Marriage: It Can Be A Bless or Hidden Curse of Their Life! A Criminological Study on Husbands’ Influence for the Culpability of Women Prisoners (Special reference to Welikada Women’s prison)

Wijewardhana BVN, Rajaneththige S – December 2019 Page No.: 01-08

Within the causes of family relationships both males and females maintain specific tasks and positions based on the gender perspectives since the historic epoch in Sri Lanka. According to sociologists, the tasks are merely divided on gender based decisions. Child births, socialization, fulfill husbands’’ needs, and manage the economy with series of other vigorous activities of the family unit to be fulfilled by the married woman. In this context family disputes were unavoidable when challenges occurred due to ineffective control of family matters. Owing to changes occurred in the society transformation of the role and tasks of women too, were happened resulting that women represent comparatively to the men in the current labour market. The continuation of uninterrupted family system within the said composition is still a task coming under the purview of women. Married women are accustomed to perform the tasks within the family units while accomplishing the status of male-female gender aspirations.
Women who are enduring penalties being imprisoners in contradictory to their bestowed tasks and status based on the gender related matters at domestic level, this study attempts to emphasize the causes affected them to be guilty on some offenses and also to analyze whether influences were there or not from their husbands, if so, in what nature and which form of influences was the problem to be determined through this research. Accordingly, 63 married women prisoners were selected from different age categories and from mixed religious backgrounds. The research was launched through discussions, using questionnaire, observations, and case studies and via focused group discussions, too. The investigations revealed that 79.66% of informants were in the opinion that main cause behind their offensiveness was the muddles involved by their husbands. It was also disclosed that husbands’ direct involvement on drug related actions, abusing women, murder, theft and burglary were candidly affected them to face the current situation. The research findings endorsed the need of mandatory as well as socially adapted amendments targeted on the family system which could endorse an intelligible community that ensures healthy relationship between husband and wife and within the family units.

Page(s): 01-08                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 13 December 2019

 Wijewardhana BVN
Senior Lecturer in Criminology, Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Sri Lanka

 Rajaneththige S
Senior Lecturer in Criminology, Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Sri Lanka

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Wijewardhana BVN, Rajaneththige S “Marriage: It Can Be A Bless or Hidden Curse of Their Life! A Criminological Study on Husbands’ Influence for the Culpability of Women Prisoners (Special reference to Welikada Women’s prison)” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.01-08 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/01-08.pdf

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Modern Challenges faced by banking sector of Pakistan Evidence from: the First Micro Finance Bank, JS Bank and BankIslami Pakistan

Saad Bashir, Zain Saeed Qureshi, Hamza Saeed Qureshi, Batool Fatima Qureshi – December 2019 Page No.: 09-11

The purpose of this study is to identify the problems and issues related to banking industry of Pakistan. We have focused on three banks that are specialize in their own field. We adopted the qualitative approach and developed a questionnaire to measure the responses of respondents on a likert scale. The banking history goes way back to Babylonian era. But in Pakistan the very first Pakistani bank is State bank of Pakistan. Pakistan’s banking history is quite diversified. From privatization to nationalization and then again privatization. In Pakistan banking industry is one most growing and innovative industry. Banks plays an important role in an economy. Bank are the financial institution that are regulated and monitored by State bank of Pakistan and channelize the depositor money. This report has focused on issues faced by commercial banks, microfinance institutions and Islamic banks.

Page(s): 09-11                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 December 2019

 Saad Bashir
MS Scholar, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan, Pakistan

 Zain Saeed Qureshi
MS Scholar, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan, Pakistan

 Hamza Saeed Qureshi
Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan, Pakistan

 Batool Fatima Qureshi
Nust Business School, Islamabad, Pakistan

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Saad Bashir, Zain Saeed Qureshi, Hamza Saeed Qureshi, Batool Fatima Qureshi “Modern Challenges faced by banking sector of Pakistan Evidence from: the First Micro Finance Bank, JS Bank and BankIslami Pakistan ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.09-11 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/09-11.pdf

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Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Users’ Discernment in Lagos Megacity: Lesson from Primero Transport Service

Ibrahim-Adedeji K.B; Badmus A.A.; Eniolawun, O. S.; Hassan, Y.O. – December 2019 – Page No.: 12-16

The study examines Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) users’ perspicacity in Lagos, Nigeria along Ikorodu-Mile12 Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) corridor in order to guide, provide information for policies and decision makers during policies formulation. This study assesses the socio-economic character of passengers using the primer transport service along Ikorodu-Mile 12 BRT corridor; analysed the travel behavior of commuters using the primero transport service in the study area and examine the commuters’ perspicacity and expectation on the level of service quality provided by Primero Transport Service. A total of three hundred ninety-four (394) commuters (one commuter per bus) who go back and forth through the buses were sampled. Perception and expectation about service were asked. The result of factor analysis found that commuters were satisfy with the service offer by Primero, physical appearance, level of clean, mode of operation and level of service deliver by Primero transport services.

Page(s): 12-16                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 17 December 2019

 Ibrahim-Adedeji K.B
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Lagos State Polytechnic, Ikorodu, Lagos, Nigeria

 Badmus A.A.
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Lagos State Polytechnic, Ikorodu, Lagos, Nigeria

 Eniolawun, O. S.
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Lagos State Polytechnic, Ikorodu, Lagos, Nigeria

 Hassan, Y.O.
Post-graduate Student, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Lagos, Nigeria

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Ibrahim-Adedeji K.B; Badmus A.A.; Eniolawun, O. S.; Hassan, Y.O. “Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Users’ Discernment in Lagos Megacity: Lesson from Primero Transport Service” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.12-16 December 2019 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/12-16.pdf

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The Role of Managerial Competency on Information and Communication Technology, Access to Finance, Innovation and Agricultural Performance in Nigeria A Pilot Study

Abubakar Mayaki, Prof Madya, Dr Kadzrina Abdul Kadir, Dr Emy Ezura A Jalil – December 2019 Page No.: 17-21

The purpose of this paper is to examine a few samples of data on the role of managerial competency on information and communication technology, access to finance, innovation on agricultural performance of small and medium farmers in Nigeria. Hence, to determine the reliability and validity of the instruments the Cronbach alpha was used. The SPSS version 25 was employed to analyze the few data collected from the small and medium farmers. The result revealed that the instruments are sufficiently reliable because all the Cronbach alpha of the instruments exceed the minimum tolerable level of .70.

Page(s): 17-21                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 17 December 2019

 Abubakar Mayaki
Othman Yeop Abdullah Graduate School of Business, Malaysia

 Prof Madya
Othman Yeop Abdullah Graduate School of Business, Malaysia

 Dr Kadzrina Abdul Kadir
Othman Yeop Abdullah Graduate School of Business, Malaysia

 Dr Emy Ezura A Jalil
Othman Yeop Abdullah Graduate School of Business, Malaysia

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Abubakar Mayaki, Prof Madya, Dr Kadzrina Abdul Kadir, Dr Emy Ezura A Jalil “The Role of Managerial Competency on Information and Communication Technology, Access to Finance, Innovation and Agricultural Performance in Nigeria A Pilot Study” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.17-21 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/17-21.pdf

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Attitudes of Non-Muslims on Islamic Financial Institutions: A Study based on Sungawila Area in Sri Lanka

S. Safrin & Mohamed Haniffa Mohamed Nairoos – December 2019 Page No.: 22-27

Islamic financial institutions initially established to full-filled for the needs of not only Muslims but also non-Muslims. The number of non-Muslims involved in Islamic financial institutions is increasing. The institutions desirous of entering into this nascent field in Sri Lanka are required to know the aspirations and motivations of non-Muslims with respect to interest-free Financial Services. The main objective of this research is to identify the attitudes of non-Muslims on Islamic Financial Institutions a study based on Sungawila area. For this purpose, a representative sample of 150 respondents is surveyed with the help of a structured questionnaire developed for this purpose. The data for this study was analyzed using SPSS 20.0 multiple statistical adapted to confirm the theoretical evidence. We also attempt to measures the knowledge, intention to use and demographic factors regarding Islamic financial institutions as well as the factors which influence non-Muslims of Sungawila area in Islamic financing. The finding of the research shows majority of the non-Muslims are not expected to view Islamic Financial Institutions are only for Muslims’ obligations on other hand they are less aware about Islamic financial concept, product, services and features. Further most of the non-Muslims are expected to see should open up more branches and facilities of Islamic Financial Institutions. It is recommended that Islamic financial institutions should open up more branches and facilities and Lack of understanding about Islamic financial institutions products and services thus they should advertise among non-Muslims.

Page(s): 22-27                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 18 December 2019

 S. Safrin
BA (Hons) in Islamic Banking & Finance, South Eastern University of Sri Lanka

 Mohamed Haniffa Mohamed Nairoos
Senior Lecturer, Department of Islamic Studies, FIA, South Eastern University of Sri Lanka

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S. Safrin & Mohamed Haniffa Mohamed Nairoos “Attitudes of Non-Muslims on Islamic Financial Institutions: A Study based on Sungawila Area in Sri Lanka” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.22-27 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/22-27.pdf

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Exploring the Application, Dimensionality and Factor Structure of Organizational Citizenship Behavior Scale among Local Government Employees in Lagos, Nigeria

Ikenna Jennifer Amaka, Siti Noormi Alias and Mohd Ashraff Mohd Anuar – December 2019 Page No.: 28-35

Previous studies have observed a paradigm shift in the debate concerning the dimensionality of organizational citizenship behavior. Building on organizational citizenship behavior literature, the present study in intends to validate the dimensionality of the organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) scale developed by Smith et al., (1983) who proposed a 2 dimensional16-item instrument. Data was collected through a survey questionnaire using systematic random sampling technique to employees of local government in Lagos State, Nigeria. A total of 400 questionnaires were administered and 393 valid responses were obtained over a period of 4-weeks. Factor analysis and reliability analysis were conducted to confirm that the instrument is valid within the context of local government employees. The implication of this current study is that OCB scale developed by smith et al., (1983) has revealed two-dimensional structures comprising of; altruism and generalized compliance. The instrument was found to be valid and reliable scale for OCB measurement among employees of public organization, particularly Local Government employees in Lagos, Nigeria.

Page(s): 28-35                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 18 December 2019

 Ikenna Jennifer Amaka
Department of Professional Development & Continuing Education, Faculty of Educational Studies, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia

 Siti Noormi Alias
Department of Professional Development & Continuing Education, Faculty of Educational Studies, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia

 Mohd Ashraff Mohd Anuar
Department of Professional Development & Continuing Education, Faculty of Educational Studies, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia

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Ikenna Jennifer Amaka, Siti Noormi Alias and Mohd Ashraff Mohd Anuar “Exploring the Application, Dimensionality and Factor Structure of Organizational Citizenship Behavior Scale among Local Government Employees in Lagos, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.28-35 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/28-35.pdf

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Hope and Positive Development in the Third Decade of Life. A Theoretical Perspective on Tertiary Education Students in Cameroon

Akom Delbert Afumbom- December 2019 Page No.: 36-41

University is relatively considered a stressful moment in the life of students due to numerous academic workloads and academic activities. The situation is further aggravated by the fact that some university students are in emerging adulthood, a developmental period which is psychologically fraught with uncertainty, instability and identity issues among others. Added to these, the context of most universities like Cameroon which is marred with political, economic and social turbulence common to other developing societies in the sub Saharan region makes life unbearable. Looking at the challenges that confront tertiary education students in the third decade of life, increases possibilities of fears that they will founder thus narrowing the route to a blossomed transition into adulthood and through the university from home into the world of work. However, observations reveal that some have remained hopeful as they continuously believe in themselves and their worth. As such, they have resiliently shrugged off the vast burden placed on them by the adult society as they struggle intentionally with continuous efforts to succeed. Being hopeful and self-efficacy beliefs are observed to be some of the effective drivers that pull emerging adults through the storms of university transition thus facilitating positive development into subsequent life stages. Unfortunately just a paucity of literature albeit theoretically actually narrates via scholarly corridors the monumental successes recorded by students as they sail flourishingly through university in the midst of storms an in the third decade of life. This paper examines and addresses the foregoing through the lenses of some theories.

Page(s): 36-41                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 20 December 2019

 Akom Delbert Afumbom
Department of Educational Psychology, Faculty of Education, University of Buea, Cameroon
University of Buea, P.O.Box 63 Buea, Cameroon

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Akom Delbert Afumbom, “Hope and Positive Development in the Third Decade of Life. A Theoretical Perspective on Tertiary Education Students in Cameroon” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.36-41 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/36-41.pdf

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Cross-Sectional Study of Minutiae Patterns in Bini Ethnic Group of Southern Nigeria

John Nwolim Paul, Deborah Abosede Akinola, Oja-Alumehe Favour Erezih – December 2019 Page No.: 19-22

Background: This study was aimed at evaluating the minutiae patterns in of Bini ethnic group of Southern Nigeria. The study was descriptive and cross-sectional with volunteers age ranging from 18-60 years. For the purpose of this study, an individual was considered to be a Nigeria of a particular ethnic group if the parents and four grandparents are of the same ethnic group.
Materials and Methods: Purposive sampling method was used for the study. The selection and collection of required parameters relied on informed consent of volunteer subjects. This was done by giving them a copy of the informed consent letter which was signed and dated. A total of 400 subjects (Males 225, Females 175) were recruited for the study. The fingerprints were obtained using print scanner (Hp G3110 Photo scanner) following Oghenemavwe and Osaat (2015) improvised model.
Results and Discussion: Distribution of total digital patterns in Bini showed that on the left hand they had the following: Ridge Ending 4399(17.1%), Ridge Crossing 2335 (9.0%), Bridge 1979(7.7%), Lake 2077(8.1%), Bifurcation 5283(20.5%), Double Bifurcation 2021 (7.8%), Dot 2015 (7.8%), Trifurcation 1938 (7.5%), Opposed Bifurcation 2029 (7.9%), Island 1723 (6.6%), while on the right hand the distributions were: Ridge Ending 4415 (17.2%), Ridge Crossing 2323 (9.0%), Bridge 1999(7.7%), Lake 2065(8.0%), Bifurcation 5303(20.6%), Double Bifurcation 2005 (7.7%), Dot 2025 (7.8%), Trifurcation 1915 (7.4%), Opposed Bifurcation 2044 (7.9%), Island 1709 (6.7%).
Conclusion: The descriptive cross-sectional study of minutiae pattern has revealed the following trend of patterns: Bifurcation 5283 (20.5%) > Ridge ending 4399(17.1%) > Ridge crossing 2335 (9.0%) on the left whereas on the right hand thus: Bifurcation 5303(20.6%) > Ridge ending 4415 (17.2%) > Ridge crossing 2323 (9.0%). This trend is in line with the stated trends for Africa, this study provides a baseline data on level 2 patterns or minutiae for the Bini people of Southern Nigeria.

Page(s): 19-22                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 21 December 2019

 John Nwolim Paul
Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria

 Deborah Abosede Akinola
Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria

 Oja-Alumehe Favour Erezih
Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria

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John Nwolim Paul, Deborah Abosede Akinola, Oja-Alumehe Favour Erezih “Cross-Sectional Study of Minutiae Patterns in Bini Ethnic Group of Southern Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Scientific Innovation (IJRSI) vol.6 issue 12, pp.19-22 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijrsi/digital-library/volume-6-issue-12/19-22.pdf

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Implementation of Vision 20:2020 Agricultural Policy and Food Production in Nigeria, 2007-2015

Ofozoba Chinonso Anthony – December 2019 Page No.: 42-64

The study set out to examine the implementation of the vision 20:2020 agricultural policy by the Federal Government and its effect on food production in Nigeria between 2007 and 2015. The qualitative method of data collection and analysis and the Marxian instrumentalist theory were adopted for the study. The study established that the implementation of the Vision 20:2020 did not effectively improve and modernize production systems in Nigeria between 2007 and 2015. Again, the implementation of Vision 20:2020 did not impact effectively on the production of tubers, grains and livestock in Nigeria between 2007 and 2015. The “improved seed projects”, Agricultural Credit Support Scheme (ACSS) as well as Commercial Agricultural Credit Scheme (CACS), and some stated subsidy packages (including that of acquisition of tractors, fast yielding crops, etc) could not be accessed by most farmers. Irrigation and efficient extension schemes, as well as use of highly disease resistant livestock campaign were not implemented. Adequate funds were not released for agricultural research institutes thus leading to low adaptability to modern farming techniques. Worse still, rural farmers lacked information on modern farming techniques, as monies meant for farmers’ enlightenment programmes were embezzled. Therefore, production of tubers, grains and livestock has either declined from 129947000 tons in 2006 (i.e. prior to implementation period) or recorded insignificant increases subsequently as against the policy goal of 100 percent increase in production. The study recommended that the government should match the Vision 20:2020 agricultural policy with commensurate funding and corrupt practices must also be checked at the level of policy implementation so as to achieve good result. The government should also advance workable strategy of attracting meaningful contribution from the private sector under the public-private partnership (PPP) framework.

Page(s): 42-64                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 21 December 2019

 Ofozoba Chinonso Anthony
Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Igbariam, Anambra State, Nigeria

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[24]. Central Bank of Nigeria (2009) “Domestic Production, Consumption and Prices,” CBN Statistical Bulletin, Vol. sec. 3, October 30.
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[58]. Adesina, A. (2011) “Nigeria’s Agriculture and Food Security in Nigeria,” Thisday, August 15

Ofozoba Chinonso Anthony, “Implementation of Vision 20:2020 Agricultural Policy and Food Production in Nigeria, 2007-2015” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.42-64 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/42-64.pdf

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Collaboration and Commercialization of University and Industry in Public Universities in South East, Nigeria

Uzonwune, Jovita Onyinye & G.G. Kpee (Ph.D.)- December 2019 Page No.: 65-71

The study investigated collaboration and commercialization of university and industry in public universities in south east, Nigeria. Two research questions and two null hypotheses guided the study. This study adopted a descriptive survey design. The population for the study is two thousand, three hundred and seventy-three (2373). This is made up of 668 administrative staff and 1705 Chief Executive Officers. The study was a descriptive survey design. The sample size was 894 (467 administrative staff and 427 CEOs). The sample was drawn through multistage sampling procedure using cluster and disproportionate stratified random sampling techniques. Collaboration and Commercialization in University-Industry Questionnaire (CCUIQ) was used for data collection. Face and content validities were ensured by experts. Internal consistency through Cronbach alpha gave reliability coefficient of 0.89 for CCUIQ. Mean, standard deviation and z-test were used for data analysis. It was found among others that the ways collaborative training programmes can contribute to funding of universities are: industrial funding of training programmes for staff of universities. Moreso, the ways commercialization of research from universities to industries contributes to university funding are through: sale of research findings; sale of intellectual property right; licensing of intellectual property (patent licensing); payment of royalties and Sell of products of technologies developed by industries. The universities should develop functional websites where they can advertise and market their research findings; intellectual property and sell of products of technologies to industries. The university should always sign a memorandum of understanding with any industry of interest on the modus operandi in order not to have a bridge of contract.

Page(s): 65-71                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 22 December 2019

 Uzonwune, Jovita Onyinye
Department of Educational Management, University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria

 G.G. Kpee (Ph.D.)
Department of Educational Management, University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria

[1]. Alison, L. (2008). Academic tenure and conservative philosophy.Higher Education Quarterly, 41 (1), 25-59.
[2]. Altbach, M. T. (1998). Managing the flow of technology. Oxford: MIT Press.
[3]. Chesbrough, H. (2003). Open Innovation: The New imperative for creating and profiting from new technology. Harvard: Harvard Business School Press.
[4]. Derek, B. (2003). Universities in the market place. New Jersey: PrincetonUniversity Press.
[5]. Hagedoorn, J., Link, A. N., &Vonortas, N.S. (2000).Research partnerships.Research Policy, 29(4-5) 567-586.
[6]. John, O. & Parson, J. (2004). University –industry partnership: Meeting the challenges of the 21st Century. Journal of Technology Transfer, 26 255-268.
[7]. Moeliodihardjo, B. Y., Soemardi, B. W., Brodjonegoro, S. S. &Hatakenaka, S. (2012). University, Industry and Government partnership: Its present and future challenges in Indonesia. Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences 52, 307-316.
[8]. Nelson, R. R. (2006). National Innovation Systems: A comparative analysis. New York: Oxford University Press.
[9]. Nwabueze, A.I. & Onyenandu, N.A. (2015).The Influence of Staff Professional Development Programmes on University Delivery System in Abia State.Journal of Education in Developing Area (JEDA). 23(1), 289-302.
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[11]. Perkmann, M., & Walsh, K. (2008).Engaging the scholar: Three types of academic consulting and their impact on Universities and industry, Research Policy, 37, 1184-1191.
[12]. Santoro, M. D. (2000). The institutionalization of knowledge transfer activities within industry-university collaborative ventures. Journal of Engineering and Technology Management, 17, 299-319.
[13]. Sugandhavanija, P., Sukchai, S., Ketjoy,N., &Klongboonjit, S. (2010). Determination of Effective University –Industry Joint Research for Photovoltaic Technology Transfer(UIJRPTT) in Thailand. Renewable Energy, 36, 600-607.
[14]. Thursby, J., Fuller, A., &Thursby, M. (2009). US faculty patenting: inside and outside the university. Research Policy, 38 (1), 14–25.
[15]. Uche, C.M. & Ahunanya, S (2011). Commercialization of universities inventions: Benefits and challenges in Southern States of Nigeria. International Journal of Education Research, International Journal of Education Research,
[16]. Worgu, O.N. (2017). Pathway to funding entrepreneurial universities in Rivers State.Unpublished Masters Dissertation, University of Port Harcourt
[17]. Yusuf, A. K. (2012). An appraisal of research in Nigeria’s university sector.JORIND, 10 (2), 321-329.

Uzonwune, Jovita Onyinye & G.G. Kpee (Ph.D.) “Collaboration and Commercialization of University and Industry in Public Universities in South East, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.65-71 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/65-71.pdf

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Influence of Product Development Strategy on Performance of Middle Level Chain Stores

Carolyn Mwongeli Kyalo, Dr. Elishiba Murigi – December 2019 Page No.: 72-74

This study sought to determine the influence of product development strategy on performance of middle level chain stores. The research did adopt a descriptive research design. The population of the study comprised of three middle level retail stores. The retail stores selected for this study include Uchumi, Tuskys and Naivas supermarkets. A questionnaire was used to collect data. The population of study was chain stores in Nairobi City County that are operational. This consisted of 65 respondents who are the employees of the chain stores. A census was conduct in the study. The primary data was collected by use of self-administered semi-structured questionnaire. Data analysis was done by use of descriptive statistics such as frequencies, percentages, mean scores and standard deviation with the aid of SPSS and presented through tables, charts, graphs, frequencies and percentages. The study established that product development strategies employed by middle level retail chain stores in Nairobi City County positively and significantly influenced their performance. It was concluded that the retail chain stores were performing except Uchumi whose financial status is still poor. Further the study concluded that the firms engaged similar strategies and shared market segments. The study recommends that the middle level retail chain stores need to improve their branding, packing and perceived new product development through rebranding to enhance their sales performance. The study recommends that the firms need to regulate their pricing strategy to avoid plunging them to negative performance. The study recommends further that the firms need to enhance employment of the promotional mix to advertise their products and improve their sales.

Page(s): 72-74                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 22 December 2019

 Carolyn Mwongeli Kyalo
Department of Business Administration, School of Business, Kenyatta University, Kenya

 Dr. Elishiba Murigi
Department of Business Administration, School of Business, Kenyatta University, Kenya

[1]. Anyika, E. N. (2010). Challenges of implementing sustainable health care delivery in Nigeria under environmental uncertainty. Journal of Hospital Administration, 3(6), 113-125.
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Carolyn Mwongeli Kyalo, Dr. Elishiba Murigi “Influence of Product Development Strategy on Performance of Middle Level Chain Stores” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.72-74 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/72-74.pdf

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Israeli Settlement Colonialism and Its Impact on the Identity of Palestinians in the Eastern Part of the City of Jerusalem

ZAHAF Djemaa, Aminurraasyid Bin Yatiban, Abd al-Fattah El-Awaisi – December 2019 Page No.: 75-79

The State of Israel is one of the settler states which seek to eliminate the indigenous population to acquire land to form a Jewish state. With its capital in the eastern part of the city of Jerusalem and to achieve the purpose trying to eliminate the identity of the city and the identity of its inhabitants. However, the eastern part of the city of Jerusalem that has 323,700 population is governed by international law, but the reality is very different. Israeli settlement colonialism carries out racist and inhumane policies towards Palestinians. This reflected negative impact on their societal security. This research examines the impact of Israeli colonial policies on the identity of Palestinians in the eastern part of the city of Jerusalem. This study uses both primary and secondary data. The primary data gathered from the in-depth interviews with the informants from the heterogeneous group. The secondary data contain books, journal articles, magazines, reports etc. This study finds that the identity crisis, the impact on the language, and the Palestinian relations are among the most important factors that suffered by Palestinians in the eastern part of the city of Jerusalem.

Page(s): 75-79                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 22 December 2019

 ZAHAF Djemaa
Institute of Excellence for Islamic Jerusalem Studies (IEIJS), University UTARA (UUM), Malaysia

 Aminurraasyid Bin Yatiban
Institute of Excellence for Islamic Jerusalem Studies (IEIJS), University UTARA (UUM), Malaysia

 Abd al-Fattah El-Awaisi
Institute of Excellence for Islamic Jerusalem Studies (IEIJS), University UTARA (UUM), Malaysia

[1]. Agbanusi, A. (2017). How colonialism underdeveloped Nigerian indigenous languages. Mgbakoigba: Journal of African Studies, 7(1), 150-155.
[2]. Shalhoub-Kevorkian, N. (2014). Human suffering in colonial contexts: reflections from Palestine. Settler Colonial Studies, 4(3), 277-290.
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[4]. Shihade, M. (2015). Global Israel: Settler Colonialism, Motility, and Rupture. borderlands, 14, 1-16.
[5]. Norton, B. (2013). Identity and language learning: Extending the conversation. Multilingual matters.
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[7]. Shihade, M. (2016). The place of Israel in Asia: settler colonialism, mobility, memory, and identity among Palestinians in Israel. Settler Colonial Studies, 6(2), 133-141.
[8]. Farinacci, E. (2017). The Israeli-Palestinian Separation Wall and the Assemblage Theory: The Case of the Weekly Rosary at the Icon of Our Lady of the Wall. Journal of Ethnology and Folkloristics, 11(1), 83-110.
[9]. Cohen, M. J. (2011). Zionism and British imperialism II: Imperial financing in Palestine. Journal of Israeli History, 30(2), 115-139.
[10]. Dawson, C. (2007). A practical guide to research methods: A users friendly manual for mastering research techniques and projects. How To Books.
[11]. Glenn, H. P. (2014). Legal traditions of the world: sustainable diversity in law. Oxford University Press (UK).
[12]. Kothari, C. R. (2004). Research methodology: Methods and techniques. New Age International.
[13]. Merriam, S. B. (2009). Qualitative case study research. Qualitative research: A guide to design and implementation, 39-54.
[14]. Qasis, A. (2014). One People United: A Deterritorialized Palestinian Identity: BADIL Survey Palestinian Youth on Identity and Social Ties-2012. BADIL Resource Center for Palestinian Residency and Refugge Rights.
[15]. Sa’di, A. H. (2002). Catastrophe, memory and identity: Al-Nakbah as a component of Palestinian identity. Israel Studies, 7(2), 175-198.
[16]. Shakib, M. K. (2011). The position of language in development of colonization. Journal of Languages and Culture, 2(7), 117-123.

ZAHAF Djemaa, Aminurraasyid Bin Yatiban, Abd al-Fattah El-Awaisi “Israeli Settlement Colonialism and Its Impact on the Identity of Palestinians in the Eastern Part of the City of Jerusalem” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.75-79 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/75-79.pdf

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Seacoast Smuggling of Rice and Economic Development in Nigeria: Assessment of 2006-2016

Abegunde, O. and Fabiyi, R. – December 2019 Page No.: 80-86

This research investigates smuggling of rice on Nigerian seacoasts and its effects on economic development. The Lagos state and Ogun State seacoasts were used as case study. The study covers the period between 2006 and 2016.This period can relatively be considered to have recorded high rate of smuggling through Nigerian seacoasts. Both primary and secondary data were used for the research and snowball sampling technique was used to collect primary data from actual smugglers, former smugglers, and traders of smuggled goods in the studied areas. Simple percentage was used in analysing data generated from the primary sources while content utilisation was used in analysing data generated through secondary sources. Smuggling of rice was confirmed to occur on high frequency on Nigerian seacoasts between 2006 and 2016. Smuggling of items on Nigerian seacoasts increased between 2006 and 2016 due to high unemployment rate, endemic poverty in the country, individual financial greed, general economic hardship, harsh and detrimental government policies, and love for foreign goods. Seacoast smuggling in Nigeria from 2006 to 2016 negatively affects economic development through economic sabotage of local industries, threat to food security, revenue loss for the government, and health hazard to the residents. Efforts to curb smuggling especially rice on Nigerian seacoasts between 2006 and 2016 were largely ineffective. New measures and improvements on existing measures were recommended to curb smuggling of rice and other smuggled items on Nigerian seacoasts were reduction of port duties, creation of a new anti-smuggling security agency or department from the existing relevant agencies, financial motivation for anti-smuggling security agents, equipping security agents with modern equipment, creation of gainful employment for the youth, establishment youth-targeted economic empowerment programmes, training and retraining of anti-smuggling security agents, conscious fostering of international cooperation. Smuggling can be reduced to a manageable level if the government demonstrate the will and make its policies and programmes citizens oriented.

Page(s): 80-86                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 22 December 2019

 Abegunde, O.
Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria

 Fabiyi, R.
Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria

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Abegunde, O. and Fabiyi, R. “Seacoast Smuggling of Rice and Economic Development in Nigeria: Assessment of 2006-2016” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.80-86 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/80-86.pdf

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Ethnic Prejudice and the Challenges of Nation Building in Contemporary Nigeria

Mustapha Salihu, Yahaya Yakubu – December 2019 Page No.: 87-90

Multi ethnic societies such as Nigeria have spent a better part of their existence trying to integrate various groups in a bid to foster the actualization of a supra-national identity. The inability of the state to manage diversity in amongst other factors, upholds the prevailing prejudice and antagonism that characterizes ethnic-groups interaction. Too often ethnic-based agitations have averted meaningful efforts at national integration thereby fostering favoritism, exclusion and discrimination to mention but a few. Hence, prevailing policies and institutions aimed fostering national integration should be reviewed in lieu of their inability to attain predetermined results.

Page(s): 87-90                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 24 December 2019

 Mustapha Salihu
Ph.D. Candidate, Peace, Conflict & Strategic Studies, Nile University of Nigeria

 Yahaya Yakubu
Political Science & International Relations, Nile University of Nigeria

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[11]. Ibid.
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Mustapha Salihu, Yahaya Yakubu “Ethnic Prejudice and the Challenges of Nation Building in Contemporary Nigeria ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.87-90 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/87-90.pdf

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Non-Academic Determinants Influencing Academic Performance: A Study of Services and Facilities at the University of Dhaka

Pronita Dutta – December 2019 Page No.: 91-96

Universities are the bedrock for higher learning, creative thinking and innovation. Universities need to offer the desired infrastructure to create an enabling environment for learning, teaching and research to reach global standards in education. In Bangladesh, only a few studies have explored education quality of universities and most of these are on private ones and no study has been undertaken to assess basic infrastructural conditions in public universities, especially the Dhaka University. This paper intends to fill the gap by inquiring into the extent Dhaka University has made its physical infrastructure convenient for students and researchers and what resources are available for their learning.

Page(s): 91-96                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 24 December 2019

 Pronita Dutta
Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University, Gopalganj, Bangladesh

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Pronita Dutta “Non-Academic Determinants Influencing Academic Performance: A Study of Services and Facilities at the University of Dhaka” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.91-96 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/91-96.pdf

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Institutional Quality and Economic Welfare Nexus: Evidence from Panel ARDL Models

Christopher Eho Olong, Dobdinga Cletus Fonchamyo, Molem C. Sama – December 2019 Page No.: 97-111

The development agenda for many African countries in the last few decades has been geared towards improving their quality of institutions and economic transformation through human development. This paper investigates the relationship between formal and informal institutional quality on human development using the Auto Regression Distribution Lag (ARDL) models. The paper makes use of secondary data collected from, Heritage Foundation, World Development Indicators, United Nations Development Program and Transparency International, from 2001 to 2018. The study reveals a long-run robust inverse relationship between institutional quality and human development with an adjustment speed of 10% for any deviation from equilibrium. The formal institutional quality (economic freedom) has a direct and significant relationship with economic welfare while informal institutional quality (corruption) has a significant inverse relationship with economic welfare. To mitigate the effect of institutional quality on human development, it is recommended that governments in African should enact laws to effectively fight corruption but should also allow some level of corruption to exist since this significantly increases entrepreneurial activity in the short-run.

Page(s): 97-111                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 24 December 2019

 Christopher Eho Olong
Ph.D Student in Economics, University of Buea, Cameroon

 Dobdinga Cletus Fonchamyo
Associate Professor of Economics, Vice Dean Faculty of Economic and Management, University of Bamenda, Cameroon

 Molem C. Sama
Professor of Economics, Vice Dean Faculty of Social and Management Sciences, University of Buea, Cameroon

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Christopher Eho Olong, Dobdinga Cletus Fonchamyo, Molem C. Sama “Institutional Quality and Economic Welfare Nexus: Evidence from Panel ARDL Models” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.97-111 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/97-111.pdf

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Female Students’ Perceptions on Physical Education and Sport Curriculum: A Case of Two Higher Learning Institutions in Masvingo, Zimbabwe

Jenet Mudekunye, Tafara Mufanechiya, Albert Mufanechiya- December 2019 Page No.: 112-119

The aim of this study was to establish the influence of female students’ perceptions on their participation in Physical Education and Sport (PES) in higher learning institutions of Masvingo, Zimbabwe. The study employed a qualitative case study. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions were used as data collection instruments. Data were presented in narrative form and analyses were done in line with the aim of the study. The sample comprised twenty female students who were purposively sampled from two institutions of higher learning. The study disclosed that the participation of female students in PES, in institutions of higher learning was, to a larger extent, influenced by stereotypical perceptions based on socialisation backgrounds, cultural norms and beliefs based on the idea that PES is for males, not females. The study also found that perceptions about injuries, muscularity and keeping up appearances in preparation for marriage contributed to the negative perceptions about PES participation amongst female students. The study, further revealed that some female students, though a minority group, had positive perceptions on their participation in PES and believed that PES participation empowered them, improved their self-esteem and helped them to live health lifestyles. The study recommended the need for government gender policies, conventions and declarations to focus on PES programs that might help change the perceptions of female students towards the development of their athletic potential. The study also suggested that institutions of higher learning introduce sensitisation programs where parents are involved as a way of transforming those perceptions that hinder the participation of female students in PES.

Page(s): 112-119                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 26 December 2019

  Jenet Mudekunye
Robert Mugabe School of Education, Great Zimbabwe University, P.O. Box 1235, Masvingo, Zimbabwe

  Tafara Mufanechiya
Robert Mugabe School of Education, Great Zimbabwe University, P.O. Box 1235, Masvingo, Zimbabwe

 Albert Mufanechiya
Robert Mugabe School of Education, Great Zimbabwe University, P.O. Box 1235, Masvingo, Zimbabwe

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[23]. Yin, R.K. (2011). Qualitative research from start to finish. New York: Guilford Press.

Jenet Mudekunye, Tafara Mufanechiya, Albert Mufanechiya, “Female Students’ Perceptions on Physical Education and Sport Curriculum: A Case of Two Higher Learning Institutions in Masvingo, Zimbabwe” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.112-119 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/112-119.pdf

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Quality Education Management Scholarship Based: Study Case Study of Model Smart Exelensia Indonesia

Abu Yazid Bastomi, Syaiful Bakhri, Rusmin Tumanggor – December 2019 Page No.: 120-127

To help the lives of poor people become better by educating their children who have academic achievements, attending quality education by providing scholarships to them, scholarships are given by following the selection conducted by Mitra Dompet Dhuafa in every province in Indonesia.
This quality education funding is fully funded by Dompet Dhuafa, covering the cost of education, accommodation, consumption, health while attending education organized by SMART Ekselensia Indonesia.
The study was conducted descriptive descriptive method, by going to the place of education to conduct interviews with the principal, the teachers and the students’ children, besides conducting a questionnaire. As well as observing students, what facilities are owned by the educational institution.
From the results of the research conducted there is a difference in the recruitment of students conducted by Smart Ekselensia Indonesian educational institutions, namely they recruit students through Dompet Dhuafa partners throughout Indonesia with full conditions and certain provisions come from underprivileged children and have academic achievements.

Page(s): 120-127                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 26 December 2019

 Abu Yazid Bastomi
University of Muhammadiyah Jakarta, Indonesia

 Syaiful Bakhri
University of Muhammadiyah Jakarta, Indonesia

 Rusmin Tumanggor
University of Muhammadiyah Jakarta, Indonesia

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Abu Yazid Bastomi, Syaiful Bakhri, Rusmin Tumanggor “Quality Education Management Scholarship Based: Study Case Study of Model Smart Exelensia Indonesia” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.120-127 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/120-127.pdf

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Rheumatoid Arthrtis Education for Improving the Quality of Life Along with Multi Treatment Approaches

Farzana Ashfaq , Sagar Pinjani, Bushra Khan, Zubia Saleem, Bushra Ejaz – December 2019 Page No.: 128-133

Background:
Rheumatoid arthritis is a progressive condition which can affect to person’s daily routine activities due to painful movements. There is a need to work on guiding the clients related to energy conservation, life style modification along with stress management techniques. Patient’s education is one of the important domain to improve the quality of life but in Pakistan there is not enough work has been done on RA education .So for the first time this study was conducted in Pakistan to work on all required domains and education guidelines of rheumatoid arthritis.
Objective:
To improve the quality of life by using multi approaches as providing RA education to guide proper use of energy conservation and life style modification techniques as preventions of deformities, and overcome the patient’s stress by using mindfulness meditation , as an initiative step in Pakistan.
Method
50 patients were enrolled with diagnosis of RA(Rheumatoid arthritis ) .Assessment was done with FIM scoring to find out the functional limitations ,PSOM to find out the level of stress due to progressive condition , PAIN INVENTORY to observe pain nature and how it burdened to home activities . Patient’s training was started with counseling and pain management in initial three sessions, 14 total sessions were conducted including energy conservation guideline, education for proper use of joints and safety precautions, relaxationexercises guided as home program, provision of adaptive devices for kitchen activities, eating and bathing purpose to prevent further deformities and same number of meditation sessions were provided side by side with relaxation massage and exercises.
After completion of 24 sessions re assessment was done with the same FIM scoring, Pain inventory and PSOMscale.
Results
Results showed the marked difference in pre and post scoring of FIM , pain inventory and PSOM scale.
Conclusion
Patient’s insight and education is very important especially in progressive conditions by guiding energy conservation techniques and life style modification to lessen the chance of deformities and it is also important part to work on to overcome stress to provide quality life in physical and psychosocial both areas .

Page(s): 128-133                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 26 December 2019

 Farzana Ashfaq
Institute of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Dow University of Health Sciences, Pakistan

 Sagar Pinjani
Institute of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Dow University of Health Sciences, Pakistan

 Bushra Khan
Institute of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Dow University of Health Sciences, Pakistan

 Zubia Saleem
Institute of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Dow University of Health Sciences, Pakistan

 Bushra Ejaz
Institute of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Dow University of Health Sciences, Pakistan

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Farzana Ashfaq, Sagar Pinjani, Bushra Khan, Zubia Saleem, Bushra Ejaz “Rheumatoid Arthrtis Education for Improving the Quality of Life Along with Multi Treatment Approaches” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.128-133 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/128-133.pdf

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The Impact of Translation Technologies on the Translation Process to Give a Quality Output: A Study with Special Reference the Government Translators in Sri Lanka

D.G.S.P.K. Yapa, W.M. Ariyaratne- December 2019 Page No.: 134-150

This article discusses about translation technologies such as CAT tools, machine translation, machine aided translation, terminology management systems and termbases and how these translation technologies affect the quality of the final translation output of the translators in the government sector in Sri Lanka and the problems confronted by them in dealing with technology. The usage of translation technologies have been analyzed using previous literature. The study applies the qualitative approach to collect data. The survey covered fourteen translators in the government sector and gathered data using a semi-structured questionnaire. The data was analyzed using graphs, charts, minitab software and excel sheets to determine the relationship between translation technology and government translators. The results show that the CAT tools, machine aided translation, terminology management systems and termbases have a positive impact for the quality while machine translation negatively affect for the quality of final output of the translators. This study highlights the recent studies conducted in the field to enhance the productivity of government translators to achieve the trilingual policy of the Government.

Page(s): 134-150                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 December 2019

 D.G.S.P.K. Yapa
Department of Languages, The Sabaragamuwa University of Sri Lanka

 W.M. Ariyaratne
Department of Languages, The Sabaragamuwa University of Sri Lanka

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D.G.S.P.K. Yapa, W.M. Ariyaratne, “The Impact of Translation Technologies on the Translation Process to Give a Quality Output: A Study with Special Reference the Government Translators in Sri Lanka” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.134-150 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/134-150.pdf

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Forms of Local Culture in Indonesian Language Teaching Books for Foreign Speakers (BIPA)

Gustia Haryati, Andayani, Atikah Anindyarini – December 2019 Page No.: 151-155

The Indonesian language is experiencing very rapid development, not only in Indonesia but also abroad. This is evidenced by a large number of foreign speakers who are interested in learning Indonesian, or what is known as BIPA, namely Indonesian for Foreign Speakers. One of the interests of foreign students coming to Indonesia is because Indonesia has a diversity of cultures. Culture is the most important factor that must be taught to foreign students. This study aims to explain and illustrate the manifestation of local culture in BIPA textbooks that are focused on textbooks namely the Indonesian Sahabatku and Keren textbooks. The form of research used is content analysis with a qualitative approach by recording symbols or messages systematically and interpretatively, the source of the data is the BIPA textbook. Data was collected using observations and in-depth interviews with several BIPA experts to support data analysis. The results of this study found that the form of local culture is an important aspect for students in the success of BIPA learning. The material presented about culture can increase students’ motivation and goals in learning BIPA because learning the language of the nation is the same as learning culture in the global era.

Page(s): 151-155                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 December 2019

 Gustia Haryati
Universitas Sebelas Maret, Surakarta, Indonesia

 Andayani
Universitas Sebelas Maret, Surakarta, Indonesia

 Atikah Anindyarini
Universitas Sebelas Maret, Surakarta, Indonesia

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[16]. D. Tjaturrini, “Pengaruh Budaya Dalam Pembelajaran Bahasa (Asing),” Proceedings, Int. Semin. Lang. Maint. Shift Iv Ed. Balai Bhs. Provinsi Jawa Teng., Vol. 18 Novembe, 2014.
[17]. Ulumuddin Arisul Dan Wismanto Agus, “Bahan Ajar Bahasa Indonesia Ranah Sosial Budaya Bagi Penutur Asing (Bipa),” J. Sasindo, Vol. 2, No. 1, Pp. 15–35, 2014.
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Gustia Haryati, Andayani, Atikah Anindyarini “Forms of Local Culture in Indonesian Language Teaching Books for Foreign Speakers (BIPA)” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.151-155 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/151-155.pdf

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Comparing Sensory Processing Abilities of age-Matched Atypical and Typical School Going Children in Pakistan

Jawaria. S, Rizwana.W, Imran.A, Nighat. T- December 2019 Page No.: 156-160

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in sensory processing abilities among age-matched children between ages 3 to 9 years with atypical children i.e. Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) & Cerebral palsy (CP), and those who are typically developing i.e. School going children in Pakistan.
METHOD: Reported sensory processing abilities of 150 children with ASD and CP were compared to age-matched peers who were typically developing, using the Short Sensory Profile (SSP). Data was collected through the survey. Forms were distributed and then recollected from different mainstream schools to collect the data of typical children and special schools and institutions in Karachi for data collection of atypical children.
RESULTS: Data gave the clear evidence that there are more sensory issues in children with disabilities as compared to typical developing children.
CONCLUSION: The findings of the study confirm the prevalence and types of sensory processing impairments in atypical children. Further research is needed to more clearly define patterns of sensory processing problems in children with ASD and CP as well as school going children.

Page(s): 156-160                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 December 2019

 Jawaria. S
Institute of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan

 Rizwana.W
Institute of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan

 Imran.A
Institute of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan

 Nighat. T
Institute of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan

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[9]. Grace T. Baranek, Fabian J. David, Michele D. Poe, Wendy L. Stone, Linda R. Watson (2006). Sensory Experiences Questionnaire: discriminating sensory features in young children with autism, developmental delays, and typical development. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry; 47(6): 591–601.
[10]. Sanger T. D, Kukke S. N (2007). Abnormalities of tactile sensory function in children with dystonic and diplegic cerebral palsy. J Child Neurology; 22 (3):289–93.
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[15]. InmaculadaRiquelme, Pedro Montoya (2010). Developmental changes in somatosensory processing in cerebral palsy and healthy individuals. Clinical Neurophysiology; 121(8): 1314–20.
[16]. Chow, S. M. K (2005). The suitability of the Sensory Profile for diagnosing sensory modulation dysfunctions in Chinese children. International Journal of Rehabilitation Research. 28(2), 153-158.
[17]. Newman, A., Greenberg, D. F., Labovitz, D. R., & Suzuki, L. A. (2004). Cross-cultural adaptation of the Sensory Profile: establishing linguistic equivalency of the Hebrew version. Occupational Therapy International, 11(2), 112-130
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[23]. Justin O’Brien, Stella Tsermentseli, Omar Cummins, Francesca Happé, Pamela Heaton & Janine Spencer (2009). Discriminating children with autism from children with learning difficulties with an adaptation of the Short Sensory Profile. Early Child Development and Care; 179(4): 383–394.
[24]. Scott D. Tomchek, Winnie Dunn (2007). Sensory processing in children with and without autism: A comparative study using the Short Sensory Profile. American Journal of Occupational Therapy; 61(2): 190 – 200.

Jawaria. S, Rizwana.W, Imran.A, Nighat. T “Comparing Sensory Processing Abilities of age-Matched Atypical and Typical School Going Children in Pakistan” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.156-160 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/156-160.pdf

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Influence of Drug Abuse on Students Academic Performance in Selected Senior Secondary Schools in Sokoto South Local Government, Sokoto State

Bashar Ibrahim, Fauziya Isiya Bakori, Ibrahim Labbo Abdul-Kadir, Abubakar Junaidu Jabo – December 2019 Page No.: 161-167

This study seeks to examine the influence of drug Abuse on students’ academic performance in senior secondary schools in Sokoto south local government. Specifically, the study sought to establish the effects of the drugs as a contributing factor to poor performance by students in Sokoto south, secondary schools. Substance use among senior secondary school students predicts substance related problems in later life. The target population was 5259 respondents consisting of 10 secondary schools. The sample size was 391 respondents, made up of 3 secondary schools. The data was collected by use of questionnaires. Data analysis was done using descriptive statistics after data cleaning and coding. Quantitative data was analyzed using frequency and percentages. Results of data analysis were presented using frequency distribution tables. The study established that more students were able to access drugs and more are at risk of being influenced to start using drugs. The study therefore recommends for stricter measures on addressing the supply and use of drugs, and also to provide more funds to fight and assist students who are addicts and increase the number of students who graduate as well as increase quality of education. The findings of this study should stimulate continuous debate on drug abuse in secondary schools and also provide valuable insights that the government, stakeholders, scholars and researchers can rely on their collective endeavor of addressing the challenges and making the fight against drug abuse initiative a success. The study findings hoped to provides a guidance upon which recommendations are made. It is expected that this study will lead to a better understanding to the major contributors to student’s academic performance. A Drug is any product other than food or water that affects the way people feel, think, see, and behave. It is a substance that due to its chemical nature affects physical, mental and emotional functioning. It can enter the body through chewing, inhaling, smoking, drinking Or rubbing on their skin.

Page(s): 161-167                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 December 2019

 Bashar Ibrahim
Department of Adult and Non-Formal Education, Shehu Shagari College of Education Sokoto, Nigeria

 Fauziya Isiya Bakori
Department of Adult and Non-Formal Education, Shehu Shagari College of Education Sokoto, Nigeria

 Ibrahim Labbo Abdul-Kadir
Ministry of Science and Technology Sokoto, Nigeria

 Abubakar Junaidu Jabo
Department of Social Science, Shehu Shagari College of Education Sokoto, Nigeria

[1]. Adewuya, A. 2005. Validation of the alcohol use disorders identification test (AUDIT) as a screening tool for alcohol-related problems among Nigerian university students. Alcohol & Alcoholism, 40(6): 575-577.
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[8]. Dee, T.S. and Evans, W.N. (2003) Teen drinking and educational attainment. Evidence from two-sample instrumental variables estimates, Journal of Labor 21(1), 178-209.
[9]. Duarte, R., Escario J.J. and Molina, J.A. (2006) Marijuana consumption and school failure among Spanish students, Economics of Education Review,25, 472-481
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[13]. Oshodi, O.Y., Aina, O.F. &Onajole, A.T. 2010. Substance use among secondary school students in an urban setting in Nigeria: prevalence and associated factors. African Journal of Psychiatry, 1(3):52-57.
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[15]. World Health Organization Report 2009. Management of substance abuse: Alcohol Geneva 2009 [http://www.who.org]. Retrieved, December 15, 2011.

Bashar Ibrahim, Fauziya Isiya Bakori, Ibrahim Labbo Abdul-Kadir, Abubakar Junaidu Jabo “Influence of Drug Abuse on Students Academic Performance in Selected Senior Secondary Schools in Sokoto South Local Government, Sokoto State” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.161-167 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/161-167.pdf

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Humanization Dimension in Kembara Rindu Novel by Habiburrahman El Shirazy

Fatmawati, Andayani, Raheni Suhita – December 2019 Page No.: 168-174

Dehumanization was allegedly being symptomatic in the midst of social life. This study aims to describe humanize the dimensions contained in the Kembara Rindu novel by Habiburrahman El Shirazy. This research utilizes Kuntowijaya’s perspective of prophetic literature by using a hermeneutic approach. This research method is a qualitative method using content analysis techniques. The data source is the Kembara Rindu novel. The description of the research results, namely, the dimension of humanization in the Kembara Rindu novel consists of four aspects, namely: 1) caring; 2) honesty; 3) tolerance; and 4) maintaining brotherhood. Care is meant manifested in a sensitive attitude to the condition of others, give respect to others by apologizing, giving advice and advice to others, even to people who were not known before, helping to solve the problems of others. Honesty can be seen from the attitude of Syifa who return goods that have been found by others. Tolerance manifests in the attitude of respecting the decisions of others. Maintain brotherhood by establishing a friendship.

Page(s): 168-174                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 December 2019

 Fatmawati
Indonesian Education, Sebelas Maret University, Indonesia

 Andayani
Indonesian Education, Sebelas Maret University, Indonesia

 Raheni Suhita
Indonesian Education, Sebelas Maret University, Indonesia

[1] Kuntowijaya, Maklumat Sastra Profetik. Yogyakarta: Grafindo Litera Media, 2006.
[2] Kuntowijaya, Muslim tanpa Masjid: Esai-Esai Agama, Budaya dan Politik dalam Bingkai Transendental. Yogyakarta: Mizan, 2001.
[3] Ali Syari’ati, Kritik Islam atas Marxisme dan Sesat Pikir-Barat Lainnya. Bandung: Mizan, 1983.
[4] Asep Rifki Abdul Aziz, “Konsep Hominisasi dan Humanisasi Menurut Driyarkara,” p. 129, 2016.
[5] S. Yulisetiani, “Dimensi profetik dalam cerpen-cerpen yanusa nugroho sebagai penguat jati diri generasi bangsa,” Konf. Nas. Bhs. dan Sastra III, pp. 299–304, 2016.
[6] M. Roqib, Prophetic Education: Kontekstualisasi Filsafat dan Budaya Profetik dalam Pendidikan. Purwokerto: STAIN Press, 2011.
[7] Anwar Efendi, “Realitas profetik dalam novel,” Litera, vol. 11, no. 1, 2012.
[8] D. Sulaksono, B. Waluyo, and D. P. Said, “Prophetic Values In Post-Reform Modern JavaneseNovels,” el Harakah, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 81–98, 2018.
[9] D. Indianto, “Visi profetik Puisi Yang Karya Abdul Wachid B.S.,” Ibda, vol. 11, no. 2, pp. 158–172, 2013.
[10] A. Efendi, “Pembelajaran Sastra Profetik sebagai Media Pengembangan Karakter Siswa,” Cakrawala Pendidik., pp. 39–51, 2011.
[11] Kuntowijaya, Paradigma Islam: Interpretasi untuk Akso. Bandung: Mizan, 1991.
[12] Newton, Menafsirkan Teks. Semarang: IKIP Semarang Press, 1994.
[13] L. J. Moleong, Metode Penelitian Kualitatif, Revisi. Bandung: PT. Remaja Rosdakarya, 2016.
[14] Bungin Burhan, Metode Penelitian Kualitatif. Depok: Rahagrafindo Pustaka, 2015.
[15] dkk Hanafi, Islam dan Humanisme: Aktualisasi Humanisme Islam di Tengah Krisis Humanisme Universal. Yogyakarta: Pustaka Pelajar, 2007.
[16] Masbur, “Integrasi Unsur Humanisasi, Liberasi dan Transendensi dalam Pendidikan Agama Islam,” Edukasi, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 44–59, 2016.
[17] A Tabi’in, “Menumbuhkan Sikap Peduli pada Anak Melalui Interaksi Kegiatan Sosial,” Ijtimaiya, vol. 1, no. 1, 2017.
[18] Markas, “Urgensi Sifat Jujur dalam Berbisnis,” Pilar, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 163–180, 2014.
[19] Messi dan Harapan, “Menanamkan Nilai-Nilai Kejujuran di Dalam Kegiatan Madrasah Bersama (Boarding School),” JMKSP, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 278–290, 2017.
[20] B. Andayani, “Pentingnya Budaya Menghargai,” Bul. Psikol., no. 1, pp. 1–8, 2002.
[21] H. Panjaitan, “Pentingnya Menghargai Orang Lain,” Humaniora, vol. 5, no. 45, pp. 88–96, 2014.
[22] Najamudin, “Integrasi Unsur Humanisasi, Transendensi dalam Pendidikan Agama Islam,” JIPSA, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 60–69, 2017.

Fatmawati, Andayani, Raheni Suhita “Humanization Dimension in Kembara Rindu Novel by Habiburrahman El Shirazy” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.168-174 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/168-174.pdf

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Influence of Market Penetration Strategy on the Performance of Telkom Kenya Limited in Nairobi City County

Jackson Luvusi, Dr. Murigi Elishiba Muthoni – December 2019 Page No.: 175-178

The environmental conditions of many companies have changed rapidly. This resulted to serious competition among telecommunication companies in Kenya, which caused Telkom Kenya Limited to seek for effective marketing expansion strategies that could differentiate itself from others in order to enhance its performance. Therefore, this study aimed at investigating the influence of market penetration strategy on the performance of Telkom Kenya Limited in Nairobi City County. The study adopted a descriptive research design. The selected target population was Telkom Kenya Limited in Nairobi Region. The total population was 75 respondents comprising of 5 marketing managers and 70 support staff. This study carried out a census of 75 respondents. Primary data was collected using questionnaires comprising of both structured and unstructured questions. Questionnaires were piloted to 10 respondents who were not included in the final study to assess the validity and reliability of the instruments. Validity was assessed using content validity and reliability was tested using Cronbach Alpha test. Quantitative data was analyzed using descriptive statistics such as mean and standard deviation and presented using tables, figures and charts. Inferential statistics were analysed using correlation analysis and multiple regression analysis. The study examined that market penetration strategy had a significant influence on the performance of Telkom Kenya Limited. The study concluded that Telkom Kenya takes advantage of low prices to increase product demand and increase market share through market penetration strategy. The study recommended that for effective implementation of market penetration strategy, Telkom Kenya should keep on adjusting the price to increase sales as lowering prices is an effective tactic to attract potential customers.

Page(s): 175-178                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 December 2019

 Jackson Luvusi
Department of Business Management, School of Business, Kenyatta University, Kenya

 Dr. Murigi Elishiba Muthoni
Department of Business Management, School of Business, Kenyatta University, Kenya

[1]. Ambler, T., Kokkinaki, F., & Puntoni, S. (2014). Assessing marketing performance: Reasons for metrics selection. Journal of Marketing Management, (20), 475 – 498
[2]. Bennett, W., Lance, C., & Woehr, D. (2014). Performance measurement: Current perspectives and future challenges. Oxford: Psychology Press
[3]. Bolivar-Ramos, M., Garcia-Morales, V. & Garcia-Sanchez, E. (2012). Technological distinctive competencies and organizational learning: Effects on organizational innovation to improve firm performance. Journal of Engineering and Technology Management, 29(3), 331 – 357
[4]. Burke, W. W., & Litwin, G. H. (2012). A causal model of organizational performance and change. Journal of management, 18(3), 523-545
[5]. Chandola, V. K., & Fu, H. (2017). Market Penetration Strategy of Smartphone Companies from China for India Market: A Multiple-case study. International Journal of Business Marketing and Management (IJBMM), 2(4), 10 -16
[6]. Danneels, E. (2013). The Dynamics of Product Innovation and Firm Competences. Strategic Management Journal, 23(12), 1095-1121
[7]. Gado, N. D. (2013). Strategic choices and performance: Evidence from an ailing industry in Nigeria. Global advanced research journal of management and business studies, 3(4), 215 – 228
[8]. Hassan, M. U., Qureshi, S. U., Sharif, S., & Mukhtar, A. (2013). Impact of marketing strategy creativity on organizational performance via marketing strategy implementation effectiveness: empirical evidence from Pakistani organizations. Middle-East. Journal of Scientific Research, 16(2), 264-273
[9]. Khang, T. Arumugam, V. Chong, A., & Chan, F. (2010). Relationship between supply chain management practices and organisation performance: a case study in the Malaysian service industry. International Journal Modelling in Operations Management, 1(1), 84 -106
[10]. Kotler, P., & Keller, K. L. (2012). Marketing Management. Dictionary of Marketing Communications. https://doi.org/10.4135/9781452229669.n2040
[11]. Letangule, S. L., Letting, D., & Nicholas, K. (2012). Effect of innovation strategies on performance of firms in the telecommunication sector in Kenya. International Journal of Management & Business Studies, 2(3), 75-78
[12]. Levay, P. Z., Drossinos, Y., & Thiel, C. (2017). The effect of fiscal incentives on market penetration of electric vehicles: A pairwise comparison of total cost of ownership. Energy Policy, 105, 524-533
[13]. Mutuma, P. (2013). An Investigation of the Effects of Expansion Strategies on Performance of Commercial Banks in Kenya (Doctoral dissertation, Kenyatta University)
[14]. Mwiti, L. K. (2011). Market penetration strategies used by Essar telecom Kenya (yu) (Doctoral dissertation, University of Nairobi).
[15]. Njomo, G., & Margaret, O. (2016). Market Penetration Strategies and Organizational Growth: A Case of Soft Drink. International Journal of Management and Commerce Innovations, 3(2), 219-227
[16]. Parmenter, D. (2015). Key performance indicators: developing, implementing, and using winning KPIs. John Wiley & Sons
[17]. Slater, S. F., & Narver, J. C. (2016). Competitive strategy in the market-focused business. Journal of market-focused management, 1(2), 159-174
[18]. Tangus, D., & Omar, N. (2017). Effects of Market Expansion Strategies on Performance of Commercial Banks in Mombasa County. International Journal of Economics, Business and Management Research, 1(2), 39-50
[19]. Wainaina, G., & Oloko, M. (2016). Market Penetration Strategies and Organization Growth: A Case of Soft Drink Sector in Kenya. International Journal of Management and Commerce Innovations, 3(2), 219 – 227

Jackson Luvusi, Dr. Murigi Elishiba Muthoni “Influence of Market Penetration Strategy on the Performance of Telkom Kenya Limited in Nairobi City County” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.175-178 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/175-178.pdf

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The Scientific facts in the holy Qur’an (With Particular Reference to Astronomy and Embryology)

Tijani Ahmad Ashimi – December 2019 Page No.: 179-184

The holy Qur’an, the main source of Islamic faith is a book believed by Muslims to be of completely divine origin. Muslims believe the Quran to be the book of divine guidance revealed from God to Muhammad through the angel Gabriel over a period of twenty-three years and view the Quran as God’s final revelation to humanity. As such, Quran has solutions to all the problems of humanity irrespective of how complex they may be and in what age they occur. It deals with all human life from cradle to death. While some worldview highly depend on human experience to have solution for scientific knowledge, and while some religious tradition only rely on scientific method (observation, experiment, skepticism, hypothesis and theory)to obtain the knowledge of natural phenomenon, the scripture of Islam (Qur’an) which is also a book of knowledge and science seems to have already proven these scientific fact for long centuries. Thus, this humble paper by adopting textual approach will examine the scientific knowledge vis-à-vis in the Qur’an, with particular reference to Embryology and astronomy.

Page(s): 179-184                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 01 January 2020

 Tijani Ahmad Ashimi
Assistant Professor, Dr., Department of General Studies, Kulliyyah of Islamic Revealed Knowledge and Human Sciences, International Islamic University Malaysia (IIUM), Malaysia

[1] Al- Qurtubi, Jami al Bayan, Shariah Academy Publication, International Islamic University, Islamabad.
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[6] Joseph Needham, (1959) A History of Embryology. Cambridge University Press.
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[8] Moor Keith , (1986) A Scientist’s Interpretation of References to Embryology in the Quran. Journal of the Islamic Medical Association, vol.18, Page 15-16
[9] Moore, Keith L. and al-Zindani, Abdul-Majeed A., (1982) The Developing Human with Islamic Additions, Third Edition, W.B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia.
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[16] Zindani Abdul-Majeed ; and Mustafa A Ahmed (1987), Collection of papers that were originally presented in the First International Conference on Scientific Signs of the Qur’an and Sunnah, held in Islamabad, Pakistan.

Tijani Ahmad Ashimi “The Scientific facts in the holy Qur’an (With Particular Reference to Astronomy and Embryology)” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.179-184 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/179-184.pdf

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From Cambridge Analytica to ‘O To Ge’ (Enough is Enough): The Dynamics of Political Canvassing and Elections in a Social Media Environment

Prof. Dr. Kemal Ozden, Abubakar Rakiya Tanko – December 2019 Page No.: 185-193

This study examined the socio-political dynamics surrounding the use of digital and social media platforms in political canvassing. Specifically, the research explored the platforms’ prospects for promotion of dialogue between elected officials and the population; as well as mass voter engagement. The prospects were however observed to be marred by challenges such as the implication on political reality arising out of the spread of fake news in social media; as well as the nuances of government regulation and oversight of social media platforms and its effects on privacy and civil liberties. These nuances were deconstructed using case studies of President Obama’s use of digital platforms to bypass traditional media and engage directly with youths during the 2008 American presidential elections; Russia’s influence operations via deployment of fake social media accounts to affect the outcome of the 2016 American presidential elections; and the datamining efforts of Cambridge Analytica, the British political consulting company, in gauging perceptions towards generation of targeted messaging to affect the outcome of the same election. Other case studies explored included President Trump’s use of Tweeter to shape the political narrative in his own image as well as the ‘O to Ge’ (Enough is Enough) movement in Kwara State, Nigeria – amplified to epic proportions via social media – reflected a political earthquake of seismic proportions in demystifying the Saraki political dynasty. It was concluded that while social media holds out promises of greater political engagement, it nevertheless holds greater danger to aspects of civil liberties and political reality arising from the medium’s sheer ubiquity.

Page(s): 185-193                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 01 January 2020

 Prof. Dr. Kemal Ozden
Department of Political Science and International Relations, Nile University of Nigeria

 Abubakar Rakiya Tanko
Department of Political Science and International Relations, Nile University of Nigeria

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Prof. Dr. Kemal Ozden, Abubakar Rakiya Tanko “From Cambridge Analytica to ‘O To Ge’ (Enough is Enough): The Dynamics of Political Canvassing and Elections in a Social Media Environment” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.185-193 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/185-193.pdf

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Symbolic Representation and Conflict Management in Africa

Elias Nankap Lamle, Felix Ogbewe Aigbovbioisa – December 2019 Page No.: 194-204

Symbols have enabled a smooth flow of communication in precolonial Africa. It was the major means for which history was stored. Creative artistry works were used by the Africans to communicate their values and educate their people. Symbols were not just a mere aspect of African culture but the major means for which order was reached and formed the bases for enforcement where the need arose. Therefore, this work provides an explanation on symbolic representation and how it was used in time past and still being used by the indigenous Africans to manage conflict and for consensus building within the society. To this end, qualitative method was used to generate data where related literatures were reviewed to elucidate facts with conclusion and recommendations made for the benefit for further researches.

Page(s): 194-204                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 01 January 2020

 Elias Nankap Lamle
Centre for Conflict Management and Peace Studies, University of Jos, Jos, Nigeria

 Felix Ogbewe Aigbovbioisa
Peace and Development Studies Programme, Salem University, Lokoja, Nigeria

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Elias Nankap Lamle, Felix Ogbewe Aigbovbioisa “Symbolic Representation and Conflict Management in Africa” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.194-204 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/194-204.pdf

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The Use of Block Plays in Enhancing the Acquisition of Mathematical Concepts and Skills in Early Childhood Education: A Study of ECD Centres in Eldoret West Sub-County, Kenya

Busienei Rose Chepketer – December 2019 Page No.: 205-210

Children have a right to receive education, and Early Childhood Education (ECDE) should be considered part of this right. An interesting challenge in the field of early education is the use of block plays in teaching and learning of children to promote thinking and learning in many areas including mathematics. Block play activities have been identified as to have a significant impact on the acquisition of mathematical concepts and skills in Early Childhood Education. The main purpose of this study was to assess the use of Block play in enhancing the acquisition of Mathematical concepts and skills in ECDE pupils in Eldoret West Sub-county, Kenya. This study was guided by Jean Piaget’s theory of cognitive development in children. The study adopted the descriptive survey research design. The target population was 181 public ECDE centres with 181 ECDE mathematics teachers and 3620 ECDE pupils. Simple random sampling technique was used to select 54 public ECDE centres and 362 pupils respectively. Purposive sampling technique was used to select 54 top class mathematics teachers. The research instruments for data collection were questionnaires, observation schedule and checklist which were validated and piloted before the use. The study findings established that the variety of shapes and sizes in block play toys enables children through construction and experiment to discover the basic structure of mathematics, under geometry and spatial sense. The study recommends that the government through the Ministry of Education needs to come up with clear policy guidelines regarding play in pre-school centers and clearly define the play activities according to the developmental stages of children. The government should enhance provision of early childhood play materials to enable pre-school children develop holistically.

Page(s): 205-210                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 01 January 2020

 Busienei Rose Chepketer
Moi University, Kenya

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Busienei Rose Chepketer “The Use of Block Plays in Enhancing the Acquisition of Mathematical Concepts and Skills in Early Childhood Education: A Study of ECD Centres in Eldoret West Sub-County, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.205-210 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/205-210.pdf

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Lateral Transfers and Organizational Commitment of Deposit Money Banks in Port Harcourt, Nigeria

Graham-Douglas, Diekumo Soala and Dr. J.M.O. Gabriel – December 2019 Page No.: 211-217

This study examined the lateral transfers and organizational commitment in Deposit Money Banks in Port Harcourt. The study adopted a cross sectional survey design. Primary data was collected using structured questionnaire. The population for the study was 131 full-time and permanent employees of five selected Deposit Money Banks in Port Harcourt. The sample size of 99 was determined using the Taro Yamane sample size determination formula. The reliability was achieved using the Cronbach Alpha Cofficeint with all items being above the 0.70 acceptance benchmark set by Nunnally (1970). After data cleaning, data for 87 respondents were suitable for used for data analysis. The hypotheses were tested using Spearman Rank Order Correlation Coefficient with the aid of the Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 23.0. The study finding revealed that there is a significant relationship between lateral transfers and organizational commitment in Deposit Money Banks in Port Harcourt. The study concludes that by practicing lateral transfers, the Deposit Money Banks in Port Harcourt can boost the levels of their affective, normative and continuance commitment. The study thus recommends that Deposit Money Banks should seek out ways to integrate work flow and departments through lateral transfers. By such transfers, workers are exposed to the work processes and operations of related units and are able to bring alongside their expectations, previous experiences in previous roles which will enable them perform better and enjoy such change in positions.

Page(s): 211-217                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 01 January 2020

 Graham-Douglas
Department of Management, Faculty of Management Sciences, Rivers, State University, Nkpolu- Oroworukwo, PMB 5080, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

 Diekumo Soala
Department of Management, Faculty of Management Sciences, Rivers, State University, Nkpolu- Oroworukwo, PMB 5080, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

 Dr. J.M.O. Gabriel
Department of Management, Faculty of Management Sciences, Rivers, State University, Nkpolu- Oroworukwo, PMB 5080, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

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Graham-Douglas, Diekumo Soala and Dr. J.M.O. Gabriel “Lateral Transfers and Organizational Commitment of Deposit Money Banks in Port Harcourt, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.211-217 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/211-217.pdf

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The Dagomba, Gonja and Bulsa Political Systems and the Concept of Democracy, Myth or Reality?

Dominic Alimbey Dery (Phd), Jacob Ibrahim Abdu, Adam Bawa Yussif (Phd)- December 2019 Page No.: 218-223

The west has always assumed the aura of supremacy when it comes to the practice of democracy. What however, will be contested is any attempt at describe Africans as new entrants to the practice of At best, democracy is no more than a system of government, but in western democracies it has acquired a sacred status, and it is taboo to question it. Democracy, which is the gravamen of this paper. This is what Bhikhu Parekh says of liberalism: Unless, we assume that liberalism represents the final truth about human beings, we cannot indiscriminately condemn societies that do not conform to it. For example, recent Archaeological findings about the existence of functional states in the pre-colonial era, point to the fact that contrary to the age old belief of Africans, these pre-colonial African states were innovative and well organized political institutions of power. States like the Ashanti kingdom, the Zulu kingdom, the Great Zimbabwe, Mapungubwe and Thulamela in South Africa. The study was basically a qualitative one. The study used an ethnographic approach; it is based on how people go about their daily lives. The study was conducted across three different districts and three different ethnic groups. A purposive sample of 50 respondents was purposively sampled, with a breakdown as follows: key informants (5) from each of the three paramountcies making (15), king makers (5) from each of the three paramountcies making (15), kings/chiefs (5) from each of the three paramountcies making (15) and governance experts (5) all adding up to a total of fifty (50) respondents. Because the focus was on chieftaincy, we considered chiefs and king makers as the main actors in the chieftaincy institution. Data were recorded on an audio recorder and in some cases video alongside writing by the researcher. The respondents were assured that this was only to ensure that no details were left out. The key findings are as follows: chieftaincy in the three kingdoms it was revealed practised devolution of power, also decisions were taken in consultation with the chiefs in Council. Council was normally composed of ‘trusted and wise’ chiefs and finally chieftaincy allowed for participation of the ruled. These chiefs will normally create for a where local interest issues were debated and finally accepted before they were promulgated as laws.

Page(s): 218-223                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 January 2020

 Dominic Alimbey Dery (Phd)
Department of Languages and Liberal Studies, Tamale Technical University (Ghana)

 Jacob Ibrahim Abdu
Department of Languages and Liberal Studies, Tamale Technical University (Ghana)

 Adam Bawa Yussif (Phd)
Department of Languages and Liberal Studies, Tamale Technical University (Ghana)

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Dominic Alimbey Dery (Phd), Jacob Ibrahim Abdu, Adam Bawa Yussif (Phd) “The Dagomba, Gonja and Bulsa Political Systems and the Concept of Democracy, Myth or Reality?” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.218-223 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/218-223.pdf

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Social Media and Political Mobilisation in Nigeria

Fasunwon Adebayo Folorunso Phd. – December 2019 Page No.: 224-230

The media is one of the key gents of political socialization. However, with the intensification of globalisation, and the embrace of culture of social media, political socialization and mobilisation has taken a new form and expression. The reach of social media transcends the traditional reach and form of the old media, with diverse consequences. Using a combination of strategy and functional theories, this study argues that the social media has become a viable and veritable tool of political mobilisation, sensitization, and socialization. The study discovered that government, activists, citizens, politicians, and political parties are able to interact and mobilize the masses, educating them on their grievances, programmes and policies through social media platforms. However, given the uncensored information, and technological manipulations of facts disseminated globally, social media has also become an avenue for broadcasting news and ideas that have mobilized people into violent political activities. This study recommends that while the positive aspects of social media, should be embraced, accepted, and enhanced by nations of the world, there is a need to control its usage in dissemination of violent prone texts and images that may lead to social and political disorders.

Page(s): 224-230                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 January 2020

 Fasunwon Adebayo Folorunso Phd.
Department of Political Science and Public Administration, Faculty of Social and Management Sciences, Adekunle Ajasin University, Akungba Akoko, Ondo State, Nigeria

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Fasunwon Adebayo Folorunso Phd. “Social Media and Political Mobilisation in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.224-230 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/224-230.pdf

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Resonating the Unheard Voice through Ammu in Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things: A Postcolonial Feminist Study

Tasnia Talukder, Md. Aminul Haque – December 2019 Page No.: 231-233

This paper focuses on the mechanism of patriarchy -the cultural mindset of society as a barrier to female and social identity formation in society in Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things through Ammu. The author from postcolonial contexts portrays female character Ammu who struggles with the normative gender identity and eventually eliminates the traditions and conventions of Victorian stereotype ‘angel’ woman to provide voices to the silenced women in her contemporary society. Roy’s protagonist Ammu suffers through the strictly rigid patriarchal norms for female power and social identity formation. Based on the postcolonial feminist perspective, this study analyzes how Ammu breaks the double –bind of patriarchy and colonial legacy by voicing up her desires against all the odds of a male-dominated society and try to form her own identity according to her preferences. Nevertheless, Ammu finally tries to confront the existing social inequalities to bring about a social change despite the post-colonial power structure of the society merely by her involvement in different issues. It further exposes the universal parameters of highly conventional society which Ammu faces as a subaltern and compels her to resonate with her unheard voice.

Page(s): 231-233                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 January 2020

 Tasnia Talukder
Lecturer, Department of English, Uttara University, Bangladesh

 Md. Aminul Haque
Department of English, Uttara University, Bangladesh

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Tasnia Talukder, Md. Aminul Haque “Resonating the Unheard Voice through Ammu in Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things: A Postcolonial Feminist Study” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.231-233 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/231-233.pdf

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The Improvement of Text Writing Results on Imaginary Stories about Environmental Damage with Think Talk Write Method

Endah Wihartati, Sumarwati, Budhi Setiawan – December 2019 Page No.: 234-240

The goal of learning Indonesian, especially on text writing competence, has not been achieved yet. The result of the competency test on writing an imaginary text was below score 70 of the Minimum Criteria for Completion. Therefore, action is needed to improve it. The purpose of this study was to improve the ability of imagination stories text writing about environmental damage with the Think Talk Write method. The subjects of this study were students and teachers of the Indonesian language Warga Middle School of Surakarta. This study used data collection techniques in the form of documents and tests. Data validity was conducted by data sources triangulation and method triangulation. The data analysis technique was through fixed comparative analysis and critical analysis. The results showed that the Think Talk Write method could improve the competence of writing imagination stories text about environmental damage. The step of effective learning is to form groups; explain spelling, punctuation, and linguistic characteristics; watch videos of environmental damage; record problems and think of solutions; convey the core of the story orally; determine the character of the story; create a text outline; writing text; and editing (content and language).

Page(s): 234-240                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 January 2020

 Endah Wihartati
Indonesian Education, Sebelas Maret University, Indonesia

 Sumarwati
Indonesian Education, Sebelas Maret University, Indonesia

 Budhi Setiawan
Indonesian Education, Sebelas Maret University, Indonesia

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Endah Wihartati, Sumarwati, Budhi Setiawan “The Improvement of Text Writing Results on Imaginary Stories about Environmental Damage with Think Talk Write Method” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.234-240 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/234-240.pdf

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Value stream and Waste Analysis in the Tempe Production System in Trenggilis Kauman Surabaya

Soffia Pudji Estiasih, Lulus Margiati, Tri Titut Rahayu Ningsih, Rahaju Saraswati – December 2019 Page No.: 241-247

As Indonesia’s favorite food, Tempe-making centers can be found in almost every region. No exception in Surabaya, East Java. One of the biggest tempe centers in the City of Heroes is in the Tenggilis District. Tenggilis Kauman, an area in the east of Surabaya, has been a long time until now many of its citizens produce tempeh so that the area is known as a village of tempe. It is estimated that there are approximately 20 MSMEs (Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises) that produce tempe. The problem often faced by tempe entrepreneurs in Trenggilis Kauman is an inefficient production system, there is still a lot of waste and non value added activity that occurs in the tempe value chain flow. Waste waiting, defective products, excess production and inventory still occur frequently. Because of this condition, researchers conducted lean manufacturing studies and tempe business models to revitalize the small-scale Tempe Industry in Trenggilis Kauman Surabaya. The purpose of this study is to identify wasteworkshop and minimize activities that have no added value to the tempe production system in Trenggilis Kauman Surabaya.
The method used in this research is Waste workshop identification, Value Stream Analysis Tool (VALSAT) and Canvas Business Model. Waste workshopquestionnaire is used to identify the type of waste that often occurs in the process of production of tempe in the village of Tempe Trenggilis Kauman Surabaya. Value Stream analysis Toll is used to determine the mapping tool that will be used to map activities, lead time, demand, production quantities, defective products in the tempe production system. While the CANVAS business model is used to restructure the tempe business process in Trenggilis KaumanSurabaya.
Based on the workshop waste questionnaire, it is known that the most frequent waste in the tempe production system in Trenggilis Kauman Surabaya is the type of waste waiting and excessive transportation activities.Based on the process activity mapping in the tempe production process above it is known that the value-added activity is 62.5 %, while the non-value added activity for the tempe production process in Trenggilis Surabaya is 37.5 %.For the tempe business model in Trenggilis Kauman Surabaya, it is necessary to continuously innovate to adjust to the conditions of the Tempe business competition level both in Indonesia and in the World

Page(s): 241-247                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 January 2020

 Soffia Pudji Estiasih
Postgraduate Program University of WR Supratman Surabaya, Indonesia

 Lulus Margiati
Postgraduate Program University of WR Supratman Surabaya, Indonesia

 Tri Titut Rahayu Ningsih
Postgraduate Program University of WR Supratman Surabaya, Indonesia

 Rahaju Saraswati
Industrial Engineering University of WR Supratman Surabaya, Indonesia

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Soffia Pudji Estiasih, Lulus Margiati, Tri Titut Rahayu Ningsih, Rahaju Saraswati “Value stream and Waste Analysis in the Tempe Production System in Trenggilis Kauman Surabaya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.241-247 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/241-247.pdf

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Corporate Eco-efficiency and Financial Performance: Evidence from Guinness Nigeria Plc

Agu, Stephen Ikechukwu; Dr. Okegbe, Theophilius Okonkwo – December 2019 Page No.: 248-255

This study examines the interplay between corporate eco-efficiency and financial performance of Guinness Nigeria Plc. An ex –post facto research design approach was adopted for the study. Using a series data for the period of seven (7) years 2011 to 2017, Guinness Nigeria Plc was studied based on the firms’ position as one largest brewing companies and one of the key players in the industry. Secondary data were obtained from the annual /sustainability reports of the company from 2011 to 2017 financial year. Three hypotheses were formulated and tested in the course of this study. Regression analysis by aid of SPSS v.21 was used to test for statistical significance and relationship between corporate eco-efficiency and financial performance. The results showed that there is significant positive relationship between energy efficiency and financial performance of Guinness Nigeria Plc.This study further revealed that there is a statistical significant and positive relationship between water utilization efficiency (WUE) and financial performance of Guinness Nigeria Plc.Finally, the result also established that there is a statistical positive and significant relationship between the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission management and financial performance of Guinness Nigeria Plc.Based on the findings, this study recommends among others; that the management of Brewers should improve energy efficiency by the use of gas-powered generators, economizers on its boilers and compressors. Brewers should consider the installation of water guns to reduce water flow rate, installation of flow meters for effective data capturing, monitoring & controls. The management of CO2 emission in Brewery firms should accommodate among others; using less fossil fuel for energy and steam generation as well as increased application of solar-powered street lighting.

Page(s): 248-255                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 January 2020

 Agu, Stephen Ikechukwu; Dr. Okegbe, Theophilius Okonkwo

[1] Agu, S.I, Udeh, F.N.P,Nwafor, G.C,and Okolo, M.N(2019). Empirical study on the effect of corporate eco-efficiency on the profitability of Nigerian breweries Plc, European Journal of Business and Management, 11(20):1-9.
[2] Antonio, A., Pilar, P., Felipe, M.R & Libertad, R.(2014). Eco-Efficiency: Environmental Performance vs Economic Performance, Management Studies,2(4):239-253.
[3] Basuki1, B.(2015). Eco-Efficiency and Sustainable Development as Efforts to Produce Environmentally Friendly Product: An Exploratory Case Study, Issues in Social and Environmental Accounting, 9(3)199-218.
[4] Dobbs, S., and Van Staden, C. (2011). Motivations for corporate social and environmental reporting: New Zealand Evidence. Retrieved from http://www.utas.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0011/188426/Dobbs_VanStaden.pdf
[5] Equity Research (2014).Brewing Sector Report, Meristem. Retrieved from https://secure.arm.com.ng/research/EquityReports/Brewery%20Sector%20%20update%209M%202014%20-%20The%20forgotten%20stone%20now%20the%20stumbling%20block.pdf
[6] Equity Research (2018).Brewing Sector Report, Meristem.Retrieved from https://secure.arm.com.ng/research/EquityReports/Brewery%20Sector%20%20update%209M%202018%20-%20The%20forgotten%20stone%20now%20the%20stumbling%20block.pdf
[7] Faisal, M, Singh, P.P & Irchhaiya, R (2012).Review on Albizia Lebbeck: a potent Herbal Drug, International Research Journal of Pharmacy, 3(5):63-68
[8] Galitsky,C., Worrell,E, Martin,N(2014). Energy Efficiency Opportunities in the Brewery Industry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,USA.
[9] Guo, M., and Zhao, X. (2011). What is the impact of industrial environmental events on the quality of environmental disclosure in corporate annual reports? A longitudinal study (Master’s thesis). Umea University, Sweden. Retrieved from http://www.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:429076/FULLTEXT02
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[13] WBCSD, (2000b).Eco-efficiency: Creating More Value with Less Impact, World Business Council for Sustainable Development, Geneva, Switzerland.
[14] Worrell, E., Galitsky,G. & Martin,N. (2014).Energy efficiency opportunities in the brewery industry, scholarship, University of Califonia. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (forthcoming).retrieved at http://escholarship.org/uc/item/2mx450cp

Agu, Stephen Ikechukwu; Dr. Okegbe, Theophilius Okonkwo “Corporate Eco-efficiency and Financial Performance: Evidence from Guinness Nigeria Plc” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.248-255 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/248-255.pdf

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Study on Bank Efficiency in Bangladesh: A Panel Data Analysis

Md. Nezum Uddin – December 2019 Page No.: 256-261

This research aims to assess the efficiency of commercial banks in Bangladesh using a Z score methodology where Z score (efficiency ratio) is the dependent variable constructed by the proportion of total operating expenses and net operating income of banks. Z score is regressed on some other indices. Panel data estimation technique is used from 2015 to 2017. Two models are constructed in this regard while 6(six) explanatory variables comprise in model-1 and in model-2 an additional independent variable along with previous six variables is added. According to the fashion of panel data estimation, two effect models(fixed effect and random effect) are also estimated. For both models, the random effect is found to be suitable. According to the random effect, three variables have found to be a negative effect, and three variables have observed the positive impact on the Z score in model-1. By the same token in model-2 three indices have a negative, and four indices have a positive effect on the Z score. Remarkably GDP growth rate has found a profoundly positive impact of efficiency ratio in both models.

Page(s): 256-261                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 January 2020

 Md. Nezum Uddin
Assistant Professor, Department of Economics & Banking, International Islamic University Chittagong, Bangladesh

[1] Abduh, M., Hasan, S., & Pananjung, A. (2013). Efficiency and performance of Islamic Banks in Bangladesh. Journal of Islamic Banking and Finance, 30(2), 94-106.
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[9] Chieng, J. (2013). Verifying the Validity of Altman’s Z” Score as a Predictor of Bank Failures in the Case of the Eurozone. Dublin, National College of Ireland.
[10] Grigorian, D. A., & Manole, V. (2002). Determinants of commercial bank performance in transition: An application of data envelopment analysis: The World Bank.
[11] Islam, M. A., & Rana, R. H. (2017). Determinants of bank profitability for the selected private commercial banks in Bangladesh: a panel data analysis. Banks and Bank Systems, 12(3), 179-192.
[12] Rahim, S. R. M., Hassan, N. M., & Zakaria, R. H. (2012). Islamic Vs. Conventional Bank Stability:‘A Case Study Of Malaysia’. Paper presented at the Presented Paper at 7th Malaysian National Economic Conference (PERKEM VII).
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[15] Wozniewska, G. (2008). METHODS OF MEASURING THE EFFICIENCY OF COMMERCIAL BANKS: AN EXAMPLE OF POLISH BANKS. Ekonomika/Economics, 84.

Md. Nezum Uddin “Study on Bank Efficiency in Bangladesh: A Panel Data Analysis” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.256-261 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/256-261.pdf

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Prosperity Gospel: Social and Economic Corruption in Disguise

Serah Madiiga Kitsiiri – December 2019 Page No.: 262-266

Prosperity Gospel has spread very fast from its origin to the rest of the world. However, it has done more harm than good to people involved through depriving the subjects and enriching the preachers. Basing on the fact that psychological motivation and giving sacrificially can lead to blessings, victims have increased day by day. The purpose of this paper is to empirically discuss prosperity gospel as corruption in disguise in the church. In a nutshell, the victims and the governments have failed to bring to a stop this debacle that has propagated both social and economic corruption.

Page(s): 262-266                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 January 2020

 Serah Madiiga Kitsiiri
Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology, Kenya

[1] Adoyi, A. (2012). “Why New Generation Churches must be banned in Nigeria.” Retrieved from www.dailypost.com.ng
[2] Akiri M. (2018, January 2). The Prosperity Gospel: Its Concise Theology, Challenges and Opportunities. Retrieved at https://www.gafcon.org/resources/the-prosperity-gospel-its-concise-theology-challenges-and-opportunities
[3] Apologetics Index (July, 2016). Hermeneutics: The Eight Rules of Bibilical Interpretation. Retreived from http://www.apologeticsindex.org.
[4] Bowler, K. (2013). Blessed: A History of the American Prosperity Gospel. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0199827695.
[5] Chaves, M. (2010). “Rain dances in the dry season: Overcoming the religious congruence fallacy.” Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 49(1):1-14.
[6] Coleman, S.(2011). ‘Prosperity unbound? Debating the “Sacrificial Economy”’, in L. Oba-dia& D. Wood (eds.), The economics of religion: Anthropological approaches, pp. 23–45, Bingley, Emerald.
[7] Daniels, D.D. (2015). ‘Prosperity gospel of entrepreneurship in Africa and Black America: A pragmatist Christian innovation’, in A. Heuser (ed.), Pastures of plenty: Tracing religio-scapes of prosperity gospel in Africa and beyond, pp. 265–277.
[8] Freeman, D. (2012).‘The Pentecostal ethic and the spirit of development’, in D. Freeman (ed.), Pentecostalism and development: Churches, NGOs and social change in Africa, pp. 1–38, Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke.
[9] Heuser, A. (2016). ‘ChartingAfrican Prosperity Gospeleconomies’, HTS TeologieseStudies/Theological Studies72(1), a3823. http://dx.doi.rg/10.4102/hts.v72i1.3823
[10] Kwakye, A. (2015). ‘Encountering “prosperity” gospel in nineteenth cen-tury Gold Coast: Indigenous perceptions of Western missionary societies’, in Andreas Heuser (ed.), Pastures of plenty: tracing religio-scapes of the prosperity gospel in Africa and beyond, pp. 217–228, Peter Lang, Frankfurt.
[11] Lauterbach, K. (2016), ‘Religious entrepreneurs in Ghana’, in U. Röschenthaler & D. Schulz (eds.), Cultural entrepreneurship in Africa, pp. 19–36, Routledge, New York.
[12] Pew Research Center (July, 2019). A Closer Look at How Religious Restrictions Have Risen Around the World. Retrieved from http://www.pewreasearch.org.
[13] Rosane K.T. (2017). ‘Miracles in the Neo-charismaticmovement: Historical andtheological critique’, Verbumet Ecclesia 38(1), a1736.https://doi.org/10.4102/ve.v38i1.1736.
[14] Robbins, J. (2004). “The globalization of Pentecostal and Charismatic Christianity.” Annual Review of Anthropology 33:117-143.
[15] Robin, R. G. (2010). Pentecostalism in America. ABC-CLIO. ISBN 978-0-313-35294-2.
[16] Rosin, H. (December 2009). “Did Christianity Cause the Crash?”. The Atlantic. Retrieved November 20, 2019.
[17] Walton, J. L. (2009). Watch This! The Ethics and Aesthetics of Black Televangelism. NYU Press.
2002).

Serah Madiiga Kitsiiri “Prosperity Gospel: Social and Economic Corruption in Disguise” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.262-266 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/262-266.pdf

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Strategies for Social Engagement: The University of Zambia Student Unrests

Brian Chanda Chiluba – December 2019 Page No.: 267-271

Students in higher institutions of learning have several needs to satisfy. At that level of education, they are impatient to end their dependence and strive for autonomy, to take on responsibility in various sectors of the society. This study uses a normative approach, the study of which refers to university unrests contained in different documents including; newspaper reports, published materials and views of students. Therefore, both primary and secondary data techniques were carried out by means of online research, interviews and observations. Data analysis was qualitative. The root causes of student unrest at the University of Zambia were due to accumulation of the unsolved issues. A combination of causes and the recurrence of these cases have contributed to student’s impatience. The analysis model used showed that in managing and resolving students’ unrest, the involvement of university management, government and students body is pertinent. The lack of early warning mechanism to detect problems and take immediate steps as soon as the symptoms of student’s unrest emerged caught the university unaware of what would happen.

Page(s): 267-271                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 08 January 2020

  Brian Chanda Chiluba
The University of Zambia, School of Health Sciences

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Brian Chanda Chiluba “Strategies for Social Engagement: The University of Zambia Student Unrests” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.267-271 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/267-271.pdf

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Assessing the Effectiveness of Voluntary Retirement among Civil Servants: The Case of Colleges of Education in Ashanti-Brong Ahafo (ASHBA) Regions

Nicholas Aning Boadu, Armstrong Ephraim Awinbugri – December 2019 Page No.: 272-275

The study perused the effectiveness of voluntary retirement amongst civil servants in Colleges of Education, within Ashanti and Brong Ahafo Regions(ASHBA). Quantitative and qualitative research approaches in the form of closed and open ended research questions were used in conducting the study.
The research population was 200, out of which 156 respondents were purposively selected as the sample size from thirteen (13) Colleges of Education, nine (9) in Ashanti and four(4) in BrongAhafo regions respectively.
The research unraveled that voluntary retirement is not effective amongst civil servants in Ghana. One hundred and thirty one (131) respondents, representing 84% believed voluntary retirement was not effective amongst civil servants. This is evidenced by the fact that, within the last ten(10) years, no civil servant went on voluntary retirement within the researched organizations. The researchers thus recommended that greater incentives should be put in place to entice people to go on voluntary retirement just like Malaysia that has lower cost of housing and living so that employment avenues could be engineered for the younger generation.

Page(s): 272-275                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 08 January 2020

 Nicholas Aning Boadu
Ag. Principal, Agogo College of Education, Ghana

 Armstrong Ephraim Awinbugri
Accountant, Agogo College of Education, Ghana

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Nicholas Aning Boadu, Armstrong Ephraim Awinbugri “Assessing the Effectiveness of Voluntary Retirement among Civil Servants: The Case of Colleges of Education in Ashanti-Brong Ahafo (ASHBA) Regions” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.272-275 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/272-275.pdf

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An Investigation of Academic Performance of Grade 9 Learners of Computer Studies: A Case of Chamunda Secondary School of Masaiti District, Zambia

Beatrice Mwaba-Chiluba, Akakandelwa Akakandelwa, Brian Chanda Chiluba – December 2019 Page No.: 276-282

Development and teaching of Computer Studies in African secondary schools is vital if the continent is to reduce the knowledge, technological and economic gaps between itself and the rest of the world. But there had been few or no studies conducted to establish the performance of learners in Computer Studies subject so as to determine the worthiness of integrating it in school curriculum. There is a significant gap within the current bodies of research, most research does not focus on performance of learners in Computer Studies. This research aimed to fill this gap by addressing the performance of learners in Computer Studies since it was introduced in Secondary Schools in Zambia. A mixed method was adopted, using a convergent concurrent parallel design. The qualitative methods used interviews, while the quantitative used a descriptive cross sectional study. A 100 Pupils were randomly selected to respond to the questionnaire and 13 staffs that included the Head teacher and teachers teaching computer studies were interviewed, making a total sample of 113. Fewer teachers were found teaching computer studies, while the Examination Council of Zambia archives of Grade 9 results for 2015, 2016 and 2017 showed a decreasing trend in performance. The pass rate in 2015 was 56%. In 2016 the pass rate was 38%. In 2017 the pass rate was 23%. Boys performed better than girls over the years. The study revealed a third of the learners had positive perception, with a dominance of males towards. Students challenges were computer accessibility and those that never had access were (65%). These results suggested that simply increasing the educational input on computers at school may not produce the desired effect; instead, the quality of teaching also matters. Integrating computer use into effective instructional activities plays a more important role in influencing student academic performance.

Page(s): 276-282                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 08 January 2020

 Beatrice Mwaba-Chiluba
School of Education, The University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia

 Akakandelwa Akakandelwa
School of Education, The University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia

 Brian Chanda Chiluba
School of Health Sciences, The University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia

[1]. Adewole, A. P., Akinwale, A. T., & Omokanye, B. M. (2008). A consulting information and communication technologies (IcTs) teacher model for teaching secondary school curriculum. College of Natural Sciences Proceedings, 1, 38-46.
[2]. Almekhlafi, A. G., &Almeqdadi, F. A. (2010). Teachers’ perceptions of technology integration in the United Arab Emirates school classrooms. Educational Technology & Society, 13(1), 165–175
[3]. Chiluba, B., Nkandu, E.M., Daka, C.N., Chola, M., Chongwe, G., (2017). Cardiovascular Disease Risk from Protease Inhibitors-ART for HIV: Retrospective Cohort of University Teaching Hospital, Zambia.Cardiology and Cardiovascular Research. Vol. 1, No. 4, 2017, pp. 98-103. doi: 10.11648/j.ccr.20170104.11 (19) (PDF) Cardiovascular Disease Risk from Protease Inhibitors-ART for HIV: Retrospective Cohort of University Teaching Hospital, Zambia. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/319442935_Cardiovascular_Disease_Risk_from_Protease_InhibitorsART_for_HIV_Retrospective_Cohort_of_University_Teaching_Hospital_Zambia [accessed Apr 21 2019].
[4]. Gurevich, I., &Gorev, D. (2012). Examining the impact of an integrative method of using technology on students’ achievement and efficiency of computer usage and on pedagogical procedure in geometry. International Journal for Technology in Mathematics Education, 19(3), 95-104
[5]. Morgan, C.T., 1956. An Introduction to Psychology Newyork:. McGraw-Hill Book Co., Inc. Grubb, P. (2000). A comparison of concept age gains in kindergarten children in traditional and twenty-first century classrooms. Dissertations/Theses, pp. 69 Iddings, S.A., Ortman, T.L.,
[6]. Hennessy, et al. (2010). Developing use of ICT to enhance teaching and learning in East African schools: a review of the literature. Cambridge, UK and Dar es salaam, TZ: Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge and Aga Khan University Institute for Educational Development – Eastern Africa.
[7]. Tondeur, J., Van Braak, J. &Valcke, M. (2006). Towards a typology of computer use in primary education. Journal of Computer-Assisted Learning, 23, 197–206.
[8]. Warschauer, M., Arada, K., & Zheng, B. (2010). Laptops and inspired writing. Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, 54(3), 221-223
[9]. Zambia Ministry of Education (2013). Revised Curriculum Framework 2013.
[10]. Zambian Ministry of Education. (2006). National ICT Policy.
[11]. Habeenzu, S. (2010). Zambia ICT Sector Performance Review 2009/2010, “Towards Evidence- based ICT Policy and Regulation Volume Two, Policy Paper 17, 2010. www.researchictafrica.net/zambia-ict-sector-performance-review-2009/2010.html
[12]. Ministry of Communications and Transport. (2006).National Information and Communication Technology Policy, Lusaka: GRZ.
[13]. Chuni V, Chiluba BC, Mwango M, Nkandu EM, Shula H. (2018). An Exploration of the Knowledge ofInformal Caregivers on Ageing Related Health Conditions at Matero and Chawama Old People’s Homes, Zambia. International Journal ofNeurologic Physical Therapy. Vol. 4, No. 1, pp. 1-6. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnpt.20180401.11

Beatrice Mwaba-Chiluba, Akakandelwa Akakandelwa, Brian Chanda Chiluba “An Investigation of Academic Performance of Grade 9 Learners of Computer Studies: A Case of Chamunda Secondary School of Masaiti District, Zambia” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.276-282 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/276-282.pdf

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The International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) and Jurisdictional Issues

Hakeem Olugbolahan Dawodu – December 2019 Page No.: 283-288

International Criminal Law seeks to make certain crimes punishable at the international level by bringing such crimes within the purview of international Courts or Tribunals. The international court or tribunal so created therefore assumes jurisdiction for the trial of persons accused in this regard. This jurisdiction is without prejudice to the National Courts’ power to try such cases and or individual accused persons. This exercise of Jurisdiction may pose a problem even where the international court or tribunal has been vested with what is termed as jurisdictional primacy. This paper examines this issue and possible conflicts inherent in this arrangement and proffers possible solutions in resolving its consequential logjam using the ICTR set up in 1994 to try cases arising out of the crisis in that country in 1993 as a case study.

Page(s): 283-288                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 08 January 2020

 Hakeem Olugbolahan Dawodu
Department of General Studies, The Federal Polytechnic Ilaro, Ogun State, Nigeria

[1]. The UN Security Council Resolution 955; Statute of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR).
[2]. The UN Security Council Resolution 827; Statute of the International Criminal Tribunal for Yugoslavia (ICTY).
[3]. The Rwanda Genocide: 100 days of Slaughter-BBC News. Accessed at http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-26875506
[4]. Rwanda Profile-Timeline-BBC News. Accessed at http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-14093322
[5]. Rwanda, How The Genocide Happened. BBC News. Accessed at http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-13431486
[6]. Rwandan Genocide: the fight to bring the perpetrators to Justice. http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/apr/02/rwanda-genocide-fight-justice
[7]. Office of The Prosecutor Completion Strategy Report S/2008/322 (ICTR)
[8]. The Rome Statute of The International Criminal Court.
[9]. Bernhardt Graefrath, “Universal Criminal Jurisdiction and an International Criminal Court”. 1 EJIL (1990) 67. www.iejil.org/pdfs/1/1/1146.pdf
[10]. Neil J. Kritz et al, “The Rwanda Tribunal and its relationship to National Trials in Rwanda”. The American University International Law Review, Vol 13, Issue 6, 1998, pp. 1469-1493
[11]. Oscar Solera, “Complimentary Jurisdiction and International Criminal Justice”. IRRC Vol 84, No 845, March 2002. pp. 145-171.
[12]. Linda E. Carter, “The Principle of Complimentarity and the International Criminal Court, The Role of Ne Bis in Idem”, 8 SANTA CLARA J. INT’L. 165 (2010).
[13]. Cedric Ryngaert, “The International Criminal Court and Universal Jurisdiction: A Fraught Relationship?, New Criminal Law Review: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal, Vol. 12, No. 4 (Fall 2009), pp 498-512. University of California Press.
[14]. Michael P. Scharf, “Statute of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda”. Accessed at http://legal.un.org/avl/ha/ictr/ictr.html
[15]. William A. Schabas, “Genocide Trials and Gacaca Courts”, Journal of International Criminal Justice, 3 (2005) 1-17. Oxford University Press.
[16]. The Nuremberg and Tokyo Trials; US Department of State, Office of The Historian. Accessed at http://history.state.gov/milestones/1945-1952/nuremberg
[17]. Maximo Langer, “The Diplomacy of Universal Jurisdiction: The Political Branches and the Transnational Prosecution of International Crimes”, The American Journal of International Law, Vol.105, No. 1 (January 2011), pp 1-49. The American Society of International Law.
[18]. Olympia Bekou and Robert Cryer, “The International Criminal Court and Universal Jurisdiction: A Close Encounter?”, The International and Comparative Law Quarterly, Vol. 56, No. 1 (Jan., 2007), pp. 49-68. Cambridge University Press (on behalf of), British Institute of International and Comparative Law.

Hakeem Olugbolahan Dawodu “The International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) and Jurisdictional Issues” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.283-288 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/283-288.pdf

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Restructuring School Education in Rural Nigeria: Issues and Challenges

Abdulkarim Alhaji Isa, Mohammed Lawan Bashayi, Shettima Alhaji Umar, and Ahmad Babayo – December 2019 Page No.: 289-291

The poor state of the rural schools and their predicament accompanied by unfavourable government education policies towards the rural area was the key factor that attract this research. Nigeria, as one of the largest economy among the African countries, is still a developing nation, this indicates the need for reforms that will bring about technological development. For Nigeria to become a developed nation there is a need for improvement in the quality of education especially in the rural areas where a large chunk of the Nigerian population resides. The schools in rural areas lack the necessary infrastructure, such as teaching aid, conducive atmosphere, qualified teachers and other necessary needs for improving this sector. This made the residence of the rural areas feel neglected and consider education as waste of time. The present study makes a cursory reading of the national policy on education and makes a comparison with what is actually happening in the rural areas by making an interview with the stakeholders and recommends an urgent need of special educational policy to be formulated, the government should modify its policy on education so as to improve education in rural areas. The colonial system of education should be abandon or modify to suit the current need for technological development everywhere.

Page(s): 289-291                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 08 January 2020

 Abdulkarim Alhaji Isa
Lecturer, Department of General Studies, Mai Idriss Alooma Polytechnic, P. M. B. 1020, Geidam, Yobe State, Nigeria

 Mohammed Lawan Bashayi
Lecturer, Department of Social Development, Mai Idriss Alooma Polytechnic, P. M. B. 1020, Geidam, Yobe State, Nigeria

 Shettima Alhaji Umar
Lecturer, Department of Social Development, Mai Idriss Alooma Polytechnic, P. M. B. 1020, Geidam, Yobe State, Nigeria

 Ahmad Babayo
Lecturer, Department of Social Development, Mai Idriss Alooma Polytechnic, P. M. B. 1020, Geidam, Yobe State, Nigeria

[1]. Anyaegbu R, Christman, D.E and Jingpu, C. (2004). The Challenges of Rural Education in Nigeria: Potential Lessons from China.EJournal of Teaching and Learning inDiverse Setting. I (2)160-174.
[2]. Dike, V. (2004). The State of Education in Nigeria and the Health of the Nation. www.AfricaEconomicAnalysis.org.
[3]. Fabunmi, M. (2003). Social and Political Context of Educational Planning andAdministration, Ibadan: Distance Learning Centre, University of Ibadan, Ibadan.
[4]. Haruna, M. J., & Liman, B. M. (2015). Challenges Facing Educating Nigerian Child in Rural Areas: Implications for National Development. Proceeding of the 3rd Global Summit on Education GSE (E-ISBN 978-967-0792-01-1).
[5]. Ibukun, W. O., State, O., Aboluwodi, A., & State, O. (2010). Nigeria’s National Policy on Education and the University Curriculum in History: Implication for Nation Building. Journal of Education and Prcatice, 1(2), 9–17.
[6]. Festus, E. O. (1998). Special education reform in Nigeria: prospects and challenges Special education reform in Nigeria: prospects and challenges. European Journal of Special Needs Education, 13(1), 57–71. http://doi.org/10.1080/0885625980130106
[7]. Imam, H. (2012). Educational Policy in Nigeria from the Colonial Era to the Post-Independence Period. Italian Journal of Sociology of Education, 1: 181–204.
[8]. Kayode, E., Innocent, T., and Charity, R. (2015). Teacher Education and Development in Nigeria: An Analysis of Reforms, Challenges and Prospects. Education Journal, 4(3), 111–122. http://doi.org/10.11648/j.edu.20150403.14
[9]. Serumu, I. (2015). Challenges of Implementing Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) Curriculum in Delta State Colleges of Education. Journal of Educational Research and Review, 4(5): 72–80.

Abdulkarim Alhaji Isa, Mohammed Lawan Bashayi, Shettima Alhaji Umar, and Ahmad Babayo “Restructuring School Education in Rural Nigeria: Issues and Challenges ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.289-291 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/289-291.pdf

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Impact of Mirror Therapy Techniques with Conventional Therapy to Facilitate Hand Functions and Adl`S in Post Stroke Survivor

Sana Nauman, Shankar Lal Ahuja, Nighat Tahir, Drsyed Imran – December 2019 Page No.: 292-298

BACKGROUND: Rehabilitation of the hemiplegic arm after stroke represents a major challenge especially in hand functioning and ADL training.
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate impact of Mirror therapy in Stroke patient to improve hand functioning and ADL’s.
METHOD: Experimental study design, this study was conducted at Institute of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, DOW University of Health Sciences. We recruited 25 hemiplegic patients through convenience sampling techniques; inclusion criteria for present study was stroke (1 year),age30-60 both male and female, Manual muscle Test Grade at shoulder is 3,modified Ashworth scale is at +2, No severe cognitive impairment (MMSE score >24). and exclude patient with Sensory impairment in U.E,TBI,modified Ashworth is at 3 and 4,Visual and Auditory Impairment,Psychological/Perceptual Disorder. All patients were assessed by Fugal-Meyer Assessment Upper Extremity (FMA-UE) for Motor function, Functional Independence Measurement (FIM) for Activities of Daily Living (ADL’s) and Modified Ashworth scale (MAS) scale for muscles spasticity before and after the intervention. They received both conventional occupational therapy and modified mirror therapy program, followed for 12 sessions (40-45 minutes per day thrice a week). Protocol followed in modified Mirror Therapies are active range of motion exercises along with task oriented activities
RESULT: Subjects for modified Mirror Therapy group in addition to conventional therapy shows that there is a significant improvement in baseline FMA mean, standard deviation 27.4 ±1.13± after treatment FMA mean, standard deviation 43.57 ± 9.6 with p value 0.0001.
There is a significant improvement in baseline FIM score from 35.9 mean, standard deviation 8.5 to FIM after treatment score to 48.92mean, 9.9 standard deviation, markedly change in the spasticity of upper limb.(P=0.025)
CONCLUSION:
Modified Mirror Therapy in addition to conventional rehabilitation program was found to provide additional benefits in upper extremity motor recovery bilateral coordination and hand manipulation in stroke patients.

Page(s): 292-298                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 08 January 2020

 Sana Nauman
Dow University of Health Sciences, Pakistan

 Shankar Lal Ahuja
Dow University of Health Sciences, Pakistan

 Nighat Tahir
Dow University of Health Sciences, Pakistan

 Drsyed Imran
Dow University of Health Sciences, Pakistan

[1] Effectiveness of mirror therapy on lower extremity motor recovery, balance and mobility in patients with acute stroke: A randomized sham-controlled pilot trial Uthra Mohan, S. Karthikbabu, K. Vijay Kumar, B. V. Suresh,1 Z. K. Misri,1 and Prof M. Chakrapani2Ann Indian Acad Neurol. 2013 Oct-Dec; 16(4): 634–639. doi: 10.4103/0972-2327.120496
[2] A review of bilateral training for upper extremity hemiparesis MARY ELLEN STOYKOV, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, ILDANIEL M. CORCOS, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, ILOCCUPATIONAL THERAPY INTERNATIONAL Occupational. Therapy Int. 16(3–4): 190–203 (2009) Published online 10 June 2009 in Wiley Inter Science(www.interscience.wiley.com) DOI: 10.1002/oti.277
[3] ACK3-Wasay Mohammad Wasay, Ismail A. Khatri&SubhashKaul Stroke in South Asian countries 11 February 2014. Nature Reviews Neurology.10, 135–143 (2014) doi:10.1038/nrneurol.2014.13.Published online 11 February 2014 Available from: http://www.nature.com/nrneurol/journal/v10/n3/full/nrneurol.2014.13.htmlNOWLEDGEMENT:
[4] Immediate Effects of Mirror Therapy in Patients with Shoulder Pain and Decreased Range of Motion See discussions, stats, and author profiles for this publication at: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/316753096
[5] Rehabilitation of hemiparesis after stroke with a mirror Eric LewinAltschuler, Sidney B Wisdom, Lance Stone, Chris Foster, Douglas Galasko, D Mark E Llewellyn, V S Ramachandran Brain and Perception Laboratory, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, 0109, La Jolla, CA 92093-0109 (E L Altschuler e-mail: elaltsch@sdcc3.ucsd.edu); and Department of Neurosciences, Naval Medical Center, San Diego, CA 92134, USAResearch letters
[6] Mirror box therapy added to cognitive behavioural therapy in three chronic complex regional pain syndrome type I , Y. I. G. Vladimir; Geertzen, Jan H.B; Keizer, Doeke; van Wilgen, C. Paul Published International Journal of Rehabilitation Research Link to publication in University of Groningen/UMCG research database
[7] Thieme H, Mehrholz J, Pohl M, Behrens J, Dohle C Mirror therapy for improving motor function after stroke. Cochrane Database Syst Rev.2012;CD008449. March 14, 2012. doi10.1002/14651858.CD008449.http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD008449
[8] Motor Recovery and Cortical Reorganization After Mirror Therapy in Chronic Stroke Patients Marian E. Michielsen, MSc Ruud W. Selles, PhD Jos N. van der Geest, PhDMartineEckhardt,MScGunesYavuzer, PhD Henk J. Stam, PhD Marion Smits, PhD Gerard M. Ribbers, PhD Johannes B.J. Bussmann, PhD

Sana Nauman, Shankar Lal Ahuja, Nighat Tahir, Drsyed Imran “Impact of Mirror Therapy Techniques with Conventional Therapy to Facilitate Hand Functions and Adl`S in Post Stroke Survivor” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.292-298 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/292-298.pdf

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Influence of Stakeholders’ Participation on Market Development Projects Implementation in the County Government of Kisumu

Tilla Simon Osome, Gladys Kimutai – December 2019 Page No.: 299-302

The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of stakeholders’ participation on market development projects implementation in the County Government of Kisumu. The study concentrated on descriptive research design with respect to research methodology. The accessible population of 400 officials who were directly linked to the implementation of projects. The researcher purposely selected respondents. The prevailing study adopted semi structured questionnaire as data collection tool. Primary data were gathered using semi-structured questionnaires that were analyzed using statistics of description and regression. The study revealed that implementation of projects was positively and significantly related to stakeholder participation. The study concludes that market management committees embraced monitoring and evaluation in their committee. Implemented projects gave the beneficiaries opportunity in benefiting directly as well as indirectly. Favourable legal framework on market development projects. The government guaranteed its support to market management committees’. The study recommends that market management committees ought to embrace monitoring and evaluation in their committee. Project implementation ought to encourage shared ownership of the project. There ought to be a favourable legal framework on market development projects. The government ought to guarantee its support to market management committees’.

Page(s): 299-302                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 09 January 2020

 Tilla Simon Osome
Department of Management Science, School of Business, Kenyatta University, Kenya

 Gladys Kimutai
Department of Management Science, School of Business, Kenyatta University, Kenya

[1]. Abbot, J. (2004). Decentralization and Community Based Planning. PLA Notes Number 49 April 2004
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[3]. Caroline, G. M. (2017). Implementation Of Project Management Practices In Execution Of Electricity Power Projects By Government Agencies; A Case Of Nairobi County, Kenya. (Doctoral dissertation, MUA)
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[6]. Jofre, L. D. (2011). Successfully Implementing Strategic Decisions. Long Range Planning, 18, 91-97
[7]. Kariungi, S. (2014). Determinants of Timely Completion of Projects in Kenya: A Case of Kenya Power and Lighting Company, Thika. ABC Journal of Advanced Research, 3(2), 9 – 20
[8]. Lackman, M. (2014). Controlling the project development cycle, tools for successful project management. Journal of System Management, 2(1), 16-28
[9]. Milosevic, D., & Patanakul, P. (2014). Standardized project management may increase development projects success. International Journal of Project Management, 23, 181-192
[10]. Mongare, C. F. (2017). Project Management Practices and Implementation of Information Technology Projects among Selected Commercial Banks in Kenya. Master’s Project, University of Nairobi
[11]. Nicholas, J. M. (2015). Successful project management: a force-field analysis. Journal of System Management, 2(3), 24-30
[12]. Osoro, K. M., & Owino, O. L. (2017). Effects of Implementation of Project Plans on the Performance of Commercial Banks in Kenya:(A Survey of Commercial Banks in Migori Town). IOSR Journal of Humanities and Social Science (IOSR-JHSS), 19(12), 75-94.
[13]. Pearce J. A. & Robinson, B. R. (2016). Strategic Management: Strategy Formulation and Implementation, Richard D. IRWIN, INC. Homewood, Illinois 60430
[14]. Pinto, J. K. (2013). Project management: achieving competitive advantage. (2nded.). New Jersey: Prentice Hall
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[16]. Sanvido, V. E. (2015). Critical success factors for construction projects. Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, 118(1), 94-111

Tilla Simon Osome, Gladys Kimutai “Influence of Stakeholders’ Participation on Market Development Projects Implementation in the County Government of Kisumu” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.299-302 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/299-302.pdf

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The Teaching Constraints of Indonesian as a Foreign Language in Thailand

Dian Ratna Putriningtyas D, Irawan Suntoro, Sowiyah – December 2019 Page No.: 303-306

This study aims to describe the constraints of teaching Indonesian for Thai students in the Southeast Asian program. Data collection is done by observation and note-taking techniques and sees competent or interview involved. The data that has been obtained is then analyzed. The results of this study are presented informally or use words from the author’s description. The results of this study have constraints in linguistic and non-linguistic aspects. The results of the analysis show that non-linguistic constraints consist of problems of cultural differences between Indonesia and Thailand, environmental influences that cause disruption, and the negative impact of the Internet use, especially when students use google translation. Meanwhile, linguistic constraints include several aspects of language in Indonesian linguistic forms such as the acquisition of pronunciation, acquisition of grammar, and acquisition of vocabulary related to the first language (Thai) and second language (English).

Page(s): 303-306                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 09 January 2020

 Nareemah Lasa
University Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

 Andayani
University Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

 Atikah Anindyarini
University Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

[1]. K. Saddhono, “Teaching Indonesian as Foreign Language in Indonesia: Impact of Professional Managerial on Process and Student Outcomes,” Publ. by Atl. Press. Adv. Econ. Bus. Manag. Res., vol. 14, 2016.
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[3]. S. Widodo, “Bahasa Indonesia Menuju Bahasa Internasional,” Http://Badanbahasa.Kemendikbud.Go.Id/Lamanbahasa/Artikel/1362. Diunduh 25 September 2017., 2010. .
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[8]. D. Eli, “Analysis of Indonesian Pronunciation Difficulties Faced by Thai Speakers in Bengkulu University,” Lit. Crit. J., vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 69–75, 2015.
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[11]. F. . Siregar, “The Language Attitudes of Students of English Literature and D3 English at Maranatha Christian University Toward American English, British English, and Englishes in Southeast Asia, and Their Various Contexts of Use in Indonesia,” Philipp. Esl J., vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 66–96, 2010.
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[13]. H. Penggabean, Problematic Approach To English Learning And Teaching: A Case in Indonesia English Language Teaching. Canada: Canadian Center Of Science And Education, 2015.
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[15]. L. T. R. Refa, “Indonesian Language Learning Planning for Foreigners (Bipa) for Beginners Level,” J. Gramatika Penelit. Pendidik. Bhs. Dan Sastra Indones., vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 393–402, 2018.
[16]. H. & A. L. Riggenbach, Promoting Oral Communication Skills in M. Celce- Murcia [Ed] Teaching English as Second Language or Foreign Language. Boston: Heinle & Heinle, 2nd Edition, 1991.
[17]. adrian et al. Akmajian, “Linguistics (an Introduction to Language and Communication),” England: The Mit Press, 2001.

Dian Ratna Putriningtyas D, Irawan Suntoro, Sowiyah “The Teaching Constraints of Indonesian as a Foreign Language in Thailand” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.303-306 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/303-306.pdf

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Implementation of Integrated Natural Science in Junior High School/MTs Level in Jambi City

Delismar, M. Naswir, Evita Anggraini, Afreni Hamidah – December 2019 Page No.: 307-311

Integrated IPA has undertaken to SMP/MTS. Implementation of the integrated IPA will encounter obstacles when not prepared properly. This was not only about teachers’ understanding of the concepts and integrated IPA implementation strategy, but also the availability of tools and support facilities. IPA has the characteristics to be integrated fully and properly understood by all stakeholders. It explicitly integrated science teaching for SMP/MTS carried out in an integrated manner. This means, the material taught in integrated science includes biology, physics, and chemistry is taught as one unified whole is taught through the scientific process. The research objective of reviewing the application of integrated science teaching for students of SMP/MTs Jambi. The method used in this research is the study of literature, interview, observation, and distributing questionnaires integrated IPA implementation in 45 science teachers at SMP/MTs Jambi. The results showed that the implementation of integrated science teaching in SMP/MTs Jambi has been carried out but without regard to content that should have linked phisicts, chemistry, and biology in the same meeting.

Page(s): 307-311                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 09 January 2020

 Delismar
Postgraduate, Science Education Department, University of Jambi, Indonesia

 M. Naswir
Postgraduate, Science Education Department, University of Jambi, Indonesia

 Evita Anggraini
Postgraduate, Science Education Department, University of Jambi, Indonesia

 Afreni Hamidah
Postgraduate, Science Education Department, University of Jambi, Indonesia

[1]. Fogarty, Robin. 1991. The Mindful School: How to Integrated The Curricula. IRI/Skylight Publihing. Inc.: The United States of America.
[2]. Gooch, L. (2008). Overhaul science teaching: Experts ‘integrated approach better than plain facts’. South China Morning Post (Hong kong)
[3]. Koestoro, B. (2009).Studikomparasihasilakreditasisekolah- madrasah di Indonesia. Didaktika, 10 (5), 1-13.
[4]. Ministry of National Education. (2010). Integrated Character Education in Learning in Middle School. Jakarta: Directorate of PSMP Ministry of National Education.
[5]. Olteanu, R. L.,Dumitrescu,C., Gorghiu, G., &Gorghiu, L. M. (2014).Studying sciences through the integrated science modules.EuropeanJournalofSustainableDevelopment,3(3):35-42.
[6]. Pappas, C. C. (2006). The information book genre: Its role in integrated science literacy research and practice, 41(2).
[7]. Scearce, C. 2007. Scientific Literacy. ProQuest Discovery Guides.
[8]. Trianto. (2010). Model pembelajaran terpadu. Surabaya: Bumi Aksara.

Delismar, M. Naswir, Evita Anggraini, Afreni Hamidah “Implementation of Integrated Natural Science in Junior High School/MTs Level in Jambi City” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.307-311 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/307-311.pdf

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Implementation of Child Friendly School Management Functions

Dian Ratna Putriningtyas D, Irawan Suntoro, Sowiyah – December 2019 Page No.: 312-314

The purpose of this study is to analyze and describe the planning, organizing, implementing and evaluating child-friendly school in Junior High School 4 Metro. The method of this study used qualitative with a phenomenological design. The informants of this study were the headmaster, deputy principal in the curriculum field, deputy headmaster in student affairs, deputy headmaster in the field of Sarpras, school committees, teachers, parents, security guards, and the canteen. The data were collected by using interview techniques, observation techniques; and documentation techniques. The results of this study (1) planning for the implementation of child friendly school management functions does not have a written program but the SRA program continued to run in accordance with applicable SRA policies and curricula (2) a team organization of child-friendly school that specifically oversees all school activity processes that lead to the implementation child-friendly (3) the implementation of child friendly school management functions activities runs with the existence of synergetic directives starting from coordination (4) evaluation of child friendly school management functions to find out supporters of child-friendly school programs and inhibitors of child-friendly school programs.

Page(s): 312-314                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 09 January 2020

 Dian Ratna Putriningtyas D
Magister of Educational Administration, FKIP Lampung University, Street. Prof. Dr. Soemantri Brojonegoro No. 1 Bandar Lampung, Indonesia

 Irawan Suntoro, Sowiyah
Magister of Educational Administration, FKIP Lampung University, Street. Prof. Dr. Soemantri Brojonegoro No. 1 Bandar Lampung, Indonesia

[1] Aqib, Zainal (2008). Sekolah ramah Anak. Jakarta: Yrama Widya
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[3] Haryanto Alfandi. (2001). Desain Pembelajaran Demokratis dan Humanis (2001st ed.). Yogyakarta: Ar- Ruzz Media.
[4] Kristanto,Ismatul Khasananh & mila Karmila, 2011. Identifikasi Model Sekolah Ramah Anak (SRA) Jenjang Satuan Pendidikan Anak Usia Dini Se-Kecamatan Semarang Selatan. Jurnal Peneltian PAUDIA Vol 1 (1). Juni. hal 1-12
[5] Moleong, J. Lexy. (2013). Metode Penelitian Kualitatif Cet Ke-31. Bandung: PT. Remaja Rosdakarya.
[6] Qosim Nanang Muhammad. (2018). Implementasi Sekolah Ramah Anak Dalam Membentuk Budaya Sekolah di SD N Geger Tegalrejo. Prosiding Konfrensi Nasional Ke-7, 353-357.
[7] Retno (2019). KPAI temukan 21 kasus kekerasan fisik dilingkungan pendidikan tahun 2019Oktober 31, 2019,from https://m.liputan6.com/health/read/4099310/per-oktober-kpai-temukan-21-kasus-kekerasan-fisik-di-lingkungan-pendidikan-tahun-2019
[8] Sugiyono. (2008). Metode Penelitian Pendidikan Kuantitatif, Pendekatan Kualitatif dan R & D. Bandung:Alfabet

Dian Ratna Putriningtyas D, Irawan Suntoro, Sowiyah “Implementation of Child Friendly School Management Functions” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.312-314 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/312-314.pdf

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Predicting Strategic Planning on Job Effectiveness of Academic Heads of Tertiary Institutions in North Central, Nigeria

Ubi, Ije Ubana, Okongo, John Nsor & Arikpo, Nneoyi Nnana – December 2019 Page No.: 315-321

The study focused on Predicting Strategic Planning on Job Effectiveness of Academic Heads of Tertiary Institutions in North Central. Two research questions and hypotheses were adopted for the study and the adopted the descriptive survey design. Data were collected from a sample of 372 academic head of departments (HODs) from six tertiary institutions in North Central, Nigeria using a structured researchers’ developed instrument titled “Strategic Planning and Job Effectiveness Questionnaires (SPJEQ). Data collected were analyzed using simple regression analysis. The findings revealed that mission statement and core values can highly predict job performance in the study area. Also most institutions do not see the need for adequately accepting and working toward the attainment of the mission, vision statement and core values of the organization which in-turn promotes excellence in job performance by academic heads. Based on the findings of the study, it was recommended that factors related to strategic planning should be well articulated to management and staff of the tertiary institution. Also, the vision, mission statement and core value of the organization should be clearly spelt out in the organization.

Page(s): 315-321                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 10 January 2020

 Ubi, Ije Ubana
Department of Business Management, Faculty of Management Sciences, University of Calabar, CRS, Nigeria

 Okongo, John Nsor
Department of Business Management, Faculty of Management Sciences, University of Calabar, CRS, Nigeria

 Arikpo, Nneoyi Nnana
Department of Business Management, Faculty of Management Sciences, University of Calabar, CRS, Nigeria

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Ubi, Ije Ubana, Okongo, John Nsor & Arikpo, Nneoyi Nnana “Predicting Strategic Planning on Job Effectiveness of Academic Heads of Tertiary Institutions in North Central, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.315-321 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/315-321.pdf

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Pedagogical Competencies of Teachers and Performance of Junior Secondary Students in Social Studies in Kontagora Local Government Area, Niger State, Nigeria

IKANI Victoria Eno, EYONG, Emmanuel Ikpi PhD & EJUE Helen Francis – December 2019 Page No.: 322-332

This study examined Pedagogical Competencies of Teachers and Performance of Junior Secondary Students in Social Studies in Kontagora Local Government Area, Niger State, Nigeria. Three hypotheses were stated and tested in the study and the correlational research design was employed. The population of this study comprised of three thousand one hundred and twenty nine (3,129) lower basic I and II students and one hundred and ten (110) teachers from all the public and private secondary schools in Kontagora Local Government Area (LGA) of Niger State. The students were those that are currently in 2017/2018 academic session. The sample size to be used for this study consists of one hundred and fifty six (156) lower basic students representing 5% of the estimated sample of all lower basic I and II Social Studies students in public and private Secondary Schools in Kontagora LGA of Niger State. The stratified and simple random sampling techniques were used for the study with two instruments were designed by the researcher for data collection namely: Teachers Assessment Form (TAF) and Lower Basic I and II Academic Performance Test (LBAPT) for the students to respond to. In order to ascertain the validity of the instruments: Teachers Assessment Form (TAF)) and the Lower Basic Academic Performance Test (LBAPT) was determined using construct and content validity: the instrument was given to three experts, two in Measurement and Evaluation and one in Social Studies Education from the university of Jos to scrutinize the items. The reliability of the TAF was established with split half reliability method using fifty (50) respondents drawn from the population. After the administration of the TAF the co-efficient of internal consistency was determined with split half reliability index which ranged from 0.78 to 0.93 respectively. The descriptive and inferential statistics were employed in this study and the three hypotheses were tested with Pearson’s Product Moment Correlation and finding revealed that the level of competence of Social Studies teachers’ in classroom assessment competence, classroom arrangement and classroom interaction competence is high. It was recommended among others that..

Page(s): 322-332                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 10 January 2020

 IKANI Victoria Eno
Department of Social Science Education, Faculty of Education University of Jos, Nigeria

 EYONG, Emmanuel Ikpi PhD
Cross River State University of Technology Calabar, Calabar Cross River State, Nigeria

 EJUE Helen Francis
Deartment of Educational Foundations, University of Calabar, Calabar, CRS, Nigeria

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[13] Irmiya, R.A (2015). Effect of inquiry method on pre-serving teachers’ competence in teaching Social Studies concepts in plateau state and Abuja Nigeria. An Unpublished Doctoral Dissertation, Faculty of Education, University of Jos, Nigeria.
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IKANI Victoria Eno, EYONG, Emmanuel Ikpi PhD & EJUE Helen Francis “Pedagogical Competencies of Teachers and Performance of Junior Secondary Students in Social Studies in Kontagora Local Government Area, Niger State, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.322-332 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/322-332.pdf

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Primary School Students and Teachers’ Perceptions on the Role of Teachers as Moral Role Models

Timotheo Elinihaki – December 2019 Page No.: 333-336

Moral values and ethical values are mostly used interchangeably by most of the people. However, there is slight difference between the two terms. Moral values are the social, cultural and religious beliefs which tell us what is right or wrong (Encyclopedia Encarta, 2019). Moral contain rules and standards to be followed by a society or a culture as right. Certain rules or standards in one culture may be considered as right while in another may seen wrong. Ethics is the branch of philosophy that deals with the principles of conduct; it works as a guiding principle as to decide what is good or bad (Begley, 2017). Ethical values are abstract and the same regardless of any culture, religion or society. Some of the ethical values are truthfulness, honesty, loyalty, respect, fairness and integrity (Binder, 2015).

Page(s): 333-336                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 January 2020

 Timotheo Elinihaki
The Open University of Tanzania Faculty of Education P.O. Box 23409, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

[1] Anangisye, W. A. L. (2010). Promoting teacher ethics in colleges of teacher education in Tanzania: Practice and Challenges. African Journal of Teacher Education, 1(1), 67-77.
[2] Anangisye, W, A, L. (2011). Why are teachers motivated to behave unprofessionally? A qualitative data based inquiry on educational stakeholders experiences in Tanzania, A Journal of Contemporary Research, 8(1), 1-23.
[3] Begley Paul, T. & Stefkovich, J. (2017). Integrating values and ethics into post secondary teaching for leadership development: Principles, Concepts and Strategies. Journal of Education Administration. Vol. 45(4), https://doi.org/10.1108/095
[4] Betwel, O. (2013). The nature of teacher professional misconduct in Tanzaniaa public primary schools: The case of Sumbawanga municipal and rural district. International Journal of Education, 5(1), 81-93
[5] Binder, L. & LaPalombara, J. (2015). Crises and sequences in political development (SPD-7). Princeton University Press.
[6] Boimanda, A. Y. (2004). The decline in the professional code of conduct among teachers in Tanzania public schools: Causes and implications. Unpublished M A Dissertations, University of Dar es Salaam.
[7] Creswell, J.W. (2009). Research Design: Qualitative and Mixed Approach, 3rd edition. London: Sage Publications.
[8] Creswell, J., W. (2012). Educational Research: Planning, conducting and evaluating qualitative and quantitative research (4th ed.). Boston: Pearson.
[9] Fussy, D. (2012). The effectiveness of school heads in institutionalizing teacher ethics in Tanzania. Unpublished M.A Dissertation, University of Dar es Salaam.
[10] Kim, M . (2013). Cultivating teachers’ morality and the pedagogy of emotional rationality, “Australian Journal of Teacher Education, 38(1), 12-26
[11] Klaassen, C., & Maslovary, N. (2010). Moral courage and the normative professionalism of teachers. Boston: Sense Publishers.
[12] Lickona, T. (2011). Educating for character: How our schools can teach respect and responsibility. (2nd ed.). New York: Bantam Books.
[13] Lindner, S. (2014). Tanzania; The overview of corruption and anticorruption. [http://www.transparency.org/press.htm] site visited on 17/5/2015.
[14] Ministry of Education and Vocational Training (2011). Public act and regulations. Dar es Salaam: Ministry of Education and Vocational Training.
[15] Noddings, N. (2013). Educating moral people: A caring alternative to character education. (2rd ed). New York: Teachers College Press.
[16] Oladipo, S. E. (2019). Moral education of the child: Whose responsibility? In Journal of Science, 20(2), 149-156.
[17] Pantic, N., & Wubbels, T. (2012). The role of teachers in inculcating moral values: Operationalisation of concepts. Journal of Beliefs and Values Studies in Religion and Education, 33(1), 55-69.
[18] Sabasi, S. M. (2011). Challenges facing government secondary school teachers in implementation of professional code of conduct in Tanzania: a case of Kilimanjaro Region. Unpublished M A Dissertation, University of Dar es Salaam.
[19] Sanderse, W. (2013). The meaning of role modeling in moral and character education, Journal of Moral Education, 42(1), 28-42
[20] Santrock, J. W. (2015). Educational psychology. (3rd ed). New York: McGraw-Hil
[21] Zombwe, G. (2019). Who is a Teacher? Quality teachers for quality education (3rd ed.). Dar es Salaam: Haki Elimu.

Timotheo Elinihaki “Primary School Students and Teachers’ Perceptions on the Role of Teachers as Moral Role Models” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.333-336 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/333-336.pdf

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Students Religiosity MBI Amanatul Ummah (Sociological Studies in Nurul Ummah Islamic Boarding School Pacet Mojokerto)

Achmad Chudori, Agus Sholahuddin, Kridawati Sadhana – December 2019 Page No.: 337-342

This study was Employing the concept of a qualitative study which was projected to Obtain information about the form of religiosity Followed by the reasons derived from the students of the MBI (International Standardized Islamic School) AmanatulNurulUmmah in the Islamic Ummah Boarding School Pacet, Mojokerto. The Data derived in this study was in a visceral form of information through interviews, observation, documentation, and precedent references. From the study, the significant finding Showed that the form of religiosity among students both substantially and tangibly was Tirrenus through religion, social, science, motivation values the which are composed into seven keys to success and students’ commitment that is obligatory to comprehend and implement to achieve the purpose of education for students MBI that is projected for the Goals of Graduates. Based on the field research, it can be concluded into two layers. First, that the form of religiosity among students substantially and tangibly MBI was Tirrenus as essential and complex. forms. Essential here means that all the substances and materials Contain religion, social, science, values, and motivation. It also refers to the comprehensive, teaching materials given to the students. Meanwhile, the formal substance of students’ religiosity was formed in implementable-Resolute finding. Implementable means that all substances and materials taught can be comprehended and implemented in a practical way. Resolute means that all materials can Achieve the main goal set. Second, the reasons of religiosity among the students culminated into the goals and benefits for creating Religious-Nationalist, Religious-Intellectual, Intellectual-Religious, and individuals. Those reasons belong to Determining and holistic reasons. Determining means that the material substance was delivered by paying attention to a certainty ideal and noble reasons for that is projected to goals and benefits. Holistic means that the formal substance was given by paying attention to the comprehensive, reasons in a form of goals and benefits, so it can Achieve the projected-Resolute allotment. As a result, if Reviews those forms and reasons of religiosity were implemented and projected Essentially as well as implementable and Able to produce religiosity roommates is complex-Resolute, the students’ religiosity will tend range to be Determining and holistic. Determining means that the material substance was delivered by paying attention to a certainty ideal and noble reasons for that is projected to goals and benefits. Holistic means that the formal substance was given by paying attention to the comprehensive, reasons in a form of goals and benefits, so it can Achieve the projected-Resolute allotment. As a result, if Reviews those forms and reasons of religiosity were implemented and projected Essentially as well as implementable and Able to produce religiosity roommates is complex-Resolute, the students’ religiosity will tend range to be Determining and holistic. Determining means that the material substance was delivered by paying attention to a certainty ideal and noble reasons for that is projected to goals and benefits. Holistic means that the formal substance was given by paying attention to the comprehensive, reasons in a form of goals and benefits, so it can Achieve the projected-Resolute allotment. As a result, if Reviews those forms and reasons of religiosity were implemented and projected Essentially as well as implementable and Able to produce religiosity roommates is complex-Resolute, the students’ religiosity will tend range to be Determining and holistic.

Page(s): 337-342                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 January 2020

 Achmad Chudori
Doctoral Program in Social Science University Merdeka Malang, Indonesia

 Agus Sholahuddin
University of Merdeka Malang, Indonesia

 Kridawati Sadhana
University of Merdeka Malang, Indonesia

[1] Subroto,Adi D.. 1987.OrientasiNilai Orang Jawa Serta Ciri-CiriKepribadiannya Yogyakarta: FakultasPsikologi UGM, 1987)
[2] Dewey, John. 1964. Democracy and Education. New York: The Macmillan Company George Ritzer (1996)
[3] Maliki, Zainuddin, 2008, dalamkuliah “Simbol-simbolAjaran Agama” di Program PascasarjanaInstitut Agama Islam NegeriSunanAmpel Surabaya.
[4] Ahmadi, Abu. (1991). PsikologiBelajar. Jakarta. PT RinekaCipta.
[5] Ritzer, George. 1992. Teori Masyarakat Modern. Ghalia Indonesia. Jakarta
[6] Moleong, 2010, MetodologiPenelitianKualitatif, Cet ke-16, Bandung: PT. RemajaRosdakarya.
[7] Miles, B. Mathew dan Michael Huberman. 1992. Analisis Data KualitatifBukuSumberTentangMetode-metodeBaru. Jakarta: UIP.
[8] Glockdan Stark. 1996. Psychology of religion.(Needham Heigthts, Massachusetts: A Simon & Schuster Comp.

Achmad Chudori, Agus Sholahuddin, Kridawati Sadhana “Students Religiosity MBI Amanatul Ummah (Sociological Studies in Nurul Ummah Islamic Boarding School Pacet Mojokerto)” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.337-342 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/337-342.pdf

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Status of the Brackish Water Fishery in Anawasala in Kalpitiya Divisional Secretariat, Sri Lanka

M.D.K.L.Gunathilaka – December 2019 Page No.: 343-346

Brackish water fishery is one of the segments of the fishery industry in Sri Lanka. Lagoon environments are the most appropriate areas for brackish water fishery worldwide. Kalpitiya is well known for brackish water fishery based on Puttalam lagoon. Generally, the small-scale fishery has dominant constraints. The objective of the study is to identify the issues associated with small-scale fishery (SSF) in Anaiwasala fishing village. To fulfil the aim of the study questionnaire survey and non-structured interviews based on random sampling method was performed with visual encounter survey for one year to obtain primary data. The available literature on small-scale fishery was studied to get secondary data.MS Excel 2016 version was used to analyse the data and perform the relevant mapping. The results show the SSF in the village has different constraints. Saccostrea spp, Merefrixcasta, Penaeusindicus, Scylla serrata and Epinephalu ssp are the dominant species in the area. 16.6% of Tungusnet usage in the area is illegal. Dragnet and push net are identified illegal fishing methods while few of fishermen used secret illegal fishing methods.13% of teppam (log raft) generally carried out illegal dragnets. More than 80% of fishermen seasonally engaged in crab harvesting.80% of residents only have secondary education is a direct threat for the SSF. Unawareness has contributed to destruct associated surface ecosystems and benthic ecosystem. Non-target species catching also existed in the area. Increase of the number of fishermen and inadequate fish species population is also affected to have a standard SSF industry in Anaiwasala. To overcome the issues awareness programmes and enforcement of the legal framework should be applied in Anaiwasala fishing village for the utmost existence of SSF community.

Page(s): 343-346                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 January 2020

 M.D.K.L.Gunathilaka
Department of Geography, University of Colombo. Sri Lanka

[1] Creech. S (2014), Sri Lankan Blue Swimming Crab Fishery Assessment, Sri Lanka.
[2] Dayaratne, P., O. Linden, and M.W. R. N. De Silva (Eds), (1997) The Puttalam and Mundel Lake, Sri Lanka: A study of coastal resources, their utilization, environmental issues and management options. Ambio, 24 (7-8), 391-401.
[3] Dayaratne, P., O. Linden, and M.W. R. N. De Silva (Eds), (1997) – The Puttalam/Mundel Estuarine System and Associated Coastal Waters. A report on environmental degradation, resource management issues and options for their solution. Colombo: NARA and NARESA, 98 pp.
[4] Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (2013), Fisheries development and management plan of Puttalam lagoon, Sri Lanka.
[5] Gunathilaka.M.D.K.L. (2017) Environmental communication for mangrove restoration and conservation a case study in Anaiwasala fishing village in Kalpitiya, in proceedings EMURS, pp108-109.
[6] Maheepalaet al (2016),an analysis of net income of different craft and gear combinations in the Puttalam lagoon in Sri Lanka, Proceedings of the National Aquatic Resources Research and Development Agency (NARA), Scientific Sessions, Sri Lanka.
[7] Michael J. Kennish, Hans W. Paerl (2011) Coastal lagoons: critical habitats of environmental change, Taylor and Francis Group, USA.
[8] Silva et al (2013) Lagoons of Sri Lanka: From the Origins to the Present, IWMI, Colombo, Sri Lanka.
[9] Weragodathenna. D (2011) Atlas of Puttalam lagoon, IUCN, Sri Lanka.

M.D.K.L.Gunathilaka “Status of the Brackish Water Fishery in Anawasala in Kalpitiya Divisional Secretariat, Sri Lanka” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.343-346 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/343-346.pdf

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Contemporary Gospel Music Debate: Transformative (Conservatives) or Confirmative (Liberals) Perspective

Serah Madiiga Kitsiiri – December 2019 Page No.: 347-350

Music has been for long time perceived to be powerful and its impact on human beings cannot be doubted. However, Christians argue on the way gospel music is being packaged. The conservatives have held the view that gospel music should stick to the biblical standards without emulating what secular music portrays. On the contrary, the liberals feel that emulating what secular music portrays gives room to reach the people for purposes of transformation. The Purpose of this paper is to discuss the two perspectives concerning gospel music which have been a point of debate of late. To achieve this, the paper reviews the existing literature on the subject matter.

Page(s): 347-350                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 January 2020

 Serah Madiiga Kitsiiri

[1] Adedeji, F. (2007). Christian music in contemporary Africa: a re-examination of its essentials. Koers – Bulletin for Christian Scholarship.72. 10.4102/koers.v72i1.193.
[2] Atiemo, A. (2006). ‘Singing with Understanding’: the Story of Gospel Music in Ghana.Studies in World Christianity. 12. 142-163. 10.1353/swc.2006.0009.
[3] Bonner, G..(2014). Secular Vs. Gospel – The Next Chapter. Gospel Flava.Com Magazine, Available [online] at http://www.secular-vs-gospel-the-next-chapter/gospel-flava.com
[4] Ellen, G. W. (1972). Music: Its Role, Qualities, and Influence. A Compilation of Materials AssembledFor the Study of the 1972Task Force on the Philosophy of Music. Silver Spring, Maryland. Retrieved from https://whiteestate.org/legacy/issues-music-html.
[5] Etcetera,(2014). “Nigerian Gospel Artistes are Hypocrite”. GistMannia, Available [online] at http://www.gistmannia.com. Accessed on the 5/12/2019.
[6] Giselbach,B. (2018, November).Charismatic Churches: Offering a Parallel Gospel in a Post-Christian World. Retrieved from https://plainsimplefaith.com/charismatic-churches-offering-a-parallel-gospel-in-a-post-christian-world.
[7] Kahenya, S. M. (2010). Youth perceptions about the church: a study of youth exodus from the mainstream churches to the new charismatic-evangelical churches in Nairobi, Kenya. University of Nairobi Research archive. Retrieved from http://erepository.uonbi.ac.ke:8080/handle/123456789/4071
[8] Kilmer, C. B. (1976). Sounds from Silence.Bit Enki, Berkeley, Calif., LCCN 76—16729.
[9] Krista, L. P. (2010). The Gospel According to: A Theory of Transformative Discursive Allegory. Communication StudiesVol. 61, No. 1, January–March 2010, pp. 104–117.
[10] Lauritsen, M. W. (2011). “Secular Mode, Sacred Message: How Contemporary Christian Musicians are Called by God to Perform”. Sociology Undergraduate Research Paper 2, Available [online] at http://www.repository.stcloudstate.ed/soc_org_research/2 Accessed on the 27/06/2015.
[11] Lauterbach, K. (2016).‘Religious entrepreneurs in Ghana’, in U. Röschenthaler& D. Schulz (eds.), Cultural entrepreneurship in Africa, pp. 19–36, Routledge, New York.
[12] Reid, A. L. (2004). Raising the bar: Ministry to youth in the new millennium. Grand Rapids:Kregel Publications.
[13] Secrest, M. (2009). Christian Music: Making Money Off of Jesus. Retrieved from http://www.wrecked.org/arts/christian-music-making-money-off-of-jesus. Accessed 6/12/2019.
[14] Vega, A. (2012). Music sacred and profane: Exploring the use of popular music in evangelicalworship services. Journal of Religion and Popular Culture, 24(3), 365-379. Retrievedfromhttps://seu.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://search.proquest.com.seu.idm.oclc.org/docview/1270649203?accountid=43912
[15] Vega. (2014). Popular music in evangelical worship services: Secularization, sacralization, orboth? The Catholic University of America, Religion and Culture. Dissertation Abstracts International. Retrieved fromhttps://seu.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://search.proquest.com.seu.idm.oclc.org/docview/1553884089?accountid=43912.
[16] Wallin, N., Steven, B. & Merker, B. (2001). The Origins of Music. Cambridge: MIT Press. ISBN 978-0-262-73143-0.

Serah Madiiga Kitsiiri “Contemporary Gospel Music Debate: Transformative (Conservatives) or Confirmative (Liberals) Perspective” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.347-350 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/347-350.pdf

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Comparative Effectiveness of Mastery Learning and Expository Approaches in the Teaching of English Language in Nigerian Secondary Schools

Nnenna Nmaji-Uba, Prof. Mkpa Agu Mkpa, Prof. Rock Eze – December 2019 Page No.: 351-359

This study which adopted the quasi-experimental research design sought to determine if secondary school students taught some units of English language using the Mastery Learning Strategy (MLS) would perform significantly better than their counterparts taught the same lessons using the expository instructional approach. Three research questions and three hypotheses were formulated to guide the study. Data were collected using a 25-item pretest, and a 25-item post-test which also served as a retention test and had a reliability index of 0.85 by Pearson Product Moment Correlation Coefficient Statistic. The Subjects were 140 senior Secondary students purposively drawn from a population of 1257 in the Local Government Area of Study. The 4 teachers received orientation two, each on the use of MLS and the expository methods as embodied in the lesson plans developed and validated for the study. After the 4 week of experimental treatment data were collected on the achievement test while the data for retention were collected 3 weeks later.
For the research questions, means and standard deviations were used to analyze the data while Analysis of Covariance was used to analyze the data on the hypotheses. The study revealed that the experimental group taught using MLS performed significantly beer than the control group both in achievement and retention. The female students scored higher than the males in the experimental group. The implications of the study were highlighted.

Page(s): 351-359                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 January 2020

 Nnenna Nmaji-Uba
International Secondary School, Abia State University Uturu, Nigeria

 Prof. Mkpa Agu Mkpa
Faculty of Education, Abia State University, Uturu, Nigeria

 Prof. Rock Eze
Faculty of Education, Abia State University, Uturu, Nigeria

[1] Block, J. H. (2009). Mastery Learning: Current state of the craft. Educational Leadership, 114-117.
[2] Bloom, B. S (1971). Mastery Learning. In J. H. Block, Mastery Learning: Theory and Practice (pp. 47-63). New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston.
[3] Chimee, A. (2002). Professional Ethnics in Teaching: Towards the development of a code of practice. Cambridge Journal of Education, 203-221.
[4] Cotel, P. G., & Millis, B. J. (2003). Cooperative structures in the instruction of Accounting. Issues in Accounting Education, 40-60.
[5] Cummings, C. (2002). Teaching makes a difference. Taiwan: Teaching Inc.
[6] Danjuma, A. I.,M & Usman, M.A (2013). Effect of Mastery Learning on the skill development and academic achievement of pre-service teachers. Ilorin, Kwara State: Unpublished PhD thesis of the University of Ilorin, Ilorin Kwara State Nigeria..
[7] Derek, R. (2006). Problem-based learning in Astrophysics. International Journal of Collaborative teaching techniques, 19 -27.
[8] Emelike, A. O., & Grant, U.M. (2017). Gender and its influence in the ability of students to learning and collaboration in high schools. International Journal of Educational Technology, 45-57.
[9] Eric-Mawuenyega, J. O., & Otuabuko, C. M. (2017). Assessment of Lecturers’ Awareness of Webtools for Blended Instruction in Universities in Abia State. ABSU Journal of Educational Studies, 174-183.
[10] Filgona, J., Filgona, J., & Linus, S. (2017). Mastery Learning Strategy and Learning Retention: Effects on Senior Secondary School Students; Achievement in Physical Geography in Ganye Educational Zone, Nigeria. Retrieved from: www.seanticscholar.org: https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Mastery-Learning-Strategy-and-Learning-Retention%3a-Filgona-Filgona/e33381551baacc79de260fcf85fc6180ee453c
[11] Guskey, T.R. (2007). Closing Achievement Gaps: Revisiting Benjamin S. Blooms Learning for Mastery. Journal of Advanced Academics, 8-31.
[12] Harold, J. P., & Sabastin, L. K. (2018). Assessment of Student’s perception of mastery learning strategies as against the traditional classroom. Journal of Computer Education Studies, 57-67.
[13] Jegede, O. M., Alaiyemola, F., & Okebukola, P. (2009). Comprehension of Computer Assisted Co-operative Learning and Individualistic Learning. American Educational Research Journal Fall, 382-392.
[14] Kaheem, H. (2008). The importance of feedback in teaching environment. Edo Journal of Education Sciences, 41-54.
[15] Kayode, O. O. (2014.) The Conventional Teaching Method: Contemporary Issues and Techniques for 21st Century Learners. International Journal of Teaching, Learning and Practices, 23-41.
[16] Lubna, T., Arshad, A., & Farida, J. (2017). The effects of mastery learning strategy on learning retention of secondary school students in the subject of mathematics. Journal of Educational and Practice 8(19), 23 -27.
[17] Mapesos, R. M. (2017). Classroom Issues. Mindanao State University-Iligan Institute of Technology Articles, 23 -47.
[18] Nwachukwu, i. (2014). Fundamentals of Social Studies for Junior Secondary Schools. Owerri: Cape Publishers International Limited.
[19] Nzewi, U. (2011). The concept of mapping instructional strategies and student’s Achievement in Chemistry Education in Owerri Municipal. 41st Inaugural Lecture of the Imo state University.
[20] Remjai, C. B., Martin, R. B., & Romiro, G. B. (2019). Chemistry Made Easy: Unraveling the Experiences of Biological Science Majors in Using a Virtual Library. American Journal of Educational Research, 7(2), 170-173.
[21] Smith, C. O., & Frank, M. D. (2017). Mastery Learning Strategy: An alternative to the ailing teaching methods available in Ohio. International Journal of Educational Technology, 15 -27.
[22] Wambugu, P. W., & Changeiywo, J. M. (2008). Effects of Mastery Learning Approach on Secondary School Students’ Physics Achievement. EURASIA Journal of Mathematics, Science and Technology Education, 293-302.
[23] Yusuf, M. O. (2009). The Technology Enhanced Classroom: Advantages and Challenges. Journal of the Faculty of Education University of Ilorin, 47-57.
[24] Zimmerman B.J., & Dibernedetto, M. (2008). Mastery Learning and Assessment: Implication for students and teachers in an era of high-stakes testing. Psychology in the Schools, 206-216.

Nnenna Nmaji-Uba, Prof. Mkpa Agu Mkpa, Prof. Rock Eze “Comparative Effectiveness of Mastery Learning and Expository Approaches in the Teaching of English Language in Nigerian Secondary Schools” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.351-359 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/351-359.pdf

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Prophetism in African Christianity: A Phenomenological Study of Prophet David Owuor

Edmond Okelloh Ogera – December 2019 Page No.: 360-363

This is a phenomenological study of one of the largest Neo-Prophetic Movements in Kenya. This movement known as Repentance and Holiness Ministry led by renowned Prophet Dr. David Edward Owuor, which has captured the public imagination and attention in Kenya. The paper examines the stages in the phenomenological method of inquiry as espoused by James Cox, before describing and explaining the phenomenon of prophecy as propagated by prophet Owuor and his movement.

Page(s): 360-363                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 January 2020

 Edmond Okelloh Ogera
PhD in religious Studies Candidate at the Catholic University of Eastern Africa

[1] Amanze, James, N. “The Role of Prophecy in the Growth and Expansion of Synagogue Church of All Nations.” Scriptura 112, no. 1 (2013): 1–14.
[2] Cox, James. An Introduction to the Phenomenology of Religion. New York: Continuum International Publishing Group, 2010.
[3] Hameno, Nominous. “Prophetic Churches in Zimbabwe.”Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung, 2014. http://www.kas.de/simbabwe/en/publications/39206/.
[4] Kahenda, Mercy. “Standard Digital News – Kenya : Six Die at Prophet David Owuor’sNakuru Crusade.” http://www.standardmedia.co.ke, 2015. http://www.standardmedia.co.ke/article.
[5] Ngugi, NuruNyambura. “Truth Be Told: Miracles Do Happen.” Truth Be Told (blog), October 5, 2012. http://nurunyambura.blogspot.com/2012/10/miracles-do-happen_9496.html.
[6] Waanglicana. “Prophet Owuor.” Blog, 2006. https://waanglicana.wordpress.com/tag/prophet-owuor/.
[7] Stone, Jon R., ed. Expecting Armageddon: Essential Readings in Failed Prophecy. New York: Routledge, 2000.
[8] Tumminia, Diana, and William H. Swatos.How Prophecy Lives. BRILL, 2011.

Edmond Okelloh Ogera “Prophetism in African Christianity: A Phenomenological Study of Prophet David Owuor” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.360-363 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/360-363.pdf

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Flood Disaster Vulnerability in North Central Nigeria

BAMIDELE, Owemidu Femi, BADIORA, Adewumi Israel – December 2019 Page No.: 364-371

The vulnerability of residents and their livelihoods to flood disaster was examined in this study.
In order to achieve this, the study was conducted using questionnaire and field observation. The data obtained were analysed using descriptive and statistical analysis. It was revealed through findings that residents had high level of awareness of flood occurrence. It was also revealed that flood frequency in the study area was high mainly especially in the highly espoused zones. Moreover, vulnerability to flood disaster varies significantly (p< 0.05) across the 12 selected Neighbourhoods in the study area. The Neighbourhood with the highest vulnerability was Felele (0.35), followed by Adankolo (1.35), Sabo (1.71), Rijia (2.31), Marine (2.71), and so on while GRA had the lowest (5.15) vulnerability. Although flood frequency was highest in Rijia (38.94), vulnerability in the area is only fourth highest because it has a relatively strong coping capacity (1.5) compared to Felele (1.2), Adankolo (0.8) and Sabo (0.5).To reduce the impact of floods, it is very important to identify and understand the socioeconomic, physical and environmental factors that determine people’s exposure, sensitivity and ability to cope with stress or change.

Page(s): 364-371                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 January 2020

 BAMIDELE, Owemidu Femi
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria

 BADIORA, Adewumi Israel
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ago Iwoye, Ogun State, Nigeria

[1]. Abdulsamad, M. (2018). Spatio-temporal Analysis of Areas Vulnerable to Flooding in Ibaji Local Government Area of Kogi State, Nigeria. Resources and Environment, 8(3), 91-98
[2]. Adelekan, O.I, (2009). Vulnerability of Urban Poor Coastal Communities to Climate Change in Lagos Island, Nigeria. International Journal of Climatology, 18, pages 1273 – 1284.
[3]. Adelekan, O.I, (2010). Vulnerability of Urban Poor Coastal Communities to Flood in Lagos Island, Nigeria. International Journal of Natural Hazards, 10, pages 1203 – 1214.
[4]. Akwukwe, T. and Ogbodo, C. (2015). Spatial Analysis of Vulnerability to Flooding in Port Harcourt Metropolis, Nigeria. SAGE and Open Access page. www.uksagepub.com.
[5]. Brown, M.H. (2015). An Analysis of Risk Perceptions and Attitudes towards Climate Change among Residents of South-eastern Louisiana. M.Sc. Thesis, Environmental Science, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, Louisiana.
[6]. Brown, M.H. (2015). An Analysis of Risk Perceptions and Attitudes towards Climate Change among Residents of South-eastern Louisiana. M.Sc. Thesis, Environmental Science, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, Louisiana.
[7]. Emmanuel, A. (2016). Socio-economic impact of flooding in the Niger Delta Region. Advances in Natural and Applied Sciences, 3(3), 369-377.
[8]. Eze, N. J. Vogel, C., and Ibrahim, P.A., (2018). Assessment of Social Vulnerability of Households to Floods in Niger State. International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences, 24, 22-34.
[9]. Field, C.B, Barros. V., Stocker, T.F, Qin, D., Dokken, D.J., Ebi, K.L and Midgley, P. M. (2017).Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation. A Special Report of Working Groups I and II of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 582.
[10]. Geneve, D. (2016). Environmental Risk in Marginalized Communities in Asia. Journal of Land Use Policy, 20, 25-40.
[11]. Grothmann, T.(2017).Assessment of Drivers of Settlements Development in African Riverine Villages under Conditions of Land-use and Climate change: Case studies from Mkomazi and Keiskamma, Journal of Environment and Development, 8(2), 21-35. Hazard Mitigation, Sustainability, 7, 2015.
[12]. Ikusemanran (2017) Remote Sensing and GIS for Flood Surveillance: A Case Study of Kainji Lake Basin, New Bussa, Nigeria. Unpublished M. Tech Thesis, Department of Geography, Federal University of Technology, Minna.
[13]. International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Commission {IFRC} (2015). Nigeria: Flooding in Kano and Jigawa”, Information Bulletin No 2/01 (Final), available at http://www.ifrc.org/docs/appeals/rpts01/ngfl01a2.pdf.
[14]. Itopa, M. (2019). Social Vulnerability to Flooding in Lokoja Metropolis. Journal of Natural Disaster Reduction, 5(3), 1-23.
[15]. National Emergency Management Agency, [NEMA] (2018). The 2018 Floods Situation Report. No. 1, 21st September, 2018.
[16]. Onwuteaka, M. (2014). Vulnerability in the Coastal Areas of Nigeria. Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, 20, 11-27.
[17]. Percival, S. and Teuw, R. (2019). A Methodology for Urban Micro‑Scale Coastal Flood Vulnerability and Risk Assessment and Mapping. Natural Hazards (2019) 97:355–377https://doi.org/10.1007/s11069-019-03648-7
[18]. Samuel K. J., Ologunorisa.1, E.M., Olusanya, K.A. and Yakubu, S. (2017). Post-Disaster Assessment of Riverine Communities Impacted by a Severe Flooding Event. Ghana Journal of Geography, 9(1), 17–41.
[19]. The United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction {UNSDRI} (2008). Flood Risk Management Strategies in Developed Countries. UNSDRI, 20.
[20]. UN-Habitat (2015). Poverty Alleviation in Developing Countries. Environmental Change, Nairobi.
[21]. UN-Habitat (2018) Adaptions and Mitigating Change. United Nations Habitat Stratégie Plan, Nairobi, Kenya.
[22]. UN-Habitat (2019). First Session of the United Nations Habitat Assembly of the United Nations Human Settlements Programme United Nations Office Nairobi “Innovation for Better Quality of Life in Cities and Communities” 1st United Nations Assembly, 27 -31 1st May, 2019.
[23]. United Nations (2018). Household Size and Composition around the world. Population Facts. Department of Economics and Social Affairs, Population Division, No.2. Retrieved from www.unpopulation.org.
[24]. Vilém, P., Jelínková, E., Kilianová, H. and Machar, I. (2017). Analysis of Fragmentation of Selected Steppe Sites in the Pannonian Region of the Czech Republic. Acta University of Agriculture Journal, 61, 765-775.
[25]. Vincent, K. (2017). Uncertainty in Adaptive Capacity and the Importance of Scale, Global Environmental Change, 17, 12-24.
[26]. Vincent, K.; Daly, M.; Scannell, C.; Leathes, B. (2018). What can Climate Services Learn from Theory and Practice of Co-Production? Climate. Services. 12, 48–58.
[27]. Wahab, B. and Ojolowo, S., (2018). Drivers and Spatial Extent of Urban Development in Flood-Prone Areas in Metropolitan Lagos. Journal of Sustainable Development, 11(2), 98-111.

BAMIDELE, Owemidu Femi, BADIORA, Adewumi Israel “Flood Disaster Vulnerability in North Central Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.364-371 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/364-371.pdf

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Tradition of Peumeunab and Seumeuleung as A Culture of The Kingdom Negeri Daya (Social Reality Study in Annual Ritual Ceremony in Jaya District, Aceh Jaya Regency)

Teuku Minjar Nurlizai, Bambang Satriya, Kridawati Sadhana – December 2019 Page No.: 372-382

Writing this article is to describe, among others, (1) Tradition and implementation Peumeunab Seumeuleung (2) Background and persistence of tradition Peumeunab Seumeuleung, and (3) Strategy and tradition Peumeunab Seumeuleung. This study used a qualitative approach. Collecting data using interviews and documentation. Data analysis was performed with data collection, condensation, data presentation, and drawing conclusions. Implementation of tradition and ceremony Peumeunab Seumeuleung has experienced a shift in the timing of the ceremony that was originally performed only once in a year is now twice a year with the agenda of the Government. And continued with a series of processions of the stakeholders of the Negeri Daya make pilgrimage Sultan Salatin Alaidin Riayatsyah called Poe Teumeureuhom ends with face wash with water in a jar that contained the tomb area. The social capital that high a spirit of togetherness, solidarity community support, the trust of the royal family from generation to generation as family values, responsibility role, value heritage, a sense of belonging together as a wealth of tradition / culture and religion, the wealth of the kingdom is still productive and manageable well.

Page(s): 372-382                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 15 January 2020

 Teuku Minjar Nurlizai
Doctoral Program Social Science, University of Merdeka Malang

 Bambang Satriya
University of Merdeka Malang, Indonesia

 Kridawati Sadhana
University of Merdeka Malang, Indonesia

[1] Anwar, Yesmil & Adang, (2013). Sosiologi Untuk Universitas. Bandung: PT. Refika Aditama.
[2] Bakker, Sj. J.W.M. (1984). Filsasat Kebudayaan: Sebuah Pengantar. Yogyakarta: Yayasan Kanisius.
[3] Coomans, Mikhail, (1987). Manusia Daya: Dahulu Sekarang Masa Depan. Jakarta: PT. Gramedia
[4] Handoyo, Eko, dkk, (2015). Studi Masyarakat Indonesia. Yogyakarta: PT. Ombak
[5] Hanum, Fauziah. (2012). Upacara Seumeuleung.Banda Aceh: Dinas Kebudayaan dan Pariwisata Aceh.
[6] Kaplan, David. (2002). Teori Budaya (Terjemahan).Yogyakarta: Pustaka Pelajar.
[7] Koentjaraningrat. (2004). Kebudayaan Mentalitas dan Pembangunan.Jakarta: Gramedia.
[8] ———————. (2014).Manusia dan Kebudayaan di Indonesia.Jakarta: PT. Jambatan Gramedia.
[9] ———————. (2014). Sejarah Teori Antropologi.Jakarta: Universitas Indonesia (UI-Press).
[10] ———————. (2015). Pengantar Ilmu Antropologi.Jakarta: PT. Rineka Cipta.
[11] Kurdi, Muliadi. (2014). Kerajaan Daya.Banda Aceh: Lembaga Naskah Aceh (NASA).
[12] Lombard, Denys. (2006). Kerajaan Aceh Zaman Sultan Iskandar Muda (1607-1636). Jakarta Selatan: Kepustakaan Populer Gramedia (KPG).
[13] Liliweri, Alo, (2014). Pengantar Studi Kebudayaan. Bandung: PT. Nusa Media
[14] Marsden, William.(2013). Sejarah Sumatra.Depok: Komunitas Bambu.
[15] Ritzer, George. (2014). Sosiologi Ilmu Pengetahuan Berparadigma Ganda.Depok: Rajagrafindo Persada.
[16] ——————-. (2015). Teori Sosiologi Modern Edisi Ketujuh.Jakarta: Prenadamedia Group.
[17] Ritzer, George. Dan Smart, Barry (2015). Handbook Teori Sosial.Bandung: Nusa Media.
[18] Soemardjan, Selo. Soemardi, Soelaeman. (1964). “Setangkai Bunga Sosiologi” edisi pertama, Jakarta: Yayasan Penerbit Fakultas Ekonomi Universitas Indonesia.
[19] Spradley, James P. (1985) The Ethnographie Interview, New York: Holt, Rinhartand Winston.
[20] Syafi’i. (1996) Seni Warak Ngendhok: Kajian Fungsi Tradisi Ritual Masyarakat Semarang, Laporan Penelitian Lemlit IKIP Semarang.
[21] Suyanto, Bagong. M. Khusna Amal. (2010). Anatomi dan Perkembangan Teori Sosial.Malang: Adiya Media Publishing.
[22] Suriasumantri, Jujun S. (2009) “Filsafat Ilmu Sebuah Pengantar Populer” Jakarta: Pustaka Sinar Harapan.
[23] Sutrisno, Mudji. Hendar Putranto. (2005). Teori-teori Kebudayaan.Yogyakarta: Kanisius.
[24] Sztompka, Piotr. (2017). Sosiologi Perubahan Sosial.Jakarta: Kencana.

Teuku Minjar Nurlizai, Bambang Satriya, Kridawati Sadhana “Tradition of Peumeunab and Seumeuleung as A Culture of The Kingdom Negeri Daya (Social Reality Study in Annual Ritual Ceremony in Jaya District, Aceh Jaya Regency)” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.372-382 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/372-382.pdf

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Economic Implications of Tobacco Usage on Sustainable Development in South and West African Region

JOSEPH, Afolabi Ibikunle Ph.D. – December 2019 Page No.: 383-389

National development and invariably regional development is a pre–requisite to sustainable development. However, the role of youth in sustainable development in any country cannot be downplayed especially in terms of labour supply, human capital development, future revenue generation and future hope of parent as a long run return. Incidentally, substance use such as cocaine, heroin, cannabis sativa, tobacco and in the most recent psychoactive drugs like benerlyne with codeine, toilet sneezing and shisha have become so rampant among the youth with their devastating health effect such as cancer, mental illness, psychosis, tuberculosis but more importantly, the negative social behavior and even death affects development. This paper therefore, examines the economic implications of tobacco use on sustainable development in South and West African. Applying the descriptive and situational analysis, the study reveals that tobacco use as well as tobacco – related deaths is on the increase and has devastating effects on the long run in reducing human capital and loss of revenue to the economy. The study therefore recommends that an outright ban of tobacco use in public place be enforced and high taxes be imposed on tobacco and related goods in order to reduce its massive consumption by youth.

Page(s): 383-389                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 15 January 2020

 JOSEPH, Afolabi Ibikunle Ph.D.
Department of Economics, Ajayi Crowther University, Oyo, Oyo State, Nigeria

[1] Ansara, D. L., Fred, A, Sunita ,K, Jason, H, and Rachel, K. (2013). Tobacco useby men and women in 49 countries with Demographic and Health Surveys. DHS Comparative Reports No.31. Calverton, Maryland, USA: ICF International.
[2] Ekpu, V. U and Brown, A. K (2015) The Economic Impact of Smoking and of Reducing Smoking Prevalence: Review of Evidence (8), 1-35
[3] Pampel, F (2008). Tobacco use in sub-Sahara Africa: Estimates from thedemographic health surveys. Soc Sci Med. 66(8): 1772–1783. doi:10.1016/j.socscimed.2007.12.003
[4] Mathers, C.D., and Loncar, D. (2006). “Projections of Global Mortality and Burden of Disease from 2002to 2030.” PloS Medicine 3(11).
[5] Mohan, P., Lando, H.A and Pannerr, S (2018). Assessment of Tobacco Consumption and Control in India. India Journal of Clinical Medicine https://doi.org/10.1177/1179916118759289
[6] US Department of Health and Human Services (2006) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Healthy housing reference manual. Atlanta:
[7] WHO (2018) WHO report on the global tobacco epidemics 2017
[8] WHO, (‎2017)‎. Tobacco control forsustainable development. World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia. http://www.who.int/iris/handle/10665/255509
[9] World Health Organization. 2011a. “WHO Report on the Global Tobacco Epidemic, 2011.” Accessed November 20, 2011. http://www.who.int/tobacco/global_report/2011/en/

JOSEPH, Afolabi Ibikunle Ph.D. “Economic Implications of Tobacco Usage on Sustainable Development in South and West African Region” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.383-389 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/383-389.pdf

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Extrapolative Analysis of the Economic Implications of Tobacco Use in Central and East Africa

JOSEPH, Afolabi Ibikunle Ph.D. – December 2019 Page No.: 390-397

Tobacco related diseases are threat to public health all over the world, with more than 7 million deaths recorded annually. More than 6 million of those deaths are fallouts of direct tobacco consumption while about 890,000 are from passive smoking. Most of these victims, as existing studies reveals are youths. Coincidentally, the role of youths in sustainable development cannot be underestimated. Youths are the source of the human capital that create wealth for the nation and the foundation of any sustainability. Incidentally, rampant abuse of tobacco, with its attendant health problems like cancer and most importantly the negative social behavior and death significantly affect economic growth. Given the relative significance to economic growth therefore, this paper sets out toexamine the economic implications of tobacco use on sustainable development in Central and East Africa. Applying the descriptive and situational analysis, the study reveals that tobacco use as well as tobacco – related deaths is on the increase. Hence, tobacco use stands as impediment towards achieving SDGs in sub-Saharan Africa. The study therefore recommends that high tariff be imposed on tobacco in order to discourage its massive consumption by youth so as to keep them healthy for the attainment of SDGs.

Page(s): 390-397                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 15 January 2020

 JOSEPH, Afolabi Ibikunle Ph.D.
Department of Economics, Ajayi Crowther University, Oyo, Oyo State, Nigeria

[1] Achia, T.N.O (2015) Tobacco use and mass media utilization in Sub-Saharan Africa. PLoS ONE 10(2): e0117219. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0117219
[2] Akindele, O.A &Akinbode, O (2017). Assessment of tobacco control efforts in three Sub-Saharan African countries. Niger Postgrad Med. J 24(1): 8.13
[3] Ansara, D .L., Fred, A. S. K, Jason, H & Kaufmann, R ( 2013). Tobacco use bymen and women in 49 countries with demographic and health surveys. DHS Comparative Reports No.31. Calverton, Maryland, USA: ICF International.
[4] Guindon, G.E &Boisclair, D (2003). Past, current and future trends in tobacco use. The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/The World Bank. 13 -16
[5] Lee, S., Ling,P. M.& Glantz, S. A.(2012). The vector of the tobacco epidemic: Tobacco industry practices in low and middle-income countries. Cancer Causes Control 23(Suppl. 1):117129.
[6] Melberg, H. O., and. Lund, K. E. (2012). Do smoke-free laws affect revenues in pubs and restaurants? European Journal of Health Economics 13(1):93-99.
[7] Oyewaole, B.K., Animasahun, V.J & Chapman, H.J (2018). Tobacco use in Nigeria youth: A systematic review. PLoS ONE 13(5): e0196362. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.
[8] Sinha, D.N., Razwan, S.A., Krishna, K.A., Khem, B.K., Mostafa, M.Z & Prakash, C.G (2015). Trends of smokeless tobacco use among adults (Aged 15-49 years) in Bangladesh, Indi and Nepal. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev, 16(15), 6561-6568 \
[9] Tobacco Atlas 6th Edition for all the selected sub-Saharan African Countries in 2017
[10] WHO (2012).”Global Health Observatory (GHO). Tobacco consumption. Situation and trends.
[11] WHO (2011a). “WHO Report on the Global Tobacco Epidemic, 2011.” Accessed November 20, 2011. http://www.who.int/tobacco/global_report/2011/en/
[12] WHO (2017), World Health Statistics 2017: Monitoring health for SDGs

JOSEPH, Afolabi Ibikunle Ph.D. “Extrapolative Analysis of the Economic Implications of Tobacco Use in Central and East Africa” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.390-397 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/390-397.pdf

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Challenges and Strategies on Allocation of Women Enterprise Fund: Lessons from Elgeyo Marakwet East Sub County, Kenya

Samuel K. Mutukaa, Emily Laktabai – December 2019 Page No.: 398-404

Women entrepreneurship plays a critical role in economic development and in enhancing livelihoods within the family of societies in both developed and developing countries. This paper seeks to establish the contribution of women Enterprise Fund (WEF) to sustainable rural livelihoods of Elgeyo Marakwet East Sub-County. The study was guided by two research questions which include; what challenges are faced in allocation of Women enterprise fund in Elgeyo Marakwet East Sub County? What strategies can be used to ensure effective and efficient allocation of funds in Elgeyo Marakwet East Sub County? The study employed a cross sectional survey research design. It adopted simple random sampling with a target population of 360 beneficiaries of WEF projects. The study was guided by Sustainable Rural Livelihood Framework. Test-Retest technique was used to determine reliability of the instruments results. The data was collected through questionnaire method and analyzed using descriptive statistics. The study established that there was the main challenges faced in allocation of WEF is Lack of security or collateral, lengthy procedure of loan application and processing, high competition from the commercial banks, inadequate funds and fund diversion. The man strategies for effective utilization of Women Enterprise Fund are the reduction of loan disbursement grace period from 3 months to 1 month, good management of the funds by the leaders, reduction of administration fees, training programmes for the stakeholders and increase of loanable fund. The study concluded that inadequate funds; delayed in loan disbursement; lengthy procedure of loan application and processing inadequate funds; high administration cost; lack of security/ collateral; poor infrastructure were the main challenges faced in allocation of funds. The study recommended that women enterprise fund should be increased; capacity building of women entrepreneurs enhanced, policies which will reduce the mismanagement of funds developed and improve dissemination of information.

Page(s): 398-404                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 15 January 2020

 Samuel K. Mutukaa
South Eastern Kenya University

 Amiartuti Kusmaningtyas
University of 17 Agustus 1945 Surabaya, Indonesia

 Emily Laktabai
The Catholic University of Eastern Africa

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[29] World Bank, (2008).Doing Business: Women in Africa. World Bank. Washington, DC.

Samuel K. Mutukaa, Emily Laktabai ” Challenges and Strategies on Allocation of Women Enterprise Fund: Lessons from Elgeyo Marakwet East Sub County, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.398-404 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/398-404.pdf

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The Challenges of Knowledge Age and Transformational Leadership in Higher Education Institutions

Muftahu Jibirin Salihu – December 2019 Page No.: 405-409

This study is intended to explore the concept of ‘challenges’ in the context of workplace with specific attention to higher education institutions through the industrial era, knowledge age, and the present globalisation time. Similarly, with the philosophy that the greater the quality of leadership, the higher the possibility of an institution to overcome its challenges, this paper decides to examine how to address these challenges from the leadership point of view by theorising the various approaches of organisational transformation and organisational leadership, their characteristics, and types with a case study on how these theories, characteristics, and types can remarkably transform organisations from challenges into success and contextualise their application to higher education institutions towards a better educational system for sustainable tomorrow.

Page(s): 405-409                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 24 January 2020

 Muftahu Jibirin Salihu
National Higher Education Research Institute, Universiti Sains Malaysia

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[10] Salihu M. J (2019) Sustainable knowledge flow and innovation in higher education: The implementation of change management in universities. International Journal of Innovation and Sustainable Development (in press)
[11] Salihu M. J (2019). A Conceptual Analysis of the Leadership Theories and Proposed Leadership Framework in Higher Education. Asian Journal of Education and Social Studies, 1-6.
[12] Senge, P. (2000). The industrial age system of education. In P. Senge, N. Cambron-McCabe, T. Lucas, N. Smith, J. Dutton,& A. Kleiner (Eds.), Schools that learn: A fifth discipline resource(pp. 27–58). New York: Doubleday Dell Publishing Group, Inc.
[13] Ursino, B.A. (2001). A systems approach to organizational transformation. FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, 70(10), 12–18.
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[15] Weber, M. (1947).The theory of social and economic organization. Translated by A. M. Henderson & P. Talcott. New York:Oxford University Press.

Muftahu Jibirin Salihu “The Challenges of Knowledge Age and Transformational Leadership in Higher Education Institutions” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.3 issue 12, pp.405-409 December 2019  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-3-issue-12/405-409.pdf

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