nigeria’.
[25]. Hicks J.R, (1962): Theory of wages, Second edition, Macmillan, London, p.162.
[26]. Ikwuyatum, G.O. (2012). Migration as a Threat to National Security: The Case of Nigeria in the Boko Haram Era. Paper Presented at the 2012 Annual International Conference of the Royal Geographical University of Edinburgh, George Square, Edinburgh EH8 9JU, UK (July 3 –July 5 2012)
[27]. Ikwuyatum, G.O. (2012b). The Changing Face of Migration in West Africa: The Case of Nigeria. African Migration Observatorio sobre la Realidad Social del África Subsahariana, University Universadad Autonoma de Madrid (FCA-UAM). Madrid, Spain (2012).
[28]. International Organization for Migration (IOM), (2003): World Migration 2003: Managing Migration Challenges and Responses for People on the Move, Vol.2, Geneva, p.14.
[29]. James, I. (1987), ‘Human Mobility in the Lake Chad Basin.’ Annals of Borno, vol. iv, pp57
[30]. Jibowo, A.A (1992) Essentials of Rural Sociology. Abeokuta: Gbemi Sodipo Press Ltd.
[31]. Mabogunje, A. L. (1970) .Systems approach to a theory of rural-urban migration. Geographical Analysis, Jan, 2(1): 1-8.
[32]. Mabogunje, A. L. (1972). Regional mobility and resources development in West Africa. McGill University.
[33]. Majid, N. (2004). Reaching millennium goals: hoe well does agricultural productivity growth reduce poverty? ILO Employment Strategy Paper 12.
[34]. Massey, D. S., et al (1993). Theories of international migration: a review and appraisal. Population and Development Review 19 (3): 431-466.
[35]. Massey, D. S., et al (1998). Worlds in motion. Understanding international migration at the end of the millennium. Clarendon Press Oxford.
[36]. Mini S.E. (2000). The impact of rural-urban migration on the rural economy in Eastern Cape villages. (Unpublished paper delivered at the HSRC migration workshop, Pretoria, 17-20 March).
[37]. National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) (2016). Statistics on IDPs; Abuja.
[38]. National Population Commission (1998), ‘1991 Population Census of the Federal Republic of Nigeria: Analytic report at the National Level. Abuja.
[39]. National Population Commission (2008), ‘2006 Population Census of the Federal Republic of Nigeria: Protem report at the National Level. Abuja.
[40]. National Population Commission (NPC) 2010. Internal Migration Survey in Nigeria 2010
[41]. NISER (1998). Migration and Urbanization Surveys. NISER Publication, Ibadan, Nigeria.
[42]. Okpara, E.E (1983). The impact of migration on the quality of Nigeria rural life. Nigeria Agricultural Research Management and Training Institute Seminar series, 3;116.
[43]. Ravenstein E. G, (1889). The Laws of Migration. Journal of Royal Statistical Society, Vol. 52, pp. 241-305.
[44]. Stark, O (1991) ‘Migration in LDCs: risk, remittances and the family.’ Finance and Development, 28(4): 39-41.
[45]. Stark, O. (1991). The migration of labor. Cambridge: Basil Blackwell.
[46]. Stark, O. (2003). “Tales of Migration without Wage Differentials: Individual, Family, and Community Contexts”, Paper prepared for Conference on African Migration in Comparative Perspective, Johannesburg, South Africa, 4-7 June, 2003.
[47]. Torum, B. 2002. Rural – Urban Migration and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Young Guatemalan Adults. International Journal of Epidemiologists, 31:218–226.
[48]. Tvedten, I. (2001) Angola 2000/2001: Key Development Issues and the Role of NGOs. Michelsen Institute (CMI Report R 2001:1) pp. 60.
[49]. Udo, R. K. (1975). Migrant tenant farmers of Nigeria: a geographical study of rural migrations in Nigeria. African University Press, Lagos.
[50]. Udo, R. K. (1993). Migration, Urbanization and Development. National Population Commission, Lagos.

John, Wajim “Labour Migration: Causes and Patterns in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.116-123 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/116-123.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Effect of Cooperative Learning on Students’ Performance in Trigonometry: A Case Study of Mukuba Boys Secondary School, Kitwe, Zambia

Racheal Nambeye, Elizabeth Boby Samuel – October 2019 Page No.: 124-134

Trigonometry is a very important topic in mathematics education. Trigonometric functions have many applications in fields such as adverse physics, mechanical and electrical engineering, music, astronomy and biology. This study investigates the effect of Cooperative Learning specifically the Jigsaw on students’ performance in trigonometry at Mukuba Boys Secondary School and explores the following Research Questions: (a) What effect does Cooperative Learning (Jigsaw) have on students’ performance in Trigonometry? (b) What are the students’ perceptions toward learning of trigonometry using the Cooperative Learning Approach? (c) What are the challenges that students face in trigonometry using Cooperative learning (Jigsaw) vis-à-vis conventional method? The design of the study was pre-test post-test control quasi-experimental design which involves two grade 11 classes. One was assigned experimental group and the other control. The sample for the study consisted of 60 students of which 30 students were in each group. The experimental group was taught using cooperative learning approach while the control group was taught using conventional learning. A pre-test was used to establish the equivalence and homogeneity of the two groups in academic ability whereas a post-test was used to assess the effect of cooperative learning on student’s performance in trigonometry. The study compares the means of scores between experimental and control groups and an independent sample t-test was used to analyse the data at an alpha level of 0.05. In the pretest, comparison results did not show any statistical significance between the two groups. The post-test comparison results showed that there was a statistical significance of p-value=0.000<0.05,t(58)=4.138in favour of the experimental group. Furthermore, results of the study indicated that the cooperative learning approach had a positive effect on enhancing students’ performance and perception toward trigonometry. The main challenges encountered by students when learning trigonometry were lack of understanding of the concepts. It was also noticed that cooperative learning group were more engaged, more responsible in completing group assignments while working in their respective groups. Therefore, cooperative learning approach was found to have had a positive effect on students’ performance in trigonometry. The study recommended that cooperative learning techniques are well integrated with heuristic approaches in order to enhance involvement of students in classroom interaction and participation in the teaching and learning of trigonometry and the use and implementation of cooperative learning strategies should be embrace by teachers in order to develop variety of instructional method that best befits the learning needs of their students.

Page(s): 124-134                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 23 October 2019

 Racheal Nambeye
Mukuba University, School of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, P.O Box 20382, Zambia

 Elizabeth Boby Samuel
Copperbelt University, School of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, P.O Box 21692, Zambia

[1]. Abdulkadir, T., (2013). A Conceptual Analysis of the Knowledge of Prospective Mathematics Teachers about Degree and Radian, Turkey: Kastamonu University Press.
[2]. Baird, J. and White, R. (1984) Improving Learning through Enhanced Metacognition: A Classroom Study, Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, New Orleans, LA 1984.
[3]. Banda, G., & Musonda, A. (2018). Effect of Cooperative Learning on Students’ Attitude and Performance towards Probability Distributions. In Statistics, Journal of Educationand Practice. ISSN 2222-1735 (Paper) ISSN 2222-288X (Online) Vol.9, No.14.
[4]. Victor J. K. (2009) A History of Mathematics. 3rd Edition. USA: Pearson Publishers.
[5]. Vygotsky, L. (1978) Mind in the Society. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
[6]. Weber, K., (2005) Students’ Understanding of Trigonometric Functions. In Mathematics Education Research Journal, Vol. 17(3), pp. 91-112, October 2005. Netherlands: Springer Australasia.
[7]. World Education (2009) Cooperative Learning: Theory and Practice: Schools for Life Program. Boston: World Education, Inc.
[8]. Yasemin, K, Seda, O and Bilge, O (2013).Effects of Cooperative Learning Model on Science Technology Laboratory Practices Lesson. In International Journal on New Trends in Education and their Implication. October 2013 Volume: 4 Issue: 4 Article:04 ISSN1309-6249.
[9]. Victor J. K. (2009) A History of Mathematics. 3rd Edition. USA: Pearson Publishers.
[10]. Vygotsky, L. (1978) Mind in the Society. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
[11]. Weber, K., (2005) Students’ Understanding of Trigonometric Functions. In Mathematics Education Research Journal, Vol. 17(3), pp. 91-112, October 2005. Netherlands: Springer Australasia.
[12]. World Education (2009) Cooperative Learning: Theory and Practice: Schools for Life Program. Boston: World Education, Inc.
[13]. Yasemin, K, Seda, O and Bilge, O (2013).Effects of Cooperative Learning Model on Science Technology Laboratory Practices Lesson. In International Journal on New Trends in Education and their Implication. October 2013 Volume: 4 Issue: 4 Article:04 ISSN1309-6249.

Racheal Nambeye, Elizabeth Boby Samuel “The Effect of Cooperative Learning on Students’ Performance in Trigonometry: A Case Study of Mukuba Boys Secondary School, Kitwe, Zambia” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.124-134 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/124-134.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

An Assessment of Some Factors Militating Against Quality Education Transformation Agenda in Nigeria

Sanusi Abdul Wasiu, Asma’u M. Maishanu, Jamila Muhammad- October 2019 Page No.: 135-140

Globally, education is seen as a driving force and universal phenomena which allows all human societies to develop the requisite knowledge, experience and skills for self preservation and growth. Achieving these largely depends on the quality of education provided by the state. However, the falling standard of education from primary to tertiary institution has remain a major problem in Nigeria’s education, the quality of the products of various institutions leaves much to be desired, and graduates of Nigerian tertiary institutions are unemployable for their deficiencies. In fact, the pathetic state of education in the country epitomizes the intensity of decay and degradation as well as illustrates the endemic hopelessness, despair and uncertainty under which Nigerians live. However, its in view of the above, the paper intend to look at some factors militating against quality education toward actualizing the present Nigeria transformation agenda. These factors include: overcrowdings, examination malpractice, and lack of updated reading materials, lack of good leadership and excess corrupt behavior, abject poverty, lack of qualified teachers, poor links between education and employment opportunities, uncheck privileges and immunity given to lecturers, and lack of democratization of schools administrative process among others. The paper recommended that government should provide sufficient funds and the schools management should be democratic in nature among others.

Page(s): 135-140                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 23 October 2019

 Sanusi Abdul Wasiu
Department of Social Studies, Shehu Shagari College of Education (SSCOE), Sokoto State, Nigeria

 Asma’u M. Maishanu
Department of Integrated Science, Shehu Shagari College of Education (SSCOE), Sokoto State, Nigeria

 Jamila Muhammad
Department of Social Studies, Shehu Shagari College of Education (SSCOE), Sokoto State, Nigeria

[1]. Cole. G. A. (1996) Management theory and practices London DP Publications
[2]. Duro A. (1987) Education and employment. A crises point. In Along M. Ejiohu and Duro
[3]. Ajeya Lein (eds) Emergent issues in Nigeria educational research and publishers Ltd.
[4]. Ejogu A.M (1987) Demonstrate of the administrative process in Nigeria universities, issues and trends. In Aloy M Ejiogu and Duro Aleyalemi (eds) Emergent issues in Nigeria education
[5]. Eromosele E.A (2005) farming the menane of examination mal-practice in Nigeria. The gurdain news paper on line
[6]. Federal Republic of Nig (2004) National Policy on education lagos. Fmi
[7]. Haruna M. Y. & Idris a (2006) students population explosion in Nigeria schools. It challenges to teacher education. A paper presented at National conference organized by Shehu Shagari college of education sokoto.
[8]. Indabama, S.A (2001) An overview of the socio-cultoral factors militating against girl child education in Nigeria. A paper presented at the national workshop on girls education by the Kano Forum in collaboration with UNICEF April 24-27 Kano State
[9]. Jimoh A (2009) assessing the progress towards the millennium development goals in Nigeria In Olarawaju, A. 0. Ilufoye S. Ogundiya & Jimoh amzat (eds) state and civil society relation in Nigeria. Hope publication Ltd ibadan Nigeria.
[10]. Mahadi (2008) education & crises of Development in Nigeria. A key note address. In Okegbile, As apara S.A.E ogungbe. E. 0. N. S. Talla and M. H. Management (Eds) education and Development in Northern Nigeria f 11-19) lapar. Niger State Nigeria faculty of education and art IBB university.
[11]. Maimina U. R. (2009) Teacher education and the challenges of eduation for sustainable development. A paper presented at Annual national conference organized at Shehu Shagari College of Education Sokoto.
[12]. Mational Poverty Eradication Programme (NAPEP) (2001) conception implementations and monitoring
[13]. Oyekami R. (2003) exam-malpractice forces JAMB to cancel 95, 220 results. Guardian newspaper Thursday July 2005
[14]. Sanusi A.B Asmau M. Zainab T. (2009) quantity vs quality. Challenges and implication to educational standard in Nigeria. A published paper presented at National confessence organized by Shehu Shagari College of Education, Sokoto
[15]. Sanusi AB,Wadatm, D hanatu D. (2009) Bureaucratic competition and how it affects sustainable education in Nigeria. A unpublished paper presented at national conference organized by Shehu Shagari College of Education
[16]. Sylvester, V. U. (2009) reforms in in teacher education programme as a panales for sustainable development. A paper presented at national conference organized by Shehu Shagari college of education, Sokoto State.

Sanusi Abdul Wasiu, Asma’u M. Maishanu, Jamila Muhammad, “An Assessment of Some Factors Militating Against Quality Education Transformation Agenda in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.135-140 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/135-140.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Determinants of Adoption and Performance of Greenhouse Technology among Smallholder Tomato Farmers in North Rift Region, Kenya

Ann Cherotich, Daniel Kipruto Tuitoek, Edwin Kipyego Kipchoge, Silas Kiprono Samoei – October 2019 Page No.: 141-149

One of the most widely grown vegetables in Kenya is tomato, which is grown mainly for domestic consumption and sales at local markets. It is also an important cash crop for small-scale growers with potential for increasing incomes in rural areas, improving standards of living and creating employment opportunities. Greenhouse technology is one of the methods which can be used to increase tomato yield and by extension income for the farmer. Despite the importance, farmers in North Rift region hardly adopt this technology and further few studies if any have been done to establish the reason for low adoption of greenhouse technology. Therefore, this study aimed at analyzing the factors influencing the adoption of greenhouse technology among smallholder tomato farmers in North Rift region. Specific objectives were to determine the factors influencing the adoption and performance of greenhouse technology among smallholder tomato farmers in North Rift region. The target population were all smallholder tomato farmers in North Rift region. A survey research design was used in the study. Purposive, proportionate, multistage, simple random and systematic sampling techniques were used to select 384 respondents for the study. Data was collected by use of structured questionnaires and analyzed using STATA V12. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used in data analyses. Both probit and bivariate probit models were estimated to achieve the objectives of the study. Results indicated that social factors such as age, gender, education level and farm experience affected adoption of greenhouse technology among smallholder tomato farmers in North Rift region (p – value 0.0000 < 0.05). The study also indicated that economic factors such as farm income, farm size, and land tenure determined adoption of greenhouse technology among smallholder tomato farmers in North Rift region (p – value 0.0000 < 0.05). The study also revealed that institutional factors such as access to credit, availability of extension service and frequency of extension visits determined adoption of Greenhouse technology among smallholder tomato farmers in North Rift region (p – value 0.0000 < 0.05). It is recommended that the government should empower farmers through training, introduction of cost sharing programs and increase access to extension and credit services so as to enable them commercialize tomato production and hence increase adoption of greenhouse technology and thus improve their livelihoods.

Page(s): 141-149                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 24 October 2019

 Ann Cherotich
Department of Agricultural Economics and Resource Management, Moi University, Kenya

 Daniel Kipruto Tuitoek
Department of Agricultural Economics and Resource Management, Moi University, Kenya

 Edwin Kipyego Kipchoge
Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Eldoret, Kenya

 Silas Kiprono Samoei
Department of Agricultural Economics and Resource Management, Moi University, Kenya

[1]. Abdulai, A.and Huffman, W.E. (2005). “The diffusion of new agricultural Technologies. The Case of Crossbred cow Technology in Tanzania” American Journal of Agricultural Economics87:645-650.
[2]. Adeogun, O.A.Ajana, A.M., Ayinla, O.A., Yarhere, M.T. and Adeogun, M.O. (2008).Application of Logit Model in Adoption Decision: A Study of Hybrid Clarias in Lagos State, Nigeria.American-Eurasian
[3]. Atiya, B. J. (2006).Comparative Advantages of Tomato. Working Paper No 23.National Agricultural Policy Center.FAO.
[4]. Bayramoglu, Z., Gundogmus, E. and Tatlidil, F. (2010).“The impact of EurepGAP requirements on farm income from greenhouse tomatoes in”. African Journal of Agricultural Research Vol. 5 (5), pp. 348-355.
[5]. Bonabana-Wabbi, J. (2002) Assessing Factors Affecting Adoption of Agricultural Technologies: The Case of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) in Kumi District, Eastern Uganda.Master of Science Thesis. Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Blacksburg, Virginia
[6]. Ganesan, M.(2002).Comparative evaluation of low cost greenhouse and its effects on the yield and quality of two varieties of tomato. Swaminathan Research Foundation.Taramani Institutional Area.Tamil Nadu, India.
[7]. FAO, (1985).Farm management glossary Agricultural Services Bulletin, FAO, Rome, 221 pp.
[8]. FEWSNET (2010).Status of food insecurity in Kenya.http://www.fews.net
[9]. GoK (Government of Kenya). (2000). Second Report on Poverty in Kenya: Volume 1. Incidence and depth of Poverty.Ministry of Finance and Planning. Nairobi.
[10]. GoK (Government of Kenya). (2007). DistrictProfile.District Agriculture Officer.Ministry of Agriculture. Keiyo South.
[11]. GoK (Government of Kenya). (2008). District Work-plan. District Agriculture Officer. Ministry Of Agriculture.Keiyo-North District.
[12]. GoK (Government of Kenya) (2012). National Annual Report. Ministry of Agriculture. Kilimo House. Nairobi.
[13]. GoK (Government of Kenya). (2010). National Horticulture Policy.Ministry of Agriculture.Nairobi.
[14]. Greaser,G. L. and Harper, J. K. (1994). Enterprise Budget Analysis.Small- scale and Part-time Farming Project.College of Agricultural Sciences. The Pennsylvania State University. United States.
[15]. Kothari C.R., (2006) Research Methodology Models and Techniques2nded.Newdehli: New international publishers.
[16]. Liu, G.Q. Nyalala, S.P.Q., MyanjageM.O and Tuitoek, D.K. (2005).Greenhouse Management. Egerton University Press. Njoro, Kenya.
[17]. Makunike, C. (2007). Kenya to test greenhouse tomato production model for small scale farmers.Africa News Network.
[18]. Musyoki, R., Omari, F.andMwangi, T. (2005).Evaluation of Elite Tomato Varieties in the Semi-arid regions of Eastern Kenya.KARI Publication
[19]. Naika, S., van Lidt de Jeude, J., de Goffau, M., Hilmi, M. and van Dam, B. (2005). Cultivation of tomato: Production, Processing and Marketing. Agromisa Foundation and CTA, Wageningen, 2005.
[20]. OyekaleA.S., and E. Idjesa (2009).Adoption of Improved Maize Seeds and Production Efficiency in Rivers State, Nigeria Academic Journal of Plant Sciences 2 (1): 44-50, 2009
[21]. Taiwo K., A,.Akanbi C., T., and AjibolaO.O (1997).Production of Cowpeas in Tomato Sauce: Economic Comparison of Packaging in Canning and Retort Pouch Systems. Journal of Food Processing Engineering

Ann Cherotich, Daniel Kipruto Tuitoek, Edwin Kipyego Kipchoge, Silas Kiprono Samoei “Determinants of Adoption and Performance of Greenhouse Technology among Smallholder Tomato Farmers in North Rift Region, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.141-149 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/141-149.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Causes of Liquidity Crisis in Zimbabwe after the Adoption of the Multicurrency in 2009

Fainos Chinjova, Reuben Zinhumwe- October 2019 Page No.: 150-153

The study examined the real causes of the liquidity crisis in the banking sector since the introduction of the multicurrency in Zimbabwe. The liquidity crisis continued to harm string the Zimbabwean economy despite the growth in the aggregate money supply (M3) from US$300 million in 2009, following the adoption of the use of multicurrency. During the period under review, the economy registered a peak of 11.9% growth in 2011. However, despite high economic growth rates, banks still failed to supply cheap loans to the productive sectors, a significant indicator of the liquidity crisis. This was worsened by the shortage of cash in 2016. The investigation on the real causes of liquidity crisis adopted a qualitative research method. Data was collected using in-depth interviews. The research concluded that liquidity crisis in Zimbabwe was caused by poor performance of the external sector, mainly the net exports, foreign direct investment, portfolio investment, diaspora remittances as well as foreign borrowing. Failure by the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe to provide the lender of last resort function, the growing informal sector were also considered to have had a negative impact on the liquidityin the country. To improve the liquidity in the country, the study recommended that the government revert back to the principle of cash budgeting and that there should be an increase in production of local products which should be exported.

Page(s): 150-153                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 24 October 2019

 Fainos Chinjova
Graduate School of Business, National University of Science and Technology, P.O Box AC 939, Ascot, Bulawayo, Zimbabwe

 Reuben Zinhumwe
12 Cambridge Drive, Greendale North, Harare, Zimbabwe

[1]. Allen, F and Gole, D (2000): Optimal currency crisis. Carnigie- Rochester Series on Public Policy, Vol.53. pp 177-230.
[2]. Barnerjee, R.N and Mio, H (2017): The impact of liquidity regulation of banks. Journal of Financial Intermediation.
[3]. Chagwiza, W (2014): Zimbabwean Commercial Banks liquidity and its determinants. International Journal of Empirical Finance, Vol 2, issue 2, pp 52-54.
[4]. Chikoko, l (2013): Zimbabwean Commercial Banks liquidity risk determinants after dollarization. Journal of Applied Finance and Banking, Vol. 3, pp 97-114.
[5]. Creswell, J. W (2007): Research Design. Qualitative and Mixed Methods Approaches. 4th Edition: Thousand Oaks: SAGE.
[6]. Creswell, J. W (2009): Research Design. Qualitative and Mixed Methods Approaches. 2nd Edition; Thousand Oaks: SAGE.
[7]. Creswell, J. W (2013): Qualitative Inquiry and Research Design: Choosing among five. 3rd Edition. Thousand Oaks: SAGE.
[8]. Creswell, J. W (2014): Research Design. Qualitative and Mixed Methods Approaches.4th Edition; Thousand Oaks: SAGE.
[9]. Johnson, B and Christenson, L. B (2014): Educational Research. Quantitative, Qualitative and Mixed Approaches. 5th Edition. Thousand Oaks. SAGE.
[10]. Mkhitaryan, K. A (2014): Importance of Strengthening management of liquidity in banking system. ‘Conference proceedings,’ International Conference on Education, Economics and Humanities (ICEEH, 2014), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
[11]. Mugamo, G (2016): Zimbabwe trade patterns and liquidity. Working Papers. African Economic Resource Consortium.
[12]. RBZ (2016): Mid-Term Monetary Policy Statement. Harare: Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe
[13]. ZEPARU (2012): The ZEPARU Economic barometer. “Zimbabwe Economic Analysis and Research Unit, Vol.19.
[14]. Zinhumwe, (2017): An investigation into the causes of liquidity crisis in Zimbabwe: NUST

Fainos Chinjova, Reuben Zinhumwe “Causes of Liquidity Crisis in Zimbabwe after the Adoption of the Multicurrency in 2009” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.150-153 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/150-153.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Cost of Doing Business in Zimbabwe: Examining the Role of Risk Impact Assessment (RIA) in Policy Development and Implementation in Zimbabwe (2006 to 2017)

Dr David Foya, Innocent Mayida – October 2019 Page No.: 154-169

This study sought to examine the impact of regulations on the business environment in Zimbabwe. The concept of RIA in regulation and its impact on economic growth and national prosperity have received increasing attention in recent years. The study’s main aim is to make a contribution to the RIA in regulatory policy making and implementation in Zimbabwe and examines its role in the cost of doing business. Thus by studying the issue within the context of government ministries and regulatory bodies, the central research questions to be addressed is; “Taking into account the cost of doing business, sustainability concerns, why RIA is necessary including models used to achieve the regulatory goal and to evaluate them?” The research question was formulated to gain a better understanding of the regulatory policy framework of Zimbabwe. Thus, methodologies and how the regulatory bodies and government ministries use risk evaluation and assessment tools to manage regulatory risks and exposure will be explored. The study seeks to examine the need to improve the efficiency of the regulatory policies in Zimbabwe using the RIA concept and link with the cost of doing business. This includes the need for stakeholder participation in the policy framework. The results indicate the need to use RIA s which can be used to increase the efficiency of the regulatory system. This includes seven key dimensions, namely the lack of a regulatory policy framework, policy reformation, roles of Parliament and Senate, policy coordination and consultation, regulatory independence, cost and benefit analysis and lastly the issue of stakeholder participation. Finally, the study suggested recommends on the government to establish a national regulatory policy, incorporate viable business model in policy reformation, reducing multiple regulatory systems, adding RIA evaluation in the Parliamentary and Senate policy framework and improve on technical services for standards included in regulations. Finally, the research, concludes that these seven critical dimensions can increase efficiency in the policy formulation and implementation in Zimbabwe.

Page(s): 154-169                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 24 October 2019

 Dr David Foya
Department of Business Management, National University of Science & Technology, Bulawayo Zimbabwe

 Innocent Mayida
Acting Chief of Technical Services at Radiation Protection Authority of Zimbabwe

[1]. Andretta, M. (2014), ‘Some considerations on the definition of Risk based on concepts of systems and probability.’ International Journal of Risk analysis, vol. 34, number 7, pp.1184-1195.
[2]. Baldwin, R. and Cave, M. (1999), Understanding Regulation: Theory, Strategy, andPractice, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
[3]. Bell J. (1993), Doing your research project: a guide for first-time researchers in education andsocial science. Buckingham: Open University Press.
[4]. Best, J. W. and Kahn, J. V. (2006), Research in Education, Chicago: Pearson.
[5]. Blumberg, B., Cooper R. D. and Schindler, P.S. (2005), Business research methods Maidenhead: McGraw-Hill Education.
[6]. BOTSWANA. SADCTRLC (2015) Risk Impact Assessment (RIA),Gaborone SADC.
[7]. Briggs, J.D. (2008),Framework for Integrated and Environmental Health Impact Assessments ofsystematic risks. Biomed Central Ltd.
[8]. Chikwati, E. (2017), ‘Government Reverses Tobacco tax.’ The Herald,6 April 2017. Zimpapers, Harare.
[9]. Chipunza, P. (2013), ‘Standards Association of Zimbabwe (SAZ) is internationally recognized.’ The Herald, 1 March 2013. pp.9 Zimpapers Harare.
[10]. Cohen, L., Manion, L. and Morrison, K. (2000),Research Methods in Education.5th Ed.London: Routledge Falmer.
[11]. Cresswell J.W. (2011),Designing and conducting mixed method research. 2ndEd. Thousand Oaks CA: Sage Publishing.
[12]. Delloitte. (2015), Zimbabwe Investments Trends Analysis Report. Delloitte Harare Zimbabwe.
[13]. Department for International Development United Kingdom, (DFID) Directorate for Development European Commission, (EC), United Nations Development Programme, (UNDP) and World Bank (2002), Linking Poverty Reduction and EnvironmentalManagement– Policy Challenges and Opportunities. The World Bank Washington.
[14]. Dione, G. (2013), ‘Risk Management: History Definition, and Critique’. Journal of RiskManagement and Insurance Review. vol. 16, number 2, pp.141-166.
[15]. Dvorak, J. (2011), ‘Human sources the main factor of regional development’. Viešosios politikos sprendimų poveikio vertinimas Lietuvoje.vol.28, number 3, pp.87-101.
[16]. Dye, T (2002),Understanding Public Policy, Engelwood Cliffs: Prentice Hall.
[17]. Ernst and Young, Business risk Report. (2009), The Top 10 Risks for Global Business, London: Ernst and Young.
[18]. Ernst and Young, Business Risk Report. (2010) The Top 10 Risks for Business – A Sector wide View of the Risks Facing Businesses across the Globe. London: Ernst and Young.
[19]. Ernst and Young, Turn Risks and Opportunities into Results Report. (2013) Exploring the Top10 Risks and Opportunities for Global Organizations. London: Ernst and Young.
[20]. Ernst and Young. Strategic Business Risk report (2008). The Top10 Risks for Business. Ernst and Young, London.
[21]. George, C. and Kirkpatrick, C. (eds.) (2007), Impact Assessment and Sustainable Development. Cheltenhaum, Northampton: Edward Elgar Publishing.
[22]. Haussmann, R., Rodrik, D and Velasco, A. (2005), ‘Growth Diagnostics’. Journal ofInternational Development. vol. 44, pp.45-345, Working Paper No. 128.
[23]. Howe K.R. (1988),‘Against the quantitative-qualitative incompatibility thesis or dogmas die hard’. Journal of Educational Researcher vol. 17, pp.10-16.
[24]. International Monetary fund (2016), ‘Zimbabwe government restructuring Report,’ Washington.
[25]. International Risk Governance Council (2010), The Emergence of Risks: Contributing factors. Geneva: IRGC.
[26]. International Risk Governance Council (IRGC) Report (2005), Risk governance Towards anIntegrative approach. Geneva: IRGC,Centre on Regulation and Competition, IDPM.
[27]. International Risk Governance Council Report (2009a), Risk governance Deficits, An analysisand illustration of the most common deficits in Risk Governance, Geneva: IRGC.
[28]. Kadirire, H. (2016) ‘State Capture in Broadcasting’. The Daily News. 08 July 2016. Associated Newspaper of Zimbabwe (ANZ) Harare.
[29]. Katongomara, A. (2015), ‘EMA Charges Scare Away Investors.’ The Chronicle, 14 March 2015. Zimpapers Bulawayo.
[30]. Kirkpatrick, C. (2001), ‘Regulatory Impact Assessment in Developing Countries.’ Journal ofpolicy research. vol. 15, Number 7, pp. 200-344.
[31]. Kirkpatrick, C. and Parker, D. (2007), Regulatory Impact Assessment: An Overview, TowardBetter Regulation. Brussels: European Union.
[32]. Kirkpatrick, C., Parker, D. and Zhang, Y. (2004),‘Regulatory Impact Assessment in Developingcountries’. Journal of policy studies. vol. 44, number 3, pp. 45-67.
[33]. Kirkpatrick. C, Parker, D. and Zhang, Y. (2003), ‘Regulatory Impact Assessment and challengesin Developing’. Journal of Policy Studies. vol. 21, number 4, pp.112-176.

[34]. Majaka, N. (2015), ‘Africa’s richest man Dangote moots mega Zimbabwe Investments.’ The Daily News. 1 September 2015. Associated Newspapers Harare.
[35]. Majone, G (1996), Regulating Europe. London: Routledge. Manchester.
[36]. Mandizha, T. (2014), ‘Syncronise Legislation on Crimes’. The Newsday, 18 July 2014. Associated Media Holdings (AMH) Harare.
[37]. Mangudhla, T. (2016), ‘Clarity Consistency-Elude-Indigenisation-Policy.’ The Zimbabwe Independent. [Online] 16 January 2016. Availablefrom: https://www.theindependent.co.zw. [Accessed: 16 April 2017].
[38]. Marufu, L. (2017), ‘Compliance Society of Zimbabwe Launched.’ The Sunday Mail. 02 July 2017. Zimpapers Harare.
[39]. Mashakada, T. J. (2013),Macroeconomic Consequences of Fiscal Deficits in Developing Countries: A comperative Study of Zimbabwe and Selected African Countries (1980-2008). Capetown: University of Stelenbosch Press.
[40]. McAllister, D. J. (1995), ‘Affect- and Cognition-Based Trust as foundations for Interpersonal Cooperation in Organizations.’ Journal of Academy of Management. vol. 38, number 1, pp. 34-67.
[41]. Media Institute of Southern Africa, MISA (2010), Position Paper on broadcasting in Zimbabwe. Harare: Zimbabwe.
[42]. Mlilo, S. ‘(2017), ‘Challenges of Media in Zimbabwe.’ EURAM Journal vol. 12, number 2, pp.33-67.
[43]. Mpofu, B. (2016), ‘Zimbabwe in deep trouble says IMF’, 06 May 2016 The ZimbabweIndependent. Alpha Media Holdings (AMH), Harare.
[44]. Mtomba, V. (2016) ‘Government Review regulatory environment.’ The Newsday. 14 March 2014. Associated Media Holdings (AMH), Harare.
[45]. Mukoshori, G. (2017), ‘George Guvamatanga –thwarted workers bid for Barclays Takeover documents,’ The Financial Gazette. Modus Publications, Harare.
[46]. Mumbengegwi, C, (2002),‘Macroeconomic and Adjustment Policies in Zimbabwe (1980-2000): Introduction and Overview’.International Political Economy Series.pp.3-20.
[47]. Mumvuma, T., Mujajati, C. and Mufute, B. (2006), Understanding economic reforms in Africa: A tale of seven nations. London: Palgrave McMillan.
[48]. Munemo, J. (2015), ‘Foreign and Direct Investments, Business start-up regulations, and Entrepreneurship in Africa.’ Journal of Economics bulletin. vol. 35, number 1, pp.1-13.
[49]. Ndlela, D. (2015), ‘FDI into Africa by-passes Zimbabwe.’ The Financial Gazette. 25 September 2015. Modus Publications, Harare.
[50]. Ndlovu, P. (2016), ‘Parly to align Investment laws.’ The Chronicle. 7 May 2016. Zimpapers Bulawayo Available from: http://the chronicle.co.zw. [Accessed: 16 April 2017].
[51]. Ngwenya, B. (2016), ‘Ease of doing business challenges costing Zimbabwe growth.’ TheSunday News. 23 October 2016. Zimpapers, Bulawayo.
[52]. OECD. (1997), Regulatory Impact analysis, Best Practices in OECD Countries. Paris.
[53]. OECD. (2000), Reducing the risk of policy failure: Challenges of regulatory compliance. OECD Publishing.
[54]. OECD. (2002), Reviews of Regulatory Reform: Regulatory Reform in Korea 2000 Paris. OECD Publishing. (DOI: 10.1787/9789264181748-en).
[55]. OECD. (2006), National Strategies for Administrative Simplification, December, Paris.
[56]. OECD. (2008), Introductory Handbook for Undertaking Regulatory Impact Analysis. Paris.
[57]. OECD. (2012), Measuring Regulatory Performance: Impact of Regulation and regulatory policy. OECD Publishing.
[58]. OECD. (2013), Measuring Cost and Benefit Analysis: Impact of Regulation and regulatory policy. OECD Publishing.
[59]. OECD. (2016a), Regulatory Impact Analysis – OECD. OECD Publishing.
[60]. Patton, M. Q. (2001),Qualitative evaluation and Research Methods, 3rd Ed. Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publication, Inc.
[61]. Radaelli, C. (2009), ‘Implementing regulatory reform in developing nations.’ Journal of European Public Policy. vol. 33, number 5, pp. 44-77.
[62]. Radaelli, C. (eds.) (2006), Europeanisation: solution or problem. Palgrave, EU Publishing.
[63]. Radaelli, C. M. (2009),‘Desperately Seeking Regulatory Impact Assessments’. Journal PublicPolicy. vol. 15, number 1, pp.89-225.
[64]. Radaelli, C. M. and Meuwese. C. M.(2008),Better Regulation in Europe: Between Public Management and Regulatory reform. Manchester: Manchester University Press.
[65]. Radaelli, C., Troeger, V. and De Francesco, F. (2006), ‘Implementing regulatory innovations in Europe.’ Journal of European Public Policy. vol.2,number14, pp.123-245.
[66]. Raftopoulos, B. (2004), Zimbabwe political and Economy system. Harare: Weaver Press.
[67]. Randy, K and Hilty, L. (2008), Risk Models. London: Cambridge Press.
[68]. Renda A. (2006), Impact Assessment in the EU: The State of the Art and the Art of the State. Brussels: Centre for European Policy Studies Publishing.
[69]. Renda, A (2015a), ‘Too good to be true? A quick assessment of the European Commission’s new Better Regulation Package’. CEPS Special Report (108) Cambridge.
[70]. Renda, A. (2011) Law and Economics in the RIA World: Improving the use of economic analysis in public policy and legislation. Cambridge: Intersentia.
[71]. Robinson, P. (2002), Macroeconomic Performance under the Economic Structural Adjustment Program: an Essay on Iatrogenic Effects. In Mumbengegwi, C : Macroeconomic and Structural Adjustment Policies in Zimbabwe (pp. 23-52). International Political economy Series: Palgrave Macmillan UK.
[72]. Robson C. (2002),Real world research. 2nd Ed. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing
[73]. Rusike, G. (2011) ‘Rethinking financial sector regulation’, 06 September 2011. TheNewsday,Alpha Media Holdings (AMH) Harare.
[74]. Saki, O. and Chiware, T. (2007), The Law of Zimbabwe. Midlands State University (MSU)
[75]. Saunders M. and Lewis P. (2012) Doing Research in Business and Management. Edinburgh Gate: Pearson.
[76]. Saunders M., Lewis P. and Thornhill A. (2007) Research methods for business students 4th ed. Harlow: FT Prentice Hall.
[77]. Schmidt, R. A., Bennison, D., Bainbridge, S. and Hallsworth, A. (2007), ‘Legislation and SMEs retailers—Compliance costs and consequences’. International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 35, number 2, pp.256-270.
[78]. Sitklan, S.B. and Pablo, A.L. (1992), Reconceptualising the determinants of risk behaviour’. Journal of Academy of management Review. vol. 17, number 1, pp.9-34.
[79]. Staroňová, K. (2010), ‘Regulatory Impact Assessment: Formal Institutionalization and Practice’.Journal of Public Policy, vol. 30, number 1, pp.117-136.
[80]. Staroňová, K. (2015), ‘Regulatory Impact Assessment in Eastern Europe’.Journal of Public Policy, vol. 33, number 1, pp.56-99.
[81]. Sunstein, C. R and Hahn, W. (2002) ‘A new Executive order for improving Federal Regulations and Deeper and under Cost –Benefit Analysis.’ Journal of law and Economics. vol. 150, number 33, pp.34-56.
[82]. Sunstein, C.R. (1990), After the Rights Revolution: Reconceiving the Regulatory State.Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press.
[83]. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHONOLOGY. (2004) Cost analysis of inadequate interoperability in the US. Maryland: US.
[84]. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. USAID (2016) reforming everything, everywhere all at once: Business licensing reform in Zimbabwe. Washington: USAID.
[85]. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. WORLD BANK (2002)Global Economic Prospects and the DevelopingCountries,Washington.
[86]. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. WORLD BANK (2016) Ease of doing business equal opportunity for all – Zimbabwe Report (2016) Doing business 2016. Washington, D.C.
[87]. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. WORLD BANK (2016) Macro poverty outlook for Zimbabwe Report,Macro poverty outlook, Washington, D.C. World Bank Group.
[88]. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. WORLD BANK (2017) Ease of doing business equal opportunity for all – Zimbabwe Report (2017) Doing business 2017. Washington, D.C.
[89]. Wilson J. (2010) Essentials of business research: a guide to doing your research project.Thousand Oaks CA: Sage.
[90]. World Trade Organization World Trade Report (2006): Exploring the linksbetween subsidies, trade and the WTO, Geneva, WTO.
[91]. Yin, R. Y. (2009),Case Study Research: Design and Methods.4th Ed. London: Sage.
[92]. Zengeni, H. and Sibanda, G. (2017), ‘Indigenisation feud” President steps in’ The Herald. 13April 2016. Zimpapers, Harare.
[93]. ZEPARU (2012): Strengthening the Zimbabwe national policy making process, Zimbabwe Economic Policy Analysis and Research Unit
[94]. Zhou, G. and Zvoushe, H (2012), ‘Public Policy making in Zimbabwe: A three decade Perspective’. International Journal of Humanities and Social Science, Vol. 2, number 8, pp.67-89.
[95]. Zikmund, W.G. (2003),Business Research Methods. 7th Ed. Cincinnati Cengage Learning.
[96]. ZIMBABWE. MINISTRY OF FINANCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (2014) Treasury State of the economy Report. HARARE: Ministry Briefs.
[97]. ZIMBABWE. MINISTRY OF FINANCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. (2014) Treasury Reports. Harare: Government of Zimbabwe.
[98]. ZIMBABWE. MINISTRY OF FINANCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. (2016) The 2016 Mid Year Fiscal Policy Review: Riding the Storm: Economics in Time of Challenges. Harare: Government of Zimbabwe.
[99]. ZIMBAWE. MINISTRY OF ECONOMIC PLANNINING (2015) Business Tendency Report, Zimbabwe National Statistic Agency. Harare: Government of Zimbabwe.
[100]. ZIMBAWE. MINISTRY OF ECONOMIC PLANNINING (2015) Labour Force Report, Zimbabwe National Statistic Agency. Harare: Government of Zimbabwe.

Dr David Foya, Innocent Mayida “Cost of Doing Business in Zimbabwe: Examining the Role of Risk Impact Assessment (RIA) in Policy Development and Implementation in Zimbabwe (2006 to 2017)” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.154-169 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/154-169.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Consumer Awareness towards Green Products and Its Impact

N. Divyapriyadharshini, S.Devayani, V.Agalya, J.Gokulapriya – October 2019 Page No.: 170-174

Consumers are becoming more ecologically conscious and desirous of purchasing green products. Green products are environment friendly in itself or produced in an eco friendly way. The core idea of this paper is to know the consumers awareness about green products and how consumers would be helping the environment if they switch over to green products. Consumers’ green products awareness is significant in indicating the way of the green products buying decision. The data is collected from 30respondents by survey method through a structured questionnaire. Convenience sampling method is used. Data are analysed using frequency analysis. The study has found that promotional activities on eco-friendly products influences consumers green products awareness. Majority of the respondents are aware of green products. This study also reveals that green products awareness as the critical factor, which affects consumers green purchasing decision.

Page(s): 170-174                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 24 October 2019

 N. Divyapriyadharshini
Management Studies, Rajalakshmi Engineering College, India

 S.Devayani
Management Studies, Rajalakshmi Engineering College, India

 V.Agalya
Management Studies, Rajalakshmi Engineering College, India

 J.Gokulapriya
Management Studies, Rajalakshmi Engineering College, India

[1]. Md. ZillurRahmanSiddique&AfzalHossain. Sources of Consumers Awareness toward Green Products and Its Impact on Purchasing Decision in Bangladesh, Journal of Sustainable Development; Vol. 11, No. 3; 2018
[2]. Yazdanifard, R., & Yan, Y. K. (2014). The Concept of Green Marketing and Green Product Development on Consumer Buying Approach.Global Journal of Commerce & Management Perspective, 3(2), 33-38.
[3]. Yeonshin, K., &Sejung, M. C. (2005). Antecedents of Green Purchase Behavior: An Examination of Collectivism, Environmental Concern, and PCE. NA-Advance in consumer research, 32, 592-599.
[4]. Young, W., Hwang, K., McDonald, S., & Oates, C. J. (2010). Sustainable Consumption: Green Consumer Behaviour When Purchasing Products.Sustainable Development, 18(1), 20-31.
[5]. Sanjeev Kumar, RadhaGarg and Anita Makkar. Consumer Awareness and Perception Towards Green Products: A Study of Youngsters in India, International Journal of Maketing& Business Communication Volume 1 Issue 4 October 2012
[6]. Chang, N. & Fong, C. (2010). Green Products Quality, Green Corporate Image, Green Customer Satisfaction and Green Customer Loyalty. African Journal of Business Management, 4, pp. 2836 – 2844.
[7]. Chase, D. & Smith, T. K. (1992). Consumer Keen on Green but Marketers Don’t Deliver. Advertising Age, 63, pp. 82 – 84.
[8]. Coddington, W. (1993). Environmental Marketing: Positive Strategies for Reaching the Green Consumer, New York, United States: McGraw-Hill Inc.
[9]. P. Asha and R. Rathiha (2017). CONSUMER AWARENESS TOWARDS GREEN PRODUCTS,International Journal of Management (IJM) Volume 8, Issue 5, Sep–Oct 2017, pp.8–14, Article ID: IJM_08_05_002
[10]. Charles W Lamb, Joseph H Hair and Carl McDaniel, Marketing, 7th Edition, Thomson Asia(P) Ltd, 2004, Singapore, pp. 517 – 518.
[11]. Ghoshal, Moloy (2011), “Green Marketing – A changing concept in changing time”, BVIMR, Management Edge, Vol. 4, No. 1, pp. 82 – 92.
[12]. MeenakshiHanda, Green Marketing: Drivers and Challenges, B-Cognizance IIITA e-Magazine, Oct-Dec, 2006, Vol. 2, Issue 11.
[13]. Dr.M.Anbukarasi and Ms.N.Dheivanai(2017). AN ANALYTICAL STUDY ON CONSUMERS’ AWARENESS TOWARDS GREEN FAST MOVING CONSUMER GOODS IN COIMBATORE DISTRICT, International Journal of Management StudiesVol-IV, Special Issue-4, November 2017
[14]. Dr. S. Rajamohan& D. Joel Jebadurai. (2015). College Students Attitude towards Green Products in Tirunelveli City, International Journal of Research in Commerce, Economics & Management, Vol. 5, 19-24.
[15]. FaizanZafar Sheikh et. al (2014). Consumer Green behaviour toward Green Products and Green Purchase Decision, International Journal of Multidisciplinary Sciences and Engineering, Vol. 5 1-9.
[16]. Dilip Kumar & Dr. S. M. Yamuna (2014). A study on consumer preference towards green marketing products, International Journal of Scientific Research, Vol. 3, 185-187.
[17]. Dr.T.Vasanthi and N.Kavitha (2016). CONSUMER AWARENESS AND PURCHASING BEHAVIOUR OF GREEN PRODUCTS – AN ANALYTICAL STUDY, intercontinental journal of marketing research review, volume 4, issue 2, february 2016

N. Divyapriyadharshini, S.Devayani, V.Agalya, J.Gokulapriya “Consumer Awareness towards Green Products and Its Impact” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.170-174 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/170-174.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Proposed Solutions to the Legal Issues Affecting the Applicable Laws of Islamic Banking in Nigeria

Ishaaq El-Mubarak, A. M. O, Abdul Majid Tahir Mohamed – October 2019 Page No.: 175-180

Islamic banking applicable laws are lacking significant elements of standard IBF practice across the world. Provisions were not made for elements including the establishment of Islamic insurance companies, Islamic banking business, Islamic leasing business, Islamic capital market, takaful funds, takaful contracts, Islamic deposits, Islamic money market, Islamic foreign exchange market, credit sale (Al-Bai’ Bithaman ‘Ajil), advance purchase (bai’ salam), commissioned manufacture (Istisna’), hire purchase (Ijarah thumma bai’), set profile sale (Murabahah), etc in the establishing laws regulating Islamic banking in Nigeria. A legal framework was not constructed for project financing of Mudharabah, project financing of Musharakah, Islamic accepted bill, Islamic trade finance and so forth. Perhaps all the highlighted products and services are indeed a compliment to Islamic banking legal framework and not an alternative method to its operation. Hence, the study aims at proposing suggestions and solutions to the multifaceted issues in the applicable laws. The study applied an exploratory approach to survey for an efficient strategy competent to amend and upgrade the status and performances of IBF in Nigeria. In identifying the suitable strategies, the study concludes that four major entities including, government, individuals, regulators and legislators are responsible for the expansion of IBF status in Nigeria.

Page(s): 175-180                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 24 October 2019

 Ishaaq El-Mubarak, A. M. O
Faculty of Law and International Relations, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin,Terengganu, Malaysia

 Abdul Majid Tahir Mohamed
Faculty of Law and International Relations, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin,Terengganu, Malaysia

[1]. Abikan, I. A. 2010. The Legal Framework for Islamic Banking in Nigeria. Usman Dan-fodio University Sokoto, Journal of Islamic Comparative Law (UDUJICL). Vol. 2, No. 22, Pg. 25.
[2]. Laws of Malaysia. (1983; reprinted in Kuala Lumpur, 2001). Islamic Banking Act. Law Number 276. Pp. 5-9.
[3]. Rodney, W. 1998. Islam and Malaysia’s economic development. Journal of Islamic Studies. 9: 2. Pp. 259-276.
[4]. Marjan, M. & Mezbah Uddin, A. 2017. Islamic financial system: principles and operations. International Shariah Research Academy for Islamic Finance (ISRA). Kuala Lumpur: Malaysia. Pg. 25 & 134.
[5]. Rodney, W. 2012. Legal, regulatory and governance issues in Islamic finance. Edinburgh University Press Ltd. Pp. 121-122.
[6]. UAE Federal Law No. 6. 1985. Regarding Islamic Banks, Financial Institutions and Investments Companies. Abu Dhabi.

Ishaaq El-Mubarak, A. M. O, Abdul Majid Tahir Mohamed “Proposed Solutions to the Legal Issues Affecting the Applicable Laws of Islamic Banking in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.175-180 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/175-180.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Effects of Pre-Election Matters on Independent National Electoral Commission’s Preparation for Election: A Case for Legal Reform

Hawa Ajanigo Ocheni – October 2019 Page No.: 181-184

“Before every general election is concluded in Nigeria, Political Parties are expected to conduct internal preliminary elections to choose candidates that would represent the party in the general election which often lead to issues of qualification, disqualification, nomination, substitution and sponsorship of candidates for an election proceeding the general election”.

Page(s): 181-184                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 24 October 2019

 Hawa Ajanigo Ocheni
Legal Counsel, Westwood Law

Reference are not available.

Hawa Ajanigo Ocheni “Effects of Pre-Election Matters on Independent National Electoral Commission’s Preparation for Election: A Case for Legal Reform” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.181-184 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/181-184.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Linkages between Financial Factors and Financial Development: A Panel Data Approach for Comesa Region

Stephen Angwenyi Nyamweya, Josephat Cheboi, David Kosgei – October 2019 Page No.: 185-192

The concept of financial development has been a topical issue of research among scholars and policymakers in developing and developed countries in the world because it affects economic growth. However, there has been no consensus on the relationship between economic growth and financial development. Therefore this paper sought to determine the linkage between financial factors and financial development in 19 COMESA Countries. The specific objectives were to establish the effect of international remittances, financial access, inflation and foreign direct investment on financial development in COMESA Countries. The paper was guided by the finance-growth nexus theory. Data was collected from the IMF and World Bank database for analysis for the period. Fixed effect regression was used as established by use of the General Method of Moments. The results indicated that financial access, foreign direct investment and GDP had a significant effect on financial development in COMESA countries (p-values < 0.05). Therefore, results are expected to provide a basis for policy reference and also stimulate debate on financial development in developing countries under regional integration. The study is expected to generate new knowledge by indicating the relationship between financial factors, economic growth, and financial development. In particular, each COMESA Country should streamline policies aimed at encouraging FDI inflows, increasing economic growth, as well as designing Diaspora policies to encourage foreign remittances and foster financial development.

Page(s): 185-192                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 25 October 2019

 Stephen Angwenyi Nyamweya
Department of Accounting and Finance, Moi University, Kenya

 Josephat Cheboi
Department of Accounting and Finance, Moi University, Kenya

 David Kosgei
Department of Accounting and Finance, Moi University, Kenya

[1]. Adams, K., &Nyuur, R. (2018). The Financial Services Sector and Economic Growth in SSA: Insights from Ghana.
[2]. Adeniyi, O., Ajide, B., &Salisu, A. (2015). Foreign capital flows, financial development, and growth in sub-Saharan Africa. Journal of Economic Development, 40(3).
[3]. Ali W Abdullah (2015), The impact of trade openness on Economic Growth of Pakistan, Global Business Management research: An international Journal Vol.7, No 2.
[4]. Allen, D.S and Ndikumana, L. ((2000) Financial Intermediation and Economic Growth in Southern Africa. Journal of African Economics, 9,132-160. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ Jac/9.2.132.
[5]. Allen, F., Carletti, E., Cull, R., Qian, J. Q., Senbet, L., & Valenzuela, P. (2014). African financial development and financial inclusion gaps. Journal of African economies, 23(5), 614-642.
[6]. Almfraji, M. A., &Almsafir, M. K. (2014). Foreign direct investment and economic growth literature review from 1994 to 2012. Procedia-Social and Behavioral Sciences, 129, 206-213.
[7]. Aluko, O. A., & Ajayi, M. A. (2018). Determinants of banking sector development: Evidence from Sub-Saharan African countries. Borsa Istanbul Review, 18(2), 122-139.
[8]. Amata, O., Muturi, W., Mbewa, M. (2016). Relationship between interest rate, inflation, and stock market volatility. European Journal of Business, Economics and Accountancy Vol. 4.
[9]. Amuedo-Dorantes C. &Pozo S., (2006). Migration, Remittances, and Male and Female Employment Patterns. The American Economic Review, Vol. 96, No. 2, pp. 222-226
[10]. Anwar, S., Shahzadi, H., & Nasreen, S. (2017). Determinants of Financial Development for Selected SAARC Countries: A Panel Data Analysis. J. Appl. Environ. Biol. Sci, 7(7), 109-118.
[11]. Arestis, P., &Demetriades, P. (1997). Financial development and economic growth: assessing the evidence. The economic journal, 107(442), 783-799.
[12]. Arestis, P., Demetriades, P. O., &Luintel, K. B. (2001). Financial development and economic growth: the role of stock markets. Journal of money, credit, and banking, 16-41.
[13]. Arora R.U (2010): Measuring financial access. Griffith University
[14]. Asongu, S. (2015). The impact of mobile phone penetration on African inequality. International Journal of Social Economics, 42(8), 706-716.
[15]. Asongu, S. A. (2015). Financial sector competition and the knowledge economy: evidence from SSA and MENA countries. Journal of the Knowledge Economy, 6(4), 717-748.
[16]. Asongu, S. A. (2017). Assessing the marginal, threshold, and net effects of financial globalization on financial development in Africa. Journal of Multinational Financial Management, 40, 103-114.
[17]. Asongu, S. A. (2017). Information sharing and financial sector development in Africa. Journal of African Business, 18(1), 24-49
[18]. Ayadi R, Arbak E New S B and Groen W. P. D (2013). Financial development, Bank efficiency and economic growth across the Mediterranean, Wp6, Financial services, and capital markets.
[19]. Ayadi, R., Arbak, E., Naceur, S. B., & De Groen, W. P. (2015). Determinants of financial development across the Mediterranean. In Economic and Social Development of the Southern and Eastern Mediterranean Countries (pp. 159-181). Springer, Cham.
[20]. Bai, J., & Carrion-i-Silvestre, J. Ll., (2009). Structural changes, common stochastic trends, and unit roots in panel data. Review of Economic Studies, 76, 2, 471-501.
[21]. Bai, J., & Kao, C., (2006). On the estimation and inference of a panel cointegration model with cross-sectional dependence. In Baltagi, Badi (Ed.), Contributions to economic analysis. Elsevier, 3-30.
[22]. Bai, J., & Ng, S., (2002). Determining the number of factors in approximate factor models. Econometrica, 70, 191-221.
[23]. Bai, J., & Ng, S., (2004). A PANIC attack on unit roots and cointegration. Econometrica, 72, 4, 1127- 1177
[24]. Baltagi, B. H., (2008). Econometric Analysis of Panel Data. Fourth Edition. John Wiley \& Sons. New York.
[25]. Banerjee, A., & Carrion-i-Silvestre, J.Ll., (2006). Cointegration in panel data with breaks and cross-section dependence. Working paper 591, European Central Bank.
[26]. Banerjee, A., & Wagner, M., (2009). Testing economic hypotheses using Macro-panels of data. Forthcoming in The Palgrave Handbook of Econometrics, Volume II: Applied Econometrics, edited by T. C. Mills and K. Patterson, Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke.
[27]. Barajas, A., Chami, R., Ebeke, C., &Oeking, A. (2018). What’s different about monetary policy transmission in remittance-dependent countries? Journal of Development Economics.
[28]. Beck, T., & Levine, R. (Eds.). (2018). Handbook of Finance and Development. Edward Elgar Publishing.
[29]. Beck, I. & Levine, R. (2004)Stock Markets, Banks, and Growth: Panel Evidence. Journal of Banking and Finance, 28, 423-442. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0378-426(2) 00408-9142–163
[30]. Beine, M., Lodigiani, E., & Vermeulen, R., (2009). “Remittances and financial openness’ CREA Discussion Paper Series, Centre for Research in Economic Analysis”, University of Luxembourg.
[31]. Bekaert, G., C. R. Harvey, and C. Lundblad. (2001). “Does Financial Liberalization Spur Growth?” NBER Working Paper 8245, National Bureau of Economic Research, Cambridge, MA. Helms, Brigit, and Xavier Reille. (2004). “Interest Rate Ceilings and Microfinance: The Story So Far.” CGAP Occasional Paper 9, Consultative Group to Assist the Poor, Washington, DC.
[32]. Bettin, G., &Zazzaro, A. (2012). Remittances and financial development: substitutes or complements in economic growth? Bulletin of Economic Research, 64(4), 509-536.
[33]. Bhattacharya, M., Inekwe, J., &Paramati, S. R. (2018). Remittances and financial development: empirical evidence from the heterogeneous panel of countries. Applied Economics, 1-14.
[34]. Bittencourt, M. (2011). Inflation and financial development: Evidence from Brazil. Economic Modelling, 28(1), 91-99.
[35]. Bodomo, A. (2013). “African diaspora remittances are better than foreign aid funds”, World
[36]. Boyd, J. H., Levine, R., & Smith, B. D. (2001). The impact of inflation on financial sector performance. Journal of Monetary Economics, 47(2), 221-248.
[37]. Boyed, J & Champ, B (2003). ‘Inflation and financial market performance: what have we learned in the last ten years’, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
[38]. Breitung, J., & Pesaran, M. H., (2008). Unit roots and cointegration in panels. In Matyas, L., and Sevestre, P., The econometrics of panel data (Third Edition), Ch 9, pp. 279-322, Kluwer Academic Publishers.
[39]. Breitung, J., (2005). A parametric approach to the estimation of cointegration vectors in panel data. Econometric Reviews 24, 151-173.
[40]. Brown, R., Carmignani, F. &Fayad, G. (2013). “Migrants remittances and financial development: Macro and micro-level evidence of a perverse relationship”, The World Economy, Vol. 36, No. 5. pp. 636-660.
[41]. Calderón, C., & Liu, L. (2003). The direction of causality between financial development and economic growth. Journal of development economics, 72(1), 321-334.
[42]. Calero, C. Bedi, Arjun S. & Sparrow, R., (2008). Remittances, liquidity constraints and human capital investments in Ecuador. IZA Discussion Papers, No.3358
[43]. Carrion-i-Silvestre, J.Ll., &Surdeanu, L., (2009). Panel cointegration rank testing with cross-section dependence. Mimeo, Department of Econometrics, Statistics and Spanish Economy, University of Barcelona.
[44]. Chami R., Fullenkamp C. and Jahjah S. (2003). “Are Immigrant Remittance Flows a Source of Capital for Development”. IMF Working Paper WP/03/189.
[45]. Chang, Y., (2002). Nonlinear IV unit root tests in panels with cross-sectional dependency. Journal of Econometrics, 110, 261-292.
[46]. Charles, O., &Ezike, J. E. (2017). Household Inward Remittances and Banking Sector Development: The Nigerian Experience (1977–2014). Archives of Business Research–Vol, 5(7).
[47]. Cherif, M., & Dreger, C. (2016). Institutional determinants of financial development in MENA countries. Review of Development Economics, 20(3), 670-680.
[48]. Choong, C. & Chan, S. (2011). Financial Development and Economic Growth, A Review. African Journal of Business Management, 5(6), 2017-2027.
[49]. Claessens, S., &Laeven, L. (2003). Financial development, property rights, and growth. The Journal of Finance, 58(6), 2401-2436.
[50]. Costantini, M., &Lupi, C., (2006). Divergence and long-run equilibria in Italian regional unemployment. Applied Economic Letters, 13, 899-904.
[51]. Coulibaly, D. (2015). Remittances and financial development in Sub-Saharan African countries: A system approach. Economic Modelling, 45, 249-258.
[52]. Datta, K. and Sarkar, B. (2014). “Remittances and economic growth in Bangladesh: An ARDL cointegration approach”, International Journal of Economic Issues, Vol.7., No.1, pp. 51-64.
[53]. Demetriades, P. O., & Hussein, K. A. (1996). Does financial development cause economic growth? Time-series evidence from 16 countries. Journal of Development Economics,
[54]. Duarte, L. D. R. V., Kedong, Y., &Xuemei, L. (2017). The Relationship between FDI, Economic Growth and Financial Development in Cabo Verde. International Journal of Economics and Finance, 9(5), 132.
[55]. Duarte1 L. R.V., Kedong1 Y.& Xuemei1 L. (2017): The Relationship between FDI, Economic Growth and Financial Development in Cabo Verde International Journal of Economics and Finance; Vol. 9, No. 5; 2017 ISSN 1916-971X E-ISSN 1916-9728 Published by Canadian Center of Science and Education
[56]. Emenalo, C. O., Gagliardi, F., & Hodgson, G. M. (2018). Historical institutional determinants of financial development in Africa. Journal of Institutional Economics, 14(2), 345-372.
[57]. Engle, R. & Granger, C. (1987). Co-integration and Error Correction: Representation, Estimation, and Testing. Econometrica, 55(2), 251-276.
[58]. English, WB (1999) ‘Inflation and financial sector size’, Journal of Monetary Economics, vol. 44, pp. 379-400
[59]. Fayissa, B. & Nsiah, C. (2010). “The impact of remittances on economic growth and development”, The American Economist, Vol. 55., No.2, pp. 92-103.
[60]. Fernández, A., & Tamayo, C. E. (2017). From Institutions to Financial Development and Growth: What Are the Links? Journal of Economic Surveys, 31(1), 17-57.
[61]. Ferrari, A., Masetti, O., & Ren, J. (2018). Interest rate caps: the theory and the practice.
[62]. Filippo, C. (2014). “The impact of remittances on financial inclusion in Veracruz, Mexico” Wageningen University. From Zambia. Journal of Applied Business Research (JABR), 28(6), 1497-1508.
[63]. Fromentin, V. (2017). “The long-run and short-run impacts of remittances on financial development in developing countries”, The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j. qref.2017.02.006.
[64]. Gengenbach, C., Palm, F.C., &Urbain, J.P., (2005). Cointegration testing in panels with common factors, METEOR Research Memorandum, Universiteit Maastricht.
[65]. Gengenbach, C., Palm, F.C., &Urbain, J.P., (2006). Cointegration testing in panels with common factors, Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics 68 (Supplement), 683-719.
[66]. Giuliano, P., & Ruiz-Arranz, M. (2009). Remittances, financial development, and growth. Journal of Development Economics, 90(1), 144-152.
[67]. Giuliano, P., and Ruiz-Arranz, M., (2005). “Remittances, Financial Development and Growth.” International Monetary Fund Working Paper 05/234.
[68]. Gonzalo, J. (1994). Five Alternative Methods of Estimating Long-Run Equilibrium Relationships.
[69]. Greenwood J., & Jovanovic B. (1990). “Financial Development, Growth, and the Distribution of Income”, Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, 98(5), 1076-1107.
[70]. Groen, J.J.J., &Kleibergen, F., (2003). Likelihood-based cointegration analysis in panels of vector error-correction models. Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, 21, 2, 295-318.
[71]. Guetat, I., &Sridi, D. (2017). Institutional quality effect on remittances in MENA region. Middle East Development Journal, 9(1), 84-100.
[72]. Gupta, S., Pattillo, C. A., &Wagh, S. (2007). Impact of remittances on poverty and financial development in Sub-Saharan Africa (No. 7-38). International Monetary Fund.
[73]. Gupta, S., Pattillo, C.A., &Wagh, S., (2009). Effect of Remittances on Poverty and Financial Development in Sub-Saharan Africa. World Development 37, 104-115
[74]. Hami, M. (2014). Inflation and Openness: Empirical Evidences from Iran (1965-2010). Studies in Business and Economics, 9(2), 27-32.
[75]. Hanif, M.N., & Batool, I., (2006). Openness and Inflation: A Case Study of Pakistan. MPRA Paper, No 10214, 1-8.
[76]. Haslag, J. H., & Koo, J. (1999). Financial repression, financial development, and economic growth (No. 9902). Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.heterogeneous panels, Journal of the American Statistical Association, 94, 621-634.
[77]. Holly, S., Pesaran, M. H., & Yamagata, T., (2009). A spatiotemporal model of house prices in the US. Journal of Econometrics, forthcoming.
[78]. Huang, Y. (2011). Determinants of financial development. Palgrave Macmillan.Inflation on Financial Sector Performance in Iran. Quarterly Journal of Applied Economics Studies in Iran, 1(2), 177-215. (In Persian)
[79]. Johansen, S. (1988). Statistical Analysis of Co-Integration Vectors. Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, 12(2-3), 231-254. Journal of Econometrics, 60(1-2), 203-233.
[80]. Kao, C., (1999). Spurious regression and residual-based tests for cointegration in panel data. Journal of Econometrics, 90, 1-44.
[81]. Kapetanios, G., Pesaran, M. H., Yamagata, T., (2006). Panels with nonstationary multifactor error structures. Working paper, Cambridge University.
[82]. Karamelikli, H., & Bayar, Y., (2015). “Remittances and economic growth in Turkey”, ECO FORUM, Vol. 4, No.7, pp. 33-40.
[83]. Karikari, N., Mensah, S. & Harvey, S., (2016). “Do remittances promote financial development in Africa”, Springerplus, Vol., 5, No.1011., pp. 1-21.
[84]. Khan, M. S., (2002). Inflation, Financial Deepening, and Economic Growth. International Monetary Fund’s Paper prepared for the Banco de Mexico Conference on Macroeconomic Stability, Financial Markets, and Economic Development, Mexico City.
[85]. Khan, M. S., Senhadji, A. S., & Smith, B. D. (2006). Inflation and financial depth. Macroeconomic Dynamics, 10(02), 165-182.
[86]. Kiio J., Soi N., &Buigut K., (2014). “The impact of workers’ remittances on economic growth: Evidence from Kenya”, Journal of Economics and Sustainable Development, Vol 5, No. 26.
[87]. Kim, DH, Lin, SC, and Suen, YB (2010). ‘Dynamic relationship between inflation and financial development’, Macroeconomic Dynamics, vol. 14, pp. 343-364.
[88]. King, R. G., & Levine, R. (1993). Finance and growth: Schumpeter might be right. The quarterly journal of economics, 108(3), 717-737.
[89]. Koay, Y. & Choong, C., (2013). “The nexus between worker’s remittances and economic growth in Malaysia”, ProsidingPerkem, Vol. VIII, No.1, pp. 507-515.
[90]. Koay, Y. & Choong, C., (2013). “The nexus between worker’s remittances and economic growth in Malaysia”, ProsidingPerkem, Vol. VIII, No.1, pp. 507-515.
[91]. Kumar, R. R., Stauvermann, P. J., Patel, A., & Prasad, S. (2018). The effect of remittances on economic growth in Kyrgyzstan and Macedonia: accounting for financial development. International Migration, 56(1), 95-126.
[92]. Larsson, R., Lyhagen, J., & L\”{o}thgren, M., (2001). Likelihood-based cointegration tests in heterogeneous panels. Econometrics Journal, 4, 109-142.\
[93]. Li, J., Salinas, J., Ramirez, T., Hoyo, C. & Serrano, C. (2014). “Do remittances foster financial inclusion in Mexico”, Financial Inclusion Economic Watch, BBVA Research.
[94]. Loayza, N., &Ranciere, R. (2004). Financial development, financial fragility, and growth. The World Bank.
[95]. Maddala, G. S., & Wu, S., (1999). A comparative study of unit root tests with panel data and a new simple test. Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Special Issue, 61, 631-652.
[96]. Maigua, C., &Mouni, G. (2016). Influence of interest rates determinants on the performance of commercial banks in Kenya. International Journal of Academic Research in Accounting, Finance and Management Sciences, 6(2), 121-133.
[97]. Maimbo, S. M., & Gallegos, C. A. H. (2014). Interest rate caps around the world: still popular, but a blunt instrument. The World Bank.
[98]. Mbaye, L. (2015). “Remittances and credit markets: Evidence from Senegal”, IZA DP. No. 9340.
[99]. McCoskey, S., & Kao, C., (1998). A residual-based test of the null of cointegration in panel data. Econometric Reviews, 17, 57-84.
[100]. McKinnon, R.I (1973) money and capital in Economic Development. Brookings Institution Press.
[101]. Menyah, K., Nazlioglu, S., &Wolde-Rufael, Y. (2014). Financial development, trade openness and economic growth in African countries: New insights from a panel causality approach. Economic Modelling, 37, 386-394.
[102]. Meyer, D. & Shera, A. (2016). “The impact of remittances on economic growth: An econometric model”, Available at http//dx.doi-org/10.16/j.econ.2016.06.001.
[103]. Mlambo, K., & Ncube, M. (2011). Competition and efficiency in the banking sector in South Africa. African Development Review, 23(1), 4-15.
[104]. Moayedi, V., &Aminfard, M. (2012). Iran’s post-war financial system. International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, 5(3), 264–281.
[105]. Mohamed, M. R., Singh, K. S. J., & Liew, C. Y. (2017). Impact of foreign direct investment & domestic investment on the economic growth of Malaysia. Malaysian Journal of Economic Studies, 50(1), 21-35.
[106]. Moon, R. H., & Perron, B., (2004). Testing for a unit root in panels with dynamic factors. Journal of Econometrics, 122, 81–126.
[107]. Moon, R. H., Perron, B., & Phillips, P. C. B., (2007). Incidental trends and the power of panel unit root tests. Journal of Econometrics, 141, 416-459.
[108]. Mostafavi, M., (2012). “A comparative study between ARDL and Johansen procedures in narrow money estimation in the Iranian economy”, Quarterly Journal of Quantitative Economics, Vol.8., No2., pp. 47-67.
[109]. Motelle, S. (2011). “The role of remittances in financial development in Lesotho: Evidence from alternative measures of financial development”, Journal of Development and Agricultural Economics, Vol. 3, No. 6, pp. 241-251.
[110]. Muktadir-Al-Mukit, D. & Islam, N. (2016). “Relationship between remittances and credit disbursement: A study from Bangladesh”, Journal of Business and Management Research, Vol.1., No.1, pp. 39-52
[111]. Muyambiri, B., & Odhiambo, N. M. (2018). The Causal Relationship between Financial Development and Investment: A Review of Related Empirical Literature. Comparative Economic Research, 21(2), 119-136.
[112]. Mwangi, B. & Mwenda, S. (2015). “The effect of international remittances on economic growth in Kenya”, Microeconomics and Macroeconomics, Vol. 3, No.1, pp. 15-24
[113]. Naceur, SB &Ghazouani, S 2005, ‘Does inflation impact on financial performance in the MENA Region?’, Journal of Middle East Economics and Finance, vol. 3, no.3, pp. 219-229
[114]. Ng, S., & Perron, P., (2001). Lag length selection and the construction of unit root tests with good size and power. Econometrica 69, 1519-1554.
[115]. Nyamongo, E. M., and R. N. Misati. (2011). “Remittances and Banking Sector Development in Sub Saharan Africa.” paper read at Global Development Forum, Dubai, United Arab Emirates, November.
[116]. Ocharo, K. (2014). “Remittances and economic growth in Kenya”, International Conference on Dynamics of Rural Transformation in Emerging Economics, 27-28 March 2014
[117]. Odhiambo, MN (2012). ‘The impact of inflation on financial sector development: Experience from Zambia’, The Journal of Applied Business Research, vol. 28, no. 6, pp. 1497-1508.
[118]. Odhiambo, N. M. (2007). Supply‐leading versus demand‐following hypothesis: Empirical evidence from three SSA countries. African Development Review, 19(2), 257-280.
[119]. Odhiambo, N. M. (2012). The Impact of Inflation On Financial Sector Development: Experience of Cleveland, September, 15.
[120]. Ojapinwa, T. & Oladipo B., (2014). “Do workers’ remittances promote financial development in Sub-Sahara African Countries?”, International Journal of Finance and Research, Vol 5, No. 2.
[121]. Olagbaju, I. O., &Akinlo, A. E. (2018). FDI and Economic Growth Relationship in Sub-Saharan Africa: Is The Domestic Financial A Significant Intermediator? Archives of Business Research, 6(5).
[122]. Ondiege, P., (2010). “Mobile Banking in Africa: Taking the Bank to the People”, Africa Economic Brief, 1(8), pp. 1-16.
[123]. Onuonga, S. M. (2014). The Analysis of Profitability of Kenya’s Top Six Commercial Banks: Internal Factor Analysis. American International Journal of Social Science, 3(5), 94-103.
[124]. Orozco, M., &Fedewa, R., (2006). Leveraging efforts on remittances and financial intermediation. Orozco, M., & Hamilton, E., (2005). Remittances and MFI intermediation: issues and lessons.
[125]. Otchere, I., Senbet, L., &Simbanegavi, W. (2017). Financial sector development in Africa-an overview. Review of development finance, 7(1), 1-5.
[126]. Ozturk, N &Karagoz, K (2012). ‘Relationship between inflation and financial development: Evidence from Turkey’, International Journal of Alanya Faculty of Business, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 81-87.
[127]. Ozturk, N., &Karagoz, K. (2012). Relationship Between Inflation and Financial Development: Evidence from Turkey. Journal of Alanya Faculty of Business/AlanyaIsletmeFakültesi
[128]. Pería, M.S.M., Mascaró, Y., &Moizeszowicz, F., (2008). Do Remittances Affect Recipient Countries’ Financial Development? Sen, Amartya, 1999. Development as freedom. Oxford University Press.
[129]. Pesaran, M. H., (2006). Estimation and inference in large heterogeneous panels with a multifactor error structure. Econometrica 74, 4, 967-1012.
[130]. Pesaran, M. H., Shin, Y., Smith, R. P. (1999). Pooled mean group estimation of dynamic
[131]. Ploberger, W., & Phillips, P. C. B., (2004). Optimal testing for unit roots in panel data. Mimeo. The University of Rochester.
[132]. Rapoport, H., and F. Docquier. (2006). “The Economics of Migrants’ Remittances.” Handbook of the Economics of Giving, Altruism and Reciprocity 2: 1135–1198.
[133]. Ratha, D. (2007). Leveraging remittances for development. Policy Brief, 3(11).
[134]. Rostow, W., W. (1960). The Stages of Economic Growth: A Non-Communist Manifesto. Cambridge University Press.
[135]. Rousseau, P. L., & Wachtel, P. (2002). Inflation thresholds and the finance-growth nexus’, Journal of International Money and Finance, vol. 21, no.6, pp. 777-93.
[136]. Rousseau, P. L., & Wachtel, P. (2000). Equity markets and growth: cross-country evidence on timing and outcomes, 1980–1995. Journal of Banking & Finance, 24(12), 1933-1957.
[137]. Rousseau, P. L., & Wachtel, P. (2002). Inflation thresholds and the finance-growth nexus. Journal of international money and finance, 21(6), 777-793.
[138]. Samargandi, N., Fidrmuc, J., & Ghosh, S. (2015). Is the relationship between financial development and economic growth monotonic? Evidence from a sample of middle-income countries. World Development, 68, 66-81.
[139]. Schumpeter, J. (1911). The Theory of Economic Development. Harvard Economic Studies, 46, 1911-1912
[140]. Schumpeter, J. A., (1934). The Theory of Economic Development: An Inquiry into Profits, Capital, Credit, Interest, and the Business Cycle. Vol. 55. Transaction
[141]. Schwarz, G. (1978). Estimating the dimension of a model. Annals of Statistics, 6(2), 461-464.
[142]. Sharaf, M., (2014). “The remittances-output nexus: Empirical evidence from Egypt”, Economic Research International, Vol.10, No.1155, pp. 1-8.
[143]. Shera, A. & Meyer, D. (2013). “Remittances and their impact on economic growth”, Social and Management Sciences, Vol. 21, No.1, pp. 3-19.
[144]. Smith, B.D. (2003). Taking intermediation seriously. Journal of Money, Credit, and banking, 35, 1319-1357.
[145]. Stock, J. & Watson, M. (1988). Variable Trends in Economic Time Series. Journal of Economic Perspectives, 2(3), 147-174.
[146]. Stock, J. H., (1999). A class of tests for integration and cointegration. In Engle, R. F. and H. White (ed.), Cointegration, causality, and forecasting. A Festschrift in Honour of Clive W. F. Granger. Oxford University Press.
[147]. Sung, D. H., & U., K., H. (2008). The US and Japanese foreign direct investment in East Asia: a comparative analysis. Policy Studies Journal, 36(3), 385-401.
[148]. Tolcha, T. & Rao, N. (2016). “The impact of remittances on economic growth in Ethiopia”, Indian Journal of Commerce and Management Studies, Vol. VII, No. 2, pp. 1-14.
[149]. Tosetti, E., & Moscone, F., (2007). Expenditure and Income in the United States. Working paper 07/14, Department of Economics. The University of Leicester.
[150]. Tung, D. (2015). “Remittances and economic growth in Vietnam: An ARDL bounds testing approach”, Review of Business and Economics Studies, Vol.3, No.1, pp. 80-88.
[151]. World Economic survey (2006): Financial Development and Economic Growth, Critical Review.
[152]. Yahyazadehfar, M., Tehranchian, AM., and Hami, M. (2014). Social capital and financial development in Iran. Quarterly Journal of Economic Growth and Development Research, 4(16), 73-88. (In Persian)
[153]. Yartey, C. A., &Adjasi, C. K. (2007). Stock market development in Sub-Saharan Africa: Critical issues and challenges (No. 7-209). International Monetary Fund.
[154]. Zikmund W.G.; Babin B.J. Carr J.C. and Griffin M (2010). Business Research Methods eight edition South-Western Cengage Learning.

Stephen Angwenyi Nyamweya, Josephat Cheboi, David Kosgei “Linkages between Financial Factors and Financial Development: A Panel Data Approach for Comesa Region” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.185-192 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/185-192.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Need of Environment and Space Technologies Education in Indian School Curriculum

Dr. Jayachandra Kannemadugu, K. Hoyasala Devi – October 2019 Page No.: 193-196

I. INTRODUCTION
It’s more than two decades in India, the computer education/ICT (Information and Computer Technology) was introduced into the school curriculum and majority of Schools including those run by central or State Governments, have good infrastructure with basic software and internet. Space technologies i.e., the technologies involved in acquiring Earth’s information such as Sensing/acquiring Earth’s pictures through Aircrafts, Satellites, Drones etc., and collecting local ground/field information by using GPS receiver and computing into digital maps (GIS database) have become very popular in recent times across the Globe.

Page(s): 193-196                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 25 October 2019

 Dr. Jayachandra Kannemadugu
Regional Director, Centre for Environment and Development, Hyderabad, India

 K. Hoyasala Devi
B.Tech, ECE, G. Narayanamma Institute of Technology & Science, Hyderabad, India

[1]. Www. Space-awareness.org
[2]. https://mapknitter.org
[3]. Environmental Science Lesson Plans & Activities
[4]. ESRO Space education programme for school students
[5]. https://www.space-india.com
[6]. https://www.iist.ac.in

Dr. Jayachandra Kannemadugu, K. Hoyasala Devi “Need of Environment and Space Technologies Education in Indian School Curriculum” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.193-196 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/193-196.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Government Policies on Education of Learners with Special Needs in Kenya

Dr. Ogogo A. Joyce, Dr. Moi J. Edna, Dr. Ogalloh M.A. Molly – October 2019 Page No.: 197-203

This article examines the government policies guiding parents in education of learners with special needs in Kenya. It applies a framework that originated in Kenyan constitution 2010 and Acts of parliament to her citizen for a successful education of learners with special needs. This study was undertaken between 2015 and 2018 in Migori County. The study is guided by three objectives; to determine the role of parents in education of learners with special needs; to establish government policies that guide learners with special needs; to explore the challenges faced by parents in educating learners with special needs. The findings show that the key role of parents was active participation in their children’s IEP team; the available policies were not implemented fully. The major challenges were: schools were overcrowded; child’s disability overshadowed the child’s ability in the eyes of teachers and stigmatization in the community. The study utilized descriptive research design and descriptive analysis from 10 schools with 47 teachers, 34 children with autism and 68 typically developing peers and 10 parents. The study brought distinct pathways in the respondents’ contribution to the creation and exchange of knowledge, demonstrating learners with autism where programme participants co-created know-how. In conclusion, legal frameworks guiding this process were available and needed to be implemented fully and parents to be actively involved in their children’s welfare.

Page(s): 197-203                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 25 October 2019

 Dr. Ogogo A. Joyce
Kenyatta University, Kenya

 Dr. Moi J. Edna
Kenyatta University, Kenya

 Dr. Ogalloh M.A. Molly
Kenyatta University, Kenya

[1]. Ainscow, M. (1995), “Education for All: Making It Happen”. Support for Learning, Vol. 10, No.4, pages 147-57
[2]. Ainscow, M. (1994), Special Needs in the Classroom: A Teacher Education Guide. London: Jessica Kingsley/UNESCO.
[3]. African Population and Health Research Center, (2013), Children with Special Needs Living in Kenyan Slums.
[4]. Constitution of Kenya 2010
[5]. Employment Act 2007
[6]. Folkman, S. (2010) Stress, Coping and Hope, Psycho-Oncology, 19: 901Â 908, Wiley Online Library, Canada.
[7]. GoK (2011) Kenya’s Initial Report Submitted under Article 35(1) Of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
[8]. Heward, W. L. (2003). Exceptional children: An introduction to special education (7th Ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill/Prentice Hall.
[9]. Human Rights Policy
[10]. Ministry of Education, Science and Technology, 2008. Mandate. Retrieved March 19, 2009 from http://www.scienceandtechnology.go.ke/
[11]. Moak, J.B. (1975). Division of Rehabilitation Status Report. Accra Ghana Ministry of Labour, Social Welfare, and Community.
[12]. Public Officers’ Ethics Act 2003
[13]. Public Procurement and Disposal Act 2015
[14]. Schwochau, S., & Blanck, P. D. (2000). The economics of the Americans with Disabilities Act: Part III – Does the ADA disable the disabled? Berkeley Journal of Employment and Labor Law, 21(1), 271–313.
[15]. Seelman, K. D. (2000, July 17). Employment of individuals with disabilities—opportunities and challenges—The best of times/the worst of times. Paper presented at the Employment and Disability Policy Summer Institute, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY.
[16]. Snell, S. A. and Rosen, K. H. (1997) Parents of Special Needs Children Mastering the Job of Parenting, Contemporary Family Therapy, 19 (3), 425-442, Kluwer Academic Publishing, USA.
[17]. The National Council for Persons with Disabilities
[18]. The National Disability Policy and Guidelines for the Public Service March 2018
[19]. World Bank, (2011). Investment in Learners with Special Needs
[20]. Yura, M. T. (n.d.) Raising the Child with Special Needs, Individual Psychology: The Journal of Adlerian Theory, Research & Practice, The University of Texas Press, USA.

Dr. Ogogo A. Joyce, Dr. Moi J. Edna, Dr. Ogalloh M.A. Molly “Government Policies on Education of Learners with Special Needs in Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.197-203 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/197-203.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Impact of Metacognitive Teaching Strategies on Learners’ Performance in Earth Geometry: A Case Study of Mubanga Secondary School

Siamusinza Miller, Sakala William – October 2019 Page No.: 204-210

Mathematics is one of the useful subjects that is often applied by people in society. The knowledge and skills obtained from learning mathematics are used by several people to solve their everyday problems. Not only that, other subjects are depending on mathematics in that they need some elements of mathematics for them to be learnt properly. A good example of such subjects includes science, economics, accounts, woodwork and technical drawing. The unfortunate part is that the subject of mathematics has been proven to be difficult among most of the learners to an extent that most of them (learners) perform poorly in it. The poor performance of learners in mathematics has been a source of concern to many stakeholders. This research study was conducted to assess the impact of metacognitive teaching strategies on learners’ performance in Earth Geometry since the traditional method of teaching (lecture method) seem not to helps learners to attain academic achievement in Earth Geometry and mathematics in general. A sample of 94 participants, 45 boys and 49 girls were purposively sampled from Mubanga Secondary School. The participants were actually members of the only two grade twelve classes, 12A and 12B, that were at Mubanga Secondary School at that time .The treatment was randomly assigned and 12A was considered to be the experimental group while the other class, 12B became the Control group. Using a quasi-experimental research method, the experimental group experienced 16 training sessions of Metacognitive teaching strategies while the Control group was deprived of the training. Pre-test and post-test were used as suitable instruments to collect the much needed data. The instruments were tested for reliability and validity. Reliability of research instrument was tested using test retest reliability and Pearson’s product moment correlation coefficient gave the value of r = 0.748. This result showed that there was a strong linear relationship between the two tests that were conducted for assessing reliability. Validity of instruments was done using face and content validity. Two grade twelve examiners were given chance to look at the test instruments. The independent sample t-test was used to analyse the results to determine the impact of metacognitive teaching strategies towards learners’ performance in Earth Geometry. The results showed that the experimental group had statistically significant mean scores of the post-test results compared to the mean scores of the Control group for the same post-test. Based on the results of the research study, it was concluded that metacognitive teaching strategies had a positive impact on learners’ performance in Earth Geometry.

Page(s): 204-210                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 25 October 2019

 Siamusinza Miller
Department of Mathematics, Mubanda Secondary School, P.O Box: 620266, Kalomo – Zambia

 Sakala William
Department of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, The Copperbelt University, P.O Box 21692, Kitwe –Zambia

[1]. Abdellah. R (2014), metacognitive awareness and its relation to academic achievements and teaching performance of pre-service female teachers in Ajman university in UAE; Elservier Ltd.
[2]. Ajisuksmo C.R.P and SapatriG. R (2017), the influence of attitudes towards mathematics, and metacognitive awareness on the mathematics achievements. Creative Education, 8, 486-497 https://doi.org/10.4236/cc.2017.83037
[3]. BabakhamiNarges (2011), the effect of teaching the cognitive and metacognitive strategies (Self-instructions procedure) on verbal math problem-solving performance of primary school students with verbal problem-solving difficulties, Ellservier Ltd open access under cc by- NC-No Licence.
[4]. Backer De Lieste e tal (2011), Exploring the potential impact of reciprocal peer tutoring on higher education students’ metacognitive knowledge and regulation; Springer https://about Jstor.org/terms.
[5]. Boer De Hester e tal (2018), Long termeffects of meta cognitive strategy instructions on student academic performance: A meta-analysis Education Research review Journal homepage: www.Elsevier.com/locate/edurev.
[6]. Cambridge Schools Conference (2016), Developing metacognition in Students; Cambridge international examinations.
[7]. Gammit.A.D, Antolin.J.A and Gabriel A.G (2017), The effects of cooperative learning in Enhancing the performance level of Grade-10 mathematics students in Talavera National High School in the Philippines. Journal of Applied mathematics and Physics, 5, 2386-2401.https://doi.org/10.4236/jamp.2017.512195.
[8]. Garofalo Joe (1986), Metacognitive knowledge and metacognitive process: Important influence on mathematical performance: New York College learning skills Association. https://www.jstor.org/stabble/44290276.
[9]. Garofalo Joe and Frank.K (1995), Metacognitive, Cognitive monitoring and mathematical performance.National Council of teachers of mathematics.https://www.jstor.org/stable/748391
[10]. HellenAskell-Williams e tal (2010), Scaffolding cognitive and metacognitive strategy instruction in regular class lessons.
[11]. Ihdi Amin and Sukestiyam O (2015), Analysis’ metacognitive skiils on learning mathematics in
[12]. High School.International Journal of Education and Research Vol 3. No 3, Mathematics Education Research Program, Postgraduate Program, Semarang State University. Indonesia.
[13]. Maria Jose Anais e tal (2012), Motivational and Cognitive learning Strategies used by first year Engineering Undergraduate Students at UniversidalCatolica in Chile. Scientific Research. https://dx.doi.org/10.4236/cc.2012.326121
[14]. MeenakishInonge and Shefali Pandya (2015), Interactive effect of metacognitive strategies-base instruction in mathematics and approaches to learning on mathematics anxiety of students. International Journal of Education and Psychology Research (IJEPPR) volume 4.
[15]. Mitra Mir et al (2011), Surveying the Effect of Metacognitive Education on the Mathematical Achievement of 1st Grade High Junior School Female Students Educational District 5, Tehran City, 2009 – 10 Educational Year (Tehran, Iran, Islamic Republic). Elsevier Ltd
[16]. Montague Marjorie (2008), Self-Regulation Strategies to improve mathematical problems solving for students with learning disabilities. Learning disabilities (Winter,2008), pp 37-44.
[17]. Mpiontini M and Stephanou G (2017), Metacognitive knowledge and Metacognitive Regulation in Self – Regulatory Learning Style and in its Effects on Performance Expectation and subsequent Performance across Diverse School Subjects. Psychology, 8 , 1941 – 1975
[18]. Philip Wong (1989), Metacognitive Strategies in Mathematics Problem Solving; Australian.Singapore.
[19]. Schoenfeld, A. H (1992), Learning to think Mathematically: Problem solving, metacognition, and sense- making in Mathematics. Research on Mathematics Teaching and Learning (pp: 334 – 370). New York : MacMillan.
[20]. Seher Mandaci Sahin and FatmaKendir (2013), The Effect of using Metacognitive Strategies for
[21]. Solving Geometry problems on Students’ Achievement and Attitude. Academic Journals Vol. 8(19) . pp. 1777 – 1792
[22]. Tayeh Carla and Sally Roberts (2007), It’s the thoughts that counts: Reflecting on problem solving. National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.
[23]. Toit du Stephen ; Kotze Gary (2009), Metacognitive strategies in the teaching and learning of mathematics.

Siamusinza Miller, Sakala William “The Impact of Metacognitive Teaching Strategies on Learners’ Performance in Earth Geometry: A Case Study of Mubanga Secondary School” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.204-210 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/204-210.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Teachers’ Characteristics and Motivational Techniques on Teachers’ Job Performance in Public and Private Secondary Schools in Akoko South West Area of Ondo State, Nigeria

Vivian Morenike, Olaseni, Temidayo Allen, Gideon Olusola, Bakare, Taiwo Grace, Olulowo – October 2019 Page No.: 211-215

The study investigated the influence of teacher’s characteristics and motivational techniques on teacher’s job performance in the public and private secondary schools in Akoko South West Local Government Area of Ondo State. The purpose was to find out the characteristics and motivational techniques used in public and private secondary schools and also to see the relationship between motivation and teachers job performance in public and private secondary schools in Akoko south west area of Ondo state. A descriptive research design of the survey type was used to investigate the problem of the study. Ten (10) schools were selected using stratified random sampling techniques from the 33 secondary schools in Akoko South West Local Government Area. Purposive random sampling techniques were used to sample 10 principals and 50 teachers to participate in the study.A self-developed questionnaire, titled (Teachers Characteristics and Motivational Techniques on Teachers Job Performance Questionnaire (TCMTTJPQ)) was used to obtain data from respondents. Data collected were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The findings revealed that there was a positive relationship between motivation and teachers job performance. The findings also showed that teacher’s characteristics as well as the school type i.e either private or public had significant influence on teacher’s job performance. It was concluded that teacher’s attitudes to their job is determined by how much they are well motivated and that teachers’ characteristics in terms of their gender, age and experience also determine their job performance. Based on the findings, the study recommends that government and school management should improvise ways either in attitude or in materials to motivate teachers in carrying out their duties. The study also recommends that the school management should put in place measures geared towards enhancing performance of teachers and formulates motivational policies that enhance employee performance.

Page(s): 211-215                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 25 October 2019

 Vivian Morenike, Olaseni
Department of Educational Management, Adekunle Ajasin University, Akungba-Akoko, Ondo State, Nigeria

 Temidayo Allen
Rufus Giwa Polythenic, Owo, Ondo State, Nigeria

 Gideon Olusola, Bakare
Board for Adult, Technical and Vocational Education, Alagbaka Akure, Nigeria

 Taiwo Grace, Olulowo
Adekunle Ajasin University, Akungba-Akoko, Ondo State, Nigeria

[1]. Ajao W. F.(2001). Cadbury is Determined to Move Education Forward. Vanguard, December 27 2001, P. 16.
[2]. Adu E. O, Tadu S. O&Eze S. S.(2007). Teachers’ Perception of Teaching as Correlates of Students’ Academic Performance in Oyo State Nigeria. Essays in Education, 20: 57-63.
[3]. Afe J. O (2001). Reflections on Becoming a Teacher and the Challenges of Teacher Education.Inaugural Lecture Series 64. Benin City: University of Benin, Nigeria.
[4]. Bogler N. F.(2002). The Relationship Between Service Condition of Teachers and Their Effectiveness in Secondary Schools in Abia State. M. Ed. Dissertation, Unpublished, Port Harcourt: University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria.
[5]. Bolarinwa J. L.(2013). When Principals Rate Teachers. Education Next. Hoover Institution. Retrieved on March 5 2014 from http://www.educationnext.org/ 20062/58.html.
[6]. Fehintola A.W (2014). Use of Students’ Achievement Scores as Basis for Assessing Teachers’ Instructional Effectiveness: Issues and Research Results. National Forum of Teacher Education Journal, 17(3): 1-13.
[7]. Ige I. B.(2007).Perception of Teachers’ Knowledge Attitude and Teaching Skills as Predictor of Academic Performance in Nigerian Secondary Schools. Educational Research and Review, 2(7): 165-171.
[8]. Silins E.&Mulford A.(2002). School Effects and Students’ Achievement in Nigeria And Swazi-Land. Working Paper Series 71, Washington DC: World Bank.
[9]. O’niel E. B.(1995).Fractals and the Value of Student Evaluators. Centre for Teaching and Learning, Idaho State University. Retrieved October 3 2005 from www.isu.edu/ct/facultydev/extras/meaningevalsfract_ files/MeaningEvalsfract.htm
[10]. Owadiae, I. (2018). West African Senior School Certificate Examination result.The Punch. August 31:39.

Vivian Morenike, Olaseni, Temidayo Allen, Gideon Olusola, Bakare, Taiwo Grace, Olulowo “Teachers’ Characteristics and Motivational Techniques on Teachers’ Job Performance in Public and Private Secondary Schools in Akoko South West Area of Ondo State, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.211-215 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/211-215.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Effect of Think-Pair-Share Cooperative Learning Model on Grade Twelve (12) learners’ Performance in Quadratic Functions: A Case of Twashuka Secondary School in Luanshya

Bertha Haakachima, Athanasius Lunjebe – October 2019 Page No.: 216-223

The problem of poor performance in Mathematics at Twashuka Secondary School remains a major concern. This study was designed to determine the effect of the Think Pair Share model of cooperative learning Approach on learners’ performance in Quadratic Functions by adopting a quasi-experimental control group pre-test and post-test design. Two classes were randomly assigned to the experimental group and the control group. The sample size comprised of 42 learners (18 males and 24 females). The experimental group comprised of 19 leaners while the control group comprised of 23 learners. The study collected quantitative data from the participants. Achievement and Attitude tests were used to collect data regarding participants’ engagement during the teaching and learning processes. The experimental group was taught using the Think-Pair-Share cooperative learning model while the control group was taught using conventional learning approach. Quantitative data was analysed by computing inferential (F tests and t-tests) and descriptive statistics (Means and Standard deviations) using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version (SPSS). The findings indicate a significant difference existed between the posttest scores of the experimental and control group t(40) = 2.823, p< 0.001. The mean score of the experimental group was higher (M = 71.47, SD = 25.650) than that of the control group (M =51.61, SD = 19.965). The study also found that learners have positive attitudes towards cooperative learning and mathematics (Mdn = 3.45).Further, an independent samples U test indicated that there was a significant difference between the mean attitude of males and females (U = 77.500, p = 0.022, r = 0.512), with a large effect size. These findings have implications for teaching and policy making. Teachers need to employ the think-pair-share model of cooperative learning in order to improve both learners’ performance and attitudes towards Quadratic Functions. This may require teachers to be trained in the effective use of cooperative learning models through in-service training programs. Researchers need to conduct more action research studies to ascertain the effectiveness of these models in improving performance and attitudes towards mathematics.

Page(s): 216-223                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 25 October 2019

 Bertha Haakachima
Twashuka Secondary School, P.O Box 90763, Zambia

 Athanasius Lunjebe
School of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Copperbelt University, P.O Box 21692, Zambia

[1]. Alim, E. S., Umam, K., & Wijirahayu, S. (2016). The Implementation of Blended Learning Instruction by Utilizing We Chat Application. Proceedings of the 24th International Conference on Computers in Education ICCE (pp 100-107).
[2]. Awoniyi, S. A and Judith, K (2014). Comparative Study of Effectiveness of Cooperative Learning Strategy and Traditional Instructional Method in the Physics Classroom: A case of Chibote Girls Secondary School, Kitwe District, Zambia. European Journal of Educational Science March 2014 Edition Vol 1, No.1
[3]. Aziz, Z and Hossain, M. A. (2010). A Comparison of Cooperative Learning and Conventional teaching on students’ achievement in secondary Mathematics. Procedia Social and Behavioral Sciences, 9, 53-62.
[4]. Castle, Tomas Dee Jr. “The Impact of Cooperative Learning On the Development of Need for Cognition Among First-Year College Students.” PhD (Doctor of Philosophy) thesis, University of Iowa, 2014. htps://doi.org/10.17077/etd.8j7n5q43
[5]. Conway, A., Fatisson, P.-E., Eickemeyer, P., Cheng, J. and Peters, D. (2012) UrbanMicro-Consolidation and Last Mile Goods Delivery by Freight-Tricycle in Manhattan: Opportunities and Challenges. Transportation Research Board 91st AnnualMeeting, Washington DC, 22-26 January 2012.
[6]. Debreu, R. J. 2012. Twisting, stretching, and bending: A Case for Flexibility in Today’s Model of Mathematics Education.
[7]. Doolittle, P.E. (1997) Vygotsky’s Zone of Proximal Development as a TheoreticalFoundation for Cooperative Learning. Journal on Excellence in College Teaching, 8,83-103.
[8]. Else-Quest, N. M., Hyde, J. S. & Linn, M. C. (2010). Cross-national patterns of gender
differences in mathematics: A meta-analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 136: 103–127.
[9]. Eslamian, D., Aref K. & Aref, K. (2012). The influence of cooperative learning on learners’ performance. Journal of American Science, 8(2): 200-203.
[10]. Estes, I. H. Mintz, S. L. & Gunter, M. A. (2010). Instruction: A model approach, 6th Edition 272- 274.
[11]. Examinations Council of Zambia, “Examinations Performance Review,” Examinations Council of Zambia, Lusaka, 2013.
[12]. Examinations Council of Zambia, “Examinations Performance Review,” Examinations Council of Zambia, Lusaka, 2014.
[13]. Examinations Council of Zambia, “Examinations Performance Review,” Examinations Council of Zambia, Lusaka, 2016
[14]. Examinations Council of Zambia, “Examinations Performance Review,” Examinations Council of Zambia, Lusaka, 2017
[15]. Gamit, A.D., Antolin, J.A. and Gabriel, A.G. (2017). The Effects of Cooperative Learning in Enhancing the Performance Level of Grade-10 Mathematics Students in Talavera National High School in the Philippines. Journal of Applied Mathematics and Physics, 5, 2386-2401. https://doi.org/10.4236/jamp.2017.512195
[16]. Iksan, Z. & Zakaria, E (2007). Promoting Cooperative Learning in Science and Maths
Education. Journal of Maths, Science and Technology Education. 3(1): 35-39.

Bertha Haakachima, Athanasius Lunjebe “The Effect of Think-Pair-Share Cooperative Learning Model on Grade Twelve (12) learners’ Performance in Quadratic Functions: A Case of Twashuka Secondary School in Luanshya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.216-223 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/216-223.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Are They Gratified? Contemporary Revelation on How the Women’s Rights on Decision Making Affect When They Are Unemployed

Wijewardhana BVN – October 2019 Page No.: 224-235

Central to sociological understandings the gender cannot be identifiable just as difference between male and female or between the lives of women and men but more specifically it is the inequality. In particular, sociological perspective of gender has traditionally focused under different circumstances, basically along the lines of how the respective society is organized, through it’s social structure. According to similar studies, women’s empowerment is the process, by which women gain greater control over material and intellectual resources and challenge the ideology of patriarchy and also to enjoy the rights of autonomous decision making within their family settings and in other social structures, too. In this context, several researches have proved that unemployment is a major life event and It can have a devastating impact on people’s lives in particular on women also affecting their decision making capacities. It affects not just the unemployed woman but also family members and the wider community.
In this research paper, author has seen unemployed women in the contemporary society are unable to follow their rights on the autonomous decision making within family units as well as in other social settings. The selected research area is consisted by seven districts in Sri Lanka also, in focus of a 700 sample selected from both rural and unburn unemployed categories of women. The selection process was followed by the random sampling method. Data were gathered through questionnaires, Interviews (Formal/ Informal/ Focus Group Discussions), Case studies and Observations. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of data and findings were applied. As revealed through several group discussions certain factors such as; being elders in the family, poverty, under-aged marriages are the blockades preventing them joining higher education also resulting unemployment, finally, limiting them for house hold activities. Accordingly, the data shows that unemployment of women affects their economic identity and this has a detrimental impact upon their social and domestic identities.

Page(s): 224-235                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 25 October 2019

 Wijewardhana BVN
Senior Lecturer in Criminology, Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Sri Lanka

[1]. Delavande, A. and Zafar, B. (2013). Gender Discrimination and Social Identity: Experimental Evidence from Urban Pakistan. [ebook] Available at: https://www.newyorkfed.org/medialibrary/media/research/staff_reports/sr593.pdf [Accessed 25 Oct. 2018].
[2]. Jayechandran, S. (2015). The Roots of Gender Inequality in Developing Countries. [ebook] Available at: http://faculty.wcas.northwestern.edu/~sjv340/roots_of_gender_inequality.pdf [Accessed 4 Sep. 2018].
[3]. Stier, H. and Epstien, N. (2011). Women’s Part-Time Employment and Gender Inequality in the Family. [ebook] Available at: http://people.socsci.tau.ac.il/mu/hayas/files/2011/01/Stier-le2000.pdf [Accessed 18 Oct. 2018].
[4]. Sydie, RA (1994) . Natural Women, Cultured Men: A Feminist Perspective on Sociological Theory, Amazon com, UBC Press

Wijewardhana BVN “Are They Gratified? Contemporary Revelation on How the Women’s Rights on Decision Making Affect When They Are Unemployed” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.224-235 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/224-235.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Fair Value Accounting and Financial Performance of Manufacturing Companies in Nigeria

Gospel Chukwu J. Ph.D, Akpeekon, Barisua – October 2019 Page No.: 236-245

The paper examined the relationship between fair value accounting and financial performance of manufacturing companies in Nigeria. The study adopted a descriptive and quasi-experimental design in a bid to achieve a holistic evaluation of the effect of fair value accounting on the financial performance of manufacturing companies in Nigeria. The data employed in the study was generated from the annual reports of ten (10) selected manufacturing companies listed on the Nigeria Stock Exchange from 2008-2010 (representing historical cost regimes) and 2014-2016 (representing fair value regimes). The paper formulated four hypotheses. It tested the hypotheses using least square method of multiple regression. The result showed that fair value accounting has a positive and significant impact on both profit before tax and return on assets. It is therefore recommended that fair value accounting should be adopted in order to achieve a more realistic measurement of financial performance the one under the historical cost basis.

Page(s): 236-245                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 26 October 2019

 Gospel Chukwu J. Ph.D
Department of Accountancy, Ken Saro-wiwa Polytechnic, Bori, Rivers State, Nigeria

 Akpeekon, Barisua
Department of Accountancy, Ken Saro-wiwa Polytechnic, Bori, Rivers State, Nigeria

[1]. Akwu, O.D; Ofoegbu, G.N & Okafor, R.G (2017). Fair Value Measurement, Depreciation and Profitability of Listed Manufacturing Compans in Nigeria. International Journal of Scientific Research and Innovative Technology, 4(9), 153-176.
[2]. Al-Matari, E. B., Al-Swidi, A. K.& Fadzil, F. H. (2014). The Measurements of Firm Performance. Dirnensions,Asian Journal of Finance & Accounting, 6(1):35-49. ISSN 1946-052X, available at www.macrothink .crg/ajfa
[3]. Ben-Caleb, E.; Olubu Kunola, U. & Uwuigbe, U. (2013). Liquidity Management and Profitability of Manufacturing Companies in Nigeria. Journal o Business and Management, 9(1), 13-21.
[4]. Bessong, P.L. & Charles, E. (2012). Comparative Analysis of Fair Value and Historical Cost Accounting on Reported Profit: A Study of Selected Manufacturing Companies in Nigeria. Research Journal of Financial and Account, 3(8), 132-249.
[5]. Bhunia, A & Khan, I.V. (2011). Liquidity Management Efficiency of Indian Steel Companies: A Case Study Far East Journal of Psychology and Business, 3(2), 108-117.
[6]. Dyckman, T.R; Dukes, RE. & Davis, C.J. (1998). Intermediate Accounting, Masachusetts, McGrawHill.
[7]. Enahoro, J.A. &Jayeoba, J. (2C)13). Value Measurement and Disclosures in Fair Value Accounting. Asian Economic and Financial Review, 3(9):1170-1179.
[8]. International Accounting Standards Board, on International Financial Reporting Standard Board (2012, Standard IFRSS, London.
[9]. Jaijairam, P. (2013). Fair value Accounting Versus Historical Cost Accounting. Review of Business Information System, 17(1)>1-6.
[10]. John, M. & Goind, R.K. (2012). Fair Value Measurement under IFRS 13. Financial Reporting Accountancy Ireland, 4(4) 4-20.
[11]. Lamberg, S & Valming, S. (2019. Impact of Liquidity Measurement of Profitability: A Study of the Adaptation of Liquidity Strategies in a Financial Crises. Umea School of Business.
[12]. Libby, R.; Libby, P.A. & Short, D.G. (2001). Financial Accounting, New York, McGraw-Hill Compnies Inc.
[13]. Majeed, S., Makki, M. A., Sale rn, S. & Aziz, T. (2013). The Relationship of Cash Conversion Cycie and Profitability of Firms: An Empirical Investigation of Pakistani Firms, Journal of Emerging Issues in Economics, Finance and Banking (JEIEFB), 1(1):35-51.
[14]. Moran, P. (2010). Deducting other-Than-Temporary Impairment (OTTI) Adjustments, Retrieved August, 2010. http://www. plantemoran. corn/perspectives/articles’ pge/deducting-ow-adjustments.aspx.
[15]. Nwanyanwu, A.L. (2014). Cost of Loan Capital and Capital Asset Acquisition in Nigeria: Implications on Organizational Profitability. European Journal of Business and Management, 6(26), 1999-208.
[16]. Obigabemi, I.F.; Faboyedc, S.O; Adeyemo, K.A. (2016). Financial Structure and the profitability of Manufacturing Companies in Nigeria. Journal of Accounting, Finance and Auditing Studies, 2(3), 56-63.
[17]. Owolabi, S.A. &Obida, S.S. (2U12). Business management Dynamics, 2 (2), 10-25.
[18]. Owolabi, S; Obida, A & Solomon, S. (2012). Liquidity Management and Corporate Profitability: ease Study of Selected Manufacturing Companies Listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange.
[19]. Ryan, S. G. (2008). Fair Value Accounting: Understanding the Issues Raised by the Credit Cr inch. New York: Council of Institutional Investors.
[20]. Siddiqi, M.N. (1971). Recent theories of profit. Aligarh: Aligarh Muslim University Press.
[21]. Ting, Y.S. & Soo, C.M. (2005). Fair-value accounting: Relevance, Reliability and Progress in Malaysia.
[22]. Van Home, J.C. (2002). Financial Management and Policy, Pearson Education mc, Delhi, 1ndia.
[23]. Ware, E.O. (2015). Liquidity management and its effect on profitability in a tough economy; A case of companies listed on the Ghana stock exchange. International Journal of Research in Business studies and Management 2(11), 34-66.
[24]. Zyla, M.L. (2010). Fair Value Measurements: Practical Jersey: John Wiley & Sons.

Gospel Chukwu J. Ph.D, Akpeekon, Barisua “Fair Value Accounting and Financial Performance of Manufacturing Companies in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.236-245 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/236-245.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Improving Teaching Practice Exercise in Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto

Dr (Mrs) A. A. Bagudo – October 2019 Page No.: 246-252

The standard and quality of teachers and its impact on educational outcomes has remain issues of global concern. This paper focuses on Teaching Practice(TP) as important component of professional teacher training programmes as practiced in almost all part of the world. The paper reviewed literature on policy frameworks, theories, provisions on Teacher development programmes and teacher preparatory practices with specific reference to TP exercise Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto (UDUS). The purpose is to how it is performed, identify the challenges and provide suggestions on how to improve. The major aspects of TP exercise in UDUS are course specification, payment of TP fees by students, posting of students and posting of staff to supervise and assess students. Challenges identified includes funding, staffing, students, pedagogy, scope of posting, duration of TP exercise, inadequate pre-TP, during TP and post-TP activities for staff and students, lack of adequate stake holder involvements. The paper suggests the need for TET Fund and International Developmental Partners collaborative supports and fund. The paper advances need for more Academic Staff, admission of high intelligent students into Faculty of Education, improvement in preparatory TP and post TP activities to involve orientation, briefing, dialogue, and feedback, need for student mastery of subject matter, methodology and provision instructional material, need for sustainable motivation and reinforcement and the need to improve, supervision, assessment and evaluation techniques. The study suggests need for setting of TP committee, and to conduct empirical researches to improve on the current situations. The paper concludes that without proper, well organized teaching practice as preparatory training for teacher development practices the issue of standard and quality and professionalism in our education system will remain an illusion.

Page(s): 246-252                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 26 October 2019

 Dr (Mrs) A. A. Bagudo
Department of Adult Education and Extension service, Faculty of Education and Extension Services, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria

[1]. Assimonge, C.A (2014). Teaching Practice Policy for NCE Teacher Education Programme A Critique. journal of knowledge review, vol 21(2)
[2]. Ede, M.O. &Ihiejiet, M. I. (2013). Assessment of Attitudes of Pre-Services Teachers Towards Teaching Practice Exercise:A Case Study of MichealOkpara University of Agriculture
[3]. Umudike, AbiaState.African International Journal of Educational Administration and Policy.4(4)1-12
[4]. Ekeke J.H. (2016), Evaluation of Teaching Practice exercise in Nigeria. European Journal of Education Studies vol. 2 ISSN: 2801-1111, ISSN-I:2501-1111
[5]. Ekindayo.H.T Alonge.H.O.,Kolawole,A.O and Ekundayo .S.K. (2014). Teaching Practice Exercise for Education Students in Nigerian Universities: Challenges and Way Forward. Mediterranean Journal of Social Science.5(9)486-492
[6]. European Union. (2015). ET2020 working Group on School Policy shaping career long perspective on teaching . a guide on policies to improve initial teacher education http://ec.europ.eu/education/policy/strategicramework/expert-group-en-htm.
[7]. FGN. (2013). National Policy on Education. Abuja: Federal Government of Nigeria.
[8]. Jekayinfa.A.A.,Yahya.L.I.,Yusuf.A.,Ajidagba,U.A.,Oniye,A.O.,Chiyangi,S.O.,Ibraheem.T.O (2012).Lecturers Assessment of Teaching Practice Exercise in Nigerian Universities. Journal of Education Practice.3(3)
[9]. Kiggundu.E&Naylmul, S (2009). Teaching Practice: A make or a break phase for Student Teachers. South African Journal of Education, vol.29 pg345-358
[10]. Nakpodia.E.N(2011)Teacher and the StudentPractice Teaching Programme in Nigerian Universities. International journal of Educational Administration and Policy Studies.2(3)33-39.
[11]. Musset, P. (2010). Initial Teacher Education in continuing training policies in a comparative prospective. Current practices in OECD countries and a Laborative Review on potential Effects” OECD Education working paper, No 48, OECD publishing. http://dx.org/10.1787/5
[12]. Ogunyinka E. K, Okoke . T I.& Adedoyin . R.C (2015). Teacher Education and Development in Nigeria: An Analysis of Reforms, challenges and prospects.
[13]. Okobia, E.O,.Ogunmugu,.E.A &Osagie R.O. (2013) An Analysis of perceived Challenges Faced by Student teacher during teaching practice. Journal of educational practices. 4(11); 7-11
[14]. Olayinka E.K, Okeke T.I, Adedoyin R.C (2015) Teacher Education and Development in Nigeria: An Analysis of reforms, challenges and Prospects. Education journal vol.4(3): 111-12
[15]. Salawu,I.O.,Okonkwo.U.M.,Osuji,U.S.A&Adeoye.F.A,(2008).EDU355:Teaching Practice Manual I .Lagos.National OpenUniversity of Nigeria(NOUN).
[16]. Santrock, A. (2007) Child Development. Boston. McGraw-Hill
[17]. UNESCO (2017).Global Education Monitoring accountability in Education: Meeting Our Commitments.onlinegemreport@unesco.org.

Dr (Mrs) A. A. Bagudo “Improving Teaching Practice Exercise in Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.246-252 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/246-252.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Effect of Projected Instructional Media on Senior Secondary School Students Retention in Biology

Okwara, O.Kalu, Anyagh, I. Paul, Ikyaan, S. Gloria – October 2019 Page No.: 253-257

This study investigated the effect of projected instructional media on senior secondary school students’ retention in biology. Two research questions were raised and two null hypotheses formulated to guide the study. It was conducted in co-educational schools in Benue State educational zone B. Purposive sampling technique was used to select the two schools for the study. The sample of one hundred and sixty-five SSI students was used. Researchers developed instrument (Biology Retention Test) was used to collect data for both pre-test and post-test. Mean and standard deviation were used to answer the research questions while analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to test the hypotheses at 0.05 alpha level. The findings show that students taught with projected instructional media retained higher than those taught without projected instructional media. It was found that the female students also retained higher than their male counterparts when taught using projected instructional media. However, this difference was not significant. The study recommend that biology teachers should be encouraged to adopt the use of projected instructional media in the teaching and learning of photosynthesis and biology in general as this will enhance students’ retention and eliminate gender related differences in the classroom.

Page(s): 253-257                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 26 October 2019

 Okwara, O.Kalu
Department of Science Education, Federal University of Agriculture, Makurdi, Nigeria

 Anyagh, I. Paul
Department of Science Education, Federal University of Agriculture, Makurdi, Nigeria

 Ikyaan, S. Gloria
Department of Science Education, Federal University of Agriculture, Makurdi, Nigeria

[1]. Abdu-Raheem, B.O. (2012). The influence of gender on secondary school students’ academic performance in south-west, Nigeria. Journal of Social Science, 31(1):93-98.
[2]. Adeoye, M.O. (2000). Teaching effectiveness, availability, accessibility and use of library information resources among teaching staff of Schools of Nursing in Osun and Oyo State, Nigeria.
[3]. Ahmed, M.A. (2008). Influence of personality factors on biology lecturers’ assessment of difficulty levels of genetics concepts in Nigerian colleges of education. Unpublished doctoral thesis, University of Ilorin, Nigeria.
[4]. Ahmed, M.A. & Abimbola, I.O. (2011). Influence of teaching experience and school location on biology teachers’ rating of the difficult levels of nutrition concepts in Ilorin, Nigeria. JOSTMED, 7(2): 52-61.
[5]. Akinbote, O. (1999). Teacher education programme for Nigeria primary schools: Expectation for the 21st century in Abimbade, A. (Ed). Teaching and teacher preparation in the 21st century, Ibadan: Department of Teacher Education, University of Ibadan, Nigeria.
[6]. Akoja, I.E & Ali, F.A. (2012). The impart of instructional materials on the academic performance of primary school pupils in Makurdi LGA of Benue State. In P.A. Eniayeju and P.T. Ortese (Eds). Contemporary issues in education. Makurdi: Destiny Ventures.
[7]. Ali, A.O. (2012). Gender difference and school location factors as correlate of secondary school student achievement in Physics, Hawail: USA. The 2011 Mani International Academic Conference, 259 – 265.
[8]. Aniodoh, H.C.O. (2012). History and philosophy of science. Enugu: Hacofam Educational Books.
[9]. Awolaju, B.A. (2015). Instructional materials as correlates of students’ academic performance in biology in senior secondary schools in Osun State. International Journal of Information and Education Technology, 6(9), September 2016.
[10]. Ayodele, M.O. (2009). Gender Differences in Mathematics and Integrated Science Achievement among Junior Secondary School Students. MJLI. 6(41-53).
[11]. Chiansom, M.M. (2011). Effect of Cooperative Learning on Students Achievement and Retention in Circle Geometry in Secondary Schools in Benue State, Nigeria. American Journal of Scientific and Industrial Research 2(1), 33-36.
[12]. Federal Republic of Nigeria (2009). National Policy on Education, Abuja: NERDC Press.
[13]. Isola, O.M. (2010). Effects of Standardized and Improvised Instructional Materials on Students’ Academic Achievements in Secondary School Physics. M.Ed Thesis, University of Ibadan, Ibadan.
[14]. Ivowi, U.M.O. (2003). Achievement level in understanding science concepts in secondary schools. Journal of Research in Curriculum, 1(2,3):245-525.
[15]. Kareem, L.O. (2003). Effects of Audio-graphic self-instructional package on senior secondary school students’ performance in biology in Ilorin, Nigeria. Unpublished Ph.D thesis, Faculty of Education, University of Ilorin, Ilorin.
[16]. Mudasiru, O.Y. (2005). Effects of video tape and slide-tape instructions on students’ performance in Junior secondary school social studies. Malaysian Online Journal of Instructional Technology, 3(1):29-35.
[17]. Nsofor, C.C. (2010). Cultural impediments on women in science, technology and mathematics education. 42nd Annual Conference Proceedings of STAN Ilorin.
[18]. Oludipe, D.I. (2012). Gender difference in Nigeria Junior Secondary Students’ Academic and Achievement in Basic Science. Journal of Educational and Social Research 2(1):18-23.
[19]. Rotimi, C.O., Ajogbeje, O.J. & Adebola, O.O. (2012). A New Kind of Visual-Model Instructional Strategy Education in Physics. Eurasian Journal of Physics and Chemistry (Special Issue), 28-32.
[20]. TutorVista (2010). Importance of biology in our daily lives. Retrieved August 23, 2011 from http://www.tutorvista.com/biology/importance of biology in our daily lives.
[21]. Umar, A.A. (2011). Effects of biology practical activities on students’ process skill acquisition in Minna, Nigeria State, Nigeria. JOSTMED, 7(2). 118-126.

Okwara, O.Kalu, Anyagh, I. Paul, Ikyaan, S. Gloria “Effect of Projected Instructional Media on Senior Secondary School Students Retention in Biology” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.253-257 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/253-257.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Nexus between Climate Change and Criminality: The Nigerian Experience

Prof. Dagaci Aliyu Manbe, Anthony Abah Ebonyi – October 2019 Page No.: 258-264

The increase in global temperatures is worsened by frequent natural events and human activities. Climate change has taken a prominent space in the global discourse on crime and criminality. Compared to when the subject centred around the discussion on the depletion of the ozone layer and global warming, today, the narrative revolves around the implications of changes in weather and climatic conditions in relations to violent crimes or conflict that traverse vast social, economic, and political spaces in different countries. Global warming and climate change refer to an increase in average global temperatures in the Earth’s near surface air and oceans, which occurs due to human activities such as deforestation and the burning of fossil fuel such as gas flaring. The trend is projected to continue, if unchecked. This paper seeks to explore the nexus between climate change and criminality in Nigeria. It further examines the main ecological changes that predispose conflict dynamics of security threats factored by climate change to peaceful co-existence in Nigeria. It concludes with recommendations on the way forward.

Page(s): 258-264                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 26 October 2019

 Prof. Dagaci Aliyu Manbe
Prof. of Sociology, Criminology/Counter-Terrorism and Insurgency, Department of Sociology, University of Abuja, Nigeria

 Anthony Abah Ebonyi
Doctoral Candidate in Criminology, Department of Sociology, University of Abuja, Nigeria

[1]. Asueni, O., & Godknows N. (2019). Climate Change and Social Conflict: Mitigation of Fulani Herdsmen and the Implications in Nigeria. British Journal of Education 7(5), pp.82-93. Retrieved from https://www.eajournals.org/wp-content/uploads/Climate-Change-and-Social-Conflict-Migration-of-Fulani-Herdsmen-and-the-Implications-in-Nigeria.pdf
[2]. Climate Diplomacy (n.d). Climate Change and Terrorist Groups – Explaining the Links. Retrieved from https://www.climate-diplomacy.org/videos/climate-change-and-terrorist-groups-explaining-links.
[3]. Climate Home (2017). (Boko Haram terrorists thriving on climate crisis: Report Published News. Retrieved from /https://www.climatechangenews.com/2017/04/20/boko-haram-terrorists-thriving-climate-crisis-report/
[4]. Conroy, S. (2006). Land Conflict, Climate Change, and Violence in Nigeria: Patterns, Mapping, and Evolution. Retrieved from http://www.nsrp-nigeria.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Land-Conflict-and-Climate-Patterns-in-Nigeria.pdf)
[5]. David, D. (2017). Climate Change Contribute to Boko Haram Uprising. International Institute for Counter-Terrorism (ICT). Retrieved from https://www.ict.org.il/Article/2023/climate-change-contribute-to-boko-haram-uprising
[6]. Egwu, Samuel (2016). The Political Economy of Rural Banditry in Contemporary Nigeria. In Rural Banditry and Conflicts in Northern Nigeria. Kuna, M. and Ibrahim J (Ed.) Centre for Democracy and Development. Retrieved from http://cddwestafrica.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/ruralbanditryinnorthernnigeria1.pdf
[7]. Esbjorn-Hargens, S. (n.d). An Ontology of Climate Change: Integral Pluralism and the Enactment of Multiple Objects. Journal of Integral Theory and Practice, 5(1), 143–174. Retrieved from https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/a16c/17166a85ad93da8449adbaf3e75be7390896.pdf
[8]. Lytle, Natalie (2017). Climate Change as a Contributor to Terrorism: A Case Study in Nigeria and Pakistan. Senior Theses. 207. Retrieved from https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/senior_theses/207
[9]. Messer, E. (2010). Climate Change and Violent Conflict: A critical literature review. Oxfam Research Backgrounders. Retrieved from https://www.oxfamamerica.org/static/oa3/files/climate-change-and-violent-conflict.pdf
[10]. Momale, S. B. (2016). Changing Methods of Animal Husbandry, Cattle Rustling and Rural Banditry in Nigeria. Nigeria. In Rural Banditry and Conflicts in Northern Nigeria. Kuna, M. and Ibrahim J (Ed.) Centre for Democracy and Development. Retrieved from http://cddwestafrica.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/ruralbanditryinnorthernnigeria1.pdf
[11]. Ndubuisi, C.I., (2018). A critical analysis of conflicts between herdsmen and farmers in Nigeria: Causes and socioreligious and political effects on national development, HTS Teologiese Studies/Theological Studies 74(1), a5065. https://doi.org/ 10.4102/hts.v74i1.5065/https://www.ajol.info/index.php/hts/article/viewFile/177998/167368
[12]. Nwaonicha, C. (2018). Nigeria: Effect of Global Warming and Climate Change. Retrieved from https://allafrica.com/stories/201810040404.html
[13]. Odjugo, P. A. O. (2010). General Overview of Climate Change Impacts in Nigeria. Kamla-Raj 2010 J Hum Ecol, 29(1): 47-55. Retrieved from https://wedocs.unep.org/bitstream/handle/20.500.11822/18207/General_overview_of_climate_change_impacts_in.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y]
[14]. Rajan, J. (2016). The Importance of Social Conflict Theory in the Context of Social Inequalities. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/31752695/THE_IMPORTANCE_OF_SOCIAL_CONFLICT_THEORY_IN_THE_CONTEXT_OF_SOCIAL_INEQUALITIES
[15]. Schiller, J. (n.d). Crime and Criminality. Retrieved from www.des.ucdavis.edu/faculty/Richerson/BooksOnline/He16-95.pdf
[16]. Shehu, A, et al. (2017). The menace of cattle rustling and banditry in north-west Nigeria: A Case Study of Katsina state. ‖ IOSR Journal of Research & Method in Education (IOSR-JRME) , 7( 6), pp. 40-47. Retrieved from http://www.iosrjournals.org/iosr-jrme/papers/Vol-7%20Issue-6/Version-8/D0706084047.pdf
[17]. Shodhganga (n.d) Crime: Concept, Definition and Analysis Retrieved from http://shodhganga.inflibnet.ac.in/bitstream/10603/37657/7/07_chapter%202.pdf
[18]. Tittenbrun, J. (2013). Dahrendorf’s Conflict Theory of Social Differentiation and Elite Theory. Innovative Issues and Approaches in Social Sciences, 6(3). Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/270621430_RALPH_DAHRENDORF’S_CONFLICT_THEORY_OF_SOCIAL_DIFFERENTIATION_AND_ELITE_THEORY/link/57a8f9d308aed1b226244c24/download
[19]. UNDP, 13 Climate Action (2019). Retrieved from http://www.ng.undp.org/content/nigeria/en/home/sustainable-development-goals/goal-13-climate-action.html

Prof. Dagaci Aliyu Manbe, Anthony Abah Ebonyi “The Nexus between Climate Change and Criminality: The Nigerian Experience” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.258-264 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/258-264.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Effect of Organizational Structure on Company Performance in Manufacturing Industry

Muhammad Donal Mon – October 2019 Page No.: 265-270

The manufacturing industry is the leading sector that contributes the most to Indonesia’s economic growth. In 2016, the contribution of the manufacturing industry to Indonesia’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) was 20.51 percent, in 2017 the industry’s contribution to the national Gross Domestic Product (GDP) was 20.16 percent based on these data, there was a decrease in contribution to national GDP. This research is to see the effect of complexity, formalization, nature of hierarchical and technology on company performance. Collect data using a questionnaire, in order to measure how much influence the organizational structure has on the firm performance. Data is processed using the SPPS program. The results of the analysis show that the organizational structure for complexity and nature of hierarchical variables has a positive but not significant effect while formalization and technology have a positive and significant effect on firm performance. Furthermore, adjusted R square obtained at 59.1% is influenced by the four variables, the other 40.9% is the contribution of other variables not included in this study.

Page(s): 265-270                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 26 October 2019

 Muhammad Donal Mon
Fakultas Ekonomi, Universitas Internasional Batam (UIB), Indonesia

Ali, G., Mehrpour, M., & Nikooravesh, A. (2016). Organizational Structure. Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences, 230(May), 455–462. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sbspro.2016.09.057
[2]. Almatrooshi, B., Singh, S. K., & Farouk, S. (2016). Determinants of organizational performance: a proposed framework. International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, 65(6), 844–859. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJPPM-02-2016-0038
[3]. Anh, K., Thi, V., Vu, T. D., & Hoang, K. Van. (2018). Using the Balanced Scorecard to Measure the Performance of Small and Medium- Sized Garment Enterprises in Vietnam. Accounting and Finance Research, 7(3). https://doi.org/10.5430/afr.v7n3p251
[4]. Antunes, M. G., Quirós, J. T., & Justino, M. do R. F. (2017). The relationship between innovation and total quality management and the innovation effects on organizational performance. International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, 34(9), 1474–1492. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJQRM-02-2016-0025
[5]. Dessler, G., Paulo, S., & Town, C. (2015). Resource management thirteenth editionTH EDITION.
[6]. Dragnić, D. (2014). Impact of Internal and External Factors on the Performance of Fast-Growing Small and Medium Businesses. Management – Journal of Contemporary Management Issues, 119–160.
[7]. Estalaki, K. G. (2017). On the impact of organizational structure on organizational efficiency in industrial units : industrial units of Kerman and Hormozgan Provinces. Estacao Cientfika (UNIFAP), 7(3), 95–105. https://doi.org/10.18468/estcien.2017v7n3.p95-105
[8]. Eynali, M., Golshahi, K., Yazdi, M. T., & Rahimi, M. M. (2014). The Relationship between Organizational Structure of Department of Education and the Personnel ’ s Job Satisfaction. International Research Journal of Management Sciences, 2(2), 49–54.
[9]. Frese, M. (2017). Chapter 1 Performance Concepts, (January 2005). https://doi.org/10.1002/0470013419.ch1
[10]. Gawankar, S., Kamble, S. S., & Raut, R. (2015). Performance Measurement Using Balance Score Card and its Applications : A Review. Journal of Supply Chain Management Systems, 4(January). https://doi.org/10.21863/jscms/2015.4.3.009
[11]. Ghorbani, M., Noghabi, J. T., & Nikoukar, M. (2011). Relationship Between Organizational Structure Dimensions and Knowledge Management ( KM ) in Educational Organization. World Applied Sciences Journal, 12(11), 2032–2040.
[12]. Ghozali, I. (2015). Structural Equation Modeling.
[13]. Hao, Q., Kasper, H., & Muehlbacher, J. (2012). How does organizational structure influence performance through learning and innovation in Austria and China. Chinese Management Studies, 6(1), 36–52. https://doi.org/10.1108/17506141211213717
[14]. Hayat, A. (2016). Organizational Commitment Antecedent and Its Effect on Managerial Performance in Public Sector Budgeting. International Journal of Administrative Science & Organization, 23(1), 1–15.
[15]. Jenatabadi, H. S. (2015). An Overview of Organizational Performance Index : Definitions and Measurements. Researchgate, (May). https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.4298.3849
[16]. Kalowski, A. (2015). Structure Determining Factors of Business Organization. International Journal of Innovation, Management and Technology, 6(3), 206–212. https://doi.org/10.7763/IJIMT.2015.V6.603
[17]. Kaygusuz, İ., Akgemci, T., & Yilmaz, A. (2016). The impact of HRIS usage on organizational efficiency and employee performance: A research in industrial in industrial and banking sector in Ankara Istanbul Cities. International Journal of Business & Management, IV(4), 14–52. https://doi.org/10.20472/BM.2016.4.4.002
[18]. Lunenburg, F. C. (2012). Organizational Structure: Mintzberg’s Framework. International Journal for Scholarly, Academic, Intellectual Diversity, 14(1), 1–8. Retrieved from https://platform.europeanmoocs.eu/users/8/Lunenburg-Fred-C.-Organizational-Structure-Mintzberg-Framework-IJSAID-V14-N1-2012.pdf
[19]. Muscalu, E., Iancu, D., & Halmaghi, E.-E. (2016). The influence of the external environment on organizationans. Journal of Defense Resources Management, 7(13), 133–138. Retrieved from http://journal.dresmara.ro/issues/volume7_issue2/13_muscalu_iancu_halmaghi.pdf
[20]. Nazarian, A., Soares, A., & Lottermoser, B. (2017). Inherited organizational performance? The perceptions of generation Y on the influence of leadership styles. Leadership and Organization Development Journal, 38(8), 1078–1094. https://doi.org/10.1108/LODJ-05-2016-0119
[21]. Ogbo, A. I., Chibueze, N. F., Christopher, O. C., & Anthony, I. A. (2015). Impact of structure on organizational performance of selected technical and service firms in Nigeria. Corporate Ownership & Control, 13(1), 1278–1284.
[22]. Ortega, P., Saez, Z., & Cortes, C. (2010). Can formalization , complexity , and centralization in fl uence knowledge performance. Journal of Business Research, 63(3), 310–320. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2009.03.015
[23]. Oyewobi, L. O., Windapo, A. O., & Rotimi, J. O. B. (2016). Environment, competitive strategy, and organizational characteristics: A path analytic model of construction organizations’ performance in South Africa. Canadian Journal of Administrative Sciences / Revue Canadienne Des Sciences de l’Administration, 33(3), 213–226. https://doi.org/10.1002/cjas.1384
[24]. Pang, K., & Lu, C.-S. (2018). Organizational motivation, employee job satisfaction and organizational performance. Maritime Business Review, 3(1), 36–52. https://doi.org/10.1108/MABR-03-2018-0007
[25]. Peyman, Y. (2011). The Analysis of the Relationship between Organizational Structure and Information Technology ( IT ): And the Barriers to Its Establishment at the University of Isfahan from the Faculty Member ’ s Viewpoints. Canadian Center of Science and Education, 1(1), 98–104. https://doi.org/10.5539/hes.v1n1p98
[26]. Rachmayanthy. (2017). Pengaruh Struktur Organisasi dan Kepuasan Kerja Terhadap Kinerja Pegawai (Studi Kausal Pada Pegawai Direktorat Jenderal Pemasyarakatan). Jurnal Ilmiah Ilmu Manajemen, 4(1), 1–14.
[27]. Razia, M., Damiannah, K., & Maru, P. L. (2015). The Moderating Effect of Organizational Processes on the Relationship between Organizational Structure and Organizational Effectiveness in Universities in Kenya. IOSR Journal of Business and Management Ver. II, 17(9), 2319–7668. https://doi.org/10.9790/487X-17927988
[28]. Rivai, V. (2004). Manajemen sumber daya manusia untuk perusahaan.
[29]. Rizescu,&Tileaga, C. (2016). Factors Influencing continous organizational change. Journal of Defense Resource Management, 7(2), 139–144. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.annals.2004.01.010
[30]. Rosenberg, A. (2018). Taking apart structural change: The constitutive role of communication in relieving tensions. International Journal of Organizational Analysis, 26(2), 368–381. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJOA-04-2017-1156
[31]. Rzepka, A. (2017). Inter-organizational relations as a one of sources of competitive advantage of contemporary enterprises in the era of. Procedia Engineering, 174, 161–170. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.proeng.2017.01.195
[32]. Santos, J. B. (2012). Toward a Subjective Measurement Model for Firm Performance. Brazilian Administration Review, (May), 95–117.
[33]. Selvam, M., Gayathri, J., Vasanth, V., Lingaraja, K., & Marxiaoli, S. (2016). Determinants of Firm Performance : A Subjective Model. International Journal of Social Science Studies, 4(7), 90–100. https://doi.org/10.11114/ijsss.v4i7.1662
[34]. Shabbir, M. S. (2017). Organizational Structure and Employee’s Performance: A Study of Brewing Firms in Nigeria. American Research Journal of Business and Management, 3(1), 1–16.
[35]. Sisnuhadi, S. (2017). The mediating role of organizational learning in the relationship between infrastructure practices, core practices, and organizational performance. International Journal of Economic Perspectives, 11(1), 1692–1708. Retrieved from http://www.econ-society.org
[36]. Song, J. H., Chai, D. S., Kim, J., & Bae, S. H. (2018). Job Performance in the Learning Organization : The Mediating Impacts of Self-Effi cacy and. Wiley Online Library, 30(4), 249–271. https://doi.org/10.1002/piq
[37]. Steiger, J. S., Hammou, K. A., & Galib, M. H. (2014). An Examination of the Influence of Organizational Structure Types and Management Levels on Knowledge Management Practices in Organizations. International Journal of Business and Management, 9(6), 43–57. https://doi.org/10.5539/ijbm.v9n6p43
[38]. Sugiyono. (2015). Metodologi Penelitian Bisnis. ALFABETA Bandung.
[39]. Sweis, Rateb J Ismail, Asma’a .s Amayreh. Sayyed, A. (2019). ( TQM ) Implementasi and organization performance: Evidance from the airlines companies in UAE. International Journal of Information, Business and Management, 11(1), 58–80.
[40]. Tavitiyaman, P., Qiu Zhang, H., & qu, H. (2012). The effect of competitive strategies and organizational structure on hotel performance. International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, 24(1), 140–159. https://doi.org/10.1108/09596111211197845
[41]. Tran, Q., & Tian, Y. (2013). Organizational Structure: Influencing Factors and Impact on a Firm. American Journal of Industrial and Business Management, 03(02), 229–236. https://doi.org/10.4236/ajibm.2013.32028
[42]. Wahudi, T. (2017). Pengaruh struktur organisasi terhadap efektifitas kerja karyawan pada PT Inti Karsa Persada (Kalla Hospital). Jurnal Organisasi Dan Manajemen, (September).

Muhammad Donal Mon “Effect of Organizational Structure on Company Performance in Manufacturing Industry” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.265-270 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/265-270.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Efficacy of Home Modification & Relaxation Exercise in Cervical Myelopathy: A Case Study

F.Ashfaq, B.Ejaz, S.Malik – October 2019 Page No.: 271-274

Background: Cervical myelopathy (CM) is caused by narrowing of the cervical spinal canal. Some of its symptom can be treated without surgery such as collar or bracing are useful in treating neck immobilization, medications are used to reduce pain and inflammation.
Objective: This study aims to explore the Role of home modification& Relaxation exercise in improving the quality of life & psychological well-being of patient of cervical myelopathy.
Method: It’s a case study of patient of cervical myelopathy. On base line patient was assessed by WHOQOL, FIM, PSOM and HSSAT checklists. After completion of assessment; the patient was enrolled for therapy sessions.20 sessions were planned for desired results. After the completion of 20 sessions, patient was reassessed by same tools to measure the difference.
Results: home modification& relaxation exercise proved effective in improving quality of life and psychological well-being of patient. Her improvement was manifested by the final scores of WHOQOL, HSAT, PSOM and FIM.
Conclusion: This case study documented the role of home modification& Relaxation exercise in improving the quality of life and psychological well-being of patient of cervical myelopathy.

Page(s): 271-274                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 26 October 2019

  F.Ashfaq
Institute of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Dow University of Health Sciences, Pakistan

  B.Ejaz
Institute of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Dow University of Health Sciences, Pakistan

  S.Malik
Institute of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Dow University of Health Sciences, Pakistan

[1]. Connell, B. R., Sanford, J. A., Long, R. G., Archea, C. K. and Turner, C. S. 1993. Home modifications and performance of routine household activities by individuals with varying levels of mobility impairments: Technology and Disability, 2: 9–18.
[2]. Cumming, R.G., Thomas, M., Szonyi, G., Frampton, G., Salkeled, G. and Clemson, L. 2001. Adherence to occupational therapist recommendations for home modifications for falls prevention. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 55: 641–648
[3]. Edwards CC, Riew KD, Anderson PA, Hilibrand AS, Vaccaro AF(2003).Cervical myelopathy: current diagnostic and treatment strategies. The Spine Journal, 3(1):68-81
[4]. Fänge, A. and Iwarsson, S. 2005. Changes in ADL dependence and aspects of usability following housing adaptation. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 59: 296–304.
[5]. Gitlin, L. N., Miller, K. S. and Boyce, A. 1999. Bathroom modifications for frail elderly renters: Outcomes of a community-based program. Technology and Disability, 10: 141–149
[6]. Petersson I, Lilja M, Hammel J, Kottorp A. Impact of home modification services on ability in everyday life for people ageing with disabilities. Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine. 2008 Apr 5; 40(4):253-60.
[7]. Pynoos J, Nishita C, Perelma L. Advancements in the home modification field: A tribute to M. Powell Lawton. Journal of Housing for the Elderly. 2003 Jan 21;17(1-2):105-16.
[8]. Tanner, B., Tilse, C. and de Jonge, D. 2008. Restoring and sustaining home: The impact of home modifications on the meaning of home for older people. Journal of Housing for the Elderly, 22: 195–215
[9]. Stark S, Landsbaum A, Palmer JL, Somerville EK, Morris JC, Harvey A, Friedman DH. Client-centred home modifications improve daily activity performance of older adults. Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy. 2009 Jul;76(1_suppl):235-45.
[10]. Carnemolla P, Bridge C. Housing Design and Community Care: How Home Modifications Reduce Care Needs of Older People and People with Disability. International journal of environmental research and public health. 2019 Jan;16(11):1951.

F.Ashfaq, B.Ejaz, S.Malik “Efficacy of Home Modification & Relaxation Exercise in Cervical Myelopathy: A Case Study” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.271-274 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/271-274.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Role of Internet Banking in Customer Acquisition for Commercial Banks in Kenya: A Case of Commercial Banks in Nairobi, Kenya

Kilelson Kiplangat Mutai, James Mwikya Reuben – October 2019 Page No.: 275-284

The purpose of this study was to establish the role that internet banking has on customer acquisition for commercial banks in Kenya. The reason for this is that it is important to know the influence that internet banking has on how and why a commercial bank attracts a customer and retains its customers. It specifically assed, payment processing and account reporting as critical components that would demonstrate the relationship that exists between internet banking and the twin objectives of any progressive bank; acquisition of new clients and retention of the new and the older clients to assure future profitability and survival. Anchored on the customer service theory, the study employed a descriptive research design wherein the target population was 868 staff working in specific departments within the selected 9 banks as per the tiers. Stratified random sampling technique was used to come up with a sample of 269 respondents. Questionnaires was the data instrument used for collecting data which was then analysed using descriptive analysis in the forms of means and presenting the same in tables and graphs. Further, inferential statistics was used to assess the influence of internet banking in attracting and retaining customers by commercial banks in Kenya. Additionally, multiple regression was used to establish the relationship between the dependent and the independent variables in the study. The study is of great significant to commercial banks as it may help the banks to develop policies and strategies for attracting and retaining customers, to the CBK as it develops and deploys regulatory policies and to the research community in further development of customer acquisition and retention theories. The researcher conducted simple and multiple regression analysis in order to find out the relationship between internet banking characteristics and customer acquisition in the banking sector. The inferential results on influence of account reporting on customer acquisition in banking sector show R=0.673 indicating a strong positive correlation and R2=0.453 and there was a significant effect between account reporting on customer acquisition (t=2.548, p<0.05). The inferential results on influence of payment processing on customer acquisition R=.661 Indicating a strong positive correlation and R2=.437 and there was a significant effect between payment processing and customer acquisition (t=5.571, p<0.05). Banks need to structure their operation in order to fulfil a clients’ needs better. If possible, banks should come up with service delivery such as effective account reporting that add more value than existing customers and that are able to attract more customers. The study recommended that banks should strengthen their customer bonds. Improved customer bonds will enable both the firms and the customers to commit resources to the relationship built on high levels of trust and commitment. The study further suggest that a study be to be done on other factors (44.9%), as established in coefficient of determination) that contribution customers acquisition in the banking sector.

Page(s): 275-284                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 26 October 2019

 Kilelson Kiplangat Mutai
Management University of Africa, P.O Box 29677-00100, Nairobi Kenya

 James Mwikya Reuben
Management University of Africa, P.O Box 29677-00100, Nairobi Kenya

[1]. CBK (2016). Commercial bank financial report.
[2]. Chacha, M. (2015). Customer Relationship Marketing and its Influence on Customer Retention: A Case of Commercial Banking Industry in Tanzania. College of Business Education, Dodoma, Tanzania.
[3]. Gemechis, D. (2015). Profitability Determinants in the Insurance Sector in Ethiopia: A Panel Evidence on Non-Life Insurance. A Thesis submitted to Department of Accounting and Finance College of Business and Economics.
[4]. Gilbert, S. & Horsnell, R. (1988). Customer Service Theory
[5]. Govender, I. & Sihlali, W. (2016). A study of mobile banking adoption among university students using an extended TAM. Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences, 5(7), 451.
[6]. Hanafizadeh, P., Keating, B. W. & Khedmatgozar, H. R. (2014). A systematic review of Internet banking adoption. Telematics and informatics, 31(3), 492-510.
[7]. Kombo, F. (2015). Customer satisfaction in the Kenyan banking industry. Journal of International Studies.
[8]. Kombo, F., Paulík, J., & Kljucnikov, A. (2015). CSR as a driver of satisfaction and loyalty in commercial banks in the Czech Republic. Journal of International Studies.
[9]. Lilienfeld, S. O., Lynn, S. J., Namy, L. L. & Woolf, N. J. (2010). Social Psychology. Psychology: A Framework for Everyday Thinking. Pearson Education. p. 380.
[10]. Martins, C., Oliveira, T., & Popovic, A. (2014). Understanding the Internet banking adoption: A unified theory of acceptance and use of technology and perceived risk application. International Journal of Information Management, 34(1), 1-13.
[11]. Mbugua, G. M., Waiganjo, E. W., & Njeru, A. (2015). Relationship between strategic performance management and employee retention in commercial banks in Kenya. International Journal of Business Administration, 6(1), 53.
[12]. Navneet, K. & Kiran, R. (2015). Customer Satisfaction and Customer Loyalty in E-Banking in India. Journal of Business and Management. Volume, 16, 06-13.
[13]. Njane, J. C. (2013). An investigation of factors affecting customer retention in Barclays bank of Kenya
[14]. Okibo, B. W., & Wario, A. Y. (2014). Effects of e-banking on growth of customer base in Kenyan banks. International journal of research in management & business studies, 1(1), 78-84.
[15]. Oliver, R. L. (2011). Consumer Perceptions of Interpersonal Equity and Satisfaction in Transactions: A Field Survey Approach, Journal of Marketing, 53(April), pp. 21-35.
[16]. Ombok, E. O. (2016). Effect of automation of bank services on customers’ satisfaction at equity bank, Uasin Gishu County, Kenya (Doctoral dissertation, Kisii University).
[17]. Ondiek, C. O. (2011). An investigation into the factors that affect the adoption of internet banking among corporate bank customers in Kenya: a case study of Kenya Commercial Bank branches in Kisumu.
[18]. PwC’s (2017). Consumer Digital Banking Survey overview
[19]. Sanders M., Lewis P. & Thornhill A. (2009). Research methods for business students, 5th edition, 597.
[20]. Shaikh, A. A. & Karjaluoto, H. (2015). Mobile banking adoption: A literature review. Telematics and informatics, 32(1), 129-142.
[21]. Sheila, C. (2017). The Impact of Mobile Banking on Commercial Banks in Kenya (Doctoral dissertation, United States International University-Africa).
[22]. Vatanasombut, J., & Colgate, K. (2014). Theory, development and implementation of national customer satisfaction indices: the Swiss Index of Customer Satisfaction (SWICS), Total Quality Management,Vol. 11 No.7, pp.1017-28.
[23]. Yau, E. S. (2014). Factors affecting customer retention in internet banking among Hong Kong professionals and business practitioners. University of Newcastle, 17(3), 317-340.
[24]. Yee, B. Y., & Faziharudean, T. M. (2010). Factors affecting customer loyalty of using Internet banking in Malaysia. Journal of Electronic Banking Systems, (2010), 21.
[25]. Yee, B. Y., & Faziharudean, T. M. (2010). Factors affecting customer loyalty of using Internet banking in Malaysia. Journal of Electronic Banking Systems, (2010), 21.

Kilelson Kiplangat Mutai, James Mwikya Reuben “Role of Internet Banking in Customer Acquisition for Commercial Banks in Kenya: A Case of Commercial Banks in Nairobi, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.275-284 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/275-284.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Financial Management Practices and Fraud Risk Management of Commercial Banks in Kampala, Uganda

Angellah Mary Nakkungu Ssekamwa, Dr. Mohammad Ssendagi – October 2019 Page No.: 285-328

This study examined the relationship between financial management practices and fraud risk management in commercial banks in Kampala. This study had a population and sample of 24 licensed commercial banks and adopted a multi research design. The unit of inquiry had 120 respondents; Accounts, Finance, Audit, Risk and Branch Managers. Greed was the most common cause of fraud, forgery and altering cheques was the most common type of fraud. Four hypotheses were formulated and tested using simple regression at a significant level of 5%, Independent T-test and Oneway Anova. Correlation findings revealed a positive significant relationship between financial management practices and fraud risk management; accounting information systems (r = .153, p<.01), financial reporting analysis (r = .186*, p<.01) and forensic accounting (r = .403**, p<.01). Regression analysis showed that fraud risk management was strongly influenced by forensic accounting (beta = 0.430, p<.01), followed by financial reporting analysis (beta = 0.089, p=0.343) and accounting information systems (beta = -0.106, p = 0.305).
The F statistic in ANOVA showed significant linear relationship for all the predictor variables and fraud risk management; financial management practices (F=8.121, sig =0.000), accounting information systems (F=10.755, sig =0.000), financial reporting analysis (F=6.040, sig =0.000) forensic accounting (F=9.969, sig =0.000) and fraud risk management. While financial management practices may have an influence on fraud risk management in commercial banks in Kampala, the relationship is weak at its best. This leaves a gap for further research on other fraud risk management predictor variables.
Every fraud is unique, but the fraudsters can never be too smart. Bank managers need to pay attention to; the causes of fraud and address them promptly; proper accounting information systems management; combining improved systems with strong risk controls; effective financial reporting analysis measures; apply forensic accounting; ensure strategized efforts from all levels of staff; take heed of the lessons from previous fraud occurrences; involve all stakeholders in the fraud risk management process.

Page(s): 285-328                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 26 October 2019

 Angellah Mary Nakkungu Ssekamwa
School of Graduate Studies and Research, Team University, Plot 446, Kabaka Ajagara.rd. Kampala-Uganda

 Dr. Mohammad Ssendagi
School of Graduate Studies and Research, Team University, Plot 446, Kabaka Ajagara.rd. Kampala-Uganda

[1]. ACFE, 2015; Asia-Pacific Fraud Conference, Singapore
[2]. ACFE, 2018. Albrecht, 2005). The international journal of business & management. ProQuest LLC, 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, PO Box 1346, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
[3]. ACFE, (2018) Fraud risk management Summit: Overview: The United States of America, New York.
[4]. AICPA (2014). Forensic accounting-fraud investigation. Retrieved from https://www.aicpa.org/membership/downloadabledocuments/forensic-accounting-fraud investigations-chapter1.pdf
[5]. Ajzen, I. (1985). From intentions to actions: A theory of planned behavior. In J. Kuhl & J. Beckmann (Eds.), Action control: From cognition to behavior. Berlin, Heidelber, New York: Springer-Verlag.
[6]. Akhidime, A. E. (2018). Bridging audit expectation gap with the integration of forensic accounting: A review. Aefunai Journal of Accounting, Business, and Finance.
[7]. Alabdullah, T. T. Y., Alfadhl, M. M. A., Yahya, S., & Rabi, A. M. A. (2013). The role of forensic accounting in reducing financial corruption: A study in Iraq. International Journal of Business and Management.
[8]. Albrecht, C. C., Albrecht, W. S., & Dunn, S. G. (2001). Can auditors detect fraud? A review of the research evidence. Journal of Forensic Accounting.
[9]. Albrecht, W., Howe, K. and Romney, M. (1984), Deterring Fraud: The Internal Auditor’s Perspective. Institute of Internal Auditors Research Foundation, Altamonte Springs, FL.
[10]. Albrecht, W.S., Albrecht, C.C., Albrecht, C.O., Zimbelman, M.F., 2012. Fraud Examination (4th Ed.). Mason: Thomson South-Western Publishing.
[11]. Al-Jabari, M. (2014) The Relationship between the Information Systems of Accounting,
[12]. Alleyne, P. and Howard, M. (2005), “An exploratory study of auditors’ responsibility for fraud detection in Barbados”, Managerial Auditing Journal, Vol. 20 No. 3.
[13]. Andy Field (2013), Andy Field (2009) Discovering Statistics Using SPSS. Sage Publications Ltd., London.
[14]. Bank of Uganda, (2018) Financial Stability Report. Issue No. 10
[15]. Beck, T and Hesse H. (2006) “Bank Efficiency, ownership and market structure: Why are Interest Spreads so high in Uganda?” World Bank working paper Series WPS 4027. The World Bank. Washington DC
[16]. Bhasin, M.L. (2016) Survey of Creative Accounting Practices: An Empirical Study. Wulfenia.
[17]. Blanchard Danielle and Dionne Georges (2003, 2004), Risk Management and Corporate Governance
[18]. Boateng AA, Boateng GO, Acquah H. (2014) A literature review of fraud risk management in microfinance institutions in Ghana. Research Journal of Finance and Accounting.
[19]. Boateng, & Acquah, 2014; KPMG, 2016; Zhang, 2012). Fraud Risk Management.
[20]. Burazeri A, Sula A. (2015) Fraud risk score card: How to structure and quantify fraud risk. In The 4th International Virtual Scientific Conference on Informatics and Management Sciences.
[21]. Burger & Woods, 2008:317). Burger, A.P.J. & Woods, G. 2008. Financial management and cost accounting module. Honours Programme in Public & Development Management. Stellenbosch: School of Public Management and Planning, University of Stellenbosch.
[22]. Button M, Gee J, Brooks G. Measuring the cost of fraud: an opportunity for the new competitive advantage. Journal of Financial Crime.
[23]. Button, Gee, and Brooks (2011) [19-20], Buton M, Gee J, Brooks G. Measuring the cost of fraud: an opportunity for the new competitive advantage. Journal of Financial Crime.
[24]. C. Levy, E. Lamarre, and J. Twining, “Taking Control of Organizational Risk Culture” (New York: McKinsey & Co., February 2010).
[25]. Carpenter and Reimers (2005) Unethical and Fraudulent Financial Reporting: Applying the Theory of Planned Behavior, Journal of Business Ethics.
[26]. Chartered Institute of Management Accountant (CIMA), (2009). Corporate Fraud. Gateway Series, 1-17.
[27]. Chepkoech F, Rotich G. (2017), Effect of risk management process on motor insurance fraud in Kenya. International Journal of Social Science and Information Technology.
[28]. Cieslewicz (2010) Automatic contention detection and amelioration for data-intensive operations SIGMOD ’10 Proceedings of the 2010 ACM SIGMOD International Conference on Management of data Pages 483-494 Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.
[29]. Cook, T.D. & Campbell, D.T. (1979). Quasi-experimentation: Design and analysis issues for field settings. Chicago: Rand McNally.
[30]. Cooper, D.R. and Schindler, P.S. (2003) Business Research Methods. 8th Edition, McGraw-Hill Irwin, Boston.
[31]. Creswell, J. W. (2012). Educational research: Planning, conducting, and evaluating quantitative and qualitative research (4th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.
[32]. Crockford, G.N. (1982). The bibliography and History of Risk Management: Some Preliminary Observations, The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance.
[33]. Cronbach, L. J. (1951). Coefficient alpha and the internal structure of tests. Psychometrika.
[34]. Cullinan, C. and Sutton, S. (2002). Defrauding the public interest: A critical examination of reengineered audit processes and the likelihood of detecting fraud. Critical Perspectives on Accounting.
[35]. Dada, Enyi, & Owolabi, 2013).“Forensic accounting: A relevant tool for effective investigation of bribery cases in Nigeria”
[36]. Defining and Understanding Fraud: A South African Case Study G. J. Rossouw, L. Mulder and B. Barkhuysen Business Ethics Quarterly Vol. 10, No. 4 Cambridge University Press.
[37]. Deusidedit, S. (2014) Computerized Accounting System on Effectiveness of Financial Emerald insight journal of management accounting Global Institute of Research and Education.
[38]. Doost, R. (1990), “Accounting irregularities and computer fraud”, National Public Accountant, Vol. 35 No. 5.
[39]. Dorminey, J., Fleming, S., Kranacher, M., and Riley, R. 2012. “The Evolution of Fraud Theory,” Issues in Accounting Education.
[40]. Esmeray, A. (2016).The Impact of Accounting Information Systems on Firm Performance: Empirical Evidence in Turkish Small and Medium Sized Enterprises. International Review of Management and Marketing.
[41]. Finnerty JD, Hegde S, Malone CB. (2016), Fraud and firm performance: keeping the good times (apparently) rolling. Managerial Finance. Finucane & Holup, 2005) [32].
[42]. Fishbein, M. & Ajzen, I. (1975). Belief, attitude, intention, and behavior: An introduction to theory and research. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.
[43]. Harrington, S., and Neihaus G.R.(2003). Risk Management and Insurance, Irwin/McGraw-Hill, USA.
[44]. Hochberg, Sapienza & Jorgensen (2009), A lobbying Approach to Evaluating the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 Journal of Accounting Research.
[45]. Idowu, F.C. (2010) Impact of Microfinance on Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises in Nigeria. AL-Dahrawi. Inaya, 2016).
[46]. J. F. Weston, S. Besley and E. F. Brigham, 1996. “Essentials of Managerial Finance,” 11th Edition, The Ddryden Press, New York.
[47]. Jack Dorminey,A. Scott Fleming,Mary-Jo Kranacher,Richard A. Riley, Jr. (2012) The Evolution of Fraud Theory. Issues in Accounting Education: Vol. 27.
[48]. Kent Grayson (2004) Journal of Consumer Research, Volume 31, Issue 2.
[49]. Knapp, C.A. and Knapp, M.C. (2001), “The effects of experience and explicit fraud risk assessment in detecting fraud with analytical procedures”, Accounting, Organizations and Society, Vol. 26.
[50]. Knežević, S., & Tepavac, R. (2012). Accounting ınformation system as a platform for business and financial decision-making in the company. Management.
[51]. Koong KS, Liu LC, Qin H, Tingting Ying. (2017) Occurrences of online fraud complaints: 2002 through 2015. International Journal of Accounting & Information Management.
[52]. Kothari, C.R., (2008). Research Methodology: Methods and Techniques, New Age International Publishers
[53]. KPMG. ,(2016) Global profiles of the fraudster.
[54]. KPMG. Culture is Key : Assessing/Auditing Culture within Your Organization, 2017a.
[55]. KPMG. KPMG survey reveals surge in fraud in Australia. Australia, 2017b.
[56]. Kranacher, M.J., Riley, Jr., R.A., and Wells, J.T. 2011. Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination, New York.
[57]. Krejecie, R. V. & Morgan, D. W. (1970). Determining sample size for research activities. Educational and Psychological Measurement.
[58]. Kronfost (2014) the complexity of the research area of accounting information systems.
[59]. Mackevicius, J., & Giriunas, L. (2013). Transformational Research of the Fraud Triangle, ISSN Vol. 92.
[60]. Mailley GMJ. A tale of two triangles: comparing the Fraud Triangle with criminology’s Crime Triangle. Accounting Research Journal.
[61]. Marks, J. 2009. Playing Offense in a High-Risk Environment, Crowe Horwath, NewYork,
[62]. Martin Samociuk, Nigel Iyer & Helenne Doody (2010, 11). A short Guide to Fraud Risk;
[63]. Martin T. Biegelman Joel T. Bartow (2012) Executive Roadmap to Fraud Prevention and Internal Control: Creating a Culture of Compliance. John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
[64]. Merle Erickson, Michelle Hanlon and Edward L. Maydew Journal of Accounting Research, 2006, vol. 44.
[65]. Miller (2006). MILLER, K. (2006). Organizational communication: approaches and processes. Belmont, CA, Thomson/Wadsworth.
[66]. Modern Financial Theory, Corporate Strategy, and Public Policy: Another Perspective John W. Peavy, III The Academy of Management Review Vol. 9.
[67]. Moore, J. & Reichert, A. (1989).A Multivariate Study of Firm Performance and the Use of Modern Analytical Tools and Financial Techniques. Interfaces; Vol. 19.
[68]. Moqbel Akram, (2014), The Impact Of Accounting Information Systems (AIS) On Ecommerce Analytical Study-Service Sector-Jordan ASE, International Journal of Scientific & Technology Research, Volume 3.
[69]. Mugenda, O.M. and Mugenda, A.G. (1999) Research Methods: Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches. Acts Press, Nairobi.
[70]. Mui, G. and Mailley, J. (2015), “A tale of two triangles: comparing the Fraud Triangle with criminology’s Crime Triangle”, Accounting Research Journal, Vol. 28.
[71]. Mukherjee (2018) Frauds in Corporate Banking and role of forensic accounting research journal of social sciences.
[72]. Myers, S. (1984). Finance Theory and Financial Strategy. Interfaces 14.
[73]. Nasserinia, Ariff, and Fan-fah, 2017) [79]. Nasserinia A, Ariff M, Fan-fah C. Relationship between participation bank performance and its determinants. Pertanika Journal of Social Sciences & Humanities.
[74]. Ng, Ye, Ong, and Teh (2017) [80]; Ng SH, Ye C, Ong TS, The BH. The impact of working capital management on firm’s profitability : Evidence from Malaysian listed manufacturing firms. International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues.
[75]. Ngalyuka, (2013) The Relationship Between ICT Utilization And Fraud Losses In Commercial Banks In Kenya, University Of Nairobi
[76]. Ngechu, M. (2004). Understanding the Research Process and Methods: An Introduction to Research Methods Nairobi, Acts Press.
[77]. Njenga & Osiemo, 2013) Njenga N, Osiemo P. Effect of fraud risk management on organization performance: A case of deposit taking microfinance institutions in Kenya. International Journal of Social Sciences and Entrepreneurship.
[78]. Nunnally, J. C. (1978). Psychometric theory (2nd ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.
[79]. Nwaiwu, J. N., & Aaron, F. C. (2018). Forensic accounting relevance and fraud detection process and financial performance in Nigeria. International Journal of Advanced Academic Research/Accounting and Economic Development.
[80]. Nwinee, K., Akpos, Y., Vincent, N., & Ibibio, T. (2016). Impact of Accounting Information System on Organizational Effectiveness: A Study of Selected Small and Medium Scale Enterprises in Woji, Portharcourt. International Journal of Research.
[81]. O’Reilly -Allen M, Zikmund PE. (2013) Whose Responsibility is it to Deter and Detect Fraud ? The Role of Management, the Auditor and the Fraud Examiner. Journal of Global Business Management.
[82]. Ofoeda, 2017; Shin, Sung, Choi & Kim, 2015; Subramanian & Youndt, 2005)
[83]. Oso and Onen (2008) Oso W.K and Onen D. 2008: A General guide to writing research proposals and report. (2nd ed) Kampala: Makerere University.
[84]. Owolabi M. Bakre (2007) The unethical practices of accountants and auditors and the compromising stance of professional bodies in the corporate world: Evidence from corporate Nigeria, Accounting Forum.
[85]. Oyedokun, 2018; Okoye, & Gbegi, 2013). Forensic Accounting: Curbing Fraudulent Activities
[86]. Oyedokun, G. E. (2013). The integrity of financial statements and forensic accounting techniques in internal control of business organizations. (Master’s thesis), Babcock, Nigeria.
[87]. Oyedokun, G. E (2012). Compendium of writings on forensic accounting &fraud examination. ASCO Publishers, Lagos. Nigeria.
[88]. Oyedokun, G. E (2012). Fundamentals of forensic accounting & fraud examination. AARON Publishing Company, Lagos. Nigeria.
[89]. Oyedokun, G. E. (2014). Forensic accounting and investigation: A means of curbing money laundering activities. Being a paper delivered at the Nigerian Students’ Economic and Finance Summit (UNICEF) 2014; of Obafemi Awolowo University’s Chapter of the Nigeria University, Accounting Students’ Association.
[90]. Oyedokun, G. E. (2015). Approach to forensic accounting and forensic audit. Being a lecture delivered by the staff of internal audit department of Niger Delta Development Commission.
[91]. Oyedokun, G. E. (2017). Forensic accounting techniques, tax justice and federally collected tax revenue in Nigeria (2000-2016). Unpublished PhD Thesis, Babcock University.
[92]. Oyedokun, G.E. (2013). Audit, investigation and forensic accounting: Similarities and differences. Being a lecture delivered at the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Nigeria’s forensic accounting certification Programme
[93]. Paul, Devi, and Teh (2012) [88] Paul SY, Devi SS, Teh CG. Impact of late payment on Firms’ profitability: Empirical evidence from Malaysia. Pacific Basin Finance Journal.
[94]. Peltier-Rivest, D. and Lanoue, N. (2015), “Cutting fraud losses in Canadian organizations”, Journal of Financial Crime, Vol. 22.
[95]. Popoola OMJ, Che-Ahmad AB, Samsudin RS.(2015) An empirical investigation of fraud risk assessment and knowledge requirement on fraud related problem representation in Nigeria. Accounting Research Journal.
[96]. Popoola, O., Che-Ahmad, A., Samsudin, R., Salleh, K., & Babatunde, A. (2016). Accountants’ capability requirements for fraud prevention and detection in Nigeria. International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues.
[97]. Rachmawati, R., & Lasniroha, T. (2014). The Effect of Management Accounting Information System, Management Accounting Information Quality, Services Quality to User Satisfaction and Implications on Decision Making Process. International Conference on Trends in Multidisciplinary Business and Economics Research, 27-28, March, Bangkok, Thailand, 66- 74.
[98]. Rapina’s study (2014) Factors Influencing the Quality of Accounting Information System and Its Implications on the Quality of Accounting Information. Research Journal of Finance and Accounting.
[99]. Raval (2016) A Disposition-Based Fraud Model: Theoretical Integration and Research Agenda. Journal of Business Ethics.
[100]. Reporting: A case Study Of Stanbic Bank, Mbarara Branch. [E-journal]. Bishop Stuart University.
[101]. Romney and Steinbart (2012, p.686) The Impact of the Use of Accounting Information Systems on the Quality of Financial Data.
[102]. Romney et al (2009) Accounting Information Systems: Lessons in State-Owned Enterprise in Developing Economies. Journal of Finance and Management in Public Services. Volume 12.
[103]. S.C. Kuchal (1998) Financial Management. EW fact professional studies series Chaitanya Publishing House.
[104]. Saeidi, H (2014) The Impact of Accounting Information Systems on Financial Performance – a case Study of Tes – India. Indian Journal of Fundamental and Applied Life Sciences. Vol. 4.
[105]. Salehi, M. and Torabi, E (2016) The Role of Information Technology in Financial Reporting
[106]. Sanusi, Rameli, & Isa, 2015) [92]. Fraud Schemes in the Banking Institutions: Prevention Measures to Avoid Severe Financial Loss 7th International Conference On Financial Criminology
[107]. Sarantakos, S. (2005) Social Research. 3rd Edition, Palgrave Mac-Millan, New York.
[108]. Saunders, M., Lewis, P., & Thornhill, A. (2003). Research Methods for Business Students (3rd edition.). England: Prentice Hall.
[109]. Sawsan Saadi Halbouni, 2015; The Role of Auditors in Preventing, Detecting, and Reporting Fraud: The Case of the United Arab Emirates (UAE)
[110]. Sekaran, U. (2003) Research Methods for Business: A Skill Building Approach. 4th Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Hoboken.
[111]. Shanghverzy &Small Business Administration. (2003). Definition of Small Business in the United States: Frequently Asked Questions.US Small Business Administration.
[112]. Sridhar Ramamoorti (2008) The Psychology and Sociology of Fraud: Integrating the Behavioral Sciences Component Into Fraud and Forensic Accounting Curricula. Issues in Accounting Education: November 2008, Vol. 23.
[113]. Sufian and Chong (2008) [99] Determinants of Bank Profitability in a Developing Economy: Empirical Evidence from the Philippines. Asian Academy of Management Journal of Accounting and Finance AAMJAF, Vol. 4.
[114]. Suleiman, Othman and Ahmi (2018) Suleiman, N., Othman, Z., & Ahmi, A. (2018). Mitigating Corruption Using Forensic Accounting Investigation Techniques. Indian-Pacific Journal of Accounting and Finance.
[115]. The Bank Scene Newsletter February 2019 Uganda Institute of Banking and Financial Services.
[116]. The Observer July 1, 2014). Literature about bank behavior in Uganda is limited (Mugume, 2010).
[117]. Trompeter, Carpenter, Desai, Jones and Riley (2013) Symbiosis of Fraud Triangle and Crime Triangle.
[118]. Vanguard News (2016). Corruption to cost Nigeria up to 37% of GDP reduction. Retrieved from http://www.vanguardngr.com/2016/10/corruption-cost-nigeria-37-gdp-study/
[119]. Vanguard News (2017). Capital Market Scandals. Retrieved from https://www.vanguardngr.com/2017/12/capital-market-scandal-oandos-inquiry-secreveals breach-isa-act-2007-investigations/
[120]. Vousinas GL. (2016) The critical role of Internal Auditing in addressing bank fraud : A conceptual framework. Journal of Economics Literature.
[121]. William A., and Heins, M.H. (1995), Risk Management and Insurance, McGraw-Hill, New York.
[122]. Wolfe, David T., and Dana R. Hermanson. “The Fraud Diamond: Considering the Four Elements of Fraud.” CPA Journal 74.
[123]. Wood & Lewis, (2017). International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research and Development Online ISSN: 2349-4182, Print ISSN: 2349-5979; Impact Factor: RJIF 5.72 Received: 11-11-2018; Accepted: 12-12-2018 www.allsubjectjournal.com Volume 6.
[124]. Wood A. Lewis A. 2017 Risk culture development within the Caribbean development bank. The Businessand Management Review.
[125]. Zhang, (2012).A Robust Unsupervised Method for Fraud Rate Estimation.Journal of Risk and Insurance Volume 80.
[126]. Zysman, A., (2004). Forensic accounting demystified. World investigators network standard practice for investigative and forensic accounting engagement? Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants.

Angellah Mary Nakkungu Ssekamwa, Dr. Mohammad Ssendagi “Financial Management Practices and Fraud Risk Management of Commercial Banks in Kampala, Uganda” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.285-328 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/285-328.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Moderating Effect of Interest Rates in COMESA Countries

Stephen Angwenyi Nyamweya, Dr. Josephat Cheboi, David Kosgei – October 2019 Page No.: 329-332

The paper sought to determine the moderating effect of interest rate on the linkage between financial factors and financial development in 19 COMESA Countries. The specific objectives were to determine the moderating effect of interest rates on the relationship between international remittance, financial access and the financial development in COMESA countries. The results indicated that interest rate moderated positively the relationship between international remittance and financial development (β=0.0217,p-value=0.0074). Further, interest rate showed a significant moderating effect on the relationship between financial access and the financial development with coefficient 0.0046(p-value=0.0009). Therefore, results are expected to provide a basis for policy reference and also stimulate debate ondiaspora policies on interest rates in developing countries especially COMESA regionsto encourage foreign remittances, financial access and thereby fostering financial development.

Page(s): 329-332                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 October 2019

 Stephen Angwenyi Nyamweya
Department of Accounting and Finance, Moi University, Kenya

 Dr. Josephat Cheboi
Department of Accounting and Finance, Moi University, Kenya

 David Kosgei
Department of Accounting and Finance, Moi University, Kenya

[1]. Arora R.U (2010): Measuring financial access. Griffith University
[2]. Asongu, S. (2015). The impact of mobile phone penetration on African inequality. International Journal of Social Economics, 42(8), 706-716.
[3]. Bhattacharya, M., Inekwe, J., &Paramati, S. R. (2018). Remittances and financial development: empirical evidence from the heterogeneous panel of countries. Applied Economics, 1-14.
[4]. Claessens, S., &Laeven, L. (2003). Financial development, property rights, and growth. The Journal of Finance, 58(6), 2401-2436.
[5]. Coulibaly, D. (2015). Remittances and financial development in Sub-Saharan African countries:A system approach. Economic Modelling, 45, 249-258.
[6]. Green, R. C., Hollifield, B., &Schürhoff, N. (2006). Financial intermediation and the costs of trading in an opaque market. The Review of Financial Studies, 20(2), 275-314
[7]. Loayza, N., &Ranciere, R. (2004). Financial development, financial fragility, and growth. The World Bank.
[8]. Misati, R., & Kamau, A. (2015). Local and International Dimensions to Credit Provision by Commercial Banks in Kenya. Working Paper Series, WPS/04/15. Centre for Research on Financial Markets and Policy. Nairobi: Kenya Bankers Association.
[9]. Nyamongo, E. M., and R. N. Misati. (2011). “Remittances and Banking Sector Development in Sub Saharan Africa.” paper read at Global Development Forum, Dubai, United Arab Emirates, November.
[10]. Ondiege, P., (2010). “Mobile Banking in Africa: Taking the Bank to the People”, Africa Economic Brief, 1(8), pp. 1-16.
[11]. Samargandi, N., Fidrmuc, J., & Ghosh, S. (2015). Is the relationship between financial development and economic growth monotonic? Evidence from a sample of middle-income countries. World Development, 68, 66-81.
[12]. World Economic survey (2006): Financial Development and Economic Growth, Critical Review.

Stephen Angwenyi Nyamweya, Dr. Josephat Cheboi, David Kosgei “Moderating Effect of Interest Rates in COMESA Countries” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.329-332 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/329-332.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Profitability Analysis of Groundnut Production in Chikun Local Government Area, Kaduna State, Nigeria

Ayodele, J.T. – October 2019 Page No.: 333-338

This study assessed the profitability analysis of groundnut production in Chikun Local Government Area of Kaduna State. Structured questionnaire was used to generate primary data for the study. Descriptive statistics, Net farm income analysis, and profitability ratios were employed in the analysis. Results revealed that majority of the respondents (87.95%) were relatively young and fell within the active age (21 – 50 years). Male respondents marginally dominated groundnut production at 55.42 % and majority (59.04%) were married. Results further revealed that significant (73.50%) number of the respondents had below 11 inhabitants in their households. Educationally, 64.00 % of respondents had post primary education. The net farm income per hectare was N81, 518.33 and gross income of N173, 952.45 were obtained per hectare of groundnut cultivated with a return on capital invested determined at 0.47 implying that for every naira invested, the farmers makes 47 kobo (N0.47)and the gross rati o was calculated at 0.53 indicating that total farm costs was about 53% of the gross income which shows that groundnut production is a viable, beneficial and profitable enterprise in the study area. Major constraints faced by the farmers were incidence of pests and diseases infestation plus inadequate capital. Despite these constraints, the farmers made profit. Therefore, groundnut production could be one of the poverty alleviating enterprise, if well-articulated. It is recommended that: credit facilities should be provided so that farmers can have fund to purchase farm inputs such as pesticides and insectices to combat problem of pests and diseases infestation identified, improve varieties of groundnut should be developed and made available to the farmers so that their yield can increase, and farmers should form themselves into cooperative groups so that they can pool their resources together in getting adequate funds to finance groundnut production activities.

Page(s): 333-338                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 October 2019

 Ayodele, J.T.
Federal College of Mechanization P.M.B. 2273, Afaka, Kaduna, Nigeria

[1]. Abal J.Y.,and Harkness, C.(2008). A review of the 1975 groundnut rosette epidemic in Nigeria.Samaru Conference Paper 9. Institute for Agricultural Research (Samaru).
[2]. Adesina G. (1991). Traditional versus improved groundnut production practices: Some furtherevidences from Northern Nigeria. Experimental Agriculture. 22(1), 33-38.
[3]. Agwu. J. K. (2011) Improved Marketing as a for GeneratingincreasedFoodProduction, A Nigeria Experience. West African Journal of Agricultural Economics,1(1): 21-26.
[4]. Ajeigbe HA, Waliyar F, Echekwu CA, Ayuba K, Motagi BN, Eniayeju D and Inuwa A. (2014). )A Farmer’s Guide to Groundnut Production in Nigeria. Patancheru 502 324, Telangana, India: International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics. 36 pp.
[5]. Alabi J, Musa, D.and Filein, W. (2005). Seed Systems in Sub-Sahara Africa: issues and options. The World Bank Discussion paper 266: The World Bank, Washington D.C USA.
[6]. Audu, S.I., Girei, A.A., Onuk, E.G., and Onyenye, P.O. (2017). Productivity and Profitability of Groundnut Production ( Arachis hypogaea L.) in Lafia Local Government Area of Nasarawa State, Nigeria. Asian Research Journal of Agriculture, 4(3): 1- 11
[7]. FAO, (2004) Food and Agricultural Organization Expert’s recommendations on fats and oils in human nutrition. The article is adapted from the first chapter of fats and oils in human nutrition: report of joint expert consultation, FAO Food and Nutrition Paper No. 57.
[8]. FAO, (2014). Scope: Groundnut production to hit record high 08. Prices up press release:United Nations Docs Trainin-info-tool-seetf-e.html.
[9]. Murtala.F, Ocra, V.K, I.C. Dehimini, R.A Asuboah and E.AAsuedu (2004), seed Management Manual to Ghana, Mofa, Accra, Chanu, Loaf.3(1).pp30-41.
[10]. National Agricultural Extension and Research Liaison Services – NAERLS (2011).Extension guide.Zaria, Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development.
[11]. Ndjeunga, J and Ibro. A. (2010). Groundnut trends and prospects in west and central africa. Technical report, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT). Unpublished Paper.
[12]. Taru, V.B., Kyagya, I.Z., Mshelia, S.I., and Adebayo, E.F.(2008). Economic Efficiency of Resource Use in Groundnut Production in Adamawa State of Nigeria. World Journal of Agricultural Sciences, 4: 896 – 900.
[13]. Usman, I., Ayinde, B. T., Dauda, H and Mukhtar, A. A.(2011). Socio-Economic Factors Affecting Groundnut Production In Sabongari Local Government Of Kaduna State, Nigeria. International Journal of Food and Agricultural Economics ISSN 2147-8988 Vol. 1No.1 pp.41-48 41

Ayodele, J.T. “Profitability Analysis of Groundnut Production in Chikun Local Government Area, Kaduna State, Nigeria ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.333-338 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/333-338.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Physiological Effect of Stress of Nurses Engaged in Continuing Medical Education on Job Performance

Aaron Adjei, Evans Kwashie Kagbetor – October 2019 Page No.: 339-346

The study assessed the impact of continuing medical education on job performance among nurses. A quantitative approach was used to explore nurses’ views with regards to continuing formal education. A sample size of eight (8) categories of nurses was adopted. The study was limited to various categories of practicing nurses. Inferential analysis was conducted to investigate contingency with educational status groups. The result shows that response to physiological effects (Cardiovascular diseases) was significantly related (Chi-Square=23.382, p —value=0.00) to health professionals’ educational status. Results indicated that more health professionals engaged in continuing medical education (CME) without official approval experienced cardiovascular diseases.

Page(s): 339-346                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 October 2019

 Aaron Adjei
Central University, P.O BOX DS 2310 Dansoman, Accra- Ghana -West Africa

 Evans Kwashie Kagbetor
Maranatha University College P. O. Box AN 10320, Accra North

[1]. Aiken, L.H., Clarke, S.P., Cheung, R.B., Sloane, D.M., & Silber, J.H. (2003). Educational levels of hospital nurses and surgical patient mortality. Journal of American Medical Association, 290, 1617-1623
[2]. American Nurses Association, (2012). Nursing world: What is nursing? Accessed on 28 August 2012.http://www.nursingworld.org/EspeciallyForYou/What-is-Nursing
[3]. American Nurses Association, (2012). Nursing world: Nursing Shortage. Accessed on 6 September 2012. http://www.nursingworld.org/nursingshortage
[4]. Aspinall, S.R., Bradburn, D.M., & Mills, S.J. (2006). Hospital at night and the surgical middle grade: An observational study from a district general hospital. Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England 88(Suppl):24– 26.
[5]. Folkman, S. & Lazarus, R.S (1988) “Coping as a mediator of emotion” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 54 466-475.
[6]. Lazarus, R.S., & Folkman, S. (1984). Stress, appraisal and coping. New York: Springer Publishing Company.
[7]. Lincoln M, Adamson B, Covic T (2004). Perceptions of stress, time management and coping strategies of speech pathology students on clinical placement. Advances in Speech Language Pathology 6(2): 91-99
[8]. Newton J, Billett S., Ockerby C (2009b). Journeying through clinical placements – an examination of six student cases. Nurse Education Today 29(6): 630-634
[9]. Perin, D. (2006). Academic progress of community college nursing aspirants: An institutional research profile. Community College Journal of Research and Practice,30, 657–670.
[10]. Perry, M (2000) “Reflections on intuition and expertise” Journal of Clinical Nursing 9137-145
[11]. Pintrich, P. R. (2000). An achievement goal perspective on issues in motivation terminology, theory, and research. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 25, 92-104.
[12]. Rakel, D., Barrett, B., Zhang, Z., Hoeft, T., Chewning, B., Marchand, L. & Scheder, J. (2011), ‘Perception of empathy in the therapeutic encounter: Effects on the common cold’, Patient Education and Counseling, vol. 85, no. 2011, pp. 390‐397.
[13]. Rao, J.K., Anderson, L.A., Inui, T.S. & Frankel, R.M. (2007), ‘Communication interventions make a difference in conversations between physicians and patients: A systematic review of the evidence’, Medical Care, vol. 45, no. 4, pp. 340‐349.
[14]. Schirmer, J.M., Mauksch, L., Lang, F., Marvel, M.K., Zoppi, K., Epstein, R.M., Brock, D. & Pryzbylski, M.(2005), ‘Assessing communication competence: a review of current tools’, Family Medicine, vol. 37, no. 3, pp. 184‐192.
[15]. Sneider, E.B., Larkin, A.C., & Shah, S.A. (1996). Has the 80-Hour Workweek Improved Surgical Resident Education in New England? Journal of Surgical Education, (3), 140-145
[16]. Somjai Nokdee (2007) Self-directed learning among Thai Nures in clinical practice.
[17]. Sonoma Valley Hospital. (1999). {On-line} Available: http://svh.com/spring97 Spelling Commission. (2006). A test of leadership: Charting the future of U.S. Higher Education. Education Publication Center, Washington DC: U.S. Department of Education.
[18]. Stein L (1998) The doctor-nurse game In Dingwall R and McIntonsh J (Editors)(1998) Readings in the sociology of nursing Edinburgh: Churchilll Livingstone.
[19]. Street, R. L., G. Makoul, N. K. Arora, and R. M. Epstein, (2009). ‘How does communication heal? Pathways linking clinician‐patient communication to health outcomes.’ Patient Education and Counseling 74:295‐301.
[20]. Stewart, M.A. (1995), ‘Effective physician‐patient communication and health care outcome: A review’, Canadian Medical Association Journal, vol. 152, no. 1995, pp. 1423‐1433.
[21]. Thistlewaite.J. (2008) Professionalism in Medicine. Oxford Radcliffe.
[22]. Toghill, P. (1998). Continuing medical education: Where next? British Medical Journal, 316, 721-722.
[23]. Webster, R. (1990), “The role of the nurse teacher” Senior Nurse, vol.10, no.8, pp.16-18.
[24]. Weerakoon, P. K. & Fernando, D. N. (1991). Self-evaluation of skills.
[25]. Williams, B. (2004). “Self-direction in a problem-based learning program” Nurse Education Today, vol. 24, pp. 277-285.
[26]. Zachariae, R., Pedersen, C.G., Jensen, A.B., Ehrnrooth, E., Rossen, P.B. & von der
[27]. Maase, H. (2003),’Association of perceived physician communication style with patient satisfaction, distress, cancer‐related self‐efficacy, and perceived control over the disease’, British Journal of Cancer, vol. 88, pp. 658‐665.

Aaron Adjei, Evans Kwashie Kagbetor “Physiological Effect of Stress of Nurses Engaged in Continuing Medical Education on Job Performance” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.339-346 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/339-346.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Community Participation, Policy Framework and the Performance of Solar Energy in Kenya: A Case Study of Kalobeyei Ward in Turkana West Sub-County

David Kaloki Kitenge, Prof. Elijah Siringi – October 2019 Page No.: 347-358

Understanding the dynamics solar energy transitions and the collaborative advantage of involving the communities in planning for sustainable energy in the local level can facilitate the steering of current and future global developments for clean energy solutions. This study investigated the relationship between community participation and policy framework on the performance of solar energy projects in Kenya. The key objective of this study were to investigate the relationship between community empowerment and policy framework on performance of solar energy in Kenya with focus on Kalobeyei Ward in Turkana West Sub-County. The research study used descriptive research and regression for the investigation. The target population of the study was 3200 households. Stratified Radom sampling was employed during the study with a sample of 320 household heads. A pilot study was conducted to test the accuracy of the research instruments to ensure reliability and validity of research data. Data was processed and analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. Independent and dependent variables relationship was determined by use of multiple regression models using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20. Research findings were presented using graphs, pie charts and frequency tables. The inferential statistics used regression and correlation analysis. The findings indicated that there was a positive and significant relationship between community participation andpolicy framework on the performance of solar energy in Kalobeyei Ward. The study concluded that most of the respondents strongly agreed that in their area civic education was done to transfer and disseminate knowledge, skills, and values to general public and to promote solar energy project efficacy. The study also found out that there are Turkana Countygovernment has a directorate mandated to support public participation. The study established that community satisfaction surveys are important platforms to enhance the project performance and access achievement of the intended program to the beneficiary.The two variables studied only explain 57.8 percentage of the performance of solar energy as indicated by R2. His means that 42.2% of solar energy is contributed by other factors not studied in this study. The study found out that public participation and policy framework contribute significantly to the performance of solar energy. The study concluded that the county governance structures should ensure that decisions made during public participation and are included in their plans and the county fiscal strategy paper.The study also concludes that the local government should also share the solar energy project indicators and project progress reports for the public to validate the success of failure of the projects. The study recommends that the there is need to ensure inclusivity and community empowerment during community participation to ensure sustainability of the of solar energy projects. The government should also foster the use of Information and Communication technology (ICT) to expand democratic space for community participation in project design, implementation as well monitoring and evaluation of solar energy projects. Finally the study recommends that the community should be trained on aspects of community action planning and mappingto identify their needs and develop plans in a participatory process to address local challenges and contribute to renewable energy initiatives.

Page(s): 347-358                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 October 2019

 David Kaloki Kitenge
Masters of Arts in Development Studies, Management University of Africa, Kenya

 Prof. Elijah Siringi
Management University of Africa, Kenya

[1]. Augustine, Z. & Nhlanhla H. (2017). Study of Poor Fisher Families in Pangkep, Indonesia
[2]. Baumgartner, Tom, Walter Buckley, and Tom R. Burns. (1975). Relational Control: The Human Structuring of Cooperation and Conflict. Journal of Conflict Resolution 19: 417–40.
[3]. Bochel, C., Bochel, H., and Pool, B. A. (2015).Reaching In Scenario’: The Potential for E-Petitions in Local Government. In Uppsatspresenterad vid the PSA Annual Conference (Vol. 30).
[4]. Bolanle, W. and Olayinka A. (2015).Conflict resolution strategies on community-driven projects in private and public housing estates in lagos state, nigeria.
[5]. Burns, Tom R., and Anna Gomolinska. (2000). The Theory of Socially Embedded Games: The Mathematics of Social Relationships, Rule Complexes, and Action Modalities. Quality and Quantity: International Journal of Methodology 34: 379–406. [CrossRef]
[6]. Christopher, F., and Annette O., (February,2015). Building community participation in Kenya’s Devolved Government: Overview of key challenges and opportunities for enhancing participation in newly devolved institutions and systems,A summary of the working papers series. World Bank Group
[7]. Cooper, D. R., & Schindler, P.S. (2011). Business Research Methods. New York: McGraw Hill.
[8]. Davis, F.D. (1986). A technology acceptance model for empirically testing new end-user information systems: Theory and results. Massachusetts, United States: Sloan School of Management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
[9]. Day, D. (1997). Citizen participation in the planning process: an essentially contested concept. Journal of Planning Literature, 11(3), 421-434.
[10]. Dinkelman, T. (2011).The Impact of Rural Electrification on Employment: New Evidence from South Africa. Princeton: Princeton University
[11]. Ekpo, A. (2016). Decentralization and Service Delivery: A Framework Paper Prepared for the African Economic Research Consortium, Nairobi.
[12]. Energy Regulatory Commission, (2015).Annual Report Financial Statement 2014/2015.
[13]. Finch, C. (2015).Participation in Kenya’s Local Development Funds: Reviewing the Past to Inform the Future. World Bank and Kenya School of Government Working Paper Series 3, Washington, DC.
[14]. Finch, C. (2015).Participation in Kenya’s Local Development Funds: Reviewing the Past to Inform the Future.World Bank and Kenya School of Government Working Paper Series 3, Washington, DC.
[15]. Geels, F.W. and Schot, J. (2007).Typology of sociotechnical transition pathways. Research Policy 36(3): 399–417.
[16]. Hardin, R. (1993). Collective Action, Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press.
[17]. Hasanov, M. and Zuidema, C. (2018).The transformative power of self-organization: Towards a conceptual framework for understanding local energy initiatives in The Netherlands. Energy Research & Social Science 37: 85–93.
[18]. Innes, J. E., &Booher, D. (2004).Reframing community participation: strategies for the 21st century. Planning Theory & Practice, 5(4), 419-436.
[19]. Institute of Economic Affairs, (2015).Review of status of Community participation, and County Information Dissemination Frameworks: Case Study of Isiolo, Kisumu, Makueni and Turkana Counties. Nairobi: Institute of Economic Affairs.
[20]. Irena, (2015).Rethinking Energy Renewable Energy and Climate Change.Masdar City: International Renewable Energy Agency.
[21]. Kalekye, A. D. (2016). Determinants of citizen participation in devolved governance in kenya; a case study of Machakos County. Masters Thesis, University of Nairobi.
[22]. King, C. S., Feltey, K.M., & O’Neill Susel, B. (1998).The Question of Participation: Toward Authentic Community participation in Public Administration. Public Administration Review, 58(4), 317-326.
[23]. Koij, H.J., Otema, M., Veenman, S. et al.,(2018). Between grassroots and treetops: Community power and institutional dependence in the renewable energy sector in Denmark, Sweden and the Netherlands. Energy Research & Social Sciences 37: 52–64
[24]. Lai P. C. & Zainal A. A., (2015). Consumers’ Intention to Use a Single Platform E-Payment System: A Study among Malaysian Internet and Mobile Banking Users. Journal of Internet Banking and Commerce. (20) (1) 1-13
[25]. Lambe, F., Jürisoo, M., Wanjiru, H. and Senyagwa, J. (2015).Bringing Clean, Safe, Affordable Cooking Energy to Households across Africa: An Agenda for Action. New Climate Economy working paper, based on a background paper to the Africa Progress Panel 2015 report Power, People, Planet: Seizing Africa’s Energy and Climate Opportunities. New Climate Economy and Stockholm Environment Institute, Stockholm.http://www.seiinternational.org/publications?pid=2841
[26]. Lee, T.M., & Jun, J.K. (2007).The role of contextual marketing offer in Mobile commerce acceptance: comparison between Mobile Commerce users and nonusers. International Journal of Mobile Communications, 5(3), 339-356.
[27]. Lenz, L., Munyehirwe, A., Peters, J. & Sievert, M. (2015).Does Large Scale Infrastructure Investment Alleviate Poverty? Impacts of Rwanda’s Electricity Access Roll-Out Program
[28]. Lewis, D. (2002). Convention: A Philosophical Study, Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
[29]. Luarn, P., & Lin, H., H. (2005). “Toward an understanding of the behavioral intention to use mobile banking.” Computers I Human Behavior, 21, 873-89
[30]. Manzo, L.C., & Perkins, D.D. (2006, May).Finding Common Ground: The Importance of Place Attachment to Community Participation and Planning.Journal of Planning Literature, 20(4), 335-350.
[31]. Meadows, D. H. (2008).Thinking in Systems: A Primer. D. Wright (Ed.). White River Junction, VT: Chelsea Green Publishing.
[32]. Meine, P. V., Marike. N, and Emiele. W. (eds) (2016). Governing Cities: New Institutional Forms in Developing Countries and Transitional Economies. London: ITDG.
[33]. Moore, M. (1993).Globalization and Social Change. New York, NY: Elseiver
[34]. Mugenda, O. M., &Mugenda, A. G. (2003).Research Methods; Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches. Nairobi: Arts Press.
[35]. Obala, R. N. (2016) Media censorship in the devolved system of governance in Kenya.MastersThesis.University of Nairobi.
[36]. Oso, W. Y., &Onen, D. (2011).A General Guide to Writing Research Proposal and Report; Handbook for Beginning Researchers. Nairobi: Jomo Kenyatta Foundation.
[37]. Ostrom, E. (1990). Governing the Commons: The Evolution of Institutions for Collective Action, New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
[38]. Ostrom, E., Larry, S. and Susan, W. (2013). Institutional Incentives and Sustainable Development: Infrastructure Policies in Perspective. Oxford: Westview Press.
[39]. Polo, A., Algeria, M., &Sirkin, J. (2012).Increasing the engagement of Latinos in services through community-derived programmes: The right question project mentalhealth.Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 43(3), 208-216.
[40]. Putnam, M. B. G. (2006). A ladder of community participation for underdeveloped countries. Habitat international, 20(3), 431-444.
[41]. Rabya, N. & Abraham.R.M. (2015).Kenya Development working papers; Basic requirements for community participation in Kenya’s Legal Framework. World Bank Group
[42]. Radtke, J. (2014). A closer look inside collaborative action: Civic engagement and participation in community energy initiatives. People, Place and Policy 8(3): 235–248.
[43]. Reyes, G. E. (2001). Four Main Theories of Development: Modernization, Dependency, Word-System, and Globalization.Nómadas.RevistaCrítica de CienciasSociales y Jurídicas, 04
[44]. Romanus, O. Baraka, & M. Keziah, M. et al., (2017).Attaining E-Democracy Through Digital Platforms in Kenya. E-Democracy for Smart Cities.
[45]. Rulinawaty, K. (2017).The Implementation Model of Poor Fisher Community Empowerment. A Study of Poor Fisher Families in Pangkep, Indonesia
[46]. Ruth, K. (2016).The effect of budget utilization on the performance of county governments: a case study of eastern kenya region
[47]. Shipley, R., &Utz, S. (2012). Making it Count: A Review of the Value and Techniques for Public Consultation.Journal of Planning Literature, 27(1), 22-42.
[48]. Sophia, O. O.(2017) Role of community participation on performance of devolved governance systems in Kenya. PhD Thesis University of Nairobi.
[49]. Thomas, K. W. (2012). Conflict and conflict management: Reflections and update. Journal of organizational behavior, 13(3), 265-274.
[50]. Vanessa, M. M. (2018). Natural resource management framework as a conflict management strategy in kenya: a case study of Laikipiacounty. Masters Thesis University of Nairobi.
[51]. Verbong, G. and Geels, F. (2007).The ongoing energy transition: Lessons from a socio-technical, multi-level analysis of the Dutch electricity system (1960–2004). Energy Policy 35(2): 1025– 1037.
[52]. Webler, T., Tuler, S., & Kruger, R. (2001). What is a Good Community participation Process? Five Perspectives from the Public. Environmental Management, 27(3), 435-450.
[53]. White, H. (2003). ‘Social Organization, Civic Responsibility and Collective Action: Game Theory Models of Community Participation’. Oxford Development Studies, Vol. 31, No. 2, 2003.
[54]. White, S. (1996). Depoliticizing development: the uses and abuses of participation.Development in Practice, 6(1), 142-155.
[55]. World Bank Group, (2015). FY15 Kenya Country Opinion Survey Report. Source: file:///C:/Windows/Temp/kenya_cos_fy15_report_final_.pdf. Retrieved on 03.05.17.
[56]. World Bank Group., (February, 2015). Kenya development working Participation in Kenya’s Local Development factor; Reviewing the past to inform the Future. World Bank Group.
[57]. World Bank, (2016).Community Driven Development in the Context of Conflict- Affected Countries: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: World Bank
[58]. Yang, J., Shen, P., Bourne, L., Ho, C..&Xue, X. (2011).A typology of operational approaches for stakeholder analysis and engagement. Construction Management and Economics, 29, 145–162.
[59]. Yang, K.C.C. (2005).Exploring factors affecting the adoption of mobile commerce in Singapore.Telematics and Informatics. 22, 257-277

David Kaloki Kitenge, Prof. Elijah Siringi “Community Participation, Policy Framework and the Performance of Solar Energy in Kenya: A Case Study of Kalobeyei Ward in Turkana West Sub-County” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.347-358 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/347-358.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Burnout among Head Teachers of Public Primary Schools: The Existence of the Three Dimensions in Kakamega County, Kenya

Ambunya Lawrence Omollo, Dr Otieno Kenneth – October 2019 Page No.: 359-364

Research has shown that role conflict and role ambiguity are associated with burnout among head teachers of public schools and educators in generas beel. Burnout has be documented to exist in three distinct dimensions-Emotional Exhaustion, Depersonalization and reduced Personal Accomplishment. A quantitative study of head teachers was done to establish the existence of different dimensions of burnout. The study was based on Role Stress Theory, Existential Theory, and the Sociological Burnout Theory. Descriptive and Correlation survey designs; simple random, stratified and purposive sampling techniques were used to carry out the study. Data was collected using the role questionnaire, Maslach Burnout Inventory-Education Survey and a semi-structured interview schedule. A pilot study was conducted prior to the main study to ascertain the validity and reliability of the instruments. The target population was 855 while the study sampled 261 head teachers. The head teachers completed the Eclectic Questionnaire and an in-depth interview was conducted among the head teachers and 12 Sub-County Quality Assurance Officers (SQUASO). Data analysis was guided by the study objective. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the study sample. A one- tailed sample t-test was conducted to establish the presence of the three dimensions of burnout.. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 26.0 was used to analyze the data. Data has been presented in tabular form and discussed. The three dimensions of burnout were found to be present and statistically significant. The recommendations made from the findings of the study may be useful in policy formulation on intervention strategies to burnout among head teachers of Public Primary Schools particularly in Kakamega County.

Page(s): 359-364                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 October 2019

 Ambunya Lawrence Omollo
Research Student, Department of Educational Psychology, Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology, Kenya

 Dr Otieno Kenneth
Department of Educational Psychology, Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology, Kenya

[1]. Bauer J., Stamm, A., Virnich, K., Wissing, K., Muller, U., Wirsching, M. and Schaarschmidt,U.(2006).Correlation between burnout syndrome and psychological and psychosomatic symptoms among teachers. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 79,199-204. doi:10.1007/s00420-005-0050-y
[2]. Bold, T. (2011). Does abolishing fees reduce school quality? Evidence from Kenya. Unpublished manuscript. Retrieved from Burnside, R. (2012). Stepping into someone else’s shoes: The effects of empathy development on student behavior. Rising Tide, 5, 1-14.
[3]. Gloria, C.T, Fawik, K. E and Steinhard, M.A. (2013). Positive affectivity predicts successful and unsuccessful adaptation to stress. Motivation and Education, 37, 185 – 193.
[4]. Ingersoll, R. (2012) Beginning teacher induction: What the data tell us. Phi Delta Kappan, 93(8), 47-51. doi:10.1177/003172171209300811.
[5]. Innstrand, S. T., Langballe, E. M., Falkum, E., and Aasland, O. G. (2011). Exploring within and between gender differences in burnout: 8 different occupational groups. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 84(7), 813-824.
[6]. Maslach, C., Schaufeli, W.B. and Leiter, M.P. (2001). Job burn-out. Annual Review of Psychology, 52(1),397-422.
[7]. Matin, H.Z., Kalali, N.S., and Anvari, M.R.A. (2012). Do demographic variables moderate the relationship between job burnout and its consequences? Iranian Journal of Management Studies; 5(1), 47-62.
[8]. Morales, A. I. R.,(2011). Factors that foster Latina English language learners. Nontraditional student resilience in higher education and their persistence in teacher education. (Doctoral dissertation, Kansas City State University).
[9]. Pas, E..T., Bradshaw, C.P., and Hershfeldt, P.A. (2012). Teacher- and school-level predictors of teacher efficacy and burnout: Identifying potential areas for support. Journal of School Psychology, 50, 129-145. doi: 10.1016/j.jsp.2011.07.003
[10]. Skaalvik, E. M., and Skaalvik, S. (2011). Teacher job satisfaction and motivation to leave the teaching profession: Relations with context, feelings of belonging and emotional exhaustion.

Ambunya Lawrence Omollo, Dr Otieno Kenneth “Burnout among Head Teachers of Public Primary Schools: The Existence of the Three Dimensions in Kakamega County, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.359-364 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/359-364.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Effect of Working Discipline on the Quality of Public Services in Indonesia

Ria Kurniati, Sowiyah, Riswanti Rini – October 2019 Page No.: 365-368

The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of work discipline on the quality of public services at the University of Lampung, Lampung Province, Indonesia. The method used in this research is quantitative method. The sampling technique uses purposive sampling. Data collection techniques using a questionnaire with a total sample of 349 students using Slovin technique. Hypothesis testing uses simple linear regression analysis and multiple regression analysis through the F test and t test to determine the effect of the independent variable on the dependent variable with a confidence level of 95% (0.05). The research results can be concluded that work discipline has a significant effect on the quality of public services.

Page(s): 365-368                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 October 2019

 Ria Kurniati
Faculty of Teacher Training and Education, Universitas Lampung, Indonesia

 Sowiyah
Faculty of Teacher Training and Education, Universitas Lampung, Indonesia

 Riswanti Rini
Faculty of Teacher Training and Education, Universitas Lampung, Indonesia

[1]. Kehoe, R. R., & Wright, P. M. 2013. The impact of high-performance human resource practices on employees’ attitudes and behaviors. Journal of management, 39(2), 366-391.
[2]. Gammahendra, F. 2014. Pengaruh struktur organisasi terhadap efektivitas organisasi (studi pada persepsi pegawai tetap Kantor perwakilan Bank Indonesia Kediri). Jurnal Administrasi Bisnis, 7(2).
[3]. Mostafa, A. M. S., Gould‐Williams, J. S., & Bottomley, P. 2015. High‐performance human resource practices and employee outcomes: The mediating role of public service motivation. Public Administration Review, 75(5), 747-757.
[4]. Supriadi, E., & Yusof, H. 2015. Relationship between Instructional Leadership of Headmaster and Work Discipline and Work Motivation and Academic Achievement in Primary School at Special Areas of Central Jakarta. Journal of Education and Learning, 4(3), 123-135.
[5]. Foucault, M. 2012. Discipline and punish: The birth of the prison. Vintage.
[6]. Mangkunegara, A. P., & Octorend, T. R. 2015. Effect of work discipline, work motivation and job satisfaction on employee organizational commitment in the company (Case study in PT. Dada Indonesia). Universal Journal of Management, 3(8), 318-328.
[7]. Sutrisno, Edy. 2011. Human Resource Management. Jakarta: Kencana.
[8]. Tumilaar, B. R. 2015. The effect of discipline, leadership, and motivation on employee performance at bpjs ketenagakerjaan Sulut. Jurnal EMBA: Jurnal Riset Ekonomi, Manajemen, Bisnis Dan Akuntansi, 3(2).
[9]. Sugiyono. 2018. Quantitative Research Methods. Bandung. Alfabeta, CV.

Ria Kurniati, Sowiyah, Riswanti Rini “The Effect of Working Discipline on the Quality of Public Services in Indonesia” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.365-368 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/365-368.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Maximizing the Potentials of Megacities

Nikhil Ravindra – October 2019 Page No.: 369-375

The article aims at efficient measures to maximize thepotentials of megacities across the globe and based on research questions ‘What solutions are suggested to deal with the major challenges associated with a mega-city?’. The paper introduces the term “Megacity” coined and defined by the United Nations; and the urbanization trend observed in recent times to understand the problems. The diversity of challenges faced by these cities such as low maturity levels, natural disasters, infrastructural, safety and social problems are highlighted by referring to a survey conducted by Siemens in 2016. Possible solutions with regards to governance, financing and strategies to overcome these challenges are recommended based on desktop research and also literature review of reports by reputed companies such as Allianz and Ericsson. A long term approach of dealing with the challenges are not just addressing the five pillars of sustainability: ecology, economy, legal, urban layout/ architecture and social aspects; but, a holistic approach integrating information communication technology in order to minimize the weaknesses and threats.

Page(s): 369-375                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 October 2019

 Nikhil Ravindra
Urban Development, Technische Universität Berlin, Germany

[1]. Allianz. (2015). The megacity state: The world’s biggest cities shaping our future. Munich: Allianz SE.
[2]. Ericsson. (2012). The three ages of Megacities. Stockholm: Ericsson AB.
[3]. Ericsson. (2013). The next age of megacities. Stockholm: Ericsson AB.
[4]. MunichReGroup. (2005). Megacities – Megarisks Trends and challenges for insurance and risk management. Munich: Munich Re Group.
[5]. Roger, J. (2019, 6 7). Retrieved from Unsplash: https://unsplash.com/photos/LY1eyQMFeyo
[6]. Schule. (2019, 6 7). Retrieved from Schule: http://webs.schule.at/
[7]. Shine. (2019, 6 7). Retrieved from Shine: https://www.shine.cn/
[8]. Siemens. (2016). Megacity Challenges – A Stakeholder perspective. Siemens.
[9]. UN. (2016) The world cities in 2016. United Nations

Nikhil Ravindra “Maximizing the Potentials of Megacities” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.369-375 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/369-375.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Student’s Adjustment Inventory (SAI) as a Cultural Tool: To Measure the Levels of Adjustment of Secondary Students in Cameroon

Professor Tanyi Ebangha Maureen, Egbe Gwendoline Arrika – October 2019 Page No.: 376-384

SAI is an instrument designed to measure the level to which a child adjust to the school norms. It contains 57 psychological constructs. The purpose of this study is to measure the level of adjustment amongst the South West and the Centre regions secondary students in Cameroon. Norms were established for the adjusted and maladjusted. Sex and Age were amongst the variables considered. A sample of 3461 forms two and three students aged 12-18 was drawn from the two regions. Three research questions and 6 hypotheses guided the study. Mean and standard deviation and t-test were used for the analysis. The following results among others were obtained:
1. General norms for the maladjusted and adjusted students ranged from 11.47 to 36.23 and. 9.08 to 20.21 while that for the whole test was 87.07 and 39.31 respectively.
2. The norms for the male and female students were found to be 69.17 and 69.44 respectively.
3. Those for the early and late adolescents stood at 69.47 and 69.04 respectively
4. It was also found that there were no significant sex and age difference in students’ adjustment as measured by the SAI.
Based on the results, the implications and recommendations was that SAI be used to identify and measure the incidence of mal-adjustment among students in Cameroon.

Page(s): 376-384                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 October 2019

 Professor Tanyi Ebangha Maureen
Head of Department Curriculum and Evaluation, University of Yaounde 1 – Cameroon

 Egbe Gwendoline Arrika
Researcher Ministry of Scientific Research and Innovation, Yaounde Cameroon
Ph. D Student University of Buea

[1]. Adler, A. (1927). Practice of Individual Psychology. New York: Harcourt Brace and World.
[2]. Ashiabi, S. G. and O’Neal, K. K. (2007). Food Insecurity and Adjustment problems in a national sample of Adolescents. Journal of Children & Poverty, Vol.13, No. 2, pp. 111-132.
[3]. Bandura, A. (1977). Social Learning Theory. Englewood Cliffs: N.J. Prentice Hall.
[4]. Bell, H.M. (1962). Bell Adjustment Inventory Manual. California: Consulting Psychologist Press Inc.
[5]. Campo, A. T., & Rohner, R. P. (1992). Relationship between perceived parental acceptance-rejection, psychological adjustment and substance abuse. Child Abuse & Neglect, Vol. 16, pp. 429-440.
[6]. Conger, R. D., Ge, X., Elder, G. H., Lorenz, F. O., & Simons, R. L. (1994). Economic stress, coercive family process, and developmental problems of young adults. Child Development, Vol. 65, pp. 541-561.
[7]. Crockenberg, S. C., & Leerkes, E. M. (2003). Parental acceptance, postpartum depression, and maternal sensitivity: Mediating and moderating processes. Journal of Family Psychology, Vol. 17, pp. 80-93.
[8]. Demir, M. and Urberg, A. K. (2004). Friendship and adjustment among adolescents. J. Experimental Child Psychology, Vol. 88, No. 1, pp. 68–82.
[9]. Dodge, K. A., and Pettit, G. S. (2003). A biopsychosocial model of the development of chronic conduct problems in adolescence. Develop Psychol, Vol. 39, No. 3, pp. 349 371.
[10]. Freud, Sigmund (1949). An outline of psychoanalysis. New York: Oxford University Press.
[11]. Hetherington, E. M. (2006). The influence of conflict, marital problem solving and parenting on children’s adjustment in non-divorced divorced and remarried families.Journal of Family Psychology, Vol. 7, pp. 39-56.
[12]. Kerr, M., and Stattin, H. (2000). What parents know, how they know it, and several forms of adolescent adjustment: Further support for a reinterpretation of monitoring. Developmental Psychology, Vol. 36, pp. 366 – 380.
[13]. Laycock, S. R. (1946). How Parents hinder Adolescents Adjustment to the Opposite sex. Journal of school health, Vol. 16, No. 6, pp. 151-156.
[14]. Ochoa, M. G., Lopez, E. E. and Emier, P. N. (2007). Adjustment Problems in the Family and School Contexts, Attitude towards Authority and Violent Behavior at School in Adolescence. Adolescence, Vol. 42, No. 168, pp. 779-794.
[15]. Raju, M.V.R. and Khaja, R. T. (2007). Adjustment Problems among School students. Journal of Indian Academy of Applied Psychology, 33(1), 73-79.
[16]. Rubin, K. H., Dwyer, K. M., Booth, L. C., Kim, A. H., Burgess, K. B., & Rose, K. L. (2004). Attachment, friendship, and psychosocial functioning in early adolescence. Journal of Early Adolescence, Vol. 24, pp. 326–356.
[17]. Satia, P.N. (1984). The role of the counsellor in dealing with Factors Leadind to Secondary School Students Attrition in Cameroon. Unpublished Ph.D dissertation, Lagos.
[18]. Sbarra, D. A. (2006). Predicting the onset of emotional recovery following non-marital relationship dissolution: Survival analysis of sadness and anger.Personality and social Psychology Bulletin, Vol. 32, 298-312.
[19]. Shiferaw, S., Fantahun, M. and Bekele, A. (2006). Psychosocial problems among students in preparatory school in Dessie town, north east Ethiopia. Ethiop. J. Health Development, Vol. 20, No. 1, pp. 47-54.
[20]. Steinberg, L. (2001). Adolescent development. Annual Review of Psychology, Vol. 52, No. 1, pp. 83-85.
[21]. Tanyi, M.E. (1988). The development and Preliminary Validation of Instrument for measuring Secondary School Adjustment in Kumba Cameroon. Unpublished M.Ed. Thesis. Department of Education, University of Nigeria, Nsukka.
[22]. Var, A. F., Paul, A. M., Kumar, P. and Shah, A. S. (2011). Self-esteem and Psychosocial problems among Kashmiri Youth. Delhi Psychiatry Journal, Vol. 14, No. 2, pp. 307-313.

Professor Tanyi Ebangha Maureen, Egbe Gwendoline Arrika “The Student’s Adjustment Inventory (SAI) as a Cultural Tool: To Measure the Levels of Adjustment of Secondary Students in Cameroon” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.376-384 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/376-384.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Geopolitical Economy of Myanmar and the Role of Great Powers in Rohingya Crisis

Mahfujur Rahman, Md. Saifullah Akon – October 2019 Page No.: 385-390

Recent Rohingya exodus from the Rakhine State of Myanmar is undoubtedly one of the biggest humanitarian crises ever. Despite the severity of this crisis, it could not draw much attention from the global powers for a possible solution. Historically, ethnic differences in the Rakhine State of Myanmar have been primarily held responsible for the emergence of oppression against the Rohingya people. This paper tries to portray the role of regional and global powers in the recent Rohingya crisis in Rakhine State of Myanmar. The geopolitical economy of the South East Asian region is also focused here to show how it influenced the crisis in different perspectives. As this paper explores external interest and reluctance as the factors of the recent Rohingya crisis along with Myanmar’s internal ethnic diversities, the theoretical argument grows with neo-classical realist model which bridges between internal and external realities to evaluate any particular event in global politics. This paper also shows how and why the recent Rohingya crisis lacked attention from major global powers. The role of regional and global powers during the crisis and their appeasement towards Myanmar are elaborated and examined too here. While explaining the role of external powers, it is showed how Myanmar managed to eclipse one of the worst ever refugee crises because of lack of global pressure and response. Finally, the paper concludes with showing the obstacles in resolving the Rohingya crisis with a critical evaluation of the role of international community.

Page(s): 385-390                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 October 2019

 Mahfujur Rahman
Lecturer, Department of International Relations, Bangladesh University of Professionals, Bangladesh

 Md. Saifullah Akon
Lecturer, Department of Japanese Studies, University of Dhaka, Bangladesh

[1]. Abrar, C.R. (n.d.). Repatriation of Rohingya Refugees. Burma Library. Retrieved from http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs/Abrar-repatriation.htm
[2]. Ahmed, K. U. (2018, June 06). The geo-politics of Rohingya crisis. The Financial Express. Retrieved from https://thefinancialexpress.com.bd/views/views/the-geo-politics-of-rohingya-crisis-1528297511
[3]. Albert, E. & Chatzky, A. (2018, December, 05). The Rohingya Crisis. Council on Foreign Relations. Retrieved from https://www.cfr.org/backgrounder/rohingya-crisis
[4]. Beauchamp, M. (2013, December 19). Beyond bigotry: Unravelling ethnic violence in Rakhine. New Mandala. Retrieved fromhttp://www.newmandala.org/beyond-bigotry-unravelling-ethnic-violencein-rakhine/
[5]. Bhaumik, S. (2017, October 18). Why do China, India back Myanmar over the Rohingya crisis? South China Morning Post. Retrieved from https://www.scmp.com/week-asia/geopolitics/article/2115839/why-do-china-india-back-myanmar-over-rohingya-crisis
[6]. China’s role in Myanmar’s internal conflicts. (2018). Retrieved from https://www.usip.org/sites/default/files/2018-09/ssg-report-chinas-role-in-myanmars-internal-conflicts.pdf
[7]. Cookson, F. (2017, November 21). The geo-politics of the Rohingya crisis. Dhaka Tribune. Retrieved from https://www.dhakatribune.com/opinion/op-ed/2017/11/21/geo-politics-rohingya-crisis?fbclid=IwAR1YCwZJVa_vtD9vBk7XiCvUYJlthh-mSfjGxOamgbg0qqh8JdyK0kubbaw
[8]. Hunt, K. (2017, November 13). Rohingya crisis: How we got here. CNN. Retrieved from https://edition.cnn.com/2017/11/12/asia/rohingya-crisis-timeline/index.html
[9]. India commits $25 million to develop Myanmar’s Rakhine state (2017, December 21). The Hindustan Times. Retrieved fromhttps://www.hindustantimes.com/india-news/india-commits-25-million-to-developmyanmar-s-rakhine-state/story-lpwndpPujIn1hCwBhJoqAJ.html
[10]. India must play positive role in Rohingya crisis (2018, March 19). The Daily Star. Retrieved from https://www.thedailystar.net/world/asia/india-must-play-positive-role-rohingya-crisis-1550317
[11]. Japan for safe repatriation of Rohingyas with UN cooperation. (2019, April 17). Dhaka Tribune. Retrieved from https://www.dhakatribune.com/bangladesh/rohingya-crisis/2019/04/17/japan-for-safe-repatriation-of-rohingyas-with-un-cooperation
[12]. Japan grants Myanmar $ 3 million to repatriate Rohingya Muslims. (n.d.). DW. Retrieved from https://www.dw.com/en/japan-grants-myanmar-3-million-to-repatriate-rohingya-muslims/a-42121365-0
[13]. Ko, T.K. (2009, February 18). US businesses eye investment opportunities in Myanmar. The Myanmar Times. Retrieved from https://www.mmtimes.com/news/us-businesses-eye-investment-opportunities-myanmar.html
[14]. Letter: The USA is investing in Myanmar’s future (2019, April 05). The Myanmar Times. Retrieved from https://www.mmtimes.com/news/letter-us-investing-myanmars-future.html
[15]. Nitta, Y. (2018, August 16). Myanmar taps Japan connections to overcome Rohinyga crisis. Nikkei Asian Review. Retrieved from https://asia.nikkei.com/Politics/International-relations/Myanmar-taps-Japan-connections-to-overcome-Rohingya-crisis
[16]. Refugee Response in Bangladesh (2019, June 30). UNHCR. Retrieved from https://data2.unhcr.org/en/situations/myanmar_refugees
[17]. Ripsman, N.M. (2011). Neoclassical Realism. Oxford Research Encyclopedia of International Studies. Doi:10.1093/acrefore/9780190846626.013.36
[18]. Rohingya Crisis: Hasina, XI for quick solution. (2019, July 6). The Daily Star. Retrieved from https://www.thedailystar.net/frontpage/news/resolving-rohingya-crisis-hasinaxi-quick-solution-1767349
[19]. Rohingya Crisis (n.d.). Human Rights Watch. Retrieved from https://www.hrw.org/news/2019/06/20/japans-cold-blooded-approach-rohingya-crisis
[20]. Rohingya Refugee Crisis (n.d). UNOCHA. Retrieved from https://www.unocha.org/rohingya-refugee-crisis
[21]. Sassen, S. (2017, September 15). The Assault on the Rohingya is not only about religion-it’s also about land. Huffpost. Retrieved from https://www.huffpost.com/entry/rohingya-land-grab-military_b_59b96400e4b02da0e13e79f4
[22]. Solving Rohingya crisis: China to press Myanmar. (2019, July 05). The Daily Star. Retrieved from https://www.thedailystar.net/frontpage/news/solving-rohingya-crisis-china-push-myanmar-1766956
[23]. Spetalnick, M. &Brunnstrom, D. (2018, August 17). U.S. imposes sanctions on Myanmar military over Rohingya crackdown. Reuters. .Retrieved fromhttps://www.reuters.com/article/us-myanmar-rohingya-usa/us-imposes-sanctions-on-myanmar-military-over-rohingya-crackdown-idUSKBN1L21KL
[24]. Su, B. (2013, October 23). The importance of emerging Southeast Asia and Myanmar. NAOC. Retrieved from http://natoassociation.ca/the-importance-of-emerging-southeast-asia-and-myanmar/
[25]. Tri-nation pipeline envisaged (2017, March 6). The Telegraph. Retrieved fromhttps://www.telegraphindia.com/1170306/jsp/business/story_139183.jsp
[26]. UNSC, neighbours off to Rakhine next week (April 26, 2018). The Myanmar Times. Retrieved fromhttps://www.mmtimes.com/news/unsc-neighbours-rakhine-next-week.html
[27]. US official appreciates Bangladesh’s role in addressing Rohingya crisis (2018, July 25). The Daily Star. Retrieved from https://www.thedailystar.net/country/us-official-appreciates-bangladeshs-role-addressing-rohingya-crisis-1610785
[28]. Who are Rohingya Muslims and why govt wants to deport 40,000 of them? (2017, August 10). India Today. Retrieved from https://www.indiatoday.in/india/story/rohingy-muslim-india-myanmar-deportation-1029075-2017-08-10
[29]. Zaman, M (2019, 19 January). Rohingya crisis: Issues and challenges that have emerged. Inter Press Service. Retrieved from http://www.ipsnews.net/2019/01/rohingya-crisis-issues-challenges-emerged/
[30]. Zhou, L. (2017, November 19). China lays out three-point plan to ease Rohingya crisis. South China Morning Post. Retrieved fromhttps://www.scmp.com/news/china/diplomacy-defence/article/2120607/china-lays-out-three-point-plan-ease-rohingya-crisis

Mahfujur Rahman, Md. Saifullah Akon “Geopolitical Economy of Myanmar and the Role of Great Powers in Rohingya Crisis” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.385-390 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/385-390.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Personnel Management: Implications for the Effectiveness of the School System

Judith Nonye Agunwa Ph.D, Valentine Joseph Owan, Mercy Bassey Ekpe – October 2019 Page No.: 391-395

This paper takes a qualitative view of the administration of personnel management function and its implication for the school. In this paper, the meaning of personnel management, various personnel management functions of educational managers and their implication for the effectiveness of the school system were discussed. The paper concluded that personnel management is inevitable to the school system because it is as important as the establishment of the school itself. The need for personnel to be managed in the school, cannot be over-emphasized. Every educational manager should understand that the benefits of personnel management functions are dependent on the implementation of these functions during the staffing process. Therefore, efforts should be made to perform these functions discussed in this paper. If adhered to, it can lead any school to success in terms of goal attainment and increased productivity. It was recommended among several others that educational managers should set clear standards that specify what is acceptable in the organization as well as the guidelines for performing tasks. This will ensure that every worker understands what is expected of them.

Page(s): 391-395                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 October 2019

 Judith Nonye Agunwa Ph.D
Department of Educational Administration and Planning, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria

 Valentine Joseph Owan
Department of Educational Administration and Planning, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria

 Mercy Bassey Ekpe
Department of Educational Administration and Planning, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria

[1]. Akpan, C. P. (2011). Fundamentals of School Business Management. Calabar: Primchoice Konsult.
[2]. Bankole, A. (2000), Principles of Personnel Management, Published by Fadec, Ebute-Metta, Lagos
[3]. Gareth R. (2005).Recruitment and selection (2nd ed.). Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development.
[4]. Mbieli, Patrick (2006). Public Administration: A broad view. Nigeria: Megavons (West Africa) Limited
[5]. Prachi J. (2018). Articles on Personel management. Retrieved from https://www.managementstudyguide.com/personnel-management-articles.htm on the 23rd April 2018. 9:29 pm WAT
[6]. Singh, O. M. (2012). Functions Of Personnel Management. http://www.polyeyes.com/Article/Functions-of-Personel-Management on the 23rd of April, 2018. 9:22 pm WAT
[7]. Vaghela, M. (2015). Importance of personnel management – personnel management theory. London: Mactoshith Press

fontawesome=”fa fa-file-text-o” add_icon=”true” title=”Cite” tab_id=”1516096414067-a01e0205-9a46″]

Judith Nonye Agunwa Ph.D, Valentine Joseph Owan, Mercy Bassey Ekpe “Personnel Management: Implications for the Effectiveness of the School System” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.391-395 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/391-395.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Transformation in Public Service Delivery in Kenya: A Case of Huduma Kenya Centres

Felistus Kinyanjui and Irene Waithaka – October 2019 Page No.: 396-405

Huduma is a Kiswahili word for service, as such it has been appropriately been adopted to represent the government’s readiness to avail itself in terms of service to the citizens in the most easily accessible way through use of technology to reach all corners of the republic. The Huduma Kenya programme aims to transform Public Service Delivery by providing citizens access to various Public Services and information from One-Stop-Shop citizen centered service centres and through integrated technology platforms. Huduma centres operate from what were previously Kenya Post and Tele-communication offices located countrywide thus easing accessibility and affordability of public services. Huduma Kenya is an approach that is reforming service delivery in Kenya. It is interactive, integrated, vertical and horizontal as it brings on board to one stop services from different departments, ministries and agencies of both county and national governments. The huduma programme presents a shift in paradigm from the centralization to devolution and getting services closer to the clients, the citizens of Kenya. Institutional reform is emphatic on accountability, transparency and trust. It has received local and international awards to its attempt to transform public service delivery to a majority and satisfaction of many in Kenya and abroad. At a practical level the successes of huduma Kenya can be replicated across the globe as a means to achieve best practices in the public sector yet have an angle of PPE as is the case in Kenya.

Page(s): 396-405                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 01 November 2019

 Felistus Kinyanjui
Department of History, Kenyatta University, P.O Box 43844, 00100, Nairobi, Kenya

 Irene Waithaka
Department of History, Kenyatta University, P.O Box 43844, 00100, Nairobi, Kenya

[1]. Aduda & Ohaga, M. (2004) Information and Communication Technology Policy: Kenya , in strengthening national information and communication technology policy in africa: governance, equity and institutional issues. Nairobi African Technology Policy Studies Network .
[2]. Angawa M.D W.(2010), Kenya Marks Promulgation of New Constitution 27 August 2010, Retrieved July 24, 2015 from
http://www.kenyaelections.com/2010/08/kenya-marks-promulgation-of-new-constitution-27-august-2010/
[3]. Barkan, J.D. & Chege, M. (1989). Decentralizing the State: District Focus and the Politics Of Reallocation in Kenya , 27 Journal of Modern African Studies.
[4]. Bowman, Warigia, ‘Governance, Technology and the Search for Modernity in Kenya’ William and Mary Policy Review, 1. 87.
[5]. Etta, F.(2005). Policymaking: The New Development El Dorado, in, At the Crossroads: ICT Policymaking In East Africa. East African Educational Publishers.
[6]. Gitelson, S (1977). Policy Options for Small States: Kenya and
Tanzania. Studies in Comparative International Development.
[7]. KANU (1963). The Manifesto. Government of Kenya.
Kihanya, J.N. & Oloo, L.M. (2004). KICTAnet, Rapporteurs Notes and Report: Kenya National ICT Visioning Workshop, Norfolk Hotel, Nairobi.
[8]. Klopp, J.M. (2001).Ethnic Clashes and Winning Elections: The Case of Kenya’s Electoral Despotism, 35 Canadian J. of Afr. Studs. 473- 477.
[9]. Ministry of Planning and National Development (2003). Republic of Kenya, Economic Recovery Strategy for Wealth and Employment Creation: 2003-2007. GOK.
[10]. Mulunda, L. (2005). Board’s Sacking Puts Telecoms Into a Spin. E. AFR. STANDARD.
[11]. New African Magazine (2012). Forgetting The ‘Big Man Syndrome’. Retrieved on July 29, 2015 from
http://newafricanmagazine.com/forgetting-the-big-man/syndrome/
[12]. Ncube Mthuli and Ondiege Peter Silicon Kenya: Harnessing ICT Innovations for Economic Development African Development Bank.
[13]. Ngaru Sarah Wanjiru and Wafula Moses Kimani ‘Factors Influencing the Choice of Huduma Centers’ Services:A Case Study of Mombasa Huduma Centre’, International Journal of Scientific and Research,, Volume 5, Issue 6, June 2015.
[14]. Siambi, W. (2008). Introduction of ICT in the Public Service Commission of Kenya For Service Delivery: Experience and Challenges. Canadian International Development Agency

Felistus Kinyanjui and Irene Waithaka “Transformation in Public Service Delivery in Kenya: A Case of Huduma Kenya Centres” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.396-405 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/396-405.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Addressing Elearning Issues: National Policy Considerations

Hannah A. Tanye, Isaac Asampana, Albert A. Akanferi – October 2019 Page No.: 406-413

Enrollment into tertiary education has increased over the years. To be able to deliver effective distance learning, e-learning delivery mode is adopted to supplement the face-to-face meeting with the distance learning students. Subsequently, a number of institutions are practicing e-learning in their teaching and learning activities. Most institutions have implemented learning management system. There is little collaboration between e-learning practicing institutions.The study determine dissues that should be considered in policy to enhance quality eLearning, and National Commission for Tertiary Education (NCTE) role in collaborating these institutions. The theoretical perspective is interpretive and the methodology used was qualitative. Data was collected using semi structured interview. The study found that there should be a state body put in place for e-learning accreditation, copyright, confidentiality of information, integrity, and availability and that these issues must all be indicated in policy. Collaboration of e-learning practising institutions must be initiated at the national level.

Page(s): 406-413                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 01 November 2019

 Hannah A. Tanye
Department of Information Technology Studies, University of Professional Studies, Accra, Ghana

 Isaac Asampana
Department of Information Technology Studies, University of Professional Studies, Accra, Ghana

 Albert A. Akanferi
Department of Information Technology Studies, University of Professional Studies, Accra, Ghana

[1]. SEND-Ghana, “2018 budget SEND- Ghana assessment points out serious concerns. ,” SEND Ghana, Accra, Ghana2017, Available: https://www.myjoyonline.com/news/2017/november-17th/2018-budget-send-ghanas-assessment-points-out-serious-concerns.php.
[2]. NCTE, “2013 Budget,” 2013.
[3]. J. Tilak, “Global trends in funding higher education.,” International Higher Education, no. 42, 2015.
[4]. NCTE, “2014 Budget,” 2014.
[5]. A.-M. C. report, “Meeting the Challenges of Education in the Twenty-First Century. ,” 2013, Available: http://www.moe.gov.gh/assets/media/docs/ Challenges1Educational%20Reforms%28Jophus%29.pdf.
[6]. M. Duwiejua and O. Edigheji, “Higher Education Convening Ghana: Communique’ on Tertiary Education Policy Dialogue in Ghana. ,” 2013.
[7]. D. Matthews, “Ghana’s higher education sector seeks coherent national policies,” ed, 2013.
[8]. H. Elletson and A. Mackinnon, “eLearning Africa Report, (2012, 2013 ,& 2014). ,” 2014, Available: http://www.paynamibia.org/documents/eLearningAfrica_Report_2013_EN_WEB.pdf.
[9]. NCTE, “1995, 1996, 2013 Annual Reports,” Ministry of Education, Accra, Ghana, Accra, Ghana2013.
[10]. P. O. Hardt and P. A. Misité, “Effective Online Teaching and Learning: A question of alignment.,” Journal of Excellence in e-learning, vol. 1, no. 2, 2008.
[11]. P. Guiney, “Government and sector-level tertiary e-learning initiatives: ,” 2014, Available: http://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/publications/ict/14708.
[12]. C. Dondi and M. Moretti, “Elearning Quality in European Universities: Different Approaches for Different Purposes. ,” 2007.
[13]. A. Ali, M. Fadzil, and A. Kaur, “Open and distance education in Malaysia.,” 2006.
[14]. A. R. Ahmad, A. Farley, and M. Naidoo, “An examination of the implementation federal government strategic plans in Malaysian public universities. ,” International Journal of Business and Social Science, vol. 3, no. 15, 2012.
[15]. S. Keil and A. Brown, “Distance Education Policy Standards: A Review of Regional and National Accrediting Organizations in the United States.,” Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration., 2014.
[16]. E. Borokhovski et al., “An extended systematic review of Canadian policy documents on e-Learning: What we’re doing and not doing.,” Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology/La revue canadienne de l’apprentissage et de la technologie, vol. 37, no. 3, 2011.
[17]. A. Nenkova and L. Vanderwende, “The impact of frequency on summarization.,” Microsoft Research, Redmond, Washington, Tech. Rep., 2005.
[18]. K. Hong and A. Nenkova, “Improving the estimation of word importance for news multi-document summarization. ,” in The 14th Conference of the European Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics, 2014, pp. 712-721.
[19]. J. Sauro, “Types of Qualitative Methods. ,” 2015.
[20]. T. Adali, “Accreditation in e-learning: North Cyprus higher education case. Procedia-Social and Behavioral Sciences,” vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 2077-2080., 2009.
[21]. A. S. Elameer and R. M. Idrus, “National E-Learning Strategy to Enhance and Enrich the Iraqi Universities. ,” 2011.
[22]. S. E. Brownell and K. D. Tanner, “Barriers to faculty pedagogical change: Lack of training, time, incentives, and… tensions with professional identity?. ,” CBE-Life Sciences Education, vol. 11, no. 4, pp. 339-346, 2012.
[23]. K. Durah, A. Alraddadi, O. Alzubi, and B. Alzubi, “Strategic Elearning. Global Journal of Computer Science and Technology, ,” vol. 11, no. 2, 2011.
[24]. O. Darkwa, “Presentation On “Strengthening Higher Education Systems in Ghana.,” 2013.
[25]. T. Bates, “National strategies for e-learning in post-secondary education and training, Fundamentals of Educational Planning ” 2001.

Hannah A. Tanye, Isaac Asampana, Albert A. Akanferi “Addressing Elearning Issues: National Policy Considerations” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.406-413 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/406-413.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Influence of Competition on Performance of Enterprises: A Literature Review

Maryam A. Koko, Nasiru Liman Zuru – October 2019 Page No.: 414-416

The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of competition on performance of enterprises. Specifically, the relationship between competition and performance of enterprises. Based on the review of the literature and past studies, the findings of this study suggest that, competition have a negative effect on the performance of enterprises. The implication is that, enterprises should be aware that competition in the industry effect their organisational performance therefore, these enterprises should focus on good business practices to be able to cope with the competition in the industry in order not only to improve their performance but also to sustain their success.

Page(s): 414-416                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 01 November 2019

 Maryam A. Koko
Faculty of Management Sciences, Usmanu Danfodiyo University Sokoto, Nigeria

 Nasiru Liman Zuru
Faculty of Management Sciences, Usmanu Danfodiyo University Sokoto, Nigeria

[1]. Abu Kasim, N. A., Minai, B., & Chun, L. S. (1989). Performance measures in Malaysia- The state of the art. Malaysia Management Review, 24(3).
[2]. Bluedorn, A. C., Johnson, R. A., Cartwright, D. K., & Barringer, B. R. (1994). The interface and conver- gence of the strategic management and organi- zational environment domains. Journal of Management, 20.
[3]. Cull, R., Demirgüç-kunt, A., & Morduch, J. (2011). Microfinance Tradeoffs : Regulation, Competition, and Financing. The Handbook of Microfinance, (September), 141-. https://doi.org/citeulike-article-id:13936360
[4]. Doyle, P. (1994). Marketing management and strategy. New York: Prentice Hall.
[5]. Drucker, P. (1977). People and performance. Routledge. Retrieved from http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=i3OlqZ3U-IIC&pgis=1
[6]. Duncan, R. B. (1972). Characteristics of organizational environments and perceived environmental uncertainty. Administrative Science Quarterly, 17(3).
[7]. Galbraith, C., & Schendel, D. (1983). An empirical analysis of strategy types. Strategic Management Journal1, 4.
[8]. Gwasi, N., & Ngambi, M. T. (2014). Competition and Performance of Microfinance Institutions in Cameroon. International Journal of Research In Social Sciences, 3(8), 1–36. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2029568
[9]. Hair, J. F., Hult, G. T. M., Ringle, C. M., & Sarstedt, M. (2014). A primer on partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM). London: Sage Publications.
[10]. Hashim, M. K. (2008). Strategic management: Text and cases. Singapore: Thomson Learning.
[11]. Lenz, R. T. (1980). Strategic capability: A concept and framework for analysis. The Academy of Management Journal, 5.
[12]. Miller, D., & Friesen, P. (1983). Strategy-making and enviroment. Strategic Management Journal, 4, 221–235.
[13]. Moradi, M., Velashani, M. A. B., & Omidfar, M. (2017). Corporate governance, product market competition and firm performance: evidence from Iran. Humanomics, 33(1), 33–55. https://doi.org/10.1108/H-04-2014-0037
[14]. Mustafa, A., & Saat, M. (2013). Microfinance institutions performance measurement: introducing a new performance measurement framework. Middle East Journal of Scientific Research, 15(11).
[15]. Nash, J. C. (1993). We Eat the Mines and the Mines Eat Us: Dependency and Exploitation in Bolivian Tin Mines. New York: Columbia University Press.
[16]. Nkundabanyanga, S. K., Akankunda, B., Nalukenge, I., & Tusiime, I. (2017). The impact of financial management practices and competitive advantage on the loan performance of Enterprises . International Journal of Social Economics, 44(1).
[17]. Nthigah, P. M., Iravo, M., & Kihoro, J. (2014). Influence Of Competitor ’ s Marketing Experience On Choice Of Strategic Response Of Multinational Corporations In Kenya, 2(3), 1–14.
[18]. Oyewobi, L. O., Windapo, A. O., & Rotimi, J. O. B. (2016). Environment, competitive strategy, and organizational characteristics: A path analytic model of construction organizations’ performance in South Africa. Canadian Journal of Administrative Sciences, 33(3).
[19]. Porter, M. (1980). Competitive strategy. New York: The Free Press.
[20]. Robinson, R. B. J. (1982). The importance of “outsiders” in small firm strategic planning. Academy of Management Journal, 25(1).
[21]. Thomasa, J. R., & Kumara, J. (2016). Social performance and sustainability of Indian microfinance institutions: an interrogation. Journal of Sustainable Finance & Investment, 22(1).

Maryam A. Koko, Nasiru Liman Zuru “Influence of Competition on Performance of Enterprises: A Literature Review” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.414-416 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/414-416.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Strategic Planning and Performance of Enterprises in Nigeria

Maryam A. Koko, Nasiru Liman Zuru – October 2019 Page No.: 417-420

Regardless of the relevance and applicability of strategic planning practice to business organisation, the literature indicates very few studies have attempted to investigate the effect of strategic planning practice on the performance of enterprises mainly the relationship between strategic planning practice and performance of entrepreneurs. The literature suggests that there is not only limited information on the strategic planning practice of Enterprises but also little research in this important area of study. By using structural questionnaires, the data for the study were collected from 52 Enterprises. The findings of the study indicate a significant positive relationship between strategic planning practice and performance of Enterprises. The result of the study seems to demonstrate that the practice of strategic planning in Enterprises will not only be to improve their financial performance but also to increase its non-performance as well.

Page(s): 417-420                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 01 November 2019

 Maryam A. Koko
Faculty of Management Sciences, UsmanuDanfodiyo University Sokoto, Nigeria

 Nasiru Liman Zuru
Faculty of Management Sciences, UsmanuDanfodiyo University Sokoto, Nigeria

[1]. Abraham, H., & Balogun, I. . (2012). Performance of microfinance institutions in Nigeria : an appraisal of self-reporting institutions to mix market. International Journal of Humanities and Social Science, 2(15), 32–50.
[2]. Amoo, Z. ., & Kolawole, I. O. (2015). Contributions of microfinance banks to small and medium scale entrepreneurial development in Nigeria ( A case study of Lagos state ). Journal of Banking and Finance, 6(9), 35–39.
[3]. Augustine, D., Wheat, C. O., Jones, K. S., Baraldi, M., & Malgwi, C. A. (2016). Gender diversity within the workforce in the microfinance industry in Africa: Economic performance and sustainability. Canadian Journal of Academic Sciences.
[4]. Auka, D. O., & Langat, J. C. (2016). Effects of strategic planning on performance of medium sized enterprises in Nakuru Town. International Review of Management and Business Research, 5(1), 188–204.
[5]. Chinasa, W. E. (2015). Constraints to women entrepreneurs ’ access to microfinance in Bayelsa state, Nigeria. Research Journal of Finance and Accounting, 4(6), 6–13.
[6]. Dibrell, C., Craig, J. B., & Neubaum, D. O. (2014). Linking the formal strategic planning process, planning flexibility, and innovativeness to firm performance. Journal of Business Research, 67(9).
[7]. Doyle, P. (1994). Marketing management and strategy. New York: Prentice Hall.
[8]. Drucker, P. (1977). People and performance. Routledge. Retrieved from http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=i3OlqZ3U-IIC&pgis=1
[9]. Ene, E. E., & Inemesit, U. A. (2015). Impact of Microfinancein Promoting Financial Inclusion in. Journal of Business Ethics, 3(2), 139–158.
[10]. Hair, J. F., Hult, G. T. M., Ringle, C. M., & Sarstedt, M. (2014). A primer on partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM). London: Sage Publications.
[11]. Hopkins, W. E., & Hopkins, A. S. (1994). Want to succeed: Get with the plan. Journal of Retail Banking, 16(3).
[12]. Hopkins, W., & Hopkins, S. (1997). Strategic planning-financial performance relationships in banks. Strategic Management Journal, 18(September 1996), 635–652. https://doi.org/10.2307/3088180
[13]. Kamukama, N., Ahiauzu, A., & Ntayi, J. M. (2010). Intellectual capital and performance: testing interaction effects. Journal of Intellectual Capital, 11(4), 554–574.
[14]. Kylaheiko, K., Puumalainen, K., Sjögrén, H., Syrjä, P., & Fellnhofer, K. (2016). Strategic planning and firm performance: a comparison across countries and sectors. International Journal of Entrepreneurial Venturing, 8(3).
[15]. Mintzberg, H. (1994). The fall and rise of strategic planning. Harvard Business Review,72(1).
[16]. Mustafa, A., & Saat, M. (2013). Microfinance institutions performance measurement: introducing a new performance measurement framework. Middle East Journal of Scientific Research, 15(11).
[17]. Nash, J. C. (1993). We Eat the Mines and the Mines Eat Us: Dependency and Exploitation in Bolivian Tin Mines. New York: Columbia University Press.
[18]. Okafor, I. G. (2016). Microfinance banks activities and standard of living in Nigeria. Journal of Economics and Finance, 7(1), 1–11. https://doi.org/10.9790/5933-07110111
[19]. Paul, G. D., & Emesuanwu Catherine Ebelechukwu, S. Y. (2015). Impact of corporate governance on financial performance of microfinance banks in north central Nigeria. International Journal of Humanities Social Sciences and Education, 2(1). https://doi.org/10.5901/mjss.2014.v5n15p93
[20]. Pawliczek, A., & Kozel, R. (2015). On the strategic planning, innovation activities and economic performance of industrial companies, 20(1), 16–25.
[21]. Pearce, J. A., & Robinson, R. B. (1994). Strategic management. Formulation, Implementation, and Control.
[22]. Rezamand, E., Zeinali, S., & Asadi, M. (2015). Effects of Entrepreneurial Strategic Planning Dimensions on Organizational Performance & Mitigation of Environmental Uncertainty ( Case Study : Food Industries- Shiraz City ), 8(1).
[23]. Ridwan, M. S. (2015). Strategic planning practices. Faculty of Business and Law School of Management, 93(96). Retrieved from http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/158357/
[24]. Solomon, E., Juliana, I., & Antonia, A. I. (2016). Analysis of the effects of microfinance banks loans on the livelihood of small-holder farmers in Delta state , Nigeria. Economics Affairs, 61(3), 381–390. https://doi.org/10.5958/0976-4666.2016.00049.8
[25]. Tadele, H., & Rao, P. M. S. (2014). Corporate governance and ethical issues in microfinance institutions (Enterprises ) – A study of microfinance crises in Andhra Pradesh, India. Journal of Business Management & Social Sciences Research, 3(1).
[26]. Taiwo, J. N., Agwu, M. E., Aregan, A. I., & Ikpefan, O. A. (2016). Microfinance and poverty alleviation in Southwest Nigeria: Empirical evidence. International Journal of Social Sciences and Management, 3(4), 256. https://doi.org/10.3126/ijssm.v3i4.15960
[27]. Thomasa, J. R., & Kumara, J. (2016). Social performance and sustainability of Indian microfinance institutions: an interrogation. Journal of Sustainable Finance & Investment, 22(1).
[28]. Umar, M., Tanveer, Z., Aslam, S., & Sajid, M. (2012). Impact of capital structure on firms ’ financial performance : evidence from Pakistan. Research Journal of Finance and Accounting, 3(9), 1–13.

Maryam A. Koko, Nasiru Liman Zuru “Strategic Planning and Performance of Enterprises in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.417-420 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/417-420.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Africa Inland Church (AIC) Arguments On Cattle Rustling Wars and Insecurity among The Pokot and Tugen of Kenya

Daniel Rotich Kandagor, Charles C Moindi – October 2019 Page No.: 421-432

I. BACKGROUND TO THE STUDY
In Clemens Greiner’s article on “Guns, land and voters: Cattle rustling and the politics of boundary(re)making in Northern Kenya”, it is evident that competition for natural resources in Baringo Plains (Anderson, 2002) is one of the main factors for the protracted conflicts between the Tugen and Pokot communities (Greiner, 2013). Consequently, Emma Elfversson in her conference paper underscores the role of religion in conflicts by saying, “The importance of religion and prayers in building support for, and sustaining, peace should not be underestimated… ( Elfversson, September,2014.p23).

Page(s): 421-432                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 01 November 2019

 Daniel Rotich Kandagor
Department of Religious Studies, Kisii University, Kenya

 Charles C Moindi
Department of Religious Studies, Kisii University, Kenya

[1]. Adedeji, A. (1981). Comprehending and Mastering African Conflicts. London: Zed Books.
[2]. Agarwal, B. (1997). Environmental action, gender equity and women’s participation. Development and Change, 28, 1–44.
[3]. Anderson, J.; Gauthier, M; Thomas, G.; Wondolleck, J. (1996). Setting the stage. Presented at the Global e-Conference on Addressing Natural Resource Conflict Through Community Forestry, (Jan–Apr 1996). Forests, Trees and People Programme of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome, Italy.
[4]. Anderson. M & Olson, L. (2003), Confronting War: critical lessons for peace practitioners. Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, collaborative for development Action.
[5]. Article 2007-2008 Kenyan Crisis.
[6]. Ascerlad, H. (1992). Environment and democracy. Instituto Brasileiro de Analisis Sociais Economicas, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
[7]. Ashoka (2009): http://www.changemakers.net/en-us/node/21222
[8]. Ayling, R.; Kelly, K. (1997). Dealing with conflict: natural resources and dispute resolution. Commonwealth Forestry Review, 76(3), 182–185.
[9]. Barkan J., (ed.) (1995). Beyond Capitalism vs. Socialism in Kenya and Tanzania.
[10]. Basedau, Matthias and Tim C. Wegenast. (2009). Natural resources and civil war in Sub-Saharan Africa: A combined quantitative and comparative perspective.
[11]. BBC News- Kenya: Tana River clashes leaves dozens dead
[12]. Berman, N.M Couttenier, D. Rohner and M Thoenig (2014), “This mine is mine! How minerals fuel conflicts in Africa”. OxCarre Research Paper.
[13]. Bingham, G. (1986). Resolving environmental disputes: a decade of experience. Donnely and Sons, Harrisonburg, VA, USA.
[14]. Borrini – Feyerabend, G (1996), Collaborative Management of protested areas: tailoring the approach to the context, Tiland, Switzerland, IUCN.
[15]. Brown, L.D. (1983). Managing conflict at organizational interfaces. Addison-Wesley, Reading, MA, USA.
[16]. Buckles, D. (ed). (1999), Cultivating peace: conflict and collaboration in natural resource management. Ottawa, Outario, Canada, International development research centre and World Bank.
[17]. Castro, A.P.; Ettenger, K. (1996). Indigenous knowledge and conflict management: exploring local perspectives and mechanisms for dealing with community forest disputes. Presented at the Global e-Conference on Addressing Natural Resource Conflict Through Community Forestry, (Jan–Apr 1996). Forests, Trees and People Programme of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome, Italy.
[18]. Castro, AP & Ettenger, K. (1997), Indigenous knowledge and conflict management: Exploring local perspectives and mechanisms for dealing with community forestry dispute. In FAO complication of discussion papers made to the electronic conferences on addressing natural resource conflicts through community Forestry, Volume I, PP 141 – 164. Rome, FAO.
[19]. Castro, AP & Nielsen, E. (2001), Indigenous People and Co-management: Implications for conflict Management. Environmental Science and Policy, 4(4-5): 229.
[20]. Chappell A, Agnew CT.(2004).Modelling climate change in West African Sahel rainfall (1931–90) as an artifact of changing station locations. International Journal of Climatology24: 547–554.
[21]. Chevalier, J.; Buckles, D. (1995). A land without gods: process theory, maldevelopment and the Mexican Nahuas. Zed Books, London, UK.
[22]. Christiansen, Rev. Drew, S.J.. “Catholic Peacemaking: From Pacem in terris to Centesimusannus.”(2001).3.http://www.restorativejustice.org/resources/docs/christiansen/download) link as of: 3/6/06.
[23]. Cooksey, B., David Court, and Ben Makau, “Education for Self-Reliance and Harambee”
[24]. Daily Nation, (August 20, 2015), Using children and heifers for peace North Rift style.
[25]. Eberlee, J. 1999. Alternative approaches to managing conflict over natural resources. IDRC Reports, 278, 1–5.
[26]. Enough Project & BBC October 31st 2013
[27]. FAO. (2003), Natural resource conflict Management case studies Rome.
[28]. FAO. (1999), The Participatory Process for supporting collaborative management of natural resources: An overview. Rome.
[29]. FAO. (2000), Natural resource conflict management by V. Matiru, Rome.
[30]. FAO. (2002), Community-based forest resource conflict management: A training package, Rome.
[31]. For a brief biography of Christiansen, go to: (http://www.americamagazine.org/PR-050506.htm). For a brief outline of Catholic Social Teaching and its principles refer to: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. “Seven Key Themes of Catholic Social Teaching.” (1999). link as of: 3/6/06.
[32]. Gecaga M.G. (2002). “The Impact of War on Africa Women” In Getui, M.N. & Ayanga. H. (eds) PP. 53 – 70.
[33]. Hadley J, Pastoralist cosmology: The organizing framework for indigenous conflict resolution in the Horn of Africa Eastern Mennonite University: VA, USA, (1997)
[34]. Hassan, Yusuf Fadi and Gray, R, (2002) Religion and conflict in Sudan, Nairobi.
[35]. Haugerud, A. (1995). The Culture of Politics in Modern Kenya. Cambridge: University Press.
[36]. Homer-Dixon, T.; Blitt, J. (1998). Ecoviolence: links among environment, population, and security. Rowman & Littlefield, Lanham, MD, USA.
[37]. Irin Africa/ Kenya: clashes, elections and land – church keeps watch in Molo /Kenya conflicts/governance Refugees /IDPs
[38]. Jaega, R. N. (1988). Survey Methods in Educational Research. Washington D.C: Brooking Institution Press.
[39]. Joseph V. Montville (2001). “Religion and Peacemaking”, in Raymond G. Helmick, S.J, and Rodney L.Peterson eds., Forgiveness and Reconciliation: Religion, Public Policy and Conflict Transformation. USA: Templeton Foundation Press.
[40]. Kahumbi, Newton Maina (2004). Women Religious leaders as actors in ethnic conflict management and resolution in Nakuru and Uasingishu districts, Kenya. Kenyatta University, Unpublished paper.
[41]. Kanyinga, K. “Governance Institutions and Inequality in Kenya” in SID (ed.) 2006.
[42]. Kerlinger, F. N. (1973). Foundation of Behavioral Science. New York: Holt Renehard and Winston.
[43]. Kimenju J. Mwachofu S. And Mwagiru F. (2003). Peace and Conflict Management in Kenya.Nairobi: East Africa.
[44]. Kobia, Samuel (2005). Healing the World: Working Together With Religion in Global Society Chicago: International Council of Christians and Jews.
[45]. Lederach, J.P. (1992). Enredos, pleitos y problemas: una guia practica para ayudar a resolver conflictos. Commission Central Menonita. Ediciones Clara-Semilla, Guatemala City, Guatemala.
[46]. Lederach, John Paul, (1997). Building peace sustainable Reconciliation in divided societies. Washington: US Institute for peace.
[47]. Maina, L. (2000). Ethnicity among the Communities of Nakuru Districts. In Muruga G.R. (ed) Pg 108 – 193.
[48]. Mkutu K, & Morani M, (2001). “The role of civic leaders in the mitigation of cattle rustling and small arms: The case study of Laikipia and Samburu”. (African peace Forum: Nairobi,
[49]. Mkutu K, (2000). “Banditry, cattle rustling and the increase of small arms, the case of Baragoi Division of Samburu District”, Arusha report African Peace Forum: Nairobi,
[50]. Moore, C. (1996). The mediation process; practical strategies for resolving conflict. Jossey-Bass Publishers, San Francisco, CA, USA.
[51]. Morgan (2009) Attended Workshop: Conflict Resolution, 1 day workshop at Genomic Health, Redwood City, CA.
[52]. Morgan (2009) Attended Workshop: Difficult Conversations, 1 day workshop at Genomic Health, Redwood City, CA.
[53]. Morgan (2009) Attended Workshop: Effective Management, 1 day workshop at Genomic Health, Redwood City, CA.
[54]. Mugenda, O. M. and Mugenda A. G. (1999). Research Methods Quantitative and Qualitative approaches. Nairobi: Acts Press.
[55]. Nachmias, F. (1996). Research Methods in Social Sciences Oaks: Sage Publications.
[56]. NCCK, SNV & SARDEP, (2001)
[57]. Niamir-Fuller M, “Conflict management and mobility among pastoralists in Karamoja, Uganda in managing mobility in African rangelands” (ITDG: UK, 1999).
[58]. Ochieng, (1995). Decolonization and Independence in Kenya(1940-1993). Nairobi: East African
[59]. Ogot, B. A. “The Decisive Years: 1956-63”, in Ogot, B. A. and William Ochieng’ (eds.)
[60]. Ogula P. A. (2005) Research Methods. Nairobi: CUEA Publications.
[61]. Orodho A. J. (2003) Essentials of Educational and Social Sciences Research Methods. Nairobi. Masola Publishers.
[62]. Ortiz, P. (1999). Apuntes teórico-conceptuales para el diseño de una propuesta metodológica de manejo de conflictos socioambientales a través de la forestería comunitoria. In Ortiz, P., ed., Comunidades y conflictos socioambientales: experiencias y desfíos en América Latina. Ediciones ABYA–YALA; FAO–FTPP; COMUNIDEC, Quito, Ecuador.
[63]. Ostrom,E. (1990), Governing the commons, New York, Cambridge University Press.
[64]. Peet, R.; Watts, M. (1996). Liberation ecologies: environment, development and social movements. Routledge, London, UK.
[65]. Pendzich, C.; Thomas, G.; Wohlgenant, T. (1994). The role of alternative conflict management in community forestry. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome, Italy.
[66]. Pope John Paul XXIII. Pacem in Terris. 9. (1963). (http://www.vatican.va/holy-father/john-xxiii/encyclicals/cic_documents/hf-j-xxiii-enc-11041963- pacem-en.html) link as of 3/6/06.Readings on Inequality in Kenya: Sectoral Dynamics and Perspectives, Nairobi: SID
[67]. Rupesinghe, K. ed(1996). Ethnicity and Power in the Contemporary World. Tokyo: United Nations University Press.
[68]. Rutto, S. (2000). Ethnicity as Objects of Hatred. Community Relations and Democratization process Among the Kalenjin Communities of the Rift Valley Province in Kenya. In Murunga, G.R. (ed) 70 -107.
[69]. Scheper, E. (2002). “Women War and Religion: An Overview”, in World Conference on Religion and Peace 35-32.
[70]. Schreiter, Robert J., C.PP.S., “Grassroots Artisans of Peace.” In Artisans of Peace: Grassroots Peacemaking among Christian Communities, eds. Thomas Bamat and Mary Ann Cejka (Maryknoll, New York: Orbis Books, 2003): 287-300. 287-88.
[71]. Scott, J. (1987). Weapons of the weak: everyday forms of peasant resistance. Yale University Press, New Haven, CT, USA.
[72]. Seligman, A. (1997). The problem of trust. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, USA.
[73]. Shaftoe, D., ed. (1993). Responding to changing times: environmental mediation in Canada. Interaction for Conflict Resolution, Waterloo, ON, Canada.
[74]. The Summa Theological of Thomas Aquinas. (1946).Vol. 1. New York: INC.
[75]. Thomas, G.; Anderson, J.; Chandrasekharan, D.; Kakabadse, Y.; Matiru, V. (1996). Leveling the playing field: promoting authentic and equitable dialogue under inequitable conditions. Presented at the Global e-Conference on Addressing Natural Resource Conflict Through Community Forestry, (Jan–Apr 1996.) Forests, Trees and People Programme of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome, Italy.
[76]. Wafula, Caroline (20 Nov. 2012) MPs accuse state of using underforce “Daily Nation Retrieved 21st Nov. 2012
[77]. Wallerstein, Immanuel M. 1974. The modern world systems: Capitalists Agriculture and the origin of the European World – Economy in 16th Century. New York: Academic Press.
[78]. Web of Science® Times Cited: 10
[79]. Wells, Harold. (1997). “Theology of reconciliation”. In the reconciliation of people: Challenge to Church, Gregory Baum and Harold Wells (eds). Marknoll: Orbis Books.
[80]. Wiley Online Library
[81]. Williamson, (R. 1999). The international fur ban and public policy advocacy: the significance of Inuit cultural persistence. Practicing Anthropology, 21(1), 2–8.
[82]. Wirmark, Bo (ed). (1997). Government – NGO Relations in Preventing Violence, Transforming Conflict and Building Peace. Report from a Conference in Mariefred, Sweden, September 4-6. Peace Team Forum.

Daniel Rotich Kandagor, Charles C Moindi “Africa Inland Church (AIC) Arguments On Cattle Rustling Wars and Insecurity among The Pokot and Tugen of Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.421-432 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/421-432.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Learners’ Evaluation of Task-Based Online Language Activity in a Community of Inquiry

Zailin Shah Yusoff, Nik Aloesnita Nik Alwi, Safra Liyana Sukiman – October 2019 Page No.: 433-436

This study explored learners’ evaluation of task-based online language learning. Using the Community of Inquiry framework to design the online environment, a task-based activity simulating an e-meeting was introduced to engage the learners in problem-solving and discussions to foster higher-order learning and critical discourse (Garrison, 2007). The participants of the study were 60 third year engineering students at two public technical universities in Malaysia enrolled in a workplace English language course. They were divided into teams of four in which two participants from each university made up each team. Seven teams were assigned as +Task Structure (+TS) teams while the other eight were the –Task Structure (-TS) teams. The participants’ perception was gauged using a learners’ evaluation survey distributed via Google forms. The analyses of the findings demonstrate the potential of task-based online language learning activity when embedded in a Community of Inquiry to stimulate learners’ interest in the task on top of encouraging critical and creative thinking.

Page(s): 433-436                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 01 November 2019

 Zailin Shah Yusoff
Centre for Language Studies, UniversitiTun Hussein Onn Malaysia

 Nik Aloesnita Nik Alwi
Centre for Modern Languages, Universiti Malaysia Pahang

 Safra Liyana Sukiman
Centre for Language Studies, UniversitiTun Hussein Onn Malaysia

[1]. R.D. Garrison, T. Anderson, & W. Archer, “Critical Inquiry in a Text-based Environment: Computer Conferencing in Higher Education”. The Internet and Higher Education, 2 (2-3), 87–105, 2000.
[2]. R.D. Garrison, “Online Community of Inquiry Review: Social, Cognitive, and Teaching Presence Issues”. Journal of Asynchronous Learning networks, 11 (1), 61–72, 2007.J
[3]. R. Ellis, “Task-based language learning and teaching”. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003.
[4]. S. Mackey & A. Mackey (Eds.), “The Routledge Handbook of Second Language Acquisition”. London: Routledge, 2012.
[5]. M.A. Bowles & R.J. Adams, “A Comparison of L2–L2 and L2–Heritage Learner Interactions in Spanish Language Classrooms”. The Modern Language Journal, 98 (2), 497-517, 2015.
[6]. E. Szeto, “Community of Inquiry as an instructional approach: What effects of teaching, social and cognitive presences are there in blended synchronous learning and teaching?”. Computers & Education, 81, 191-201, 2015.

Zailin Shah Yusoff, Nik Aloesnita Nik Alwi, Safra Liyana Sukiman “Learners’ Evaluation of Task-Based Online Language Activity in a Community of Inquiry” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.433-436 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/433-436.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Effect of Audit Committee Size on Risk Management. Evidence from Selected Listed Firms in Kenya

Thomas Kiptanui Tarus, Dr. Joel Tenai, Dr. Joyce Komen – October 2019 Page No.: 437-443

The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of audit committee size on financial risk management of 41 listed non-financial firms from 2010-2017 in Kenya. The longitudinal research design was used while the content analysis guide was used as a tool for collecting data from audited financial reports. The binary logistic regression technique was applied and the results revealed that audit committee size had a negative and significant effect on risk management(β = -1.17,p<0.05). Thus, the study concluded thata large audit committee size reduces hedging activities. This is supported by agency theory on conflict of interest in large audit committee size. The study recommends the reduction of audit committee size so as to increase hedging activities.

Page(s): 437-443                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 03 November 2019

 Thomas Kiptanui Tarus
Ph.D. Student, Department of Accounting & Finance, School of Business and Economics, Moi University Kenya

 Dr. Joel Tenai
Senior Lecturer, School of Business and Economics, Moi University Kenya

 Dr. Joyce Komen
Senior Lecturer, School of Business and Economics, Moi University Kenya

[1]. Aabo, T., Hansen, M. A., &Muradoglu, Y. G. (2015). Foreign Debt Usage in Non‐Financial Firms: a Horse Race between Operating and Accounting Exposure Hedging. European Financial Management, 21(3), 590-611.
[2]. Abdul Rahman, R., Noor, S., & Ismail, T. H. (2013). Governance and risk management: Empirical evidence from Malaysia and Egypt. International Journal of Finance & Banking Studies, 2(3), 21-33.
[3]. Abdullah, S. N. (2001). Characteristics of board of directors and audit committees among Malaysian listed companies in period leading to 1997 financial crisis. Akauntan Nasional, 14(10), 18-21.
[4]. Abernathy, J. L., Beyer, B., Masli, A., &Stefaniak, C. M. (2015). How the source of audit committee accounting expertise influences financial reporting timeliness. Current Issues in Auditing, 9(1), P1-P9.
[5]. Aldamen, H., Duncan, K., Kelly, S., McNamara, R., & Nagel, S. (2012). Audit committee characteristics and firm performance during the global financial crisis. Accounting & Finance, 52(4), 971-1000.
[6]. Ali, M. M., Besar, S. S. N. T., &Mastuki, N. A. M. (2017). Audit Committee Characteristics, Risk Management Committee and Financial Restatements. Advanced Science Letters, 23(1), 287-291.
[7]. Allayannis, G., &Ofek, E. (2001). Exchange rate exposure, hedging, and the use of foreign currency derivatives. Journal of international money and finance, 20(2), 273-296.
[8]. Allayannis, G., Lel, U., & Miller, D. P. (2012). The use of foreign currency derivatives, corporate governance, and firm value around the world. Journal of International Economics, 87(1), 65-79.
[9]. Allison, P. D. (2014, March). Measures of fit for logistic regression. In Proceedings of the SAS Global Forum 2014 Conference (pp. 1-13).
[10]. Al-Matari, Y. A., Al-Swidi, A. K., Fadzil, F. H. B. H., & Al-Matari, E. M. (2012). Board of directors, audit committee characteristics and the performance of Saudi Arabia listed companies. International Review of Management and Marketing, 2(4), 241-251.
[11]. Alqatamin, R. M. (2018). Audit committee effectiveness and company performance: evidence from Jordan. Accounting and Finance Research, 7(2), 48.
[12]. Archambeault, D., &DeZoort, F. T. (2001). Auditor opinion shopping and the audit committee: An analysis of suspicious auditor switches. International Journal of Auditing, 5(1), 33-52.
[13]. Bae, S. C., Kim, H. S., & Kwon, T. H. (2018). Currency derivatives for hedging: New evidence on determinants, firm risk, and performance. Journal of Futures Markets, 38(4), 446-467.
[14]. Beck, T., Demirguc‐Kunt, A. S. L. I., Laeven, L., & Levine, R. (2008). Finance, firm size, and growth. Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, 40(7), 1379-1405.
[15]. Bédard, J., &Gendron, Y. (2010). Strengthening the financial reporting system: Can audit committees deliver?.International journal of auditing, 14(2), 174-210.
[16]. Bodnar, G. M., &Gebhardt, G. (1999). Derivatives usage in risk management by US and German non‐financial firms: A comparative survey. Journal of International Financial Management & Accounting, 10(3), 153-187.
[17]. Bodnar, G. M., Giambona, E., Graham, J. R., & Harvey, C. R. (2014). A Guide to Corporate Risk Management. Available at SSRN 2479483.
[18]. Brooks, C. (2019). Introductory econometrics for finance. Cambridge university press.
[19]. Campbell, K., & Vera, A. M. (2010). Female board appointments and firm valuation: Short and long-term effects. Journal of Management & Governance, 14(1), 37-59.
[20]. Chaudhry, D., Mehmood, M. S., &Mehmood, A. (2014). Determinants of corporate hedging policies and derivatives usage in risk management practices of non-financial firms. Wulfenia Journal, ISI Indexed, Impact Factor 0.267, 21(7), 293-310.
[21]. Coopers, P. W. (2012). Rising to the Next Flow. A Kenya perspective on 2012 State of the Internal Audit Profession Study.
[22]. Dellaportas, S., Leung, P., Cooper, B. J., Lary, A. M., & Taylor, D. W. (2012). Governance characteristics and role effectiveness of audit committees. Managerial Auditing Journal.
[23]. Dhaliwal, D. A. N., Naiker, V. I. C., &Navissi, F. (2010). The association between accruals quality and the characteristics of accounting experts and mix of expertise on audit committees. Contemporary Accounting Research, 27(3), 787-827.
[24]. Dionne, G., &Triki, T. (2005). Risk management and corporate governance: The importance of independence and financial knowledge for the board and the audit committee.
[25]. Dionne, G., Maalaoui Chun, O., &Triki, T. (2013). Risk management and corporate governance: The importance of independence and financial knowledge. Risk Management and Corporate Governance: The Importance of Independence and Financial Knowledge (February 2013).
[26]. Gongera, G. E., Ouma, B. O., & Were, J. N. (2013). Effects of Financial Risks on Profitability of Sugar Firms in Kenya. European Journal of Business and Management, 5(3).
[27]. Grote, G. (2015). Promoting safety by increasing uncertainty–Implications for risk management. Safety Science, 71, 71-79.
[28]. Harner, M. M. (2010). Ignoring the writing on the wall: the role of Enterprise risk management in the economic crisis. J. Bus. & Tech. L., 5, 45.
[29]. Henry, D. (2010). Agency costs, ownership structure and corporate governance compliance: A private contracting perspective. Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, 18(1), 24-46.
[30]. Hillman, A. J., & Dalziel, T. (2003). Boards of directors and firm performance: Integrating agency and resource dependence perspectives. Academy of Management Review, 28(3), 383-396.
[31]. Hsu, W. Y., &Petchsakulwong, P. (2010). The impact of corporate governance on the efficiency performance of the Thai non-life insurance industry. The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance-Issues and Practice, 35(1), S28-S49.
[32]. Huang, T. C., Huang, H. W., & Lee, C. C. (2014). Corporate executive’s gender and audit fees. Managerial Auditing Journal, 29(6), 527-547.
[33]. Jensen, M. C. (1993). The modern industrial revolution, exit, and the failure of internal control systems. The Journal of Finance, 48(3), 831-880.
[34]. Jensen, M. C., &Meckling, W. H. (1976). Theory of the firm: Managerial behavior, agency costs and ownership structure. Journal of financial economics, 3(4), 305-360.
[35]. Kallamu, B. S., &Saat, N. A. M. (2015). Audit committee attributes and firm performance: evidence from Malaysian finance companies. Asian Review of Accounting, 23(3), 206-231.
[36]. Krishnan, G. V., & Visvanathan, G. (2008). Does the SOX definition of an accounting expert matter? The association between audit committee directors’ accounting expertise and accounting conservatism. Contemporary Accounting Research, 25(3), 827-858.
[37]. Lajili, K. (2009). Corporate risk disclosure and corporate governance. Journal of Risk and Financial Management, 2(1), 94-117.
[38]. Lel, U. (2012). Currency hedging and corporate governance: a cross-country analysis. Journal of Corporate Finance, 18(2), 221-237.
[39]. Li, J., Mangena, M., & Pike, R. (2012). The effect of audit committee characteristics on intellectual capital disclosure. The British Accounting Review, 44(2), 98-110.
[40]. Madawaki, A., &Amran, N. A. (2013). Audit committees: How they affect financial reporting in Nigerian companies. Journal of Modern Accounting and Auditing, 9(8), 1070.
[41]. Malik, M. (2014). Audit committee composition and effectiveness: a review of post-SOX literature. Journal of Management Control, 25(2), 81-117.
[42]. Mallin, C., &Melis, A. (2012). Shareholder rights, shareholder voting, and corporate performance. Journal of Management & Governance, 16(2), 171-176.
[43]. Maruhun, E. N. S., Abdullah, W. R. W., Atan, R., & Yusuf, S. N. S. (2018). The Effects of Corporate Governance on Enterprise Risk Management: Evidence from Malaysian Shariah-compliant Firms. International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, 8(1), 865-877.
[44]. Miccolis, J., & Shah, S. (2000). Enterprise risk management: An analytic approach.
[45]. Sharma, D. S., Boo, E. F., & Sharma, V. D. (2008). The impact of non‐mandatory corporate governance on auditors’ client acceptance, risk and planning judgments. Accounting and Business Research, 38(2), 105-120.
[46]. Sobel, P. J., &Reding, K. F. (2004). Aligning corporate governance with enterprise risk management. Management Accounting Quarterly, 5(2), 29.
[47]. Sultana, N., Singh, H., & Van der Zahn, J. L. M. (2015). Audit committee characteristics and audit report lag. International Journal of Auditing, 19(2), 72-87.
[48]. Yasuda, T. (2005). Firm growth, size, age and behavior in Japanese manufacturing. Small Business Economics, 24(1), 1-15.
[49]. Yatim, P. (2009). Audit committee characteristics and risk management of Malaysian listed firms. Management & Accounting Review (MAR), 8(1), 19-36.
[50]. Zabri, S. M., Ahmad, K., &Wah, K. K. (2016). Corporate governance practices and firm performance: Evidence from top 100 public listed companies in Malaysia. Procedia Economics and Finance, 35, 287-296.
[51]. Zaman, M., Hudaib, M., &Haniffa, R. (2011). Corporate governance quality, audit fees and non‐audit services fees. Journal of Business Finance & Accounting, 38(1‐2), 165-197.
[52]. Zikmund, W. G., Babin, B. J., Carr, J. C., & Griffin, M. (2013). Business Research Methods, 9th International Edition. South-Western Cengage Learning, Canada.

Thomas Kiptanui Tarus, Dr. Joel Tenai, Dr. Joyce Komen “Effect of Audit Committee Size on Risk Management. Evidence from Selected Listed Firms in Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.437-443 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/437-443.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Teacher Motivation and O’Level Students’ Performance of the Selected Universal Secondary Education Schools in Masindi District

Angela Nyandera, Martin Eturu, Steven Ainebyona – October 2019 Page No.: 444-463

The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of teachers’ motivation on O’Level students’ performance in selected USE schools in Masindi district. The study was guided by four research objectives. The research objectives were to examine the role of teacher recognition on performance of students at “O” level, to determine the relationship between remuneration and students’ performance, to examine the influence of reduced workload on students’ performance, to examine the effect of annual salary increment on students’ performance. The sample size was 108 and data was collected using questionnaires and interview guides. Analysis was done using Pearson correlation coefficient and Linear Regression. Findings revealed that the government had endeavored to provide conducive working conditions in USE Schools and with these teachers were expected to be motivated to perform better and this would result into good students’ performance. Findings also revealed that recognition of teachers influenced students’ performance. Findings also revealed that remuneration of teachers had a big influence on students’ performance. According to findings, it was also revealed that teachers’ workload had influence on students’ performance. A regression analysis on whether performance was influenced by recognition factors revealed a strong relationship between recognition related factors and students’ performance at “O” level in USE schools.
According to the findings, teachers’ annual salary increment also influenced students’ performance.
The study also concluded that recognition of teachers positively influences students’ performance. A study on the relationship between teachers’ motivation and students’ performance should be carried out to establish the challenges which USE school administrators face in motivating teachers. Study should also be carried out to find out how motivation of teachers can be sustained. A study should also be carried out in private secondary schools in Masindi for comparative purposes.

Page(s): 444-463                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 03 November 2019

 Angela Nyandera
School of Graduate Studies and Research, Team University, Plot 446, Kabaka Ajagara.rd. Kampala-Uganda

 Martin Eturu
School of Graduate Studies and Research, Team University, Plot 446, Kabaka Ajagara.rd. Kampala-Uganda

 Steven Ainebyona
School of Graduate Studies and Research, Team University, Plot 446, Kabaka Ajagara.rd. Kampala-Uganda

[1]. Academic performance –the impact of motivation on teachers and students in some selected secondary school . (n.d.). Udi Local Government Area.
[2]. ADELABU, M. (Dec 2005). research Teacher motivation and incentives. Nigeria: unknown.
[3]. Alarm. T.M, F. S. (2011, Jan). Factors affecting teachers motivation. International Journal of Business and Social Sciences, 2(1).
[4]. Ave.PittsburghPA15213, 3. s. (2010). Teachers’ Compesations. Pittisburg: Pittsburg, Public School Journal. Careen Cameron, B. T. (n.d.). Recognition without rewards.
[5]. Cole, G. (1996). Managemeent Theory and Pratice. Tweed.
[6]. Gitonga, D. W. (2012). Research project on influence of teachers’ motivation on students ‘performance in Kenya certificate of secondary education in public secondary schools. Imenti south district Kenya: Kenya Gazzette.
[7]. Graham, D. G. (n.d.). Public Praise. Baldon, 149.
[8]. Herzberg. (1968). One more time: How do you motivate employee?
[9]. Hutchinson, S. a. (Director). (1985). Teachers in LDC [Motion Picture].
[10]. john, T. m. (2014). Motivation.
[11]. Burton, C. H. (Spring 2012). A study of motivation: How to get your employees moving, PEA Honors Thesis. Indiana: Indiana University.
[12]. Kiiza, J. (2017, January 31, 11:39am). 2016 UCE results out. Performance Declines, p. 6.
[13]. Kofi. O. A, P. O. (2010-2011). Teacher Motivtion and Quality Education Delivery. Ghana.
[14]. Lautham, A. (1998). Teacher satisfaction.
[15]. Locke, E. (1976). Nature and Causes of Job Satisfaction in MD. Dunnetened.
[16]. Marques, J. (2010). Joy at work – Living and working mindfully everyday. Oersonhood press.
[17]. NATU. (2016). Pay pensions conditions/ workload. UK: https://www.teachers.org.uk/pay-pensions-conditions/workload.
[18]. NATU. (n.d.). Teachers workload poster and pamplet. United Kingdom: https://www.gov.uk/govt/publications/teachers-workload-poster-andpamplet.
[19]. Nyatika, S. K. (1996). A Study of factors leadng to poor performance in Kenyan Certificate of Secondary Schools in Magambo. Nyatika.
[20]. Bennell, K. A. (2007). Teacher Motivation in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia.
[21]. PISA. (2000, 2003, 2006). Evaluation of the impact of teachers’ renumeration on performance of students. Internal Journal of Science and Research (IJSR), 6, 9, 10.
[22]. Rashhed, M. I. (2017). Working Environment. Vehari Pakistan: Department of science, COMSATS Institute of Info Tech.
[23]. Silver, F. (n.d.). Motivation. Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
[24]. Spear (Director). (2000). Teachers in UK [Motion Picture].
[25]. M. o. (2007, Jan). Operational Arrangements of Implemetation of Universal Secondary Education (USE). p. 7(10.1).
[26]. M. o. (Jan 2007). Policy and operational arrangements for implementation of Universal Secondary Education (USE). Kampala: Macmillan.
[27]. T., M. (2011). Primary Source.
[28]. Tella. (2007). Intrinsic Motivation.
[29]. UNESCO. (2006). Teachers’ performance. www.indiareseacrh journals.com.
[30]. http://catchbox.>education>teacher Motivation
[31]. PallegedaraAsnkha and Yamano Takashi(impacts of USE policy on secondary school enrolment
[32]. http://Impactteachers.com>motivated – teacher-key –classroom>teacher.
[33]. https://www.tankonyvtar.hu>2011-0023-psychology.0300300.Scorm
[34]. https://simply educate .me>2015/01/05>Conceptual framework-guide.
[35]. Kelli Burton, spring 2012
[36]. Htt://www.mindtool.com/pages/article/new LDR 96.htm
[37]. Circular Standing Instruction No.4 of 2019, Salary Structure for Financial year 2019/2020 Ref PMD 80/80/01 dated 1/7/2019
[38]. Best,J.W&Kahn,J.V.(2003).Research in Education (7thed) New Delhi: Prentice –Hall of India.
[39]. Maslow,A.(1954).Motivation &personaliting.NewYork:Harper and Row publishers.
[40]. Maslow,A.(1954).A theory of Human Motivation. Psychological Review 50,370-396.
[41]. African Region Human Development Working Paper Series.Uganda Post – Primary Education Sector Report .XiaoyanLiang,AfricanRegion,The world Bank ,September 2002.

Angela Nyandera, Martin Eturu, Steven Ainebyona “Teacher Motivation and O’Level Students’ Performance of the Selected Universal Secondary Education Schools in Masindi District” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.444-463 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/444-463.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Factors hindering Geography Teachers from Designing Meaningful Pedagogical Activities in Secondary Schools, Kenya

Mohamed Moses Muchiri, Kariuki Stephen Mwaniki – October 2019 Page No.: 464-469

The purpose of the study was to investigate difficulties facing Geography teachers from designing meaningful pedagogical activities when teaching and learning Geography in Secondary Schools. Like any other pedagogical issue, teaching and learning of Geography in Secondary Schools faces and poses a wide range of challenges. These challenges range from expertise, technical and logistical support from the school administrative arising from the instructional established system, practices and traditions. This study was set to establish from both the school Geography teachers and department administrators whether they were aware of any challenges that existed in the teaching and learning of Geography. The study was based on Shulman, 1987, a model of knowledge growth in teaching. It adopted a descriptive cross-sectional survey targeting public Secondary Schools Geography Heads of the Department, Geography teachers and form three and form four Geography students. Data were collected using questionnaires for Geography Teachers, interview schedules for Heads of Department and an observation checklist were used to investigate the types of instructional resources used in form three (3) and form four (4) Geography lessons. On the teaching and learning process, the respondents cited many deficiencies such inadequate duration for covering the syllabus, examination-oriented programme and cheating, understaffing and lack or inadequate instructional resources. The researcher, therefore, concluded there is little or no technical and logistical support provided to the Geography Department and in particular to Geography teachers in terms of financial resources, instructional resources, and in-service programmes to facilitate proper preparation for quality instruction. It was therefore recommended, to manage emerging pedagogical technological challenges in teaching and learning of Geography in Secondary Schools, there is a need for teachers to invest adequately on computer-aided instruction. This strategy will not only promote its quality but also make it relevant to the needs of learners and teachers of Kenya and beyond.

Page(s): 464-469                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 03 November 2019

 Mohamed Moses Muchiri
M.Ed. Social Studies, Department of Education Communication and Technology, School of Education, Kenyatta University, Kenya

 Kariuki Stephen Mwaniki
M.Ed. Business Studies, Department of Education Communication and Technology, School of Education, Kenyatta University, Kenya

[1]. Bariham, I., Ondigi, S., Kiio, M. N. and Muchiri, M. M. (n.d.). Senior High Schools’ Students’ Perception of Computer-Aided Instruction in North East Region of Ghana.
[2]. DAN, B. (2010). Application of the integrated approach in teaching Social Studies in Ibanda PTC and selected primary Schools in Ibanda District (pHD Thesis). Makerere University.
[3]. Education, K. P. W. P. on, Decade, M. T. for the N., Beyond, Kamunge, J. M. A.N Moi, D. A. (1988). Report on the presidential working party on education and manpower training for the next decade and beyond. The Republic of Kenya.
[4]. Genvieve, N. (2017). Preparation of Teacher-Trainees in Pedagogy in Kenyan Universities. Journal of Education and Practice, 8(13), 28–34.
[5]. Kafu, P. A. (2011). Teacher Education in Kenya: Emerging issues. International Journal of Curriculum and Instruction, 1(1), 43–52.
[6]. Lee, D. K. (2013). Teacher education for democracy and social justice. Routledge.
[7]. Muchiri, M. M. and Bariham, I. (n.d.). Evaluation of Geography Teachers’ Preparedness in Pedagogical Approaches for an Enhanced Instructions in Secondary Schools, Kenya.
[8]. Roehrig, G. H., Kruse, R. A. and Kern, A. (2007), Teacher and school characteristics and their influence on curriculum implementation. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 44(7), 883–907. https://doi.org/10.1002/tea.20180
[9]. Shulman, L. E. E. S. (2012). Understand Knowledge. 15(2), 4–14.
[10]. Wafula J. K. (2015). Relationship between fieldwork and performance in the teaching and learning of geography in Kiminini division Trans-Nzoia County, Kenya (pHD Thesis). Kenyatta University.
[11]. Wanjohi, A. M. (2011). Development of the education system in Kenya since independence. KENPRO Online Papers Portal.

Mohamed Moses Muchiri, Kariuki Stephen Mwaniki “Factors hindering Geography Teachers from Designing Meaningful Pedagogical Activities in Secondary Schools, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 10, pp.464-469 October 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-10/464-469.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Pension Decentralization Policy and Service Delivery in the Pension Unit, Ministry of Public Service, Uganda

Moses Mukiibi, Martin Eturu – October 2019 Page No.: 470-498

The study was carried out in order to examine Pension decentralization Policy and Pension Service delivery in Uganda’s Public Sector, The interest of the problem was that despite the Several Government reforms and policies to improve efficiency and effectiveness in Pension Service delivery, there is still delayed access to pensions by pensioners and beneficiaries, extortion, persistent wage shortfalls, errors and inaccuracies in the payroll, poor network systems which is sometimes on and off, wrong pension computations, capacity gap in the processing of pension, poor interpretation of the policies concerning pension, among others
The study therefore sought to examine Pension decentralization Policy and Pension Service delivery in Uganda’s Public Sector with specific reference to Ministry of Public Service as one of the Votes which initiated the Pension decentralisation Policy. The study was conducted using a cross sectional descriptive survey design with a target sample size of 180 staff and pension clients in the various departments within the Ministry of Public Service. The study finds were that Pension Decentralization Policy in Uganda has vivid results that streamlined the pension process and therefore pensioners can easily access their pension but also the people involved in pension processing have had a better process since they can always refer to the various polices and statutes and has eliminated Ghosts on payroll.
It was further established that the wealth of knowledge on Pension Decentralization Policy in Uganda has equipped all the stake holders in the Pension business process with Policies /guidelines, knowledge of systems /technology, budgets / Plans among others and this has greatly reduced the work overload at the Center – MoPs and that the responsible officers can process pension without much handoff.

Page(s): 470-498                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 03 November 2019

 Moses Mukiibi
School of Graduate Studies and Research, Team University, Plot 446, Kabaka Ajagara.rd. Kampala-