Social Media, Filipinos, and Key National Issues in the Philippines: A Macro Analysis

Prof. Mark Gabriel Wagan Aguilar – April 2020 Page No.: 01-03

The Philippines as the top user of social media worldwide has witnessed Filipinos rely on information posted in social media for knowledge on key national issues. This research clearly explained the root cause why people of the Philippines has become ignorant towards issues but remained highly confident when it comes to giving comments on such through social networking websites. It has been found that Filipinos are likely to give comments and/or feedbacks to issues despite knowing nothing on it, and tend to rely on information posted in social media without checking its validity and the sources’ reliability due to the illusory truth effect caused by the continuous commenting, posting, and sharing of information verified or not. The results also show that poverty is the reason why a person has limited access to reliable information that affects their perception towards key national issues, thus, regulating social media in countries where poverty rate is high is highly recommended.

Page(s): 01-03                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 15 April 2020

 Prof. Mark Gabriel Wagan Aguilar
School Director, Abe International Business College-Quezon City, Philippines

[1]. Manstead, 2018: The Psychology of social class: How socioeconomic status impacts though, feelings, and behaviour. British Journal of Social Psychology/ Volume 57, Issue 2.
[2]. DeNavas-Walt & Proctor, 2014: Income and Poverty in the United States: 2014/ Current Population Reports, P60-252, Census Bureau
[3]. Hasher, Goldstein, &Toppino, 1977: Frequency and the Conference pf referential validity. Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, P107-112
[4]. Ipsos MORI, 2017: The Perils of Perceptions 2017
[5]. Abad, 2014: What the Philippines tells us about democracy. World Economic Forum on East Asia, March 21-23, 2014
[6]. Untalan, 2015: The Real Crisis of Philippine Democracy. Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia/ Issue 18. September 2015
[7]. Hickman, 2015: Lack of education is root cause of poverty. Rochester Business Journal
[8]. Tupas, 2019: Cybercrimes up by 80% in 2018/ Philippine National Police Anti-Cybercrime Group/ The Philippine Star Global News
[9]. World Population Review: Third World Countries 2020/ United National Development Programme.
[10]. 1987, Article III, Section 4, Constitution of the Republic of the Philippines
[11]. Geronimo, 2018: Social Weather Stations Survey on September 2018; 84% of Filipinos satisfied with how democracy works
[12]. FocusEconomics S.L.U., 2018: The Poorest Countries in the World
[13]. Chapter 2. Works: Politics and Government, The Book of Life. The School of Life
[14]. Ohme, 2018: Facebook is now a vital part of our democracy. The Conversation UK
[15]. ChildFund International.Org; Poverty and Education
[16]. Giovetti, 2019: How does education affect poverty? It can help it. / ConcernUSA.Org
[17]. Sherman, 2014: Finally: Science explains why we’re all more ignorant than we think. / Inc.com

Prof. Mark Gabriel Wagan Aguilar “Social Media, Filipinos, and Key National Issues in the Philippines: A Macro Analysis” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.01-03 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/01-03.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Corporate Social Responsibility Expenditure and the Financial Performance of Quoted Firms in Nigeria

Prof. Oladele P.O, Mokuolu J.O – April 2020 Page No.: 04-10

The study assesses the impacts of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on the financial performance of some quoted firms in Nigeria. The study focuses on oil and banking sectors being the two sectors that mostly dominate the CSR activities in Nigeria. Profit after tax of the firms is used to proxy their performance while total expenditure on CSR, total asset, working capital and leverage ratio are used as independent variables in the model. Panel data analysis is adopted as the major estimating techniques and the results show that CSR expenditure of the firms though, have positive impacts on their performances but the effect is not significant. Total asset of the firms remains the most significant variable on their performances. The study also showed that the banking sector is more organized and unique in their approaches to CSR and its implication on their performances is more than the oil firms. It is recommended that firms in Nigeria should engender ways to make their CSR expenditure impact positively and significantly on their performances and relevant authorities should also beam more search light on the oil sector where diverse approaches to CSR exist.

Page(s): 04-10                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 16 April 2020

 Prof. Oladele P.O
Department of Business Administration, Faculty of Management Sciences, Federal University, Oye-Ekiti, Nigeria

 Mokuolu J.O
Department of Banking and Finance, Faculty of Management Sciences, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria

[1] Adeyemo, S. A., Oyebamiji, F. F. & Alimi, K. O. (2013). An Evaluation of factors Influencing Corporate Social Responsibility in Nigerian Manufacturing Companies. International Journal of Academic Research in Economics and Management Sciences, 2(6), 54-63.
[2] Amaeshi, K., & Amao, O. O. (2009):Corporate Social Responsibility in Transnational Spaces: Exploring Influences of Varieties of Capitalism on Expressions of Corporate Codes of Conduct in Nigeria. Journal of Business Ethics, 86, 225-239.
[3] Azad, A., Zahir, R., & Hossain, Z. (2010).Assessment of CSR Performance in some selected commercial Banks in Bangladesh.Arabian Journal of Business and Management Review. 3,(12), 221-244
[4] Kitzmueller, M. & Shimshack, J. (2012). Economic Perspectives on Corporate Social Responsibility.Journal of Economic Literature, 50(1), 51–84.
[5] Margolis, J. D., Elfenbein, H. A., & Walsh, J. P. (2007).Does it pay to be good? A meta-analysis and redirection of research on the relationship between corporate social and financial performance. Working paper, Harvard Business School, Cambridge.
[6] McWilliams, A., & Siegel, D. (2000).Corporate Social Responsibility: A Theory of Perspective.Academy of Management Review, 26 (1), 117-127.
[7] Okiro, K., Omoro, N., & Kinyua, H. (2013).Investment in Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustained Growth in Commercial Banks in Kenya. Journal of Emerging Issues in Economics, Finance and Banking. An Online International Monthly Journal,3(2), 1057-1064.
[8] Ong’olo, P. B. (2012).Relationship between Corporate Social Responsibility Practices and Market Share among Supermarkets in Kisumu Town. An unpublished (MBA Research project), University of Nairobi.
[9] Phillips, F. (2006).Corporate Social Responsibility In An African Context. Journal of Corporate Citizenship, 24, 23-27.
[10] Waddock, S. A., & Graves, S. B. (1997). The Corporate Social Performance – Financial Performance Link. Strategic Management Journal, 18 (4), 303-319.

Prof. Oladele P.O, Mokuolu J.O “Corporate Social Responsibility Expenditure and the Financial Performance of Quoted Firms in Nigeria ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.04-10 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/04-10.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Violence against Women: A Case of Dhaka City

Md. Shahidul Islam, Dwipayan Roy, Md. Omar Faruque, Md. Khaled Sifullah, Md Shovon Molla – April 2020 – Page No.: 11-15

This study makes an attempt to explore the nature, cause and effect of domestic violence against women as well as the strategies of reduction of domestic violence, To make the attempt a success, this study first of all, reveals the nature and causes of domestic violence, Most of the variables and indicators profoundly related to domestic violence, have been studied carefully to identify the consequences of domestic violence and the government’s strategies in this respect. This study starts through reviewing the existing relevant literature along with some theoretical ideas in relation to delineate how social policy and rules are related to domestic violence. Then it formulates the conceptual framework and later constructs its methodology. The study followed the quantitative approaches to bring out the intensity and its negative impact on women as well as society, The study sets various techniques of data collection such as questionnaire in the line of sociological perspectives.

Page(s): 11-15                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 16 April 2020

 Md. Shahidul Islam
LGED-JICA-2 Smale Scale Project, Bangladesh

 Dwipayan Roy
School of Law and Public Administration, China Three Gorges University

 Md. Omar Faruque
Department of Public Administration, Jagannth University, Dhaka, Bangladesh

 Md. Khaled Sifullah
Department of History, Jagannth University, Dhaka, Bangladesh

 Md Shovon Molla
School of Law and Public Administration, China Three Gorges University

[1] M A Mannan,VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN: MARITAL VIOLENCE IN RURAL BANGLADESH ,CPD-UNFPA Paper 20
[2] Taposh Nipa , In a detailed discussion of wife abuse flavia agnes,Thesis report,East-West University,Dhaka, Bangladesh
[3] Rachel, Marques (1993),Violence against women inBangladesh, Pakistan, Egypt,Sudan, Senegal and Yemen,Report prepared for Special Programme WID, Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs (DGIS)
[4] Ain o Shalish Kendro, Violance (Update jan-Feb2020,)Against Women ,Report paper

Md. Shahidul Islam, Dwipayan Roy, Md. Omar Faruque, Md. Khaled Sifullah, Md Shovon Molla “Violence against Women: A Case of Dhaka City” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.11-15 April 2020 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/11-15.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Artisanal Refining and Socioeconomic Development in Rivers State, Nigeria, 2007-2017

OGELE, Eziho Promise, Egobueze, Anthony – April 2020 Page No.: 16-25

Artisanal refining of petroleum products in Rivers State has become a source of revenue for young people in the oil-bearing communities. This study attempts to interrogate the socioeconomic implication of artisanal refining in the Rivers State. Applying the Relative Deprivation Theory, the study explored what prompted the emergence of artisanal refining and its socioeconomic implication on development in Rivers State. To achieve its objectives, the study adopted triangulation method as sources of data collection. Primary data obtained through questionnaire and interviews, was analysed through descriptive statistical and quantitative methods. While the content analysis was used in the analysis of the secondary data. The study unravelled that the flames which emanate from the process of artisanal refining of crude oil increase global warning because the process of refining is relatively unprofessional and lacked international standard of crude oil refining, which often leads to hazards and pollution. Also, the study discovered that artisanal refining increased the number of school dropouts, cult rivalry, arms proliferation, among others in the State and recommends that the creation of awareness on the consequences of artisanal refining on the ecosystem, among others would engender meaningful development in the State.

Page(s): 16-25                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 17 April 2020

 OGELE, Eziho Promise
Department of Political Science, Faculty of Social Sciences, Rivers State University, Nkpolu Oroworukwu, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

 Egobueze, Anthony
Department of Political Science, Faculty of Social Sciences, Rivers State University, Nkpolu Oroworukwu, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

[1] Asodike, J.D. and Ikpitibo, C.L. (2014). Basic Issues in Primary Education Delivery in Nigeria. European Scientific Journal January edition. vol. 8, No.1. Retrieved on 2019/04/16 from https://eujournal.org/index.php/esj/article/download/4608/4404
[2] Babalola, D. (2014). The Underdevelopment of Nigeria’s Niger Delta Region: Who is to Blame? Journal of Sustainable Development. Vol. 7, No. 3; Retrieved on 2019/04/16 from:http//www.ccsenet.org/jsd
[3] Balogun, T.F. (2015). Mapping Impacts of Crude Oil theft and Illegal Refineries on Mangrove of the Niger Delta of Nigeria with Remote Sensing Technology. Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences. Vol 6, No 3. Rome-Italy MCSER Pub
[4] Donovan, J. (2019). Nigeria: Shell Decries Crude Theft, Vandalism in Niger Delta. Retrieved December 5, 2019 from, https://royaldutchshellgroup.com/2019/09/10/nigeria-shell-decries-crude-theft-vandalism-in-niger-delta/
[5] Ebiri,K.(2018). Resource control will end crude oil theft, artisanal refining. The Guradian, July 11th. Retrieved on 2019/04/16 from: https://guardian.ng/news/resource-control-will-end-crude-oil-theft-artisanal-refining
[6] Egobueze, T. and Williams, I. (n.d,). The Oil Economy, Environmental Pollution and Conflict in the Niger Delta: Implication for National Security. In Sharma, P. (Eds) Research Trends in Environmental Science. Vol.1.India. AkiNik Pub.
[7] Giadom, F.D. (2018). The Port Harcourt ‘Black Soot’ Phenomenon: Causes and Effects on Public Health and Environment. Department of Geology, University of Port Harcourt. A paper presented at the Port Harcourt Clean Summit, Elkan Terrace Hotels, 27th June.
[8] Hutchful, E. (1985). Oil Companies and Environmental Pollution in Nigeria. In Ake,C. (Eds) Political Economy of Nigeria. London. Longman Pub.
[9] Ikanone, G. & Fyneface F.D. (2016). Policy Options for Addressing Artisanal Crude Oil Refineries and Pollution in Nigeria. Social Action briefing. No.12 October. Port Harcourt, Nigeria. Social Development Integrated Centre (Social Action) Pub.
[10] Ikanone, G., Egbo, M., Fyneface, D. F., Oduma, I. & Ebimondikonyo, E. (2014).CRUDE BUSINESS: Oil Theft, Communities and Poverty in Nigeria. Port Harcourt, Nigeria. Social Development Integrated Centre (Social Action) Pub.
[11] Ikelegbe, A. (2005). The Economy of Conflict in the Oil Rich Niger Delta Region of Nigeria. Nordic Journal of African Studies 14(2): 208–234.Retrieved on 2019/04/20 from: http://www.njas.helsinki.fi
[12] Naanen,B and Tolani, P.(2014). Private gain public disaster: Social context of illegal oil bunkering and artisanal refining in the Niger Delta. Port Harcourt, Nigeria. Niger Delta Environment and Relief Foundation Pub.
[13] Nyanaya, B.L. (2002) ‘Forest Resources’ in Alagoa, E.J. & Derefaka, A. (ed) The Land and People of Rivers State: Eastern Niger Delta. Port Harcourt: Onyoma Research Pub.
[14] Obenade, M. and Amangabara, G. (2012). The Socio-Economic Implications of Oil Theft and Artisanal Refining in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria. International Journal of Science and Research. Retrieved on 2019/04/16 from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/264534633
[15] Obenade, M. and Amangabara, G. (2014). Perspective: The Environmental Implications of Oil Theft and Artisanal Refining in the Niger Delta Region. Asian Review of Environmental and Earth Sciences Vol. 1, No. 2, 25-29. Retrieved on 2019/04/16 from: http://www.asianonlinejournals.com/index.php/AREES
[16] Paki, F.A.E. (2017). Economic exclusion is the cause of local refineries in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria: Origin and impacts. Nigerian Journal of Oil and Gas Technology. Vol 3. No.1. Retrieved on 2019/04/16 from: http//www.rsustnjogat.com/…/
[17] Pettigrew, T.F. (2015). Samuel Stouffer and Relative Deprivation. Social Psychology Quarterly. Vol. 78(1) 7–24. Retrieved on 2019/04/16 from: http://spq.sagepub.com
[18] Sahara Reporters, New York (2017). Dangerous But Lucrative: The Business Of “Crude Oil Cooking” In The Niger Delta. Sahara Reporters online. February 3rd. Retrieved on 2019/04/16 from: http://saharareporters.com/2017/02/03/dangerous-lucrative-business-
[19] Saro-Wiwa, K (1992). Genocide in Nigeria: The Ogoni Tragedy. London: Saros International Pub.
[20] Social Action Briefing (2016). Policy options for addressing artisanal crude oil refineries and pollution in Nigeria. No. 12, October. Retrieved from http://saction.org/books/SA_Briefing_12.pdf
[21] Stakeholder Democracy Network (SDN) (2013). Communities Not Criminals: Illegal oil refining in the Niger Delta. Port Harcourt, Nigeria. Stakeholder Democracy Network Pub.
[22] The Sun Newspaper Editorial (2018). The N2.6 trillion losses to crude oil theft. The Sun online newspaper. August 9th. Retrieved on 2019/04/16 from:https://www.sunnewsonline.com/n2-6trillion- loss-crude-oil-theft/
[23] United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) (2011). Environmental assessment of Ogoniland, Nairobi. Kenya: United Nations Environment Programme Pub.

OGELE, Eziho Promise, Egobueze, Anthony “The Artisanal Refining and Socioeconomic Development in Rivers State, Nigeria, 2007-2017” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.16-25 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/16-25.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Mobile Phone Usage among University Students in Kenya: A Recipe for Sustainable Development

Margaret Ongek, Veronicah Onjoro – April 2020 Page No.: 26-31

Kenya is one of the countries where mobile phones have revolutionized nearly all sectors of life of the citizenry regardless of age and place. In recent times however, many a learner especially those at university level strive hard to have a mobile phone for various purposes. Besides the most common usage of a phone which is communication, there are other purposes that these gadgets serve. This paper therefore sets out first to survey the various ways in which mobile phones are used by learners at university and secondly, make appraisals to enhance the impact of these devices on sustainable development.

Page(s): 26-31                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 17 April 2020

 Margaret Ongek
Department of Curriculum, Instruction & Educational Media, University of Kabianga, Kenya

 Veronicah Onjoro
Mount Kenya University, Kenya

[1] A.A. Akanferi, L. K.Aziale, I. Asampana, “An Empirical Study of Mobile Phone Usage among Young Adults in Ghana: From the viewpoint of University Students” International Journal of Computer Applications (0975-8887),Volume 98-No.5,pp.15-21, July 2014.
[2] S. Bhuvaneswari, A Study on Mobile Phone Usage Among College2016.
[3] R.Jain, “The Many Uses of a Mobile Phone”, in Digital Business Standard. March24, 2005.
[4] J. Irungu, “How Mobile Phone Impacts Today’s Daily Life”. Digital Standard.9th October2018,
[5] D. North,K.Johnston,andJ.Ophoff, “The Use of Mobile Phones by South African University Students,”Available at https://www.researcggate.net/publication/275947037-The-Use-of-Mobile-Phones-by-South-African-Universities.
[6] J.P.Puro, “Finland a Mobile Culture”, Available at January, 2002.
[7] Market Analysis & Consumer Research Organisation, A Report on Study of Mobile Phone Usage among The Teenagers and Youth in Mumbai-ITU”. Available at https//.www.itu.int/osg/spu/ni/futwemobile/soci/sociall/aspat, MACRO 2004.
[8] J. Ngunjiri, “Kenya Tops in Phone Internet Traffic Globally”,Available at https://www.businessdailyafrica.com/corporatetech/kenya-tops-inphone-internet-traffic-1425847. March 20,2018.
[9] S.C.Quist, and H.O. Quarshie, “The Use of Mobile Phones among Undergraduate Students –a case in Ghana” Journal of Academic Research Special Edition,May 2016, pp.80-89.
[10] A. Bianchi, &J.G. Phillips, “Psychological Predictors of Problem Mobile Phone Use,” Journal ofCyber Psychology & Behavior. Volume 8, Number 1, pp39-51, 2005.
[11] N. Waburi, “The Contribution of Mobile Phones to the Kenyan Economy” Available at msra.or.ke/documents/conferences/2009/THE-IMPACT-OF MOBILE-TELEPHONY-pdf.
[12] S. Parasuraman et.al, Smartphone Usage and increased Risk of Mobile Phone Addiction: A Concurrent Study,International Journal of Pharmaceutical Investigation.,7(3),pp.125-131,July-September 2017.
[13] L. Manica,&M. Vescovi, Mobile Telephony in Kenya. Is It Making the Life to better? Available at https://www.researchgate.net/publication/228900464-mobile-Telephony-in-Kenya-is-it-Making-the life .
[14] B.M.Casey, Linking Psychological Attributes to SmartPhone Addiction, Face-to-face Communication, Present Absence and Social Capital, School of Journalism and Communication. Unpublished Graduation Project, TheChineseUniversity of HongKong.
[15] B. Woodcock,Considering the Smartphone Learner An Investigation into Student Interest in the Use of Personal Technology to Enhance their Learning .Student Engagement and Experience Journal. Volume 1(1): pp. 1-15, 2012.
[16] M.M. Rambitan, “The Effect of Smartphone on Students’ Critical Thinking Skill,” American Journal of Educational Research.,3(2), pp.243-249, 2015.
[17] M. Jwaifell, “The Intensity of Social Networks Group Use among the Students of Jordanian Universities”Available at https://www.researchgate.net/publication/258440109-The-Intensity-of-Social-Networks-Group-Use.
[18] E. M. Mojaye, “Mobile Phone Usage Among Nigerian University Students and Its Impact on Teaching and Learning,” Global Journal of Arts kHumanities and Social Sciences, Vol.3, No.1, pp29-38, January 2015.
[19] M. Sarwar, and T. R.Soomro, “Impact of SmartPhones on Society,”European Journal of Scientific ResearchVol.98 No 2, pp. 216-226 March, 2013.
[20] E. Nurvitadhi,Trends in Mobile Computing: A study of Mobile Phone Usage in the United States and Japan. A Thesis submitted to Oregon State University, 2005.
[21] G.A. Walton, “Phone Addiction is Real-And So Are Its Mental Health Risks,” December11,2017 Available at https://www.forbes.com/sites/alicegwalton/2017/12/11phone-addiction-is-real-and-
[22] A. Mengistu, and S. Imende “Kenya’s Mobile Tech Revolution. Nairobi takes its place among the global IT community” in Selamta, The Magazine of Ethiopian AirlinesJan–Feb 2013.
[23] A. Vaida, V. Pathak, A. Vaidya, “ Mobile Phone Use Among Youth,”International Journal of Applied Research and Studies, Volume V, Issue 3 March 2016.
[24] S. Young, “How to Overcome your Phone Addiction”inIndependent,Monday, 22 January 2018

Margaret Ongek, Veronicah Onjoro “Mobile Phone Usage among University Students in Kenya: A Recipe for Sustainable Development” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.26-31 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/26-31.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Hypertension in Bangladesh: Identification of the Potential Risk Factors

Sabrina Rahaman, Sharmin Islam, S.M. Nasim Azad, and Md. Farhad Hossain – April 2020 Page No.: 32-36

Nowadays Hypertension is one of the egregious public health problems in the world. This is a dramatically increasing health problem in Southeast Asia, particularly in Bangladesh. Many people do not have any idea about the medical facilities. This paper aim is to identify the relationship between hypertension and the risk factors associated with diseases in Bangladesh. Data has been collected from BIRDEM (Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine, and Metabolic Disorders) and we have a total of 144267 patient’s information that was registered at BIRDEM in the year 2014-2015, after dropping missing information we got valid information of 9620 patients. The variables age, sex, place of residence, education, occupation, physical exercise, income, heredity, and weight has been considered as potential risk factors for hypertension. The binary logistic regression model has been applied to detect the impact of risk factors from selecting the independent variable of the Pearson chi-square test and finally calculated the odds ratio (OR) for each independent variable. All statistical analysis was completed using R.

Page(s): 32-36                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 18 April 2020

 Sabrina Rahaman
Department of Statistics, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University, Gopalganj-8100, Bangladesh

 Sharmin Islam
Department of Statistics, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University, Gopalganj-8100, Bangladesh

 S.M. Nasim Azad
Department of Statistics, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University, Gopalganj-8100, Bangladesh

 Md. Farhad Hossain
Department of Statistics, Comilla University, Cumilla, Bangladesh

[1] Alwan, A., “Global Status Report on Noncommunicable Diseases 2010.” World Health Organization,ISBN: 978 92 4 156422 9.
[2] Lim SS, Vos T, Flaxman Ad, Danaei G, Shibuya K, Adair-Rohani H, et al. “A comparative risk assessment of disease and injury attributable to 67 risk factor clusters in 21 regiond, 1990-2010: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010”. The Lancet, 2012; 380(9859):2224-60.
[3] Pearson, Karl (1900). “On the criterion that a given system of deviations from the probable in the case of a correlated system of variables is such that it can be reasonably supposed to have arisen from random sampling” (PDF). Philosophical Magazine. Series 5.50(302):157 157.
[4] Malik A., “Congentital and acquired heart diseases : (A survey of 7062 persons).” Bangladesh Med Res Council Bull . 19762(2):155-119 PMID: 1037368.
[5] Alauddin A., et al. “Hypertension and associated risk factors in some selected rural areas of Bangladesh.” International Journal of Research in Medical Sciences, vol. 2, DO – 10.5455/2320-6012.ijrms20140816.
[6] Chowdhury S., Chowdhury P., “Prevalence of Hypertension among the Bangladeshi Adult Population: A meta-analysis of Studies between 2004 and 2014.”Cardiovascular Journal, Vol. 7, No. 2, 2015.
[7] Anupama, Y.J., et al. “Hypertension is an important risk determinant for chronic kidney disease: result from a cross-sectional, observational study from a rural population in South India.”Journal of Human Hypertension, Vol. 31, No. 5, 2017, P. 327.
[8] Chowdhury et al. “Hypertension among adults in Bangladesh; evidence from a national cross-sectional survey”. BMC Cardiovascular Disorder (2016) 16:22. DOI 10.1186/s12872-016-0197-3.
[9] Ahmed A, et al. “Hypertension and associated risk factors in some selected rural areas of Bangladesh”. Int J Res Med Sci.2014 Aug; 2(3):925-931. DOI:10.5455/2320-6012.ijrms 20140816.
[10] Dickinson HO, Nicolson D, et al. “Magnesium supplementation for the management of primary hypertension in adults”. The collaboration and Published in the Cochrane Library 2006, Issue 3.

Sabrina Rahaman, Sharmin Islam, S.M. Nasim Azad, and Md. Farhad Hossain “Hypertension in Bangladesh: Identification of the Potential Risk Factors” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.32-36 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/32-36.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Implementation of School Based Management Program (MBS) in Improving School Quality

Puji Waras Prihanto, Sudjarwo, Risma M Sinaga- April 2020 Page No.: 37-39

This study aims to explain the Implementation of School Based Management (SBM) Program in Improving School Quality in SMA Negeri 1 Terbanggi Besar, Central Lampung. The method used in this research is qualitative method. Data collection techniques in this research are interview techniques, observation and documentation. The data analysis technique used in this study is quality analysis through data reduction, data presentation and conclusion. The results of this study indicated that: (1) School independence in complying the availability of teaching and educational staff was sufficient, and school independence in complying the availability of facilities and infrastructure was sufficient and adequate. (2) School partnership/cooperation was already good, it can be seen from the internal relationship of the school that has been well established through the working meeting, briefing and MGMP. Whereas with external parties, it can be proven that schools have cooperated with 8 institutions with a proven MoU. (3) Form of Participation can be seen through the existence of financial support, facilities and personnel provided by school stakeholders in the implementation of school programs. (4) Transparency conducted by schools has also been good, it can be seen from the openness of schools in conveying information through meeting activities, school notice boards and school websites. (5) School accountability, financial accountability was done by making a report in the form of a school accountability report (school LPJ), then the results of the report were reported to the central education office, the provincial education office, the school committee, and BPK (the Supreme Audit Board).

Page(s): 37-39                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 18 April 2020

 Puji Waras Prihanto
Master of Social Science Education, FKIP Universitas Lampung, Indonesia

 Sudjarwo
Master of Social Science Education, FKIP Universitas Lampung, Indonesia

 Risma M Sinaga
Master of Social Science Education, FKIP Universitas Lampung, Indonesia

[1] Dharma, Agus. 2003. Manajemen Supervisi: Petunjuk Praktis Bagi Para. Supervisor. Jakarta: Raja Grafindo Persada.
[2] JurnalAdministrasiPendidikanPascasarjanaUniversitasSyiahKuala.Vol.3 Nomor1, 2015
[3] Moleong, Lexy J. 2004. Metodologi Penelitian Kualitatif, Bandung : PT RemajaRosdakarya
[4] Peraturan Pemerintah Republik Indonesia Nomor19Tahun2005,Standar Nasional Pendidikan. Jakarta :Lembaga NegaraRepublik Indonesia, 2005.
[5] Peraturan Menteri Pendidikan NasionalNomor 24 Tahun2007,Standar Saranadan Prasarana Sekolah/Madrasah PendidikanUmum.Jakarta: MenteriPendidikanNasional, 2007.
[6] Zamroni.ManajemenPendidikanSuatuUsahanuntukMeningkatkanMutuSekolah.Jakarta: Ombak, 2013.

Puji Waras Prihanto, Sudjarwo, Risma M Sinaga, “The Implementation of School Based Management Program (MBS) in Improving School Quality” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.37-39 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/37-39.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Development of Student Activity Sheet Based on Student Team Achievement Division to Increase Student Interest in Class X

Deni Ardiyanto, Pargito, Sugeng Widodo – April 2020 Page No.: 40-43

The purpose of this research to produce a student activity sheet (LKPD) based on the model of student team achievement division (STAD), and know the increase student interest. Type of research is the Research and Development (R & D) Borg and Gall. Subjects in this research were students X.IPS1 Senior High School State 1 Way Jepara, amount32 students. The technique of collecting data using interview, observation, and questionnaires. Based on the results concluded that the results of test 83.3`3 media expert, material expert testing 85.41 and 95.83 linguists test. Enhancement gainof student interest using LKPD includes 0.66 attention indicator, 0.68 happy indicator, 0.69 indicator involvement, and 0.72 interest indicator.LKPD by using the model STAD is still not able to make all the students maximum in achieving high classification with obtained N-gain 0.68 after using LKPD based on STAD model.

Page(s): 40-43                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 20 April 2020

 Deni Ardiyanto
Master of Social Sciences Education, Faculty of Training and Education, University of Lampung, Indonesia

 Pargito
Master of Social Sciences Education, Faculty of Training and Education, University of Lampung, Indonesia

 Sugeng Widodo
Master of Social Sciences Education, Faculty of Training and Education, University of Lampung, Indonesia

[1] Borg, WR & Gall, MD, 2003. Educational Research: an introductions, (5th ed). Longman: New York
[2] Prastowo. 2012. Free Creative Creating Innovative Teaching Material. DIVA Press: Yogyakarta
[3] Slameto. 2010. Learning and Factors Affecting. Rineka Copyright: Jakarta
[4] Slavin, Robert E. 2015. Cooperative Learning Theory, Research and Practice. Nusa Media: Bandung
[5] Smaldino, SE, Lowther, DL, and Russell, JD 2011. Instructional Technology and Media for Learning – Instructional Technology and Media for Learning: Ninth Edition. Kencana Prime Media Group: Jakarta
[6] Trianto. 2010. Innovative Design Progressive Learning Model. Kencana: Jakarta

Deni Ardiyanto, Pargito, Sugeng Widodo “Development of Student Activity Sheet Based on Student Team Achievement Division to Increase Student Interest in Class X ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.40-43 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/40-43.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Features of Written Discourse

Muhammad Abubakar Abdullahi, Shehu Baraya, Aisha Abubakar Yasmin, Umukalthum Abubakar, Suwaiba Umar Dodo – April 2020 Page No.: 44-45

Broadly speaking, the study of written discourse is the study of written language and language use consisting of more than a single sentence, but connected by some system of related topics. The written discourse is often times narrowly construed as a form of corrected sequence of sentences, phrases, this paper attempts to highlight on the features of written discourse as a topic in the linguistic subfield of pragmatics.

Page(s): 44-45                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 20 April 2020

 Muhammad Abubakar Abdullahi
College of General Studies (English Unit), Umaru Ali Shinkafi Polytechnic Sokoto Nigeria

 Shehu Baraya
College of General Studies (English Unit), Umaru Ali Shinkafi Polytechnic Sokoto Nigeria

 Aisha Abubakar Yasmin
College of General Studies (English Unit), Umaru Ali Shinkafi Polytechnic Sokoto Nigeria

 Umukalthum Abubakar
College of General Studies (English Unit), Umaru Ali Shinkafi Polytechnic Sokoto Nigeria

 Suwaiba Umar Dodo
College of General Studies (English Unit), Umaru Ali Shinkafi Polytechnic Sokoto Nigeria

[1] Adrian Akmajian An Introduction to Language and Communication, Cambridem USA: MT Press.
[2] Alexander, G. (1988) ‘How not to be confused about Linguistics’, In Alexander G. (ed) Reflections on CHONSKY, pp 90-107, Basil Blackwell Ld, Oxford, UK.
[3] Donna, J.N. (1996) Linguistics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
[4] Isidore C. Nnadi, Essential of English Com. Skills.
[5] Lyons (1977) Chomsky, Oxford University Press.
[6] Radford A (1997) Syntax (A) Minimalist Introduction Cambridge University Press New York.

Muhammad Abubakar Abdullahi, Shehu Baraya, Aisha Abubakar Yasmin, Umukalthum Abubakar, Suwaiba Umar Dodo, “Features of Written Discourse ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.44-45 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/44-45.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Nigerian Teachers’perception of Applying Technology Task Based Approach at Basic Education Level

Iliyasu Hussaini, Lee Ming Foong, Danjuma Shehu Ibrahim- April 2020 Page No.: 46-50

Though integration of technology in second language teaching has received enormous attention, many language teachers in Nigeria are still struggling to handle this development. The aim of this study is to explore Nigerian teachers’ perceptions of using technology task based approach to second language teaching in the classroom. A self-designed teachers’ perception questionnaire was used for data collection in the study. Descriptive research design was employed in this study. The study involves fifteen primary school teachers from Lamido primary school Dakingari, Nigeria. The study sought teachers’ perception towards applying, integrating technology in teaching. Mean scores, percentages and frequencies were used in the data analysis. The findings indicated that teachers have positive attitudes towards the use of TTBA in language teaching. Teachers believe that the integration of technology in TTBA is of great importance in language teaching. In their opinion, lack of the technical skills necessary for technology integration in the classroom hinders their application of technology in the classroom. Another factor that affects the application of TTBA as indicated by the teachers is that this approach is time consuming, it requires a lot of time due to multiple stages involved in this approach. It is recommended that teachers should utilize all the steps and procedures designed in TTBA so as to improve their pedagogical strategies as well as to enhance student’s language skills.

Page(s): 46-50                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 22 April 2020

 Iliyasu Hussaini
Universal Basic Education Commission, Abuja, Nigeria
Faculty of Technical & Vocational Education, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia

 Lee Ming Foong
Faculty of Technical & Vocational Education, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia

 Danjuma Shehu Ibrahim
Department of Science Education, Gombe State University, Gombe, Nigeria

Abiola, O. O. F. (2013). Students’ Perception of Teachers’ Factors in the Teaching and Learning of English Language in Nigerian Secondary Schools. Journal of Educational and Social Research, 3(3), 173–180.
[2] Ajibola, M. A. (2010). Confronting the Challenges of Teaching English Language as a Second Language In Nigeria. Journal of the Nigeria English Studies Association, 13(2), 95–105.
[3] Asokhia, M. O. (2009). Improvisation/Teaching Aids : Aid to Effective Teaching of English Language. International Journal of Education Science, 1(2), 79–85.
[4] Babai, H., & Sadeghi, K. (2009). Characteristics of an Effective English Language Teacher as Perceived by Iranian Teachers and Learners of English. English Language Teaching, 2(4), 130–143.
[5] Chaisiri, T. (2010). Implementing a Genre Pedagogy to the Teaching of Writing in a University Context in Thailand. Language Education in Asia, 1(1), 181–199.
[6] Elnaga, A. A. (2012). The Impact of perception on Work behavior. Journal of Business and Management Review, 2(2), 56–71.
[7] Gadanya, W. L. (2015). Perception of Nigerian Students toward the Role of Information and Communication Technology (ICT ) in Enhancing Language Learning. Journal of Emerging Trends in Educational Research and Policy Studies, 6(7), 305–312.
[8] Haider, G. A. (2013). Perceptions of ESL Teachers towards CALL. Implications for English Language Teaching at the Intermediate Level. Language in India, 13(8), 204–238.
[9] Kinik, B. (2014). Teachers ’ Perceptions towards Technology Use and Integration to Teach English. In Conference proceedings. ICT for language learning (p. 456). libreria universitaria.
[10] Kozma, R. B. (2003). Technology and Classroom Practices_Kozma. Journal of Research on Technology and Education, 36(1), 1–14.
[11] Lidice, A., & Saglam, G. (2012). Perceptions of In-Service Teachers Regarding Technology Integrated English Language Teaching. Turkish Online Journal of Qualitative Inquiry, 3(3), 1–14.
[12] Nikian, S., Nor, F. M., & Aziz, M. A. (2013). Malaysian Teachers’ Perception of Applying Technology in the Classroom. Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences, 103, 621–627.
[13] Park, C. N., & Son, J. B. (2009). Implementing Computer-Assisted Language Learning in the EFL Classroom : Teachers ’ Perceptions and Perspectives. International Journal of Pedagogies and Learning, 5(2), 80–101.
[14] Xiongyong, C., & Samuel, M. (2011). Perceptions and Implementation of Task-based Language Teaching among Secondary School EFL Teachers in China. International Journal of Business and Social Science, 2(24), 292–302.
[15] Yaratan, H., & Kural, C. (2010). Middle school English language teachers’ perceptions of instructional technology implementation in North Cyprus. Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology, 9(2), 161–174.

Iliyasu Hussaini, Lee Ming Foong, Danjuma Shehu Ibrahim “Nigerian Teachers’perception of Applying Technology Task Based Approach at Basic Education Level” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.46-50 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/46-50.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Effectiveness of Google Classroom as a Digital Tool in Teaching and Learning: Students’ Perceptions

Iliyasu Hussaini, Sawida Ibrahim, Bashir Wali, Ibrahim Libata, Usman Musa – April 2020 Page No.: 71-77

The aim of this study is to evaluate Students’ perceptions on the effectiveness of Google Classroom as a Digital tool in Teaching and Learning. The study was conducted through a Survey Research Design to investigate the Students’ Perceptions. The population of study consists of all UG II Undergraduate Students, Faculty of Education, Kebbi State University of Science and Technology Aliero (KSUSTA). Data analysis was conducted using Descriptive Statistics. The results of the study indicated that Google Classroom is effective in improving Students access and attentiveness towards learning, knowledge and skills gained through Google Classroom makes Students to be active learners, as a Digital Tool, it provides meaningful feedback to both Students and Parents. However, Poor network hinders students from effective utilization of Google Classroom; thus, submitting their work late. Therefore, teachers should integrate the conventional teaching with Google Classroom to improve Students’ Performance. Google Classroom should also be a form of assessing Students’ Assessment through online Assignments and Quizzes; hence making Students to participate actively in Educational Technology Classes. The University should also provide a standard network to enable Students join Google Classroom and submit their assignments on time.

Page(s): 71-77                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 22 April 2020

 Iliyasu Hussaini
Universal Basic Education Commission, Abuja, Nigeria

 Sawida Ibrahim
Faculty of Education, Kebbi State University of Science and Technology, Aliero

 Bashir Wali
Faculty of Education, Kebbi State University of Science and Technology, Aliero

 Ibrahim Libata
Faculty of Education, Kebbi State University of Science and Technology, Aliero

 Usman Musa
Faculty of Education, Kebbi State University of Science and Technology, Aliero

[1] Bell, K. (2015). The Teacher’s Guide to Google Classroom.
[2] Fahrurrozi, U. Hasanah, R. S. D. (2019). “Integrated Learning Design Based on Google Classroom to Improve Student Digital Literacy,” 2019 5th International Conference on Education and Technology (ICET), Malang, Indonesia (pp. 108-111.).
[3] Geertsema, J. (2014). Technology and the role of the teacher. CDTL Brief, 17(1), 2–3.
[4] Keane, D. T. (2012). Leading with Technology. The Australian Educational Leader, 34(2), 44.
[5] Mafa, K. R. (2018). Capabilities of Google Classroom as a Teaching and Learning Tool in Higher Education, (November), 3–8.
[6] Nizal, I., Shaharanee, M., Jamil, J. M., Syamimi, S., & Rodzi, M. (2016). The Application of Google Classroom as a Tool for Teaching and Learning, 8(10), 5–8.
[7] Salavati, S. (2013). Novel Use of Mobile and Ubiquitous Technologies in Everyday Teaching and Learning Practices: A Complex Picture. Licentiate. Linnaeus University, Sweden. Växjö: Linnaeus University Press. (2013).
[8] Salavati, S. (2016). Use of Digital Technologies in Education: The Complexity of Teachers’ Everyday Practice. Department of Informatics, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden: Doctoral dissertation.

Iliyasu Hussaini, Sawida Ibrahim, Bashir Wali, Ibrahim Libata, Usman Musa “Effectiveness of Google Classroom as a Digital Tool in Teaching and Learning: Students’ Perceptions” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.71-77 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/71-77.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Malnutrition… An Unsolved Social Predicament with Special reference to Buldana District of India

Dr. Sangita K. Walse – April 2020 Page No.: 55-57

During the nineties, India became a liberalized economy in the world. Economic Growth picked the momentum in India. It boosted a steady and positive growth in social indices of elimination of poverty, employment and health. Maharashtra being one of the leading states, it has higher percent of maintaining equilibrium of social standards with economical growth. However, the problem of Malnutrition is an unsolved social problem. In this paper, the descriptive method of study has been used. Our results shows the under reporting may be major cause. Despite of efforts the malnutrition is the serious problem observed in women and children underprivileged section. Serious and foresighted efforts are required to finish the malnutrition from society.

Page(s): 55-57                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 23 April 2020

 Dr. Sangita K. Walse
Associate Professor, Department of Home Economics, SBB Art College, Sindkhed Raja Dist. Buldana M.S., India

[1] National Family Health Survey- 4; District Fact Sheet Buldana (2015-16)
[2] National Family Health Survey-3 Maharashtra Report
[3] National Family Health Survey-4 Maharashtra Report (2015-16), April 2018
[4] Indian Express Report by Tabassum Barnagarwala | Mumbai | Published: April 16, 2018)
[5] A special Report on Malnutrition, by Jyoti Shelar published on June 30, 2019 in The Hindu.
[6] PIB Release on Ministry of Women and Child Development dated June 28, 2019.
[7] Global Nutrition Report, 28 November 2018

Dr. Sangita K. Walse “Malnutrition… An Unsolved Social Predicament with Special reference to Buldana District of India” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.55-57 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/55-57.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Information and Communication Technologies Use in Niger Delta University Libraries: Problems and Prospects

Etebu, Abraham Tabor (Ph.D), DIME, Ishioma Angela – April 2020 Page No.: 58-63

This research work focused on Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) use in the Niger Delta University libraries, with aims of ascertaining their problems and prospects for improvement. Two research questions guided the study. It sought to as certain the problems of ICT use in NDU libraries and to examine the prospects of ICT use in NDU libraries. Descriptive survey design was employed for the study and the entire population was the university community while the sample size was one hundred and fifty (150) registered library users. The instrument for data collection was questionnaire. Out of 150 copies of the questionnaire distributed to the respondents 140 copies were properly filled and returned representing 93.33%. To analyse the data the following descriptive statistical measures were employed: frequency table, simple percentage and mean ( ). The findings revealed that there are factors militating against the effective use of ICTs by the library users, ranging from inadequate funds, poor or erratic power supply, inadequate number of effective Internet Service Providers (ISP) to lack of policy framework on ICTs in the country. Also, strategies as prospects include; proper ICT seminars/workshops in the universities, provision of sufficient ICT facilities, government support on provision of stable power supply, reduction of telecommunication/computer importation tariffs, provision of adequate and effective internet services provider (ISP), establishment of National Research Centre for ICT, while others were provision of grants and aids by government and university and staff training and orientation. Based on the findings, it was recommended that efforts should be made to place a high premium/priority on application of ICTs in the services of university libraries.

Page(s): 58-63                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 23 April 2020

 Etebu, Abraham Tabor (Ph.D)
Department of Library and Information Science, Faculty of Education, Niger Delta University, Amassoma, Wilberforce Island, Bayelsa State, Nigeria

 DIME, Ishioma Angela
Department of Library and Information Science, Faculty of Education, Niger Delta University, Amassoma, Wilberforce Island, Bayelsa State, Nigeria

[1] Agboola,I.O. (2009). Printed and Electronic Resources Utilization by Agricultural Science Students in Nigerian Universities. An International Journal of Information and Communication Technology ICT.6 (1).
[2] Aina, L.O. (2004). Library and Information Science Text for Africa. Ibadan. Third World Information Services Limited 328 – 329.
[3] Amkpa, S.A. and Abba, T. (2010). Factors inhibiting the implement of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) in Nigerian University Libraries. International Journal of Information and Communication Technology 6 (1),33-43.
[4] Audu, C.D. (2006). Internet Availability and Use by Postgraduate Students of University of Nigeria, Nsukka. Global Review of Library and Information Science 2 (2).
[5] Bartlet, (2002). Bartlett, A. 2002. ICT and IPM. Farmers, FAO and Field Schools: Bringing IPM to the Grass Roots in Asia.United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation, Bangkok.
[6] Etebu, A. (2010).ICT Availability in Niger Delta University Libraries.Library Philosophy and
[7] Practice (e-journal) retrieved 3/12/19 from: https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/342/
[8] Faboyinde, E. O. (2006). The State of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in Selected Libraries in Lagos and Ibadan Metropolis. Paper presented at the 44th Annual Conference and Annual General Meeting of the Nigerian Library Association, Abuja, 2006. 61-68.
[9] Jameel, A. S., Abdul-Karem, M., & Mahmood, N. Z. (2017). A Review of the Impact of ICT on BusinessFirms, International Journal of Latest Engineering and Management Research, Volume 02. Issue 01. January 2017. PP. 15-19
[10] Jamaal, A. (2018) Challenges Facing Students Toward ICT Library Adoption. Conference: International Conference on Accounting, Business, Economics and Politics, At Erbil-Iraq.April 2018https://www.researchgate.net/publication/324872106_Challenges_Facing_Students_Toward_ICT_Library_Adoption
[11] Krubu, Dorcas E and Osawaru, Kingsley E (2011).The Impact of Information and Communication (ICT) in Nigerian University Libraries. Available at digitalcommons. unl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article1614&context=libphilprac. (Accessed January 17, 2013)
[12] Lawal–Solarin, E. (2013). The Use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in Academic Libraries in Nigeria: A Case Study of Covenant University Library Ota, Nigeria.
[13] Liverpool, L (2001). Modernizing Campus Information and Communication Systems in Nigeria.Paper presented at The University of Iowa, April 2001. Retrieved 18/8/06 from:http://www.widernet.org/Saweda/TWDSThesis/thesishtmlversion.htm
[14] Mezieobi, D. I. (2006). Actualizing the Social Studies Curricula in Nigerian Schools through the Instrumentality of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs). A paper presented at Institute Education conference on Information and Communication Technology in the Service of Education. University of Nigeria, Nsukka 15- 18 May.
[15] Nwachukwu, V.N. (2005). Information Technologies Application to libraries in developing countries: The need for caution. In Global Review of Library and Information Sciences 1(1)
[16] Nweke, R. (2006) Repositioning Nigerian Youths with ICT. Retrieved 26/7/06 from: ITREALMS online.
[17] Obuh, A. O. (2009) Use of Electronic Resources by Postgraduate Students of the Department of Library and Information Science of Delta State University (DELSU) Abraka, Nigeria. Library Philosophy and Practice(2009).
[18] Odeh, P. (2011). Utilization of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) By Students in Federal University Libraries in North- Central Zone of Nigeria. Master degree dissertation submitted to the Department of Library and Information ScienceUniversity of Nigeria, Nsukka, August, 2011
[19] Oketunji, I. (2002). Application of Information technologies in Nigeria: problems and prospects: paper presented at 10th Biennial conference of the National Association of Library and Information Science Educators. P.7-20.
[20] Okore, A. M. (2005). The challenges of information and communication technology (ICT) for Nigerian academic libraries. Global Review of Library and Information Science, 1 (1), 84-93
[21] Onyeneke, O.C (2007) Information and Communication Technology in Library Services in Tertiary Institutions in Nigeria H-JOLIS. Heartland Journal of Library Science, 1.(2) December,2007.
[22] Uhegbu, A.N. and Igwe, K.I. (2006).Information and Communications Technology ICT and the Millennium Development Goals. The Information Technologist 3(2): 97-100

Etebu, Abraham Tabor (Ph.D), DIME, Ishioma Angela “Information and Communication Technologies Use in Niger Delta University Libraries: Problems and Prospects” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.58-63 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/58-63.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Role of Motivational Theories in Shaping Teacher Motivation and Performance: A Review of Related Literature
Elock Emvula Shikalepo – April 2020 – Page No.: 64-76

Various scholars have theorised models of motivation, which laid a strong foundation for employers to motivate their employees. The purpose of this study was to review the motivational theories and explain their collective emphasis, with the ultimate aim of generating theoretical measures whose considerations and implementations could motivate teachers to improve quality of output in schools, as a measure of their work performance.
The study reviewed theories related to Hierarchy of Needs theory, Two-Factor theory, Existence, Relatedness and Growth (ERG) theory, Expectant theory, Equity theory and the Goal-setting theory. The theories were reviewed, analysed thematically and discussed within the context of education and teacher motivation, which was the focus of the study.
The study found out that theoretical factors that influence teacher motivation and performance, relates to the work itself, rewards and compensation, the working environment and professional growth and development opportunities. Employers should ensure that these factors are well cultivated as they serve as motivators for teachers to work optimally and improve school performance.

Page(s): 64-76                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 24 April 2020

 Elock Emvula Shikalepo
Namibia University of Science and Technology, Namibia

[1] Adjei, H. & Amofa, A.K. (2014).Teacher motivation in Senior High Schools in the Cape Coast Metropolis.European Journal of Education and Development Psychology, 2(1):18-25.
[2] Akinfolarin C.A. &Akomolafe J.M. (2011). Re-branding and managing conflicts among academic staff of Nigerian universities. Sociological and Psychological Perspectives, 1(1):15-38.
[3] Akpan, I.U. (2013). The influence of motivation of teachers’ and their incentives in AkwaIbom State, Nigeria. International Journal of Modern Management Sciences, 2(2):87-93.
[4] Alam, M.T. &Farid, S. (2011). Factors affecting teachers’ motivation. International Journal of Business and Social Science, 2(1):298-304.
[5] Alderfer, C.P. (1972). Existence, relatedness and growth. New York: Free Press.
[6] Armstrong, M. (2009). Armstrong’s handbook of human resource management practice. London: Kogan Page.
[7] Beardwell, J. &Claydon, T. (2007). Human Resource Management (5th Ed.). Great Brian: Pearson Education Limited.
[8] Beverly, A.P, Vicki, J.R. & George, J.P. (2008).Why do they stay? Elementary teachers’ perceptions of job satisfaction and retention. The Professional Educator, 32 (2)1-17.
[9] Buckley, J., Schneider, M. & Shang, Y. (2004). The effects of school facility quality on teacher retention in urban school districts. Retrieved from: http://www.ncef.org/pubs/teacherretention.pdf [Accessed on: 07 July 2015].
[10] Camp, W.G. (2001). Formulating and evaluating theoretical frameworks for career and technical education research. Journal of Vocational Education Research, 26(1):4–25.
[11] Carraher, R., Gibson, A. & Buckley, R. (2006). Compensation in the Baltic and the USA. Baltic Journal of Management, 1:7-23.
[12] Cartwright, S. & Holmes, N. (2006). The meaning of work: The challenge of regaining employee engagement and reducing cynicism. Human Resource Management Review, 16:199-208.
[13] Caulton, J.R. (2012). The development and use of the theory of ERG: A literature review. Emerging Leadership Journeys, 5(1):2-8.
[14] Christopher, N. (2014). Factors influencing secondary school teachers’ job satisfaction levels in Lang’ata District, Nairobi, Kenya Department of Education: University of Eldoret. International Journal of Community and Cooperative Studies, 1(2):12-26.
[15] Covey, S.R. (2004). The 8th habit: From effectiveness to greatness. New York: Simon and Schuster.
[16] Crooks, T. (1997). Motivation theory: Moving beyond Maslow. ELT Management, 23:18-20.
[17] Dartey-Baah, K. &Amoako, G.K. (2011).Application of Frederick Herzberg’s Two-Factor theory in assessing and understanding employee motivation at work: A Ghanaian perspective.European Journal of Business and Management,3(9):1-8.
[18] De Gieter, S., De Cooman, R., Hofmans, J., Pepermans, R. &Jegers, M. (2012). Pay level satisfaction and psychological reward satisfaction as mediators of the organisational justice-turnover intention relationship. International Studies of Management &Organization, 42:50-67.
[19] Dugguh, S.I. & Dennis, A. (2014). Job satisfaction theories: Traceability to employee performance in organisations. IOSR Journal of Business and Management (IOSR-JBM), 16(5):11-18.
[20] Gagne, M. &Deci, L.D. (2005). Self-determination theory and work Motivation. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 26:331-362.
[21] Gatsinzi, P., Jesse, R. &Makewa, N.P. (2014). Work and school related variables in teacher motivation in Gasabo District, Rwanda. Journal of Education and Training, 1(2):262-275.
[22] Gawel, J.E. (1997). Herzberg’s theory of motivation and Maslow’s hierarchy of needs.Washinton DC: ERIC.
[23] Giacometti, K.S.M. (2005).Factors affecting job satisfaction and retention of beginning teachers. Unpublished Research Report. Virginia: Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.
[24] Grant, A.M. & Shin, J. (2011). Work motivation: Directing, energizing and maintaining effort (and research). In Ryan, R. M. (Ed.). Oxford handbook of motivation (pp. 505-519). Pennsylvania: Oxford University Press.
[25] Hafiza N.S., Shah, S.S., Jamsheed, H. & Zaman, K. (2011). Relationship between rewards and employee’s motivation in the non-profit organizations of Pakistan. Business Intelligence Journal, 4(2):327-334.
[26] Harter, J.K., Schmidt, F.L. & Hayes, T.L. (2002). Business-unit-level relationship between employee satisfaction, employee engagement, and business outcomes: A meta-analysis. Journal of Applied Psychology, 87:268-279.
[27] Herzberg, F., Mausner, B. & Snyderman, B.S. (1993). The motivation to work. New Brunswick: Transaction.
[28] Hofmans, J. (2012). Individual differences in equity models.Psicológica, 33:473-482.
[29] Hofstede, G. (1980). Motivation, leadership and organisation: Do American theories apply abroad? Organisational Dynamics, 12:42-63.
[30] Horwitz, M.F., Heng, T.C. &Quazi, A.H. (2003). Finders, keepers? Attracting, motivating and retaining knowledge workers. Human Resource Management Journal, 13(4):23-44.
[31] Hynds, A. & McDonald, L. (2010). Motivating teachers to improve learning for culturally diverse students in New Zealand: Promoting Maori and Pacific Islands student achievement. Professional Development in Education, 36(3):525-540.
[32] Islam, R. & Ismail, A.Z. (2008). Employee motivation: A Malaysian perspective. International Journal of Commerce & Management, 18(4):344-362.
[33] Jerome, N. (2013).Application of the Maslow’s hierarchy of need theory, impacts and implications on organizational culture, human resource and employees’ performance.International Journal of Business and Management Invention, 2(3):39-45.
[34] Kaur, A. (2013). Maslow’s need hierarchy theory: Applications and criticisms.Global Journal of Management and Business Studies, 3(10):1061-1064.
[35] Kazi, G.M. &Zadeh Z.F. (2011). The Contribution of individual variables: Job satisfaction and job turnover.Interdisciplinary Journal of Contemporary Research in Business, 3(5):985-991.
[36] Legotlo, M.W. (2014). Challenges and Issues facing the Education System in South Africa. Pretoria: Africa Institute of South Africa.
[37] Locke, E.A. & Latham, G.P. (2004). What should we do about motivation theory? Six recommendations for the twenty-first century. Academy of Management Review, 29(3):388-403.
[38] Lunenburg, F.C. & Ornstein, A.C. (2008). Education administration: Concepts and practices (5th Ed.). Wadsworth: Cengage Learning.
[39] Lunenburg, F.C. (2011).Expectancy theory of motivation: Motivating by altering expectations.International Journal of Management, Business and Administration, 15(1):1-6.
[40] Mahadi, T.S.T. &Jafari, S.M. (2012). Motivation, its types and its impacts in language learning. International Journal of Business and Social Science, 3(24):230-235.
[41] Malik, M.E. &Naeem, B. (2013). Towards understanding controversy on Herzberg theory of motivation. World Applied Sciences Journal, 24(8):1031-1036.
[42] Martin, D.&Joomis, K. (2007). Building Teachers: A Constructivist Approach to Introducing Education. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Cangage Learning.
[43] Naomi, W.K., Ronald, C., Isaac, E.O.O. & Raja, R.S. (2012). Analysis of factors that affect teachers’ motivation in secondary schools: A case of Nakuru Municipality, Rift Valley Province-Kenya. International Journal of Scientific Research. 1(5):43-52.
[44] Nzulwa, J. (2014). Motivational factors affecting high school teachers’ professional conduct and work performance: A case of public high schools in Nairobi City. International Journal of Humanities and Social Science, 4(3):60-66.
[45] Ofoegbu, F.I. (2004). Teacher motivation: A factor for classroom effectiveness and school improvement in Nigeria. College Student Journal, 38:81-88.
[46] Parijat, P. &Bagga, S. (2014). Victor Vroom’s expectancy theory of motivation: An evaluation. International Research Journal of Business and Management (IRJBM), 6(9):1-8.
[47] Rao, S.P. (2005). Essential of HRM & industrial relationships. Toronto: Canadian Centre for Science and Education.
[48] Salancik, G.R. &Pfeffer, J. (1977). An examination of need-satisfaction models of job attitudes. Administrative Science Quarterly, 22:427-456.
[49] Saleem, R., Mahmood, A. & Mahmood, A. (2010). Effect of work motivation on job satisfaction in mobile telecommunication service organisations of Pakistan. International Journal of Business and Management, 5(11):212-222.
[50] Salifu, I. &Agbenyega, J.S. (2013). Viewing teacher motivation in the Ghana education service through a postcolonial lens. Current Issues in Education, 16(3):1-14.
[51] Sasan, B. &Yahya, G. (2012). Motivation and quality of work life among secondary school EFL teachers. Australian Journal of Teacher Education, 37(7):30-42.
[52] Shuck, M.B. & Wollard, K.K. (2008). Employee engagement: Motivating and retaining with tomorrow’s workforce [Perspectives on practice]. New Horizons in Adult education and Human Resource Development, 22(1):48-53.
[53] Steyn, G.M. (2002). A theoretical analysis of educator motivation and morale. Educare, 31(1):82-101.
[54] Ud Din, M.N., Tufail, H., Shereen, S., Nawaz, A. &Shahbaz, A. (2012). Factors affecting teacher motivation at secondary school level in Kohat City. Interdisciplinary Journal of Contemporary Research in Business. 3(10):442-449.
[55] Urwick, J., Mapuru, P. &Nkoboti, M. (2005). Teacher motivation and incentives in Lesotho. Maseru: Lesotho College of Education.
[56] Van der Westhuizen, P.C. (Ed.). (1991). Effective educational Management. Cape Town: Kagiso Tertiary.
[57] Velez, S. (2007). What is motivation? Retrieved from:http://ezinearticles.com/?What-IsMotivation&id=945902 [Accessed on: 07 July 2015].
[58] Velnampy, T. (2008). Job attitude and employees performance of public sector organizations in Jaffna District, Sri Lanka. GITAM Journal of Management, 6(2):66-73.
[59] Voluntary Service Overseas (VSO). (2003). Seen but not heard: Teachers’ voices in Rwanda. A policy research report on teachers’ morale and motivation in Rwanda. Retrieved from: http://www.vsointernational.org/sites/vso_international/files/seen-but-not-heard-rwanda_tcm76-22704.pdf [Accessed on 07 July 2015].
[60] Wagner, R. & Harter, J.K. (2006). The great elements of managing. Washington DC: The Gallup Organization.
[61] Wahba, M.A. &Bridwell, L.G. (1976). Maslow reconsidered: A review of the research on the need hierarchy theory. Organisational Behaviour and Human Performance, 15:212-240.
[62] Wright, E.B. & Pandey, K.S. (2005). Exploring the nomological map of public service motivation concept. Department of Political Science: University of North Carolina.

Elock Emvula Shikalepo “The Role of Motivational Theories in Shaping Teacher Motivation and Performance: A Review of Related Literature” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp. 64-76 April 2020 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/64-76.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Impacts of Strategic Human Asset on Organizational Performance of Non-governmental Organization in Saudi Arabia: A Pilot Study

Mustafa Mohammed Al-Mawmari, Ismail Bin Rejab, Mohammad Mahmoud Alzubi – April 2020 Page No.: 77-86

Throughout the most recent decade, associations have known about the fundamental job HR play in accomplishing better execution. By and by, non-legislative associations are not completely mindful of this issue and need to utilize human asset systems to improve their authoritative productivity. Along these lines, the reason for this examination was to inspect the connection between Strategic Human Resource Management (SHRM) and authoritative execution in non-legislative associations and to decide the degree of the effect on hierarchical execution of SHRM (obtaining, preparing, maintenance and inside work showcase); Information was gathered through printed copy polls disseminated to 44 administration and non-the board staff of non-benefit associations situated in Riyadh, Al-Qassim and Al-Sharqiyah regions of Saudi Arabia. The examination’s instrument included 45 things and was intended to evaluate the acts of Strategic Human Resource (SHR), middle person factors and authoritative execution. Theorized connections between SHRM, hierarchical execution and go-betweens were then tried utilizing Auxiliary Condition Demonstrating. The aftereffects of the investigation indicated that SHRM was fundamentally and emphatically identified with hierarchical execution. Also, the outcomes have indicated that middle person factors, for example, representative commitment, assume a huge job in interceding among SHRM and hierarchical execution. The outcomes indicated that the obtaining and maintenance of each of the four free factors had the best effect on hierarchical execution. What’s more, the aftereffects of this examination demonstrated that the intervened factors effectively interceded between the SHRM and the operational presentation of non-legislative associations. At last, the outcomes may help shape the establishment for pragmatic rules for executives of non-administrative associations of advancing human asset the board action and for laborers related to safeguarding their key edge for long haul hierarchical execution.

Page(s): 77-86                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 24 April 2020

 Mustafa Mohammed Al-Mawmari
Department of Management, Al-Madina International University, Kualalumpur-Malaysia

 Ismail Bin Rejab
Department of Management, Al-Madina International University, Kualalumpur-Malaysia

 Mohammad Mahmoud Alzubi
Department of Management, Al-Madina International University, Kualalumpur-Malaysia

[1] Ahmad, S., & Schroeder, R. G. (2003). resource management practices on operational performance: recognizing country and industry differences. Journal of operations Management, 21(1), 19-43.
[2] Amadasu D. E. (2003). Personnel and the Nigerian management crisis: Ajaokuta Iron and Steel Mill examined. Abuja Manage, 1(4),11-28.
[3] Armstrong, M. (2009). Armstrong’s handbook of human resource management practice. London, UK: Kogan Page.
[4] Baird, L., & Meshoulam, I. (1988). Managing two fits of strategic human resource management. Academy of Management Review, 13(1), 116–128.
[5] Barney, J. (1991). Firm resources and sustained competitive advantage. Journal of Management, 17(1), 99-120.
[6] Barney, J. B. (2001). Resource-based theories of competitive advantage: A ten-year retrospective on the resource-based view. Journal of Management, 27(6), 643-673.
[7] Barrett, A., & O’Connell, P. J. (2001). Does training generally work? The returns to in- company training. Industrial and Labor Relations Review, 54(3), 647-662.
[8] Bartel, A. (2004). Human resource management and organizational performance: Evidence from retail banking. Industrial and Labor Relations Review. 57(2)081-203.
[9] Becker, B. E., & Huselid, M. A. (1998). Performance work systems and firm performance: A synthesis of research and managerial implications. In G. R. Ferris (Ed.), Research in personnel and human resource management, 16, 53–101.
[10] Boxall, P. F. (1996). The strategic HRM debate and the resource-based view of the firm. Human Resource Management Journal, 6(3), 59–75.
[11] Brown, P. (2005). The evolving role of strategic management development. The Journal of Management Development, 24(3), 209-222.
[12] Brown, T. A. (2006). Confirmatory factor analysis for applied research. New York, NY: The Guilford Press.
[13] Chan, E (2004). Factors Influencing the Retention and Turnover Intentions of Registered Nurses in Singapore Hospital. Journal of Nursing and Health Sciences.
[14] Chandler, A. D. (1962). Strategy and structure. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
[15] Chua, Y. P. (2013). Mastering research statistics. Shah Alam, Malaysia: McGraw-Hill.
[16] Crowley, B. D. (1999). Hiring the right person for your hospitality industry. The Bottomline, 14(1), 13-15.
[17] Cyert, R. M. (1978). The management of universities of constant or decreasing size. Public Administration Review, 38: 344-349.
[18] De Vellis (2003). Scale development: Theory and applications. Thousand Oaks, CA:SAGE.
[19] Delery, J. E. (1996). Modes of theorizing in strategic human resource management: Test of universalistic, contingency and configurational predictions. Academy of Management Journal, 39(4), 802-835.
[20] Dyer, L., & Reeves, T. (1995). Human resource strategies and firm performance: What do we know and where do we need to go. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 6(3), 656-670.
[21] Frank, F. D. (2004). Introduction to the Special Issue on Employee Retention and Engagement. Human Resource Planning, 27(3), 11-21.
[22] Gberevbie D.E. (2008). Staff recruitment, retention strategies and performance of selected public and private organizations in Nigeria African. Journal of Business Management. 4(8), 1447-1456.
[23] Gomez-Mcjia, L. R., Balkin, D. B., & Cardy, R. L. (2001). Managing human resources (3rd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
[24] Griffeth, R. W., Hom, P. W., & Gaertner, K. N. (2000). A meta-analysis of antecedents and correlates of employee turnover: Update, moderator tests and research
[25] Guthrie, J. (2001). High involvement work practices, turnover, and productivity: Evidence from New Zealand. Academy of Management Journal, 44, 180-192.
[26] Hair, J. F., Black, W. C., Babin, B. J., Anderson, R. E., & Tatham, R. L. (1998). Multivariate data analysis (Vol. 5, No. 3, pp. 207-219). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice hall.‏
[27] Harel, G., & Tzafrir, S. (1999). The effect of human resource management practices on the perceptions of organizational and market performance of the organization. Human Resource Management, 38(3), 185-200.
[28] Hughes, J. C. (2010). Talent Management; A Strategy for Improving Employee Recruitment, Retention and Management within Hospitality Organizations. Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management Education.
[29] Huselid, M. A. (1995). The impact of human resource management practices on turnover, productivity, and corporate financial performance. Academy of Management Journal, 38(3), 635-672.
[30] Huselid, M. A., Jackson, S. E., & Schuler, R. S. (1997). Technical and strategic human resource management effectiveness as determinants of organization performance. Academy of Management Journal, 40, 171-88.
[31] Izzo, J. B., & Withers. P. (2002). Winning employee-retention strategies for today’s healthcare organizations. Healthcare Financial Management, 56(6), 52-57.
[32] Jackson, S. E., Schuler, R. S., & Rivero, J. (1989). Organizational characteristics as predictors of personnel practices. Personnel Psychology, 42, 727–786.
[33] Karami, A., Analoui, F., & Cusworth, J. (2004). Strategic human resource management and resource-based approach: The evidence from British manufacturing industry. Management Research News, 27(6), 50-68.
[34] Katou, A. A. (2008). Measuring the impact of HRM on organizational performance. Journal of Industrial Engineering and Management, 1(2), 119-142.
[35] Kline, R. B. (2005). Principles and practice of structural equation modeling (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Guilford Press.
[36] Kline, R. B. (2011). Principles and practice of structural equation modeling (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Guilford Press.
[37] Koch, M. J. & McGrath, R. G. (1996). Improving labour productivity: Human resource management policies do matter. Strategic Management Journal, 17, 335-354.
[38] Lado, A. A., & Wilson, M. C. (1994). Human resource systems and sustained competitive advantage: A competency-based perspective. Academy of Management Review, 19, 699-727.
[39] Lepak, D. P., & Shaw, J. D. (2008). Strategic HRM in North America: looking to the future. The International Journal of.
[40] McElroy, J. C. (2001). Managing workplace commitment by putting people first. Human Resource Management Review, 2, 327-335.
[41] Mitchell, H. (2002). Strategic worth of human resources: Driving organizational performance. Corporate Performance Improvement Conference. Australia: Universalia.
[42] Pearce, J. A., & Robinson, R. B. (1988). Strategic management: Strategy formulation and implementation. Georgetown, Canada: Irwin.
[43] Pfeffer, J. (1994). Competitive advantage through people: Unleashing the power of the work force. Boston: Harvard Business Press.
[44] Roger, E. W., & Wright, P. M. (1998). Measuring organizational performance in strategic HRM: Problems and prospects. Working Paper 98-109, Department of Human Resource studies School of Industrial and Labor Relations: Cornell University.
[45] Russell, J. S., Terborg, J. R., & Powers, M. L. (1985). Organizational performance and organizational level training and support. Personnel Psychology, 38(4), 849-863.
[46] Samuel, O., & Chipunta, C. (2009). Employee retention and turnover; using motivational variables as a panacea. African Journal of Business Management, 3 (8), 39-43.
[47] Schuler, R. S., Jackson, S. E., & Storey, J. (2001). HRM and its link with strategic management. Human resource management: A critical text. London and Boston: ITP.
[48] Schumacker, R. L., & Lomax, G. R.(2004). A Beginner’s Guide to Structural Equation Modeling.‏
[49] Sekaran, U., & Bougie, R. (2013). Research methods for business: A skill-building approach. British library.
[50] Skrinjar, R., Bosilj-Vuksic, V., & Indihar Stemberher, M. (2008). The impact of business process orientation on financial and non-financial performance. Business Process Management Journal, 14(5), 738-754.
[51] Smeenk S. G. A., Eisinga R.N., Teelken J. C. and Doorewaard J.A.C.M. (2006), “The effect of HRM practices and antecedents on organizational commitment among university employees”, International Journal of Human Resource Management, 17(12), 2035 – 2054
[52] Swanson, R. (1995). Performance is the key. Human Resource Development Quarterly, 6(2), 221-235.
[53] Tabachnick, B. G., & Fidell, L. S. (2001). Using multivariate statistics. Allyn and Bacon. Needham Heights, MA.‏
[54] Terpstra, D. E., & Rozell, E. J. (1993). The relationship of acquisition practices to organizational level measures of performance. Personnel Psychology, 46, 27-48.
[55] Terpstra, D. E., & Rozell, E. J. (1993). The relationship of acquisition practices to organizational level measures of performance. Personnel Psychology, 46, 27-48.
[56] Ulrich, D., & Lake, D. (1990). Organizational capability. Competing from the inside out. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc…
[57] Zhu, Y. (2007) „HRM with “Asian” characteristics: a hybrid people – management system in east Asia,‟ international journal of HRM, 18 (5), 745 – 768.
[58] Manoochehri, G., & Pinkerton, T. (2003). Managing telecommuters: Opportunities and challenges, American Business Review, 21, 9-16.

Mustafa Mohammed Al-Mawmari, Ismail Bin Rejab, Mohammad Mahmoud Alzubi “The Impacts of Strategic Human Asset on Organizational Performance of Non-governmental Organization in Saudi Arabia: A Pilot Study ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.77-86 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/77-86.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Natural Endowment and Tourism in the Hills: A Case Study of Darjeeling, Darjeeling

Binita Rai – April 2020 Page No.: 87-92

Tourism is one of the world’s most important activities, involving millions of people, generating local employment, stimulating improvements to community infrastructure. Amongst other forms of tourism, hill tourism is considered to be one of the important revenue earners. Tourists are more attracted towards mountains, landscape, clean air, aesthetic pleasure and hill tourism is endowed with all its natural ingredients. Darjeeling “the queen of the hills” is very much rich in natural resources and therefore has been a main attraction of tourists worldwide. Darjeeling is mostly famous for three T’s Tea, Tourism and Toy Train and these are also the most significant contributors of Darjeeling economy. Its economy is largely based on tea agriculture and tourism where the former has played a significant role in the development of the region since the beginning. So the present study deals with the zonal pattern of tourism(TCM) in the region which contributes to economic development and sustainable development. This paper also discusses that there is the tourism growth is haphazard because of which the question of sustainable tourism is questioned.

Page(s): 87-92                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 26 April 2020

 Binita Rai
Research Scholar, University of North Bengal

[1] Abinash Bharali and Ritwik Mazumder: Application of Travel cost method to access the pricing policy of public parks: A case of Kaziranga National Park Journal of Regional Development and Planning, Vol. 1, No. 1, 2012
[2] Bhutia, S (2013), Growth & Development of Tourism Sector in West Bengal: Issues & Concerns, American International Journal of Research in Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences, 4 (1), pp.239-246
[3] Malley, L.S.S. O, 1999: Bengal District Gazetteer: Darjeeling, Concept Publishing Company, ISBN 978-81-7268-018-3
[4] Timah Paul, NDE: Agricultural Economics and Management – Master’s Programme Degree thesis No 704 • ISSN 1401-4084 Uppsala 2011

Binita Rai “Natural Endowment and Tourism in the Hills: A Case Study of Darjeeling, Darjeeling” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.87-92 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/87-92.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Naturalising The Normal (Lawler: 2014)

Ghurni Bhattacharya – April 2020 Page No.: 93-97

I. INTRODUCTION
“BAKI RAKHA KHAJNA/ MOTE BHALO KAJ NA “ ,”JE KORE KHONITE SROM/ JENO TARE DORE JOM “”ANAHARE NAHI KHED/ BESHI KHELE BARE MED ,”JAY JODI JAK PRAN /HIRAKER RAJA BHOGOBAN “(RAY,1980).We all are aware of the above mentioned phrases observed and vividly scripted by Satyajit ray in the film Hirak Rajar Deshe where we find there are certain praising phrases about the way the reign is continuing in HIRAK RAJYO and those who stood against such above mentioned praising phrases were forced to push into “JANTAR MANTAR GHAR” where the “identified “ person’s thought process is steered and geared up absolutely so that the person loses his autonomy and just become a mere puppet losing his possession of voice .This reference of film or particularly the concept of JANTARMANTAR GHAR is what is intertwined with our daily lives and we being a part of, this vicious cycle, suffering from global epidemic of sameness is unrecognized ,thus becomes the part and parcel of our everyday life activities and this “JANTAR MANTAR GHAR “steers our every step even today in its most practical instances .To be precise this global epidemic of sameness is nothing but recognizing the fact that we live in a world which already has a meaning associated and prescribed to it which is described in the works of phenomenologists like Edmund Husserl’s concept of LIFE-WORLD (Husserl:1936) or Alfred Schutz concept of STOCK KNOWLEDGE AT HAND and SOCIAL RECIPES inherited and transmitted down generation after generation with the help of the process of Socialisation and maintenance of it is expected by all its active members thereby maintenance of social order and stability which is of macro orientation , hence it can be said that we are living in a world where differences are not celebrated.

Page(s): 93-97                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 26 April 2020

 Ghurni Bhattacharya
Jadavpur University, Kolkata, West Bengal, India

[1] Lawler Steph(2014)Identity Sociological Perspectives
[2] Husserl Edmund(1936)The Crisis of European sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology
[3] Lemert Charles & Branaman Anna(1997)The Goffman Reader
[4] Goffman Erving(1956)Presentation of self in everyday Life
[5] Durkheim Emile(1895)The rules of Sociological Method
[6] Darwin Charles(1869)On the Origin of Species
[7] Kafka Franz(1915)Metamorphosis
[8] Barthes Roland(1967)The Death of the Author
[9] Plato Aristocles(369 BC)The Nature of Knowledge
[10] Rouch Jean(1961)Chronicle of a Summer
[11] Truffaut Francois (1959)The 400 Blows
[12] Durkheim Emile(1912)The Elementary Forms of the Religious Life
[13] Adams Bert.N&Sydie R.A(2001)Sociological Theory
[14] De Sica Vittorio(1948)Bicycle Thieves
[15] Ray Satyajit(1980)Hirak Rajar Deshe
[16] Miles Susie,Miller Shirin,Lewis Ingrid & Kroft Marlies (2002)Schools For All Including Disabled Children in Education,Save the children
[17] Jensen Cole, International Symbol of Access:The perception of Disability
[18] Imrie Rob(2019)Designing Dsabilty:Symbols,space and society,Routledge,Vol-34,No.1,175-183
[19] UNICEF(2013)The State Of The World’s Children 2013
[20] UNICEF(2005)Violence Against Disabled Children
[21] Shenoy meera (2011)Persons With Disability & The India labour Market:Challenges And Opportunities
[22] World Bank,New Delhi (2007) People With Disabilities in India:Status,Challenges and prospects
[23] Mehrotra Nilika,Singh Pooja &Saini Priyanka(2016)A Resource Book On Disability In India ,Centre for the Study of Social Systems,School of Social Sciences,Jawaharlal Nehru University,New Delhi
[24] Kundu C.L(2000)Statusof Disability In India,rehabilitation Council Of India
[25] Srivastva Prashant & Kumar Pradeep,Disability,Its Issues and Challeges:Psychosocial and Legal Aspects in Indian scenario ,Delhi Psychiatry Journal,Vol.18 No 1
[26] World Health Organisation (2011)World Report on Disability
[27] Government of India Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment, First country report on the Status of disability in India
[28] Riddell Sheila(2017)Disability ,Gender and Social Class in Education :Making The Connections
[29] Https://aifs.gov.au/cfca/publications/child-maltreatment-and-disability
[30] https://www.nspcc.org.uk/what-we-donews-opinion/disable-children-equl-right-protection-abuse/
[31] https://www.thegurdian.com/commentisfree/2015/maay/18abuse-disabled-people-sexually-abused-england-cuts-services
[32] https://www.who.int/disabilities/violence/en
[33] https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/disability-and-health.
[34] https://latikaroy.org/government-facilities/
[35] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articless/PMc2690116/
[36] https://mypositiveoutlooks.com/woman-with-down-syndrome-gets-dream-job-with-airline-for-a-day/?fbclid=IwAR0XfJrhPlvquojXMe2p-sHs1EyjWqCZ02-n3RE7vaQ93sdOdPL1cwdjfTo
[37] http://vikaspedia.in/education/parents-corner/guidelines-for-parents-of-children-with-disabilities/prevention-of-disabilities
[38] https://www.parentcenterhub.org/intellectual/https://www.google.com/amp/s/familydoctor.org/what-you-can-do-to-change-your-childs-behavior/amp/#ampshare=https://familydoctor.org/what-you-can-do-to-change-your-childs-behavior
[39] https://www.parentcenterhub.org/intellectual/
[40] https://www.brighthumanity.me/story/2229/this-is-how-marketers-force-absurd-beauty-trends-on-women/?utm_source=social&utm_medium=ff&utm_campaign=shuffle
[41] https://www.equalrights.org/issue/economic-workplace-equality/discrimination-at-work
[42] https://www.brighthumanity.me/story/163/artist-draws-hilariously-honest-comics-that-every-girl-will-recognize-herself-in/?utm_source=social&utm_medium=ff&utm_campaign=shufflehttp://nypost.com/2019/08/31/calvin-klein-is-using-plus-size-models-to-reinvent-its-brand
[43] https://idsn.org/key-issues/dalit-women/
[44] https://www.downtoearth.org.in/coverage/caste-discrimination-at-work-place-says-ilo-report–6106https://www.facebook.com/100002134369673/posts/2508268685920919https://www.facebook.com/100005019965244/posts/1337767843067202
[45] https://asiabaloch.blogspot.com/2019/04/urban-dressing-vs-rural-dressing-style.html?m=1
[46] https://neostencil.com/rural-urban-divide-causes-and-consequences
[47] https://www.facebook.com/100009713226967/posts/971076943226071https://www.shethepeople.tv/news/vidisha-baliyan-first-indian-miss-deaf-world-pageant
[48] https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/sep/29/wltm-colour-blind-dating-app-racial-discrimination-grindr-tinder-algorithm-racism
[49] https://www.equalrights.org/issue/economic-workplace-equality/discrimination-at-workhttps://gem-report-2017.unesco.org/en/chapter/gender_accountability_through_school
[50] https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/jan/24/student-suicide-untouchables-stuggle-for-justice-india
[51] https://hjaap.hkspublications.org/2016/09/13/a-racial-autobiography-of-race-in-social-science-spaces-reflections-of-my-early-understandings-of-race-and-racism
[52] https://www.thecuriousreader.in/bookrack/caste-system-in-india
[53] https://www.mrsdscorner.com/60disabilitybooksforkids
[54] https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/california-natural-hair-racial-discrimination-ban-us-bill-a8989211.html
[55] https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/tv/news/rookie-afton-williamson-racism-sexual-misconduct-abc-quit-a9039426.html
[56] https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/sexual-orientation-gender/gender-gender-identity/what-are-gender-roles-and-stereotypes
[57] https://www.hrw.org/reports/2001/globalcaste/caste0801-03.htm
[58] https://idsn.org/key-issues/dalit-women/
[59] https://www.downtoearth.org.in/coverage/caste-discrimination-at-w
[60] https://idsn.org/key-issues/dalit-women/
[61] https://projecthelping.org/body-image-mental-health
[62] https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linguistic_discrimination
[63] https://www.brighthumanity.me/story/163/artist-draws-hilariously-honest-comics-that-every-girl-will-recognize-herself-in/?utm_source=social&utm_medium=ff&utm_campaign=shuffle
[64] https://www.downtoearth.org.in/coverage/caste-discrimination-at-work-place-says-ilo-report–6106
[65] https://www.bustle.com/p/7-self-care-apps-to-help-you-stay-balanced-in-2019-15643553
[66] https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2019/06/food-and-body-shame-workplace/592069/
[67] https://www.shape.com/lifestyle/mind-and-body/icydk-body-shaming-international-problem
[68] https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=1356622871122480&id=100003243410397
[69] https://www.facebook.com/bbcnewspidgin/videos/529882704457729/
[70] https://www.insider.com/things-that-are-actually-body-shaming-2018-7
[71] https://www.theodysseyonline.com/body-shaming-clothing-confidence
[72] https://www.facebook.com/1222518231/posts/10215123400658041
[73] https://www.shethepeople.tv/news/vidisha-baliyan-first-indian-miss-deaf-world-pageant/
[74] https://www.facebook.com/100009713226967/posts/971076943226071/
[75] https://www.facebook.com/100005019965244/posts/1337767843067202/
[76] https://www.facebook.com/100002134369673/posts/2508268685920919/
[77] https://www.facebook.com/100008148918017/posts/2506027393012200/
[78] https://www.facebook.com/100009713226967/posts/971076943226071/
[79] https://www.facebook.com/100005019965244/posts/1337767843067202/
[80] https://www.facebook.com/100002134369673/posts/2508268685920919/
[81] https://www.facebook.com/100008148918017/posts/2506027393012200/

Ghurni Bhattacharya “Naturalising The Normal (Lawler: 2014)” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.93-97 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/93-97.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

University Education and Transformation of Modern Africa: The Case of Teaching and Training Students in Kenyan Universities

Patrick Acleus Kafu, Genvieve Simwelo Nasimiyu- April 2020 Page No.: 98-111

From the colonial era, university education in modern africa has been held in high esteem .It has been designed and practiced as an elitist, exclusive and special form of education intended for the selected few in the society. The emphasis in this form of education has been on academic development at the expense of other aspects of education like technical and vocational education. The focus has been on preparation and production of skilled man-power to foster the desired development in this continent (Ominde, 1965). However, for university education to efficiently and effectively play this role of development in modern africa, it must be properly managed including the process of competent teaching and training of students at university level. This is the focus of the present paper that is designed to examine strategies of administering university education in modern africa and especially in Kenya. That is whether these are facilitative enough in preparation and production of graduates who can promote the transformation of this continent. Specifically, the paper discusses the nature of university education; the need and role of this form of education in the development of modern africa; the adopted principles and practices of administering university education in africa and especially modern Kenya; the required facilitation for conducting efficient teaching and training of university students in modern africa to play the facilitative role of developing the continents; the challenges of teaching and training university students to play their expected roles in the development agenda of this continent and especially Kenya and, the preferred approach and/or best strategies of preparing university students to promote the transformation/modernization of the african continent and especially modern Kenya.

Page(s): 98-111                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 April 2020

  Patrick Acleus Kafu
School of Education, University of Eldoret, Kenya

  Genvieve Simwelo Nasimiyu
Alupe University College, Kenya

[1] Babila, T.E. (1969). University Education and Development in East Africa. Kampala. Makererean Publications.
[2] Bala, Harish (2011). Challenges of Higher Education in Twenty first (21st) Century. Journal of Education and Practice, Vol.6,Issue 4.
[3] Beyer, L. (1997). The Moral Contours of Teacher Education. Journal of Teacher Education, Vol.40 (245-254).
[4] Bingham, C.W. and Sidonkin, A.M.(eds) (2004).No Education Without Relation. New York. Holt, Rinehart and Winston.
[5] Bosire, E.S. (1995). Proposals for Improvement of Training Teachers of English for Primary Schools in Kenya. Unpublished Master of Philosophy (M.phil.)Thesis. Eldoret. Moi University.
[6] Commission for University Education-CUE (2016, 2017). Need for Reforms in University Education in Kenya. Down sizing Universities, Harmonisation of degree programmes and courses for Quality. Nairobi. Commission for University Education (CUE) Kenya.
[7] DAAD (2015). International Doctoral Programmes in Germany. GATE Germany. DAAD.
[8] Delors, Jacques (1996). Learning: The Treasure Within. Report of International Commission on Education for Twenty first (21st) Century. Paris. UNESCO Publications
[9] Fullan, M. (1991). The New Meaning of Educational change. New York. Teachers College Columbia Press (OISE).
[10] Hallock, J. and Poisson, M. (2007). Corrupt Schools, Corrupt Universities. What can be done? International Institute for Educational Planning. New York UNESCO.
[11] Hughes, Nicols, W. (1903). Education for Development in Africa. London. OHM Government Printers.
[12] Imende, B. (2019). Teachers Service Commission (TSC) blasts Jubilee Government for frequent strikes (in Education sector). Nairobi. The Star Publication, Issue No. 280219 (4-5).
[13] Ingvarson et al (2014). Best Practices in Teacher Education Programmes and Australia’s own Programmes. Canberra. Australian council for Educational Research (ACA Research)
[14] International Inter-Disciplinary Conference on Education-IICE (Ireland International Conference on Education) Blog 92017). Ethical Issues on Education-Barriers to Learning in Schools).
[15] Inter-University Council of East Africa (IUCEA) (2007). Need for Improvement of Teaching Practices at University level. The focus on Pedagogy.Kampala.Inter-University Council of East Africa–IUCEA publications.
[16] Jawour et al (2014). Re-Examining External Examination Practice in Under-graduate Education in Kenya’s Public Universities: Issues and Challenges. Governance and Transformations of Universities in Africa, A GlobalPerspective. Charlotte, N.C. Information Age publications, inc.
[17] Kafu, P.A. (2010). The Emerging Issues in Teacher Education in Modern Africa .The Educator, Vol.4, No.1, ISSN: 1817-7654.
[18] (2011). The Challenges of Investing in New and Emerging Educational Technologies in Modern Africa in the Twenty first (21st) Century. The Educator, Vol.4, No.3, ISSN: 817-7654.
[19] (2012). Teacher Education. Emerging Issues. International Journal for Curriculum and Instruction (on-line), Vol.2 Issue 2.
[20] (2018). Kenyan Education on the Cross. The Hard Facts. Journal of Emerging Trends in Educational Research and Policy Studies (JETERAPS)Vol.9,No.3
[21] (2018). The Unfulfilled Mission of Teacher Education Programme in Modern Africa. The Kenyan Development Agenda Experience (Inaugural Lecture). Eldoret. University of Eldoret.
[22] Kafu, P.A. and Nasimiyu, G.S. (2014). Reforms and Innovations in Teacher Education. Facilitator of Access, Equity, Equality and Quality as Emerging Issues in Education in Kenya.Governance and Transformations of Universities in Africa. A Global Perspective. Charlotte, N.C. Information Age Publishing Inc.
[23] Karanja, J. (1978). Development of Education in Kenya this Century (20th) and Beyond. Nairobi. Daily Nation Publications, July 28, 1978.
[24] Kasule et al (2015). The Current Status of Teaching Staff Innovation Competence in Ugandan Universities: Perceptions of Managers, Teachers and Students. Journal of Higher Education Policy, Vol.37, No3 (330-343). ISSN: 1360-080X.
[25] Kavagi, L. (2010). Computer in Schools: Strategies for Successful Planning and Implementation of Computer Projects. A Handbook for Educational Administrators and Planners. Nairobi. The Jomo Kenyatta Foundation.ISBN: 9966-22-852-7.
[26] Kibabii University Workshop (2018). Training University Teachers in the New and Best Practices of Teaching. Bungoma. Kibabii University.
[27] Kigundu, J.L. (1970). The African Thought on Development of University Education. The Case of East Africa. Kampala. Makererean Publications.
[28] King, J. (1961). Education, Society and Development in Africa. London. Longman.
[29] Kirsch, M. (2014). The Bias Against Innovation. https://www.wired.com/Insights/2014/innovation/.(Accessed on 02/04/2019).
[30] Magoha, G. (2019). Kenyan Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) Stars pick Moi, Nairobi and JKUAT for University Study. Nairobi. Nation Media Group, April 2,2019.
[31] (2019). Magoha Warns on Course Duplication in Kenyan Universities. Nairobi. Nation Media Group, April 15,2019).
[32] (2019).Magoha Shocker for universities. Nairobi. The Standard Media Issue 39591, Tuesday,May 7, 2019
[33] Mbeseha, M.K. (2014). Organisation and Governance of African Universities: The Case of Cameroon. Governance and Transformations of Universities in Africa Global Perspective. Charlotte, N.C. Information Age Publishing Inc.
[34] Mugenda, O. and Mwangi, I (2014). Governance of Public Universities in Kenya: A Scholar-Practitioner’s Perspective. Governance and Transformations of Universities in Africa. A Global Perspective. Charlotte, N.C.Information Age Publishing, Inc.
[35] Mukhwana et al (2016). State of University Education in Kenya. Nairobi. Commission for University Education (CUE).ISBN: 978-9966-009-21-0.
[36] Nangoli, C. M. (2019). Why do Students Choose to Fail Examinations When it is So Easy to Pass them? Preparing Well for and Passing any Examination. New York. Holly Star Books. ISBN: 940885-16-3.
[37] Noddings, N. (1995). Teaching Themes of Caring. Education Digest, Vol. 61, Issue 3 (24-28).
[38] Occiti,P.(1968). Development of Education in East Africa. Kampala. Makererean Publications.
[39] OECD (1996). Life Long Learning for ALL. Paris.OECD.
[40] Okori, T.K. (2016). The Challenges of Administering Education in Africa. The reality in Nigeria. Journal of Education and Practice, Vol.31,No.4.
[41] Okoti-Bitek (1968).Song Lawino.African Writers Series.Nairobi.Longman.
[42] Ominde, J. (1965). Kenya Education Report on Reforms of Education. Nairobi. Government Printers.
[43] Organisation of African Unity-(OAU) (1963). Addis Ababa. OAU Publications.
[44] Otiende, T.E (1982). Education and Development in Kenya, A Historical Perspective Nairobi. University of Nairobi Press.
[45] Postman N. (1992). The End of Education: Re-Defining the Value of School. New York.Random House, Inc
[46] Razak et al (2014). Information Communication and Technology (ICT).Among Excellent Islamic Education Teachers’Colleges in Selangar, Malaysia. International Education Studies, Vol.7, No.13. ISSN: 1913-9020,E-ISSN:1913-9039.
[47] Schulman, I.S. (1987). Knowledge and Teaching. Foundations of New Reforms. Harvard Education Review, Vol.57, Issue 1 (4-14).
[48] Ssekamwa, J. (1969). History of Education in East Africa. Kampala. Makererean Publications.
[49] Ssenteza-Kajjubi (1969). Fashions in Education. The Issue of Curriculum Reforms in East Africa. Kampala. Makererean Publications.
[50] Tuitoek, J. (1996). Kenyan Public Universities Producing “Half-baked” graduates. Nairobi Nation Media Group Limited. September 21, 1996.
[51] UPSA (2015). Quality Manual. Senior Members.Handbook, Accra. University of Professional Studies, Accra (UPSA).
[52] Wikins, E. (1975). Education in Practice. A Handbook for Teachers, Londin. Evans Brothers Limited.

Patrick Acleus Kafu, Genvieve Simwelo Nasimiyu, “University Education and Transformation of Modern Africa: The Case of Teaching and Training Students in Kenyan Universities” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.98-111 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/98-111.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Social Vices: Social Studies as a Remedy

Samuel Olanrewaju OLADAPO – April 2020 Page No.: 112-119

Nigeria is currently facing the problem of social vices and the wave of menace is on the increase. The secondary schools are affected by social issues such as prostitution, internet fraud, bullying, rape, smoking, stealing to mention but a few and the need to seek approaches to the solutions of these social vices and menace becomes necessary. In view of the failure of society, parents and religious organizations to attain the expected attitudinal behaviour, it is necessary to seek other reliable means of solving national issues among students, and the nation at large. It is against this backdrop that this study considers the effective teaching of Social Studies as a cure to the menace and social vices in Junior Secondary Schools in Nigeria. Four research questions were raised for the study. Respondents were drawn from teachers of Junior Secondary Schools. Purposive sampling technique was used to select the sample for this study. The data for the study was collected using a researcher designed questionnaire. The design adopted for this study was descriptive survey design. The total number of teachers used for this study was fifty (50) from 10 schools which were randomly selected. Respondents responded to a set of questions, in which they indicated the level of their awareness on social studies concepts, knowledge on social vices and the importance of social studies in solving social issues among students. The data gathered were analyzed using simple percentage. The findings in this study highlighted the critical importance of using social studies education to solve the present and future occurrences of social vices in Nigeria. The study concluded that the more education is given priority in the nation, especially social studies, the less social vices and menace in the society. It is recommended among others that, students should be taught to be patriotic members of the society, teaching and learning facilities should be adequately provided in schools so as to motivate and encourage teachers to effectively teach and students learn effectively; this will enable effective impartation of Social Studies contents to the students, equal treatment of students irrespective of gender should be ensured and maintained in Social Studies instructions at all level. This will curtail variation in learning among students of different sex. Likewise, social studies as a course should be made compulsory in all classes of our educational system as it is the best tool for fostering unity and patriotism in the society.

Page(s): 112-119                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 April 2020

 Samuel Olanrewaju OLADAPO
Adekunle Ajasin University Akungba Akoko, Nigeria

[1] Ajiton O.s., Omoniyi T.Oi. (2017). Value Education; Essential Tool for Socio-Political and Economic Development in Nigeria. Nigeria Journal of Social Studies, 25-39.
[2] B., T. (2000). A general Survey of Conflict in the North West Zone of Nigeria. paper presented at the conference on enhancing peaceful co-existence in Nigeria. Zaria: center for peace reseach and conflict resolution.
[3] Osokoya, Y. (1999). Social Studies the search for a Definition. Nigerian Journal of Social Studies Vol.1.
[4] Udoh. (1999). A quide for primary school Teachers’ of social studies in Nigerian School. Ibadan: The Northern Nigeria Publishing Company.

Samuel Olanrewaju OLADAPO “Social Vices: Social Studies as a Remedy” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.112-119 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/112-119.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Analysis of Recruitment Effectiveness and Employee Selection Using Computer Assisted Test Method against Aparature Competence in the Government of Malang Regency

Dina Maritha, Tanto Gatot Sumarsono, M. Ch. Sina Setyadi – April 2020 Page No.: 120-125

This study aims to analyze the effect of employee recruitment and selection using the Computer-Assisted Test method on apparatus competence in the Malang Regency Government and analyze among employee recruitment and selection using the Computer-Assisted Test method that has a dominant influence on apparatus competency in the Malang Regency Government. The population in this study were all officials who handled staffing in all work units in the Malang Regency Government as many as 98 people and the number of samples in this study was 98 people, so the sampling technique used census. The data analysis technique used is multiple regression analysis. Based on the results of the analysis show that the recruitment and selection of employees using the Computer-Assisted Test method affects the competence of the apparatus in the Government of Malang Regency, which means that the better the application of recruitment and supported by good selection can improve competence. Employee selection using the Computer-Assisted Test method has a dominant effect on the competency of the apparatus in the Government of Malang Regency. This shows that the main thing that can improve competence is the selection, especially the recruitment method in the Malang Regency Government, which must obtain approval from the Related Ministry.

Page(s): 120-125                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 April 2020

 Dina Maritha
Student in the Master of Management, University of Merdeka Malang, Indonesia

 Tanto Gatot Sumarsono
Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Merdeka Malang, Indonesia

 M. Ch. Sina Setyadi
Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Merdeka Malang, Indonesia

[1]. Faradina, Dinda. 2013. Pengaruh Rekrutmen dan Pelatihan Terhadap Kompetensi Karyawan (Studi pada PT Perkebunan Nusantara III Cabang Kantor Direksi, Medan). Skripsi. Fakultas Ilmu Sosial dan Ilmu Politik. Universitas Sumatera Utara. Medan.
[2]. Gatewood, RD dan H.S. Field. 2001. Human Resource Selection, Thomson Learning.
[3]. GeorgopolousdanTannenbaum. 1985. EfektivitasOrganisasi. Jakarta: Erlangga.
[4]. Handayaningrat, Soewarno. 1994. PengantarStudiIlmuAdministrasidan.Manajemen. Jakarta: Haji Masagung
[5]. Irawan, Prasetya, SuryaniS.F.Motok, Sri WahyuKridaSakti, 1997 ManajemenSumberDayaManusia, Jakarta: STIA LAN Press
[6]. Mangkunegara, AA, Anwar Prabu.2009. EvaluasiKinerja SDM. Bandung: PT RefikaAditama
[7]. Mathis.L.RobertdanJackson.H.John. 2001, ManajemenSumberDayaManusia, Jakarta :Bukukedua.
[8]. Rivai, VeithzaldanSagala, Ella Jauvani. 2010. ManajemenSumberDayaManusiauntuk Perusahaan dariTeorikePraktik. Jakarta: PT Raja Grafindo.
[9]. Rivai, Veithzal. 2011.ManajemenSumberDayaManusiauntuk Perusahaan: dariTeorikePraktik, Jakarta : RajaGrafindoPersada
[10]. Ruky, Achmad, S. 2003. KualitasSumberDayaManusia. Jakarta: PT Gramedia. PustakaUtama.
[11]. Samsudin, S. 2006. ManajemenSumberDayaManusia. Bandung : PustakaSetia
[12]. Simamora, H., 1997, ManajemenSumberDayaManusia, Edisi 2, STIE YKPN, Yokyakarta.
[13]. Steers, M. Richard. 1985. EfektifitasOrganisasi. Jakarta: Erlangga
[14]. Sugito, Efendi dan A.D. Setiawan. 2014. Pengaruh Seleksi dan Pelatihan Terhadap Kompetensi Serta Dampaknya Pada Kinerja Karyawan (Studi Kasus Pada PT. Nugra Santana Group). Ilmu dan Budaya. Hal 4529-4558.
[15]. Utami, Desi Habiba. 2013. Pengaruh Proses Rekrutmen dan Seleksi Terhadap Kompetensi Pengurus DPD Partai XYZ Kota Bogor. Skripsi. Fakultas Ekonomi dan Manajemen. Institut Pertanian Bogor.
[16]. Widjanarko, Herry. 2004. Pengaruh Sistem Seleksi dan Program Pelatihan Terhadap Kompetensi, Kualitas Kerja Dan Kinerja Perusahaan (Studi Kasus pada PT. Djarum). Masters thesis, program Pascasarjana Universitas Diponegoro. Tesis. Program Pascasarjana. Universitas Diponegoro. Semarang.

Dina Maritha, Tanto Gatot Sumarsono, M. Ch. Sina Setyadi “Analysis of Recruitment Effectiveness and Employee Selection Using Computer Assisted Test Method against Aparature Competence in the Government of Malang Regency” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.120-125 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/120-125.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Challenges Facing MNCs towards Improving Socio-Economic Development of Residents in Nandi County

Laura Imungu Kedode, Professor. Pontian Godfrey Okoth, Dr. Susan Kimokoti – April 2020 Page No.: 126-132

A Multinational Corporation (MNC) is an enterprise that engages in foreign direct investment and owns and controls activities in more than one country. MNCs have multiple facility subsidiaries, a common strategic vision and resource pool with foreign nationals placed in key management posts. Quintessentially, studies show that MNCs can hamper economic growth as well as serve as agents of imperialism in the economies where they operate, contrary to expectations, where residents and governments expect positive development in the economies of the regions where they operate. The study sought to evaluate the effectiveness of MNCs towards the socio-economic development of residents of Nandi County. However, the study found out that, MNCs in Nandi County were facing a number of challenges. The study concludes that there are factors hampering the effectiveness of MNCs towards the socio-economic development of the residents of Nandi County. Unfavorable weather, fluctuating tea prices and wages as well as union demands have hampered too the effectiveness of MNCs’ work in Nandi County.

Page(s): 126-132                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 April 2020

 Laura Imungu Kedode
Department of Peace and Conflict Studies, P.O Box 190-50100Kakamega – Kenya

 Professor. Pontian Godfrey Okoth
Department of Peace and Conflict Studies, P.O Box 190-50100Kakamega – Kenya

 Dr. Susan Kimokoti
Department of Peace and Conflict Studies, P.O Box 190-50100Kakamega – Kenya

[1] Ake, C. A. (2002). A political economy of Africa. Longhorn.
[2] Awolusi, O. D. (2012). ‘Foreign Direct Investment and Economic Growth in Nigeria: A [7] Vector Error Correction Modeling’. Journal of Research in Economics and International Finance, Vol. 1(3), 58–69.
[3] Blanton, S. L., & Blanton, R. G. (2009). ‘A sectoral analysis of human rights and FDI: Does industry type matter?’ International Studies Quarterly, 53(2), 469–493.
[4] Bloningen, B. A. (2006). Foreign Direct Investment Behaviour of Multinational Corporations.
[5] Chukwuemeka, E., Anazodo, R., & Nzewi, H. N. (2011). ‘African underdevelopment and the multinationals: A political commentary.’ Journal of Sustainable Development, 4(4), 101–109.
[6] Chukwuemeka, E., & Obingene, A. (2002). International Politics A Contemporary Perspective, Enugu: JTC Publishers.
[7] Clark, E. (2010). Understanding African Economy. Lagos: Vinez Publishers.
[8] Cohen, S. (2007). Multinationals and Foreign Direct Investments: Avoiding Simplicity, Embracing Complexity. London: Oxford University Press.
[9] Dabour, N. (2000). ‘The Role of Foreign Direct Investments in Development and Growth in OIC Member Countries.’ Journal of Economic Cooperation, 21(3), 27–55.
[10] Domar, A. (1994). International labour law reports. Stockholm: Domstolsverket.
[11] Erwee, R. (2007). Global business leadership and strategies. Southern Africa, Cape Town: Oxford University Press.
[12] Eze, B. (2011). ‘The role of Ethnic Politics in African democratization’. African Development Review, 1(2), 12–19.
[13] Fieldhouse, D. (2000). A new imperial system: The role of the multinational Corporations reconsidered. London: Routledge.
[14] Frank, M., Lynch, L., & Rego, S. (2008). ‘Tax reporting aggressiveness and its relation to aggressive financial reporting’. Accounting Review, 84(2).
[15] Frynas, J. G. (1998). ‘Political Instability and business: focus on shell in Nigeria’. Third World Quarterly, 19(3), 457–478.
[16] Gilpin, R. (2001). Global political economy: understanding the international economic order. Princeton.: Princeton University Press.
[17] Goncalves, F. (2000). ‘The world at Davos: the fear of globalisation.’ Southern African Economist.SAPEM., 26–27.
[18] Hashimu, B., & Ango, N. A. (2012). ‘Multinational companies’corporate social responsibility performance in Lagos State,Nigeria. A quantitative analysis.”. European Journal ofGlobalization and Development Research,5(1), 247–266.
[19] Iyela, A. (2009). ‘The trend of foreign direct investment in Nigeria: problems and the way out’. Journal of the National Association for Science ,humanities and Education Research, 7(1), 15–25.
[20] Kothari, C. R. (2004). Research Methodology: Methods and Techniques. New Delhi: New Age International (P) Ltd.
[21] KNBS. (2010). The 2009 Kenya population and housing census, 1C.
[22] Litvin, D. (2003). Empires of Profit: Commerce, Conquest, and Corporate Responsibility. Pennsylvania State University: Thomson.
[23] Mbukwa, H. (2016). The Role &Impact of Multinational Corporations (MNCs) In Malawi. Retrieved from https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/role-impact-multinational-corporations-mncs-malawi-hendrix-mbukwa
[24] Mcphail, E. (1988). British Colonial Objectives in Africa. The Roots of Underdevelopment New York: Mcgraw Hill.
[25] Meyns, P., & Musamba, C. (2010). The Developmental State in Africa: Problems and Prospects. INEF Report 101/2010. Essen.
[26] Müller, T., Platzer, H. W., & Rüb, S. (2005). Global Employee Representation Structures i n Transnational Companies. (F. Garibaldo & A. Bardi, Eds.). Brussels: Peter Lang.
[27] Okoth, P. G. (2012a). ‘Multinational Corporations and Ugandan Oil Diplomacy.’ Journal of Science Technology Education and Management, 5(1 & 2), 123–135.
[28] Okoth, P. G., & Were, M. E. (2018). ‘Multinational Corporations and Paradigm Shift in African Development Cooperation.’ In P. G. Okoth, M. F. K., & O. K. (Eds.), Peace,Security and Development in 21st Century Africa: Theory and Practice (pp. 243–263). Nairobi: Finesse Publishing Ltd.
[29] Otokiti, B. O. (2012). ‘Mode of entry of multinational corporations and their performance in the Nigerian market’. An M.Sc Research Project Done and Submitted at Covenant University, Ota, Ogun State.
[30] Ozoigbo, B. I., & Chukuezi, C. O. (2011). ‘The impact of multinational corporations on the Nigerian economy’. European Journal of Social Sciences, 19(3).
[31] Simpson, R., & Sinclair, A. (2004). ‘World Sociology’. In S. Chapman (Ed.), Sociology (p. 66). Letts and Lonsdale.
[32] Tirimba, O. I., & Macharia, G. M. (2014). ‘Economic impact of multinational corporations on development of developing nations.’ International Journal of Scientific and Research Publications, 4.(9), 1–6.

Laura Imungu Kedode, Professor. Pontian Godfrey Okoth, Dr. Susan Kimokoti, “Challenges Facing MNCs towards Improving Socio-Economic Development of Residents in Nandi County” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.126-132 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/126-132.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Psychology of Education as an In-Service Teacher-Training Module: A Professional Catalyst or an Anticlimax? The Zimbabwean Experience

Tinashe F. Mavezera, Moses Kufakunesu – April 2020 Page No.: 133-139

The teaching of the Psychology of Education module in Zimbabwe has attracted mixed reactions from in-service students. Negative attitude and lack of interest was exhibited especially at Great Zimbabwe University. While scholars and academics have emphasised that the module redefine students as educators, what needs emphasized is how the module is viewed by learners. This paper therefore explored the views exhibited by undergraduate and postgraduate in-service student teachers in Zimbabwe. To address this, the paper was guided by Freud’s psychoanalytic theory, Vygotsky’s sociocultural theory, Gagne’s nine events of instruction and Rogerian principles of instruction and motivation. It used mixed method approach in which the chi-square test and the qualitative phenomenological research design with electronic questionnaires and observations as the data gathering instruments. The stratified random sampling method was used to select 50 participants. The data gathered through observations and questionnaires was subjected to thematic data analysis. The findings point to mixed views and sentiments regarding studying the module. Undergraduate student teachers harboured negative attitudes towards Psychology of Education as evidenced by their apparently low motivation, low participation, boredom and lecture avoidance. On the contrary, Graduate Diploma in Education and Master of Education students were enthusiastic to study the module and expressed favourable perceptions. The researchers recommended that the lecturers in the domain of Psychology of Education should continue highlighting the utility of Psychology of Education to students at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels.

Page(s): 133-139                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 April 2020

 Tinashe F. Mavezera
Lecturer in Psychology of Education, Department of Educational Foundations, Great Zimbabwe University, P.O Box 1235, Masvingo, ZIMBABWE

 Moses Kufakunesu
Associate Professor in Psychology of Education, Department of Educational Foundations, Great Zimbabwe University, P.O Box 1235, Masvingo, ZIMBABWE

[1] Ader, H.J., Van Marwik, H .W. Deltaan, M. and Beekman, A. (2008).Advising on ResearchMethods: A Consultants Comparison.The Netherlands: Johannes Van Kessel Publishing.
[2] Bandura, A. (1977).Social Learning Theory.Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.
[3] Chilisa, B., and Preece, J. (2005).Research Methods for Adult Education in Africa.Gaborone: UNESCO Institute for Educators.
[4] Chiromo, A. (2009).Research Methods and Statistics in Education.Gweru: Midlands State University.
[5] Cooper, C. (2010).Individual differences and personality (3rd Edition).London: Hodder Education.
[6] Driscoll, D. L, Introduction to Primary Research: Observations, Surveys and Interviews. Writing Spaces: Readings on Writing, (2) (2011), 153-174.
[7] Eggen, P, Psychology of Education: windows on classrooms, student value addition (NJ: Prentice Hall, 2010).
[8] Farooq, U, Psychology of Education–Importance for Teachers and Education (Retrieved from https://www.studylecturenotes.com, 2012).
[9] Feldman, R. S, Understanding Psychology (9th Edition) (New York: McGraw- Hill, 2009).
[10] Gangne, R. M., Briggs, L. J. and Wager, W. W, Principles of Instructional Design.(4thed). (Forth Worth, TX: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich College Publishers, 1992).
[11] Kufakunesu, M., Mavezera, T.F., Mashoko, D. and Malasha, S. (2019). Professional Enhancement or Needless Baggage: Attitudes of Undergraduate In-Service Secondary School Student Teachers towards Educational Psychology in Zimbabwe. IOSR Journal of Humanities and Social Science (IOSR-JHSS), 24 (9) (Series. 5 of September. 2019):59-68.
[12] Kufakunesu, M. and Chinyoka, K. (2017) “Shattered spider web? Developmental challenges faced by secondary school adolescent learners in Zimbabwe.” IOSR Journal of Humanities and Social Science (IOSR-JHSS), 22 (09): 26–35.
[13] Kufakunesu, M. and Dekeza, C. (2017). Symbiosis during Examination Preparation: The Perceived Utility of Group Discussions to University Students in Zimbabwe. Educational Research International (February 2017), 6(1): 50-62.
[14] Kufakunesu, M. and Chinyoka, K. (2017).Negotiating the Meanders of Career Choice amid Militating Variables: The Case of Zimbabwean Adolescents.International Journal of Current Innovation Research, (November 2017) 3(11):873-878.
[15] Kufakunesu, M. (2015).The Influence of Irrational Beliefs on the Mathematics Achievement of Secondary School Learners in Zimbabwe.DED Thesis. Pretoria: University of South Africa.
[16] Kufakunesu, M., Ganga, E. Chinyoka, K.Hlupo, T. and Denhere, C. (2013). Viewed with Skewed Lenses? Adolescents’ perceptions on the treatment they receive from parents and teachers in Masvingo urban, Zimbabwe. International Journal of Innovative Research and Development, 2(4):832-833.
[17] Langat, A. C, Students’ attitudes and their effects on learning and achievement in Mathematics: A Case study of public secondary schools in Kiambu County, Kenya, Kenyatta University, Nairobi, 2015.
[18] Mavezera, T.F., Gwirayi, C. and Kufakunesu, M. (2019). Attitudes of Primary School In-Service Undergraduate Student Teachers towards Educational Psychology in Zimbabwe. International Journal of Arts Humanities and Social Sciences Studies, 4 (8):9-14.
[19] Mensah, J., Okyere, M., &Kuranchie, A. Student attitude towards mathematics and performance: Does the teacher attitude matter? Journal of Education and Practice, 4(3), 2013, 132–139.
[20] McLeod, S, A, Simply Psychology.Retrieved from http:/www.simply psychology.org/Sigmund-Freud.html, 2018. Retrieved on 24 July 2019.
[21] Mwamwenda, T.S. (2004). Educational Psychology: An African perspective. Cape Town: Heinemann Publishers.
[22] Nezhad, A. S. and Vahedi, M, The Role of Psychology of Education in Teacher Education Programmes, Procedia – Social and Behavioural Sciences, 30, 2011, 327 – 330.
[23] Osamwonyi, E. F, In-service Education of teachers: Overview, Problems and the way forward, Journal of Educational Practice, 7(26), 2016, 83-87.
[24] Patterson, C. H, Foundations for a theory of instruction and Psychology of Education ( New York: Harper and Row, 1977).
[25] Sager, M, Being driven or thriving?Sigmund Freud versus Carl Rogers on human motivation.Retrieved from https://medium.com/@mathias.sager75, 2017.Retrieved on 8 August 2019.
[26] Schenkel, B, Impact of attitude towards Mathematics and Mathematics performance, Unpublished M.A thesis, Marietta College, Ohio, 2009.
[27] Schuman, R. B, Motivation (Psychology), Salem Press Encyclopaedia of Health(New York: Grey House Publishing, 2016).
[28] Swartz, L., De la Rey, C., Duncan, N., Townsend, L. and O’ Neill, V, Psychology: An introduction (Cape Town: Oxford University Press, 2011).
[29] Silverman, D, Interpreting Qualitative Data. Methods for Analysing Talk, Text and Interaction (London: SAGE, 2002).
[30] Thompson, C. L. and Henderson, D. A, Counselling Children (South Melbourne, VIC & Belmont, CA: Thomson/ Brooks/ Cole, 2007).
[31] Tuckman, B.W. and Monetti, D.M. (2011).Educational Psychology.New York: Wadsworth Cengage Learning.
[32] Vinney, C, Carl Rogers: Founder of the Humanistic Approach to Psychology (Retrieved from https://www.thought.com/carl- rogers – 4588296, 2019).
[33] Woolfolk, A. E, Psychology of Education. (12thed) (New Jersey: Pearson, 2013).
[34] Woolfolk, A. E, Psychology of Education(Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 2016).

Tinashe F. Mavezera, Moses Kufakunesu “Psychology of Education as an In-Service Teacher-Training Module: A Professional Catalyst or an Anticlimax? The Zimbabwean Experience” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.133-139 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/133-139.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Impact of Technology Acceptance Model on the Use of Information and Communication Technology in Training

Ogbonnaya, Esther Abosede Ph.D.- April 2020 Page No.: 140-148

Purpose: This study examined the impact of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) on the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) for training. The purposes of the research were to: ascertain the trainees and instructors perceived usefulness of ICT in training, ascertain perceived ease of use of available ICT facilities for training as well as examined attitude of trainees and instructors toward using, and actual user behavior. Salient issues were considered on the impact of TAM in the use of ICT for training
Design/Methodology & Approach: The methodology adopted was a contextual analysis that involved the review of materials ranging from publications, textbooks, and the relevant internet sources.
Implication: The ignorance of the TAM dependent variables by training institutions to infuse the use of ICT in training would not enhance training outcomes and would result in wastage of scarce resources.
Originality/Value: This paper concluded that the application of the Technology Acceptance Model in the use of ICT in training, would impact positively on training outcomes which are effectiveness, efficiency and optimal productivity.

Page(s): 140-148                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 April 2020

 Ogbonnaya, Esther Abosede Ph.D.
Esther Abosede Ogbonnaya holds a BSc in Economics from the University of Ife, Postgraduate Diploma in Education from the University of Lagos, MLS from the University of Ibadan and a Ph.D. in Library and Information Science from the University of Nigeria. Currently a Facilitator with National Open University of Nigeria, Mushin Centre, Lagos

[1] Alazzam, A., Bakar, A., Hamzah, R.,&Asimiran, S. ( 2012). Effect of Demographic Characteristics Educational Background and Support Factors on the ICT Readiness of Technical and Vocational Teachers in Malaysia. International Educational Studies. 5(6):229-243 Retrieved 18 March, 2020.
[2] Adebayo, O.O., (2007). Availability and Utilization of Material Resources as Correlates of Students Learning Outcome in Secondary School History: A Case Study of Some Selected Secondary School in Oluyole Local Government Area of Oyo State. Unpublished M.Ed. Project, University of Ibadan. Retrieved 12 March, 2020.
[3] Aldhmour, F. M.&Shannak, R. O. (2009). The Effective Utilization of Information and Communication Technology and its Impact on Competitive Advantage. European Journal of Scientific Research 29 (3): 302- 314. Retrieved 12 March, 2020.
[4] Atinmo, M.I., (2000). Availability and Accessibility of Library Resources for the Visually Handicapped in Nigeria: The Way forward, Journal of Association of Librarians for the Visually Handicapped 1(1):15- 22. Retrieved 28 March, 2020
[5] Bakar, A.R. and Mohammed, S. (2008). Teaching Using Information and Communication Technology: Do Trainee Teachers Have the Confidence? International Journal of Education and Development Using ICT /online/,.4(1)from http://ijedict.dec.uwi.edu/viewarticle.php?id=374 Retrieved 27 March, 2020
[6] Bandura, A. (1982), Self-efficacy Mechanism in Human Agency, American Psychologist 37 (2) 122-147. Retrieved 28 March, 2020
[7] Betrand, M. and Bouchard, S. (2008). Applying the Technology Acceptance Model to VR with People Who are Favourable to its Use. Journal of Cyber-Therapy & Rehabilitation. 1(2): 200- 210. Retrieved 28 March, 2020
[8] Dankaro, Jude, Inibehe, W. and Terumbur J. (2012) ICT Resources Utilization, Availability and Accessibility by Teacher Educators for Instructional Development in College of Education, (CoE) Katsina-Ala, Benue State Nigeria. Academic Journal of New Media and Mass Communications http://connection.ebscoho st.com/c/articles /82158773/ 3:1. Retrieved 20 March, 2020.
[9] Davis, F., Bagozzi, R., and Warshaw, R. (1989). User Acceptance of Computer Technology: A Comparison of Two Theoretical Models. Management Science, Volume 35, 1989, pp. 982-1003. Retrieved 18 March, 2020.
[10] Davis, Bagozzi et Warshaw (1989).Technology Acceptance Model from http://edutechwiki.unige.ch/mediawiki/index.php?title=Technology_acceptance_mo del&oldid=72539″ Retrieved 18 March, 2020.
[11] Dillon, A., and Morris, M. G. (1996). User Acceptance of Information Technology: Theories and Models. Annual Review of Information Science and Technology, Vol. 31, 3-32. Retrieved 18 March, 2020.
[12] Elwood, H. (2002). Human Resource Development. New York: Random House.
[13] Ezeoba, K. O. (2007).Instructional Media. An Assessment of The Availability, Utilization, and Production by Nursery School Teachers. Journal of Applied Literacy and Reading. 3 (Special Edition) 33 – 38. Retrieved 22 March, 2020.
[14] Fakeye, D. O. (2010).Assessment of English Language Teachers’ Knowledge and Use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in Ibadan Southwest Local Government of Oyo State. American Eurasian Journal of Scientific Research5(4) 56 – Retrieved 20 March, 2020.
[15] Fuller M.A. (2005). “Internet” in Davis G.B. (Ed.). Management Information Systems, The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Management, 2nd Ed, Blackwell Publishing, Malden.
[16] Global Information Technology Report (2005). The Networked Readiness Index Rankings 2005. www.weforum.org/pdf/global_competitiveness_reports/2006/rankings. Retrieved 29 March 2020.
[17] Haag S., Cummings M., Philips A., (2007). Management Information Systems for the Information Age 6th Ed., McGraw- Hill/ Irwin, Boston.
[18] Hauser, J. R. and Shugan, S.M. (1980), “Intensity Measures of Consumer Preference,” Operation Research, Vol. 28, No.2,(March-April), 278-320. Retrieved 29 March 2020.
[19] Ingham, John; Pierre Collerette, Why Do People Use Information Technology? A Critical Review of The Technology Acceptance Model, Information & Management, Volume 40, Issue 3, January 2003, Pages 191-204, ISSN 0378-7206,10.1016/S0378-7206(01)001434.(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378720601001434) Retrieved 29 March 2020.
[20] Kaino, L (2004). Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Research, Dissemination and Utilization in Southern AfricanUniversities.from http://www.aau.org/aau_fr/sites/default/files/ict6.pdf 25/11/12. Retrieved 29 March 2020.
[21] King, W.R., He, J. (2006).A Meta-Analysis of The Technology Acceptance Model. Information & Management. 43: 740-755 Retrieved 29 March 2020.
[22] Kiptalam and Rodrigues (2010). Accessibility and Utilization of ICTs Among Secondary School Teachers in Kenya. International Journal of Computing and ICT Research. 4 (1): 39-44. Retrieved 20 March 2020.
[23] Kiptalam, G.K.&Rodriques, A. J. (2010). Internet Utilization: A Case of Connected Rural and Urban Secondary Schools in Kenya. International Journal of Computing and ICT Research.4(1): 49-63. Retrieved 20 March 2020.
[24] Larcker, D.F., and LESSIG, V.P. (1980) Perceived Usefulness of Information: A Psychometric Examination. Decision Sciences, 11 (1). Retrieved 29 March 2020.
[25] Legris, Paul, John Ingham, Pierre Collerette (2003). Why Do People Use Information Technology? A Critical Review of The Technology Acceptance Model, Information & Management, Volume 40, Issue 3, January 2003, Pages 191-204, ISSN 0378-7206, 10.1016/S03787206(01)001434. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378720601001434) Retrieved 29 March 2020.
[26] Lepper, M. R. (1982, August). Microcomputers in Education: Motivational and Social Issues. A Paper Presented at The Annual Meeting of The American Psychological Association, Washington, D.C. Retrieved 29 March 2020.
[27] McFarland, D., & Hamilton, D. (2006). Adding Contextual Specificity to The Technology Acceptance Model. Computers in Human Behaviour, 22(3), 427-447. “http://edutechwiki.unige.ch/mediawiki/index.php?title=Technology_acceptance_model&oldid=72539” Retrieved 29 March 2020.
[28] Moswetsi, W., Renken, J. &Neethling, A. (2006).Attitudes and Perceptions of South African Military Academy Students Towards Information and Communication Technology and Computers. Scientia Militaria 34(1):49-66. Retrieved 20 March 2020.
[29] Obioha, J. (2005). The Role of ICT in Information Seeking and Use Amongst Research Officers in Research Institutes in Nigeria: The Nigerian Institute of Oceanography and Marine Research Institute Experience. The International Information and Library Review. 37(4): 303 – 314 Retrieved 20 March 2020.
[30] Scherer, R., Siddiq, F., & Tondeur, J. (2019). The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM): A Meta-analytic Structural equation Modelling Approach to Explaining Teachers’ Adoption of Digital Technology in Education. Computers & Education, 128, 13–35. from https://doi.org/10.1016/J.COMPEDU.20 18.09.009 Retrieved 29 March 2020.
[31] Tella, A. (2011). Availability of ICT in South-Western Nigeria Colleges of Education. African Research Review,5(5):315 – 331 Retrieved 19 March 2020.
[32] Thomas, T.L. (2007). “IT Requirements for Police Keeping”, US Foreign Military Studies Office Publication from http://leavwww.army.mil/fmso/documents/ITPolicekeeping/itpolicekeeping.htm Retrieved 19 March 2020.
[33] Tinio, V. L. (2002). ICT in Education. United Nations Development Programme. Bureau for Development Policy. NewYork. From http://www.eprimers.org Retrieved 29 March 2020.
[34] Usluel, Askar and Bas, (2008). A Structural Equation Model for ICT Usage in Higher Education. Journal of Educational Technology & Society 11(2), 262-273. from http://www.ifets.info/journals/11_2/19.pd f Retrieved 19March 2020.
[35] Venkatesh V. (2000). Determinants of Perceived Ease of Use: Integrating Control, Intrinsic Motivation and Emotion into the Technology Acceptance Model. New York: The Free Press.
[36] Venkatesh, V. Davies, K. & Morris, T. (2003).Social Influence on ICT utilization in Education. New York: The Free press.
[37] Venkatesh, V., Morris, M.G., Davis, G.B. & Davis, F.D. (2003). User Acceptance of Information Technology: Toward a Unified View. MIS Quarterly, 27(3), 425. https://doi.org/10.2307/30036540 Retrieved 19 March 2020.
[38] VichitaVathanophas, Nattapon Krittayaphongphun, and Chalalai Klomsiri, (2008) “Technology Acceptance Toward e-government Initiative in Royal Thai Navy”, Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, 2 (4): 256 – 282. Retrieved 12 March 2020.
[39] William & Sawyer, R. (2002). Human resource management. Enugu: Fulladu publishing.
[40] World Bank, (2002). World Bank Group, Information and Communication Technologies A
[41] World Bank Group Strategy(Washington, DC: The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/The World Bank, 2002).

Ogbonnaya, Esther Abosede Ph.D. “The Impact of Technology Acceptance Model on the Use of Information and Communication Technology in Training” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.140-148 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/140-148.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Effect of Online Shop on Shopping Behavior in X Grade Students of SMA Muhammadiyah 2 Bandar Lampung

Novia Nalom Larasati, Risma Margaretha Sinaga, Erlina Rufaidah – April 2020 Page No.: 149-151

This study aims to determine the effect of online shop on shopping behavior in X grade students of SMA Muhammadiyah 2 Bandar Lampung. This research uses survey research methods. Data collection techniques can be done in several ways, such as observation, questionnaires and documentation. The population in this study are all students of X grade of Science 1 and Science 2 in which totaling 66 people. The sampling technique used in this study is probability sampling technique using simple random sampling. The results showed that online shop in a simple linear regression affected the student shopping behavior in X grade of science students of SMA Muhammadiyah 2 Bandar Lampung. This was shown from the results of the tstatistic about 2,763 > ttable 2.364 and the probability (sig.) about 0.013 < 0.05. This stated that the online shop had a contribution to shopping behavior in X grade of Science students of SMA Muhammadiyah 2 Bandar Lampung.

Page(s): 149-151                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 April 2020

 Novia Nalom Larasati
Faculty of Training and Education, Universitas Lampung, Indonesia

 Risma Margaretha Sinaga
Faculty of Training and Education, Universitas Lampung, Indonesia

 Erlina Rufaidah
Faculty of Training and Education, Universitas Lampung, Indonesia

[1] Haubl, dan Trifts, V. 2000. Customer Decision Making in Online Shopping Environments : The Effects of Interactive Decision Aids. Marketing Science, Vol. 19 (1) : 4-21
[2] Kanserina, Dias. 2015. Pengaruh Literasi Ekonomi dan Gaya Hidup Terhadap Perilaku Konsumtif Mahasiswa Jurusan Pendidikan Ekonomi Undiska. : Vol. 5 Nomor 1
[3] Schiffman dan Kanuk. 2010. Perilaku Konsumen. Penerbit PT. Indeks : Jakarta
[4] Sugiyono. 2013. Metode Penelitian Pendidikan : Pendekatan Kuantitatif, Kualitatif dan R&D. Penerbit Alfabeta : Bandung
[5] Sugiyono. 2013. Metode Penelitian Pendidikan : Pendekatan Kuantitatif, Kualitatif dan R&D. Penerbit Alfabeta : Bandung
[6] Sugiyono. 2017. Metode Penelitian Pendidikan : Pendekatan Kuantitatif, Kualitatif, R&D. Penerbit Alfabeta : Bandung

Novia Nalom Larasati, Risma Margaretha Sinaga, Erlina Rufaidah “The Effect of Online Shop on Shopping Behavior in X Grade Students of SMA Muhammadiyah 2 Bandar Lampung” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.149-151 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/149-151.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Freedom of Information Act: A Key to Transparent and Accountable Government in Nigeria

Asadu Ikechukwu, PhD, Ozioko Sunday Chidozie – April 2020 Page No.: 152-162

Transparency and accountability are vital ingredients of democratic governance. Nevertheless, in Nigeria public sector, the state of transparency and accountability has raised concern among the scholars, policy makers, analysts and other stake holders. The rate of corrupt practices and lack of responsive leadership in the public sector has partly been attributed to poor transparency and accountability culture. The study; therefore, examined how effective utilization of the provisions of Freedom of Information Act, 2011, can facilitate accountability and transparency in the public sector management. The methodology of the study is both qualitative and descriptive. Through documentary sources, relevant data were generated and subjected to contextual-descriptive analysis. The findings of the study, among other things, demonstrated that citizens’ access to information about government activities empowers them to hold their leaders accountable for their public conducts. This in turn makes the leaders to be open, responsible and responsive to the need of the people in carrying out their public functions to avoid vote of no confidence and criticism from the public. Consequently, the study suggests, inter alia, the review of some sections of the Act which deals with non disclosure of certain information; enlightenment of the public on the utilization of the Act; strict compliance to the provisions of the Act as well as a review of any other existing laws that may affect the effectiveness of the Freedom of Information Act.

Page(s): 152-162                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 April 2020

 Asadu Ikechukwu, PhD
Department of Public Administration and Local Government, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria

 Ozioko Sunday Chidozie
Department of Public Administration, National Open University of Nigeria, Nigeria

[1] Adelberg, S., and Batson, D. (1978). Accountability and helping: when needs exceeds resources. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 36, 343-350
[2] Anechiarico, F., and Jacobs, J. (1996). The pursuit of absolute integrity; How corruption control makes government ineffective. Chicago: University of Chicago Press
[3] African Union (2003). African Union convention on preventing and combating corruption, adopted by the 2nd ordinary session of the Assembly of the Union in July.
[4] Armstrong, E. (2005). Integrity, transparency and accountability in public administration: Recent trends, regional and international development and emerging issue. Economic and Social Affair, United Nation
[5] Altman, S., Shactman, D., and Ellat, E. (2006). Could US hospital go the way of our airlines? Hospital market changes such as price transparency and specialization could have severe negative consequences. Health Affair, 25(1), 11-21.
[6] Alt, J.E., Lassen, D.D., and Skilling, D. (2002). Fiscal transparency, gubernatorial approval and the scale of government: Evidence from the states. State Politics and Policy Quarterly, 2(3), 230-250
[7] Adegite, E.O. (2010). Accounting, accountability and national development. Nigeria Accountant, 43 (1), 56 – 64
[8] Aberbach, J. D. (1990). Keeping a watchful eye: The politics of congressional oversight. Washington: Brookings Institution
[9] Aronson, M., and Dyer, B. (2000). Judicial review of administrative action. Sydney: LBC Information Service.
[10] Ayode, S. (2011). Right Nigeria: freedom of information bill proves elusive. http//www.infor.right.com
[11] Adeleke, F. (2011). Prospect and challenges of F01 bill in Nigeria. http//www.elembah.com
[12] Bovens, M. (1998). The quest for responsibility: Accountability and citizenship in complex organization. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
[13] Bauhr, M., and Grimes, M. (2012). What is government transparency: New measure and relevance for quality of government. QOG working paper series 2012:16
[14] Ball, C. (2009). What is transparency? http//www.researchgate.net/publication/250174526-whatis transparency
[15] Bertot, J.C., Jaeger, P.T and Grime J. M. (2015). What does market accountability to public governance? Paper presented at IRSPM Birmingham
[16] Baume, S. (2013). Exposer less affaire publiques au regard des citoyens.les raisons. Justificatives. du principe de transparency. In M. Pasquier (Ed) Le Principle de transparence en Suisse et dans. Le monde. Lausa une and Berne: PPUR and Haupt
[17] Bell, R. and Watchirs, H. (1988). Freedom of information: The common wealth experience. Australian Journal of public Administration, 37 (4), 297
[18] Bovens, M. (2005). Public accountability. In E. Jerlie, L. Lynne and C. Polite (Eds), The Oxford Hand Book of Public Management. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
[19] Birds, P. (1973). Accountability; standard in financial reporting. London: Haymarket Publishing
[20] Behn, R.D. (2001). Re-thinking democratic accountability. Brookings institute press
[21] Bellver, A., and Kaufman, D. (2005) Transparenting transparency, initial empirics and policy applications. World Bank Policy Research working paper
[22] Bentham, J. (2001 [1791]. Of publicity. In J.M.C. Blamires and Pease Watkin (Eds), The collected works of Jeremy Benrthan: Political tactics. Oxford: Clarendon Press
[23] Bovens, M. (2003). Public accountability. A paper for the EGPA Annual conference, Oeiras Portugal September 3 –6
[24] Bovens, M .(2007). Analyzing and accessing accountability: A conceptual framework. European Law Journal, 13 (14), 447 – 468.
[25] Cendon, A. B. (2000). Accountability and ethic: The role of value and legal procedures in raising standard. In Accountability in public administration: Reconciling democracy, efficiency and ethic. Proceedings of the 1999 Sunni dale Conference, Brussel, 59 – 78
[26] Cendon, A. B. (1999). Accountability and public administration: Concept, dimensions, development. In Openness and transparency in governance: Challenges and opportunities (pp. 23-61) Maastricht, Netherlands
[27] Cotterrell, R. (2000). Transparency; mass media, ideology and community. Cultural values 3, 414-426
[28] Clark, D.H., and Reed, W. (2005). The strategic sources of foreign policy substitution. American Journal of Political Science, 49 (3), 609-624
[29] Cowhe, P.F. (1993). Domestic institutions and the credibility of international commitment: Japan and the United States. International Organization, 47 (2), 299 – 326
[30] Cooper, T.L. (2004). Big questions in administrative ethics: A need for focused, collaborative effort. Public Administration Review, 64 (4), 395 – 407
[31] Cooper, T.L., and Yoder, D. E. (2002). Public management ethics standards in a transnational world. Public integrity, 4 (4), 333 – 352
[32] Cocker, O. (2010). Accountability in third sector organization: What role for accounting? Nigerian Accountant, 43 (1), 23 – 29
[33] Dubnick, M. J. (2002). Seeking salvation for accountability. A paper presented at the 2002 annual meeting of the American Political Science Association. Boston
[34] Dawodu, M.O. (2016). An overview of the freedom of information act; An appraisal from a lawyer’s perspective. hltp/www.spaajibade.com
[35] Eigen, P. (2003). The Web of corruption trans. J. Didarich, Frankfurt: Campus Verlag
[36] Enonche, E. (2012). What to expect from the newly signed freedom of information Bill. A conference paper delivered at the Media Right Agenda (MRA) workshop. hltp//www.allm.african media
[37] Finel, B. I., and Kristin, M. L. (1999). The suprising logic of transparency. International Studies Quarterly, 43 (2), 315 –339
[38] Finn, P. (1993). Public trust and public accountability. Australian Quarterly, 65 (winter), 50-59
[39] Ferman, J. H. (2007). The value of Transparency. Health Care Executive, 22 (5), 49
[40] Florini, A. (1996). The evolution of international norms. International Studies Quarterly, 40 (3), 363-389
[41] Finkelstein, N.D. (2000). Transparency in the public policy: Great Britain and the United States. New York: St. Martins Press
[42] Gualtieri, R. (1998). Impact of the emerging information society on the policy development process and democratic quality. Paris: OECD-Puma
[43] Grimmelikhuijsen, S.G., and Welch, E.W. (2012). Developing and testing a theoretical framework for computer-mediated transparency of local government. Public Administration Review, 72 (4), 562–571
[44] Galvin, R. (2007). A historic change: Now we have to make transparency meaningful. Modern Health Care, 37 (46), 22
[45] Gilmore, R. S., and Jenson, L.S. (1998). Reinventing government accountability: Public functions, privatization and meaning of state action. Public Administration Review, 58 (3), 247-258
[46] Gray, R. (1992). Accountability and environmentalism: An exploration of the challenge of gentle accounting for accountability, transparency and sustainability. Accounting, Organization and Society, 17 (5), 399-425
[47] Hood, C. (2007). What happens when transparency meets blame-avoidance? Public Management Review, 9 (2), 191-210
[48] Hirsch, W.Z., and Osborne, E. (2000). Privatization of government services: Pressure group resistance and service transparency. Journal of Labour Research, 21 (2) 315-326
[49] Hood, C. (2010). Accountability and transparency: Siamese twins, matching parts, awkward couple? West European Politics, 33 (5), 989-1009
[50] Holzner, B., and Holzner, L. (2006). Transparency in global change: The vanguard of the open society. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press
[51] Heald, D. (2012). Why is transparency about public expenditure so elusive? International Review of Administrative Science, 78 (11), 30 – 49
[52] Jabbra, J. C and Dwivedi, O.P (1989). Public service accountability; A comparative perspective. West Hartford; com: ICM Marian
[53] Jones, G.W. (1992). The search for local accountability. In S. Leach (Ed) Strengthening local government in the 1990s. London: Longman
[54] Lodge, J. (1994). Transparency and democratic legitimacy. Journal of Common Market Studies, 32 (3), 343 – 368
[55] Libich, J (2006). Should monetary policy be transparent? Policy, 22 (1), 28 – 33
[56] Lewis, C., and Gilman, S.C. (2005). Normative and institutional currents and commonalities. Public Integrity, 7 (4), 331 – 343
[57] Leazes, F. J. (1997). Public accountability: Is it a private responsibility? Administration and society, 29( 94), 395 – 411
[58] Lewis, W., and Birkinshaw, P. (1993). When citizens complain: Reforming justice and administration. Buckingham and Philadelphia, Open University Press.
[59] Martin, J. (1997). Changing accountability relations. politics, consumers and market. Paper delivered at the seminar on accountability and public organization responsiveness to politicians, customers and market forces, Paris 24 – 23 November
[60] Mabillard, V. and Zumofen, R. (2015). The uncertain relationship between transparency and accountability revisited through four Swiss cases. Working paper De I’IDHEAP 8/2015 unite management public et. marketing
[61] Murich, P. (2011).Revolution francaise, Opinion publique et transparence. Les fon de. ment de la democratie. Monderne Apparei (7), 1-7
[62] Michener, G (2011). FOI laws around the world. Journal of Democracy 22 (2), 145 – 159.
[63] Macpherson, B. (2006). A transparency guide. Modern Healthcare, 36 (12), 22
[64] Mueller, J. (2007). When doing good is just the start to begin good: A possible tool to improve the organizational effectiveness of non profit-health care organization. Journal of Hospital Marketing and Public Relation, 17 (2), 45-60
[65] Mulgan, R. (2000). Comparing accountability in public and private sector. Australian Journal of Public Administration, 59 (1), 87-97
[66] Meijer, A. (2014). Transparency. In M. Bovens, R.E Good and T. Schillemans (Eds). The oxford hand book on public accountability (pp.507- 529). Oxford: Oxford University Press
[67] Mitchell, R. B. (1998). Source of transparency: information system in international regimes. International Studies Quarterly, 42 (1), 109-130
[68] Osborne, D. and Gaeble, T. (1992). Reinventing government. How the entrepreneurial spirit is transforming public sector. Reading, Ma: Addison-wesley
[69] O’Kelly, C and Dubnick, M (2014). Accountability and its metaphors-from forum to agora and bazaar. A paper presented at the E G P A conference, Speyer Germany.
[70] Olowu, D. (2002). Accountability and transparency. In L. Adamolekun (Ed) Public Administration in Africa, main issue and selected studies. Ibadan: spectrum books ltd.
[71] Onuorah, A and Appah, E. (2012). Accountability and public sector financial management in Nigeria. Arabian Journal of Business and Management Review (OMAN chapter) 1 (6), 1-17.
[72] Pasquier, M. (2009). La mise en oeuvre de la loi sur la transparence: absence l’interets des citoyens ou particularities du system Suisse? In R. T. Trindade, H. peter and C. Bovet (eds). Economie Environnement Ethique. De la responsabillite societale (pp. 281-288). Geneve et Zurich: Schulthess
[73] Pasquier, M (2014, August, 26) la transparence: de la lumiere a’ l’aveuglement? Huffington post
[74] Premchand, A. (1999). Public financial management: getting the basic right. In S. Schiavo (Ed) Governance, corruption, and public financial management. Asian Development Bank,manila philippiness. ww.adb.org
[75] Pollitt, C., Bathgate, K., Caulfied, J., Smullen, A., and Talbot (2001) Agency-fever? Analysis of an international fashion. Journal of comparative policy Analysis Research and practice (3), 271-290.
[76] Qureshi, A. (1990). The new GATT trade policy review mechanism: An exercise in transparency or “enforcement”? Journal of World Trade 24, 147-160
[77] Romzek, B. S (1999). The dynamics of public sector accountability in a era of reform A paper delivered at the conference on accountability in public administration: Reconciling democracy. Efficiency and ethics of the International Institute of Administrative Science, sunning dale, 12-15 July.
[78] Romzek, B.S and Dubnick M.J(1987). Accountability in public sector: Lessons from the challenger tragedy. Public Administration Review, 47(3), 227-238
[79] Rowe, J. (1999). Joined up accountability: Bringing citizens back. Policy and Administration 14, 91-102.
[80] Rosen, B. (1982). Holding government bureaucracies accountable. Newyork: Praeger.
[81] Rehaman, M., and Batool, S. Q. (2013). Mechanism of public service accountability. Middle-East Journal of Scientific Research, 18 (4), 539-545
[82] Roy J. G. (2003). Right to information: A key to accountable and transparent administration. In D. Alka (Ed)Contemporary debates in public administration. New Delhi: PH I learning private Ltd.
[83] Romzek, B.S and Dubnick, M.J. (1998) Accountability. In J.M. Shafritz (Ed) International Encyclopedia of Public Policy and Administration Volume 1. A C, West View Press
[84] Stone, B. (1995). Administrative accountability in the west minister democracies: Towards a new conceptual framework. Governance, 8 (4), 505-526
[85] Summers, J., and Micheal, W. (2006). Pricing transparency or smokescreen? Health Care Financial Management, 60 (12), 134 – 136
[86] Stirton, L., and Lodge, M. (2001). Transparency mechanisms: Building publicness into public service. Journal of Law and Society, 28, 471-489
[87] Thornton, J. (2006). Non profit fundraising in competitive donor market. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector quarterly, 35 (2), 204 – 228
[88] UNO (2003). United Nation convention against corruption. Adopted by resolution 5814 of the General Assembly of the UN in October 2003.

Asadu Ikechukwu, PhD, Ozioko Sunday Chidozie “Freedom of Information Act: A Key to Transparent and Accountable Government in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.152-162 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/152-162.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

An Analysis of Writing Errors in First Draft Essays of Northern Nigerian College Freshmen

Dr. Hannah Mweru Mugambi, Dr. Achoda Nicholas Achoda – April 2020 Page No.: 163-168

This research paper is a concise analysis of writing errors in first draft essays of Northern Nigeria college freshmen. Data is drawn from 70 first draft freshman composition corpus which is presented and analyzed. Among the most frequent errors found are in the use of they, their, and there, the use of been and being, and the plural/ singular ‘s’ endings among others. Causative factors of errors are attributed to either careless mistakes, interlanguage development, L1 interference, overgeneralization, or language difficulty. Students come into college already using a non-standard variety of the English language, yet the form of standard English that is prescribed for use at college level in Nigeria is significantly different from those varieties that students already speak and are familiar with. This study reveals certain “errors” that emanates from students’ essay which arises out of the transfer of the lingua franca forms into academic writing work. There is also the dialectical component, as majority of the study population speak Hausa/Fulfulde language. The main objective of this study is to identify those “errors” that students in north-east Nigeria make in college level writing in order to help improve pedagogy in English language at this level. This study focuses on grammatical error analysis, while keeping in mind the importance of analysis at the levels of semantics, and overall discourse. Although students’ writing errors can be classified into various linguistic categories such as graphological, morphological, syntactical, lexicological and discoursal and semantic levels, this study focuses on the morpho-syntactic level errors only. A total of 70 student essays were read, graded and analyzed for morphological and syntactic level errors which are identified and marked in red and then categorized accordingly. The descriptive survey design was adopted for the study and strategic random sampling method was used to select the study population. Findings from the study revealed that errors are caused by a number of overarching factors which may include group work, L1 interference, TL difficulty as well as other cognitive factors like learner’s communicative strategies, leaner grammar inability, learner’s lexical deficit in coining word and learners’ inability to use synonyms. The study also provides suggestions and strategies for helping students to self-correct. The study recommends a fair balance between correcting errors whilst allowing natural stages of language learning to take place. When educators have a comprehensive understanding of students’ challenges it will help them in guiding the students better. This will boost the students’ morale and also help in the improving their overall academic performances.

Page(s): 163-168                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 April 2020

 Dr. Hannah Mweru Mugambi
English Language and Literature Department, American University of Nigeria

 Dr. Achoda Nicholas Achoda
English Language and Literature Department, American University of Nigeria

[1] Anderson, J. (1985). Cognitive psychology and its implications. New York: W.H. Freeman.
[2] Bereiter, C. & Scardamalia, M. (1987). The psychology of written composition. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
[3] Bialystok, E. (1998). Coming of age in applied linguistics. Language Learning, 48, 497-518.
[4] Brown, H.D. (2000). Principles of language learning and teaching (4th ed.). White Plains, NY: Longman.
[5] Ellis, R. (1985). Understanding second language acquisition. Oxford: Pergamon Institute of English.
[6] Ellis, R. (1994). The study of second language acquisition. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
[7] Flower, L. (1994). The construction of negotiated meaning: A social cognitive theory of writing. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press.
[8] Flower, L. & Hayes, J. (1980). The dynamics of composing: Making plans and juggling constraints. In L. Gregg & E. Steinberg (Eds.),Cognitive processes in writing (pp. 31-50). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
[9] Flower, L. & Hayes, J. (1981). A cognitive process theory of writing.College Composition and Communication, 32, 365-387.
[10] Flower, L., Stein, V., Ackerman, J., Kantz, M., McCormick, K., & Peck, W., (1990). Reading-to-write: Exploring a cognitive and social process. New York: Oxford University Press.
[11] Fox, H. (1994). Listening to the world: Cultural issues in academic writing. Urbana Illinois: National Council of Teachers of English.
[12] Friedlander, A. (1990). Composing in English: Effects of a first language on writing in English as a second language. In B. Kroll (Ed.), Second language writing: Research insights for the classroom. (pp. 109-125). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
[13] Gardner, R. (1985). Social psychology and second language learning: The role of attitude and motivation. London: Edward Arnold.
[14] Kogen, M. (1986). The conventions of expository writing. Journal of Basic Writing, 5, 24-37.
[15] Krashen, S. (1982). Principles and practice in second language acquisition. Oxford: Pergamon Press.
[16] Kutz, E., Groden, S., & Zamel, V. (1993). The discovery of competence: Teaching and learning with diverse student writers. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook Publishers.
[17] Lambert, W. (1975). Culture and language as factors in learning and education. In A. Wolfgang (Ed.), Education of immigrant students (pp. 55-83). Toronto: Ontario Institute for Studies in Education.
[18] McLaughlin, B. (1988). Theories of second-language learning. Baltimore: Edward Arnold.
[19] Odlin, T. (1994). Introduction. In T. Odlin (Ed.), Perspectives on pedagogical grammar (pp. 1-22). New York: Cambridge University Press.
[20] O’Malley, J. & Chamot, A. (1990). Learning strategies in second language acquisition. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.
[21] Radecki, P. & Swales, J. (1988). ESL student reaction to written comments on their written work. System, 16, 355-365.
[22] Raimes, A. (1998). Teaching writing. Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, 18, 142-167.
[23] Robb, T., Ross, S. & Shortreed, I. (1986). Salience of feedback on error and its effect on EFL writing quality. TESOL Quarterly, 20, 83-93.
[24] Rodby, J. (1992). Appropriating literacy: Writing and reading in English as a second language. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook Publishers.
[25] Schumann, J. (1978). The pidginization process: A model for second language acquisition. Rowley, MA: Newbury House.
[26] Schumann, J. (1998). The neurobiology of affect in language. Language Learning, 48, Supplement 1, 527-549.
[27] Sengupta, S. (2000). An investigation into the effects of revision strategy instruction on L2 secondary school learners. System, 28, 97-113.
[28] Shaughnessy, M. (1977). Errors and expectations. New York: Oxford University Press.
[29] Selinker, L. (1972). Interlanguage. International Review of Applied Linguistics, 10, 209-231.
[30] Silva, T. (1993). Toward an understanding of the distinct nature of L2 writing: The ESL research and its implications. TESOL Quarterly, 27, 657-677.
[31] Snow, M. A. (2001). Content-based and immersion models for second and foreign language teaching. In M. Celce-Murcia (Ed.), Teaching English as a second or foreign language (3rd ed.) (pp. 303-318). Boston: Heinle & Heinle.
[32] Spack, R. (1997). The rhetorical construction of multilingual students. TESOL Quarterly, 31, 765-74.
[33] Sternglass, M. (1997). Time to know them: A longitudinal study of writing and learning at the college level. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates
[34] Swales, J. (1990). Genre analysis: English in academic and research settings. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.
[35] Valdes, J. (1995) (Ed.) Culture bound. New York: Cambridge University Press.
[36] Wells, G. (2000). Dialogic inquiry in education: Building on the legacy of Vygotsky. In C. Lee & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.), Vygotskian perspectives on literary research (pp. 51-85). New York: Cambridge University Press.
[37] Widdowson, H. (1990). Aspects of language teaching. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
[38] White, E. (1994). Teaching and assessing writing. (2nd ed.) San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers
[39] Williams, J. (1989). Preparing to teach writing. California: Wadsworth Publishing Co.
[40] Zamel, V. (1983). The composing processes of advanced ESL students: Six case studies. TESOL Quarterly, 17, 165-187.
[41] Zamel, V. (1987). Recent research on writing pedagogy. TESOL Quarterly, 21, 697-715.
[42] Zamel, V. (1998). Strangers in academia: The experiences of faculty and ESL students across the curriculum. In V. Zamel & R. Spack (Eds.), Negotiating academic literacies: Teaching and learning across languages and cultures (pp. 249-264). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Dr. Hannah Mweru Mugambi, Dr. Achoda Nicholas Achoda “An Analysis of Writing Errors in First Draft Essays of Northern Nigerian College Freshmen” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.163-168 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/163-168.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Comparison Study of Time Token and Numbered Head Together Learning Models to Improve Student Life Skills by Looking at the Assignment of Projects and Portfolio in Economics Subject of X Grade at SMA Muhammadiyah 2 Bandar Lampung

Ferede Ningsih, Pargito, Sugeng Widodo – April 2020 Page No.: 169-172

This study aims to determine the significant difference in students life skills between students whose learning uses time tokens and numbered head together learning models by looking at the assignment of projects and portfolios in economics subject of X grade at SMA Muhammadiyah 2 Bandar Lampung. This research uses quasi-experimental method with a comparative approach. The population in this study are all students of X grade at SMA Muhammadiyah 2 Bandar Lampung. There are 165 students consisting of 5 classes. The sampling technique used in this study is cluster random sampling technique obtained by X grade of social one with 33 students and X grade of social two with 34 students. The results showed that there were differences in life skills between students whose learning used the Time Token learning model and the Numbered Head Together learning model in Economicss subject. There were differences in life skills between students given project assignment techniques and students given portfolio assignment techniques in economics subjects. There was an interaction between learning models with the assignment of life skills in economics subjects. Life skills of students taught using the Time Token learning model were higher than those taught using the Numbered head together learning model for students given project assignments in economics subjects. Life skills of students taught using the Numbered Head Together learning model were higher than those of students taught using the time token learning model for students given portfolio assignments in economics subjects. Life skills of students given project assignments were higher than portfolio assignments for students whose learning uses the Time Token learning model in economics subjects. Life Skills of students given portfolio assignments were higher than project assignments for students whose learning uses the Numbered Head Together learning model in Economicss.

Page(s): 169-172                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 April 2020

 Ferede Ningsih
Faculty of Training and Education, Universitasd Lampung, Indonesia

 Pargito
Faculty of Training and Education, Universitasd Lampung, Indonesia

 Sugeng Widodo
Faculty of Training and Education, Universitasd Lampung, Indonesia

[1] Anwar. 2012. Pendidikan Kecakapan Hidup (Life Skill Education. Alfabeta: Bandung.
[2] Arikunto, Suharsimi. 2013. Manajemen Penelitian. Rineka Cipta. Jakarta.
[3] Huda, Miftahul. 2014. Model-model Pengajaran dan Pembelajaran. Pustaka Pelajar: Yogyakarta.
[4] Ibrahim, Muslimin. 2005. Pembelajaran kooperatif. Unipress: Surabaya.
[5] Samani, Muchlas. 2007. Pendidikan Bermakna. Sic: Surabaya.
[6] Sapriya. 2015. Pendidikan IPS. Remaja Rosdakarya : Bandung
[7] Sugiyono. 2012. Metode Penelitian Kuantitatif Kualitatif dan R&D. Alfabeta : Bandung
[8] Sugiyono.2013. Metode Penelitian Pendidikan. Alfabeta: Bandung.
[9] Yamin, Martinis. 2013. Paradigma baru pembelajaran. Referensi. Jakarta.

Ferede Ningsih, Pargito, Sugeng Widodo “Comparison Study of Time Token and Numbered Head Together Learning Models to Improve Student Life Skills by Looking at the Assignment of Projects and Portfolio in Economics Subject of X Grade at SMA Muhammadiyah 2 Bandar Lampung” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.169-172 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/169-172.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Goals of Terrorist Organizations versus World Peace: Collaborative Counter Terrorism as Panacea

Charles Chidi Eleonu PhD – April 2020 Page No.: 173-180

Promotion of world peace is the cardinal purpose of the United Nations. Opposed to the principles of the United Nations are the overall goals of several terrorist organizations which operate all over the world. Today there is a list of some most dangerous terrorist organizations with specified goals and objectives. They parade huge wealth and exhibit forms of criminality, some also have sponsorship and backing of sovereign governments. The terrorist organizations are mostly Islamic extremists operating within specific regions. The paper found that the identified specific goals and objectives of the terrorist organizations are contrary to the purposes of the United Nations. The paper found that the specific goals of the terrorist organizations are connected to Islamic fundamentalist agenda and are therefore selfish in content and parochial in intent. The paper in addition found that the increasing proliferation of Islamic terrorist organizations does in no way indicate a near attainment of world peace. The paper concludes that with the selfish, parochial specific goals of the terrorist organizations which are particularistic with Islamic fundamentalism, world peace is a mirage. The paper therefore suggests a committed collaborative effort to end the remote selfish plan to Islamize the world. The theoretical framework adopted in this research paper is the realism approach.

Page(s): 173-180                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 April 2020

 Charles Chidi Eleonu PhD
Department of Public Administration, Port Harcourt Polytechnic, Rumuola Road Port Harcourt, Rivers State Nigeria

[1] Abadie, A. (2007). Terrorism and World Economy. John F Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University: Cambridge.
[2] Ahmed, E. (1998) Terrorism: Theirs and ours. A presentation at the University of Boulder, Colorado, Association of Tamils of Eelam& Sri Lanka in the United States. Available from: http://www.sangam.org/ANALYSIS/Ahmed.htm
[3] Bennet, A.R. (1984).International Organisation-Principles and Issues, University of Rajastathan, Jaipur.
[4] Callimachi, R. (2016). “How a Secretive Branch of ISIS Built a Global Network of Killers. August New York Times
[5] Chomsky, N. and Herman, E.S. (1979) The Washington Connection and Third World Fascism. Boston: South End Press.
[6] Cronin, A.K. (2006). “Cyber-Mobilization” In The New Levee en Masse” Parameters 36,no 2. Summer
[7] CIA Analyst Report (2003). “Old School Ties” March,10; Intelligence Report on Usama Bin Laden links to a Southern Yemeni Group, March 5, 1997.
[8] Callimachi, R. (2016). “How a Secretive Branch of ISIS Built a Global Network of Killers. August New York Times
[9] European Journal of Political Economy. (2004), The Economic Consequences of Terror: A Brief Survey.Vol 20, German Institution for Economic Research, Berlin.
[10] Freedman, L. (1998).Terrorism and International Order. London. Routledge Pub.
[11] History Learning Site (2011),“League of Nations Background.
”http://www.historvleamingsite.co.uk/leagueofnations.htm (Accessed on 11 September).
[12] InternationalRelationsTheoryKnowledgeBase,(2011),CollectiveSecurity, http://www.irtheory.com/know.htm Accessed on 10 October 2011.
[13] Jensen, R.B. (2009). “The International Campaign Against Anarchist Terrorism, 1880-1930s” Terrorism and Political Violence. Vol. 21. no.1 January – March
[14] Kant, Emmanuel (1975).“PerpetualPeaceAPhilosophicalSketch1975” http://www.mtholvoke.edu/acad/intre/kantl/htm (Accessed 02 January 2012).
[15] Korab-Karpowicz, W, (2011), “Political Realism in International Relation”, The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy Winter Edition
[16] League of Arab States (2003). The UN Security Council Counter – Terrorism Committee, Submitted to UN in February
[17] Morgenthau, H.J. and Thompson, K.W. (1993).Politics Among Nations: The Struggle for Power and Peace. McGrew Mill Inc: New York.
[18] Sandler, T. (2006).Economic Consequences of Terrorism in the Developed and Developing Countries: An overview. University of California: Los Angeles.
[19] Slater, O.R. and Stohl, M. (1988).Current Perspectives on International Terrorism. Macmillan Press: London.
[20] The Glottal Focus, “International Terrorism”, http://www.globalfocus.org/GF-Tcrrorism.htm (Accessed on 20
December 2011)
[21] United Nations. (2002). International Instruments related to the Prevention and Suppression of International Terrorism, New York, United Nations Publication, 2011 (Preface by Koffi Annan, 4 October 2002),
[22] Waugh, W. L. (2000). Terrorism and Emergency Management: Instructor Guide. Emmetsburg, Emergence Management Institute:Maryland.

Charles Chidi Eleonu PhD “Goals of Terrorist Organizations versus World Peace: Collaborative Counter Terrorism as Panacea” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.173-180 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/173-180.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Police Discretion Liability in the Function of Criminal Law Enforcement

Suhendar – April 2020 Page No.: 181-184

Police discretion in potentially abused, injustice, corruptive actions are things that cannot be hidden anymore. Pretrial as a means of control and supervision in its practice has limitations. In government discretion, the State Administration Court has received to examine and test it as a form of liability, but on the contrary it is not so in police discretion. That means, police discretion in the function of criminal law enforcement cannot be examined and/or tested that is used without any liability. The research method used was normative legal research with statutory, conceptual, historical, and analytical approaches using primary, secondary, and tertiary legal material. Based on the result, police discretion liability in the function of criminal law enforcement in Law on Police and Criminal Procedural Code was not governed expressly. Therefore, the concept of police discretion must obtain clearer, more measured, and objective interpretation and explanation so that the legitimization and operational are application and in line with the conception of legal state, law enforcement, and law liability. The absence of mechanism and examining and/or testing institution could not be maintained anymore, so had to be open to the obligation to account for it, either by pseudo-administrative trial, pure administrative trial, or both, with internal liability or external liability. Besides that, the aspect of legitimization and operational of police discretion was not applicable, limited by and in the sense within the scope of its legality principle and specification, and could not be used in the function of criminal law enforcement except police investigator discretion as a form of special discretion and constituted a specification of police discretion, realized in free discretion and bound discretion according to the Criminal Procedural Code.

Page(s): 181-184                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 May 2020

 Suhendar
Doctor of Law Program, Universitas Jayabaya, Jakarta-Indonesia

[1] M. Ulfah, A. Safrina, and W. M. H. Susilowati, “Penghentian Penyidikan: Tinjauan Hukum Administrasi Dan Hukum Acara Pidana,” Mimb. Huk. – Fak. Huk. Univ. Gadjah Mada, 2017.
[2] A. Tabah, Bureaucracy Policing (Pemolisian Birokrasi). Klaten: CV. Sahabat, 2010.
[3] Yopie Morya Immanuel Patiro, Diskresi Pejabat Publik dan Tindak Pidana Korupsi. Bandung: CV. Keni Media, 2011.
[4] A. Fendri, “Kebebasan Bertindak Pemerintah (Diskresi) Sebagai Perwujudan Nilai-Nilai Moral Dan Etika,” J. Ilmu Huk. Riau, 2015.
[5] S. . Marbun and M. Mahfud, Pokok-Pokok Hukum Administrasi Negara. Yogyakarta: Liberty, 1987.
[6] J. H. Arsyad, Korupsi Dalam Perspektif Hukum Administrasi Negara. Jakarta: Sinar Grafika, 2014.
[7] N. Sinamo, Hukum Administrasi Negara. Jakarta: Jala Permata Aksara, 2010.
[8] L. M. P. Pangaribuan, Hukum Acara Pidana: Surat Resmi Advokat di Pengadilan. Praperadilan, Eksepsi, Pledoi, Duplik, Memori Banding, Kasasi dan Peninjauan Kembali. Jakarta: Papas Sinar Sinanti, 2013.
[9] A. Sutadi, G. A. Wulan, H. Susetyo, and S. B. Harahap, Diskresi Kepolisian: Dalam Tinjauan Hukum dan Implementasinya di Lapangan. Jakarta: Komlsi Kepoljslan NASIONAL, 2013.
[10] Sidharta and J. Rizal, Pendulum Antinomi Hukum: Antologi 70 Tahun Valerine J. L. Kriekhoff. Yogyakarta: Genta Publishing, 2014.
[11] T. R. R. Nitibaskara, Ketika Kejahatan Berdaulat. Jakarta: Peradaban, 2001.
[12] S. W. Edi, Praperadilan di Indonesia: Teori, Sejarah, danPraktiknya. Jakarta: Institute for Criminal Justice Reform, 2014.
[13] J. Ibrahim, “Teori dan Metode Penelitian Hukum Normatif,” Bayu Media, Malang, 2006.
[14] P. M. Marzuki, Penelitian Hukum. Jakarta: Kencana Prenada Media Group, 2011.
[15] K. Carty, Guidebook on Democratic Policing. 2008.
[16] A. F. Susanto, “Mitos Peradilan Bersih (Ketika Etika Mulai Tergerus dan Menjadi Barang Langka),” in Problematika Hukum dan Peradilan, Jakarta: Sekretariat Jenderal Komisi Yudisial Republik Indonesia, 2014, p. 377.
[17] Bachtiar, Politik Hukum Konstitusi; Pertanggungjawaban Konstitusional Presiden. Yogyakarta: Suluh Media, 2018.
[18] J. Asshiddiqie and M. A. Safa’at, Teori Hans Kelsen Tentang Hukum. Jakarta: Sekretariat Jenderal dan Kepaniteraan Mahkamah Konstitusi RI, 2006.
[19] R. Satijipto, Ilmu Hukum. 2014.
[20] H. Ridwan, Hukum Administrasi Negara. Jakarta: Rajawali Pers, 2013.
[21] S. Soemantri, Prosedur dan Sistem Perubahan Konstitusi. Bandung: Alumni, 1987.
[22] A. Efendi and F. Poernomo, Hukum Administrasi. Jakarta: Sinar Grafika, 2017.
[23] S. Usman, Etika dan Tanggung Jawab Profesi Hukum di Indonesia. Jakarta: Gaya Media Pratama, 2008.
[24] K. D. Darumurti, Diskresi: Kajian Teori Hukum. Yogyakarta: Genta Publishing, 2016.

Suhendar “Police Discretion Liability in the Function of Criminal Law Enforcement” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.181-184 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/181-184.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Exploring Indigenous Methods of Alternative Dispute Settlement in Nigeria: A Study of the Ikwerre Traditional Arbitration

OGELE, Eziho Promise – April 2020 Page No.: 185-191

The distortion of the traditional arbitration and imposition of the English legal system of dispute settlement has adversely impacted on many traditional societies in Ikwerre ethnic nationality. Mere disputes are now tried in the court of law. Sometimes, these cases stay for years before judgments are pronounced by the trial judge. This delayin judgment and other challenges such as exorbitant legal fees, a backlog of cases, and a limited number of judges, have constituted a hiccup to achieving justice in the law court. The investigation was informed on the fact that several disputes have been settled out of courts and peace restored among the disputants within a short period among Ikwerre people. Applying the Third-Party Intervention Model, the study explored the effects of the roles played by the Ikwerre traditional arbitrators as a neutral party in dispute settlements. The study adopted a qualitative method data gathering. The study unraveled that Ikwerre traditional adjudication is fast and less expensive. Second, the parties involved are given a fair hearing based on truth, which sometimes is premised on Ikwerre religious belief. The study recommended judicial reforms to include Ikwerre’s traditional arbitration as part of the justice administration in Nigeria.

Page(s): 185-191                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 May 2020

 OGELE, Eziho Promise
Department of Political Science, Rivers State University, Nkpolu Oroworukwo, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

[1] Brock-Utne,B.(2001). Indigenous conflict resolution in Africa.University of Oslo. Being a draft presented to the week-end seminar on indigenous solutions to conflicts held at the University of Oslo, Institute for Educational Research 23rd – 24th February.
[2] Crook, R.C. (2012). Alternative dispute resolution and the Magistrate’s Courts in Ghana: A case of practical hybridity. Working Paper 25.July. Retrieved on 2019/07/19 from: http://www.institutions-africa.org/filestream/20120703-alternative-dispute-resolution-and-the-magistrate-s-courts-in-ghana
[3] Dickson,J.(2012). Overview of Commercial Alternative Dispute Resolution in Africa.Business Conflict Management. June 21th.
[4] Eboh, M.P. (1997). The Structure of Igbo Logic as shown in Dispute Settlement. Port Harcourt, Nigeria. Pearl Pub.
[5] Francis, D. J. (2006). Peace and conflict studies: An African overview of basic concepts. In S. G. Best (Ed.), Introduction to peace and conflict studies in West Africa. Ibadan: Spectrum Books Ltd.
[6] Kerrigan, F., McKay, A.L., Kristiansen, A., Kyed, H., Dahl, L., Dalton, P.Roesdahl, M. and Vehils,N.(2009).Informal Justice Systems Charting a Course for Human Rights-Based Engagement. New York, USA. UNDP Pub.
[7] Miller, C.E. (2005). A Glossary of Terms and Concepts in Peace and Conflict Studies.Second Edition. Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. University for Peace Pub.
[8] Ntuli, N. (2018). Africa: Alternative Dispute Resolution in a Comparative Perspective. Conflict Studies Quarterly, Issue 22, January.
[9] Olowu, D. (2018). Indigenous Approaches to Conflict Resolution in Africa: A Study of the Barolong People of the North-West Province, South Africa. Journal of Law and Judicial System. Volume 1, Issue 1. Retrieved on 2019/07/19 from: https://www.sryahwapublications.com/journal-of-law-and-judicial-system/pdf/v1-i1/3.pdf
[10] Price, C. (2018). Alternative Dispute Resolution in Africa: Is ADR the Bridge Between Traditional and Modern Dispute Resolution. Pepperdine Dispute Resolution Law Journal. Vol. 18, Issue 3. Retrieved on 2019/07/19 from: https://digitalcommons.pepperdine.edu/drlj/vol18/iss3/2
[11] Young,O. R.(1967) The Intermediaries: Third Parties in International Crises,Princeton, NJ:Princeton University Press.
[12] Waindim, J.N. (2019). Traditional methods of conflict resolution.The Kom experience.African Centre for the Reconstructive Resolution of Disputes.ACCORD. Retrieved on 2019/07/19 from: https://www.accord.org.za/conflict-trends/traditional-methods-of-conflict-resolution/

OGELE, Eziho Promise “Exploring Indigenous Methods of Alternative Dispute Settlement in Nigeria: A Study of the Ikwerre Traditional Arbitration?” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.185-191 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/185-191.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Teacher-Leadership Strategies for Enhancing Student Performance in Under-privileged Communities

Deepthi T V N, Ananya Patra – April 2020 Page No.: 192-195

As it is believed that leaders are born and not made, similarly, Behavioral Theories believe that people can become leaders through the process of teaching, learning and observation. Hence who other than a teacher can become a great leader? This research paper is contemplating to give insights into the teacher-leadership strategies to deal with the grass-root level problems in similar developing or underdeveloped economic nations facing the same educational inequity.

Page(s): 192-195                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 May 2020

 Deepthi T V N
Teach For India

 Ananya Patra
Teach For India

[1] HABIB, Madani. (2016). Assessment of Reading Comprehension. Revista Românească pentru Educație Multidimensională. .
[2] Douglas H. Clements, Denis Dumas, Yixiao Dong, Holland W. Banse, Julie Sarama, Crystal A. Day-Hess (2020): Strategy diversity in early mathematics classrooms.
[3] The impact of poverty on educational outcomes for children.Paediatr Child Health. HB Ferguson, S Bovaird, MP Mueller (2007).
[4] Sally Ann Sugg (2013 ),The Relationship Between Teacher Leadership and Student Achievement, Eastern Kentucky University
[5] Ron Cole (2014),Vocabulary Development and Intervention for English Learners in the Early Grades Doris Luft Baker, in Advances in Child Development and Behavior.
[6] DANIELSON, C.(2006).Teacher leadership that strengthens professional practice. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
[7] YORK-BARR, J.;DUKE,K ( 2004). What do we know about teacher leadership? Findings from two decades of scholarship. Review of Educational Research.
[8] Sommer Calderone, Andrea M. Kent, Andre M. Green, Teacher Leaders and Student Achievement: can the dots be connected?

Deepthi T V N, Ananya Patra “Teacher-Leadership Strategies for Enhancing Student Performance in Under-privileged Communities” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.192-195 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/192-195.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Assessment of the Availability and Utilization of E-Learning technologies in Economics Education Programme in Colleges of Education in Oyo State

Prof. Babatunde Adeniyi ADEYEMI, Mayowa Emmanuel OLASOYE- April 2020 Page No.: 196-206

The study determined the extent to which e-learning facilities were available for Economics Education in Colleges of Education in Oyo State, investigated the extent of e-learning technologies utilization of lecturers in colleges, and examined the computer competencies possessed by Economics lecturers in the colleges as well examined the constraint to the effective utilization of e-learning technologies in Economics Education programmes in the Colleges of Education in State. This study employed a survey research design. The population for the study consisted of Economics Educations lecturers and students in Colleges of Education in Oyo State. The study sample consisted of twenty lecturers and 120 students. Two (2) colleges of Education were selected using simple random sampling technique out of the Colleges of Education in Oyo State. Ten lecturers and 60 students were selected from each of the selected Colleges of Education using the simple random sampling technique. Two structured questionnaires were used to elicit information on the study namely: Economics Education Lecturers’ Questionnaire (EELQ) and Economics Education Students’ Questionnaire (EESQ). Data collected were analysed using simple percentage, relative significant index and independent t-test statistics. The findings of the study revealed that e-learning facilities were available especially computer room with RSI (0.63) and (0.51) for lecturers and students’ responses respectively in most Colleges of Education in Oyo State. The results also showed that 75.0% of the lecturers used e-learning technologies in the instructional delivery of Economics Education in Colleges of Education to a low extent while 25.0% of them used it to a moderate extent which showed that Economics lecturers in Colleges of Education in Oyo State were not utilizing e-learning to deliver lessons. The results further showed no significant difference in the computer competence of lecturers in both Federal and State owned College of Education (t= 1.156, p> 0.05) which showed that lecturers in both Colleges of Education were competent in handling e-learning technologies. The study concluded that e-learning facilities are available but rarely used by Economics lecturers in lecture delivery due to e-learning constraints.

Page(s): 196-206                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 05 May 2020

 Prof. Babatunde Adeniyi ADEYEMI
Institute of Education, Faculty of Education, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria

 Mayowa Emmanuel OLASOYE
Department of Arts and Social Science Education, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria

[1] Adeosun, O. (2010). Quality basic education development in Nigeria: Imperative for ICT. Journal of International Cooperation in education 13 (12) 193-211
[2] Adesoji, F.F. (2012). Undergraduate student perspectives of the effectiveness of ICT use in improving teaching and learning in Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria. International Journal of Library and information Science 4(7) 121-130
[3] Asogwa, C. I. (2011). The challenges of optimizing e-learning opportunities for effective education sevice delivery. In Onyegegbu, O, &Eze, U. (Eds.), Optimizing e-learning opportunities for effective education service delivery, Nsukka: university press
[4] Becker, H.J. (2000). Pedagogical motivations for student computer use that leads to student engagement. Education Technology journal, 40(5), 5-17.
[5] Eteng, U. & Ntui, I.A. (2009). Access to e-learning in the Nigeria University System (NUS): A case study of University of Calabar. The information Technologist: An international Journal of Information and Communication Technology. 6 (2), 1-10.
[6] Evarest, C.M. and Laura, A.P. (2011). Learning electronically in Nigerian Universities: The example of Federal University of Technology Minna, Nigeria. Journal of Emerging Trend in Computing and Information Sciences 2(12), 696-700
[7] Federal Republic of Nigeria (2004) National Policy on Education Fourth Ed. Lagos, NERDC Press.
[8] Gunga, S. O. (2010). Challenges of implementation of E-learning in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education (MSTE) in African schools: A critical Review: Journal of Contemporary Issues in Education, 2010, 5(1), pp. 45-51:http://ojs.edu.valbertafundex.pjp/jcied
[9] Jegede, P.O.&Owolabi, A.J. (2003) Computer education in Nigerian secondary schools: Gaps between policy and practice. Meridian: A Middle School Technology Journal, 6(2) 1-11
[10] Jephcote, (2004). Economics in the school curriculum: Its origins and reflections on the workings of a subject community. Teaching Business and Economics: 8(1) 13-20
[11] Jone, D & Sim, R. (2002). E-learning development in higher education: Maximizing efficiency-maintain quality
[12] Lage, M.J., Platt, G. J., & Treglia, M.(2000). Inverting the classroom: a gateway an inclusive learning environment :Journal of Economic Education 3(1) 30-4
[13] Murray, J. (2003). Contemporary literacy: Essential skills for the 21st century, the Online Educator.
[14] Nwana, S. (2012) Challenges in the application of e-learning by secondary school teachers in Anambra State, Nigeria. African Journal of Teacher Education 2(1), 67-72
[15] Okafor, I. E. (2009).Theory and Practice of Educational Technology with elements of Instructional Media.Umunze: Annyco Publishers
[16] Punie, Y., Zinnbauer, D., & Cabrera, M. (2006).A Review of the impact of ICT on learning technical notes. Working paper prepared for DG EAC.
[17] Sansanwal, D. N. (2009).Use of ICT in teaching, learning and evaluation.Central institute of educational technology, Delhi and State institute of education, Chandigarrh. Education technology lecture series.
[18] Walstad, W. (2001) Improving Assesement in University Economics: Journal of Economic Education (32) 281-294.
[19] Webb, E., Jones, A., Barker, P., & Schaik, P. (2004). Using e-learning dialogues in higher education, Innovation in Education and Teaching International, 41(1), 93-103
[20] White, G. (2003). E-learning – key Australian initiatives: An opportunity for all learners (online) http://www.educationndu.edu.au/papers/e-learning-polandoz
[21] Yusuf, A. (2012). Economics of Education. Retrieved from http://www.musero.org.ng/publications/ Economics/ Education dryusuf pdf

Prof. Babatunde Adeniyi ADEYEMI, Mayowa Emmanuel OLASOYE “Assessment of the Availability and Utilization of E-Learning technologies in Economics Education Programme in Colleges of Education in Oyo State” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.196-206 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/196-206.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Conceptualizing the Contextual Dynamics of Carbonization in Beijing: A Multilevel Perspective

Usman Sattar – April 2020 Page No.: 207-217

Beijing has pursued a linear direction of urban practices following the global north and suffered from a highly toxic air quality level. This paper aims at synthesizing the main logics leading us to the similar path of massive consumption and lock-in structuration—air pollution in the city. It underlines the limited capacity of different stakeholders to leapfrog the carbon-intensive urban development path. The study takes a panorama view by adopting multilevel perspective (MLP) and applies 15 dimensions of the MLP framework on six primary sources of carbon emission in Beijing. A methodic literature review guided by theoretical coding is undertaken. It combines the multidisciplinary strands into a coherent framework. The study classifies different study domains, stakeholders, and their limits at three levels—niche, regime, and landscape. It provides a baseline for urban stakeholders to conceptualize the diverse configuration of toxic air and potential requirements for reconfiguring the air infrastructure of Beijing.

Page(s): 207-217                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 05 May 2020

 Usman Sattar
Department of Social Work, College of Law and Political Science, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua (321004), Zhejiang, P. R. China

[1] Van Den Bergh, J.C.J.M.; Truffer, B.; Kallis, G. Environmental innovation and societal transitions: Introduction and overview. Environ. Innov. Soc. Transitions 2011, 1, 1–23.
[2] Geels, F.W. Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions. 2011, pp. 192–194.
[3] Baklanov, A.; Molina, L.T.; Gauss, M. Megacities, air quality and climate. Atmos. Environ.2016, 126, 235–249.
[4] Tukker, A. Leapfrogging into the future: developing for sustainability. Int. J. Innov. Sustain. Dev.2005, 1, 65.
[5] Wen, P. China on second red alert as smog smothers cities, stops flights, closes roads Available online: http://www.theage.com.au/world/china-on-second-red-alert-as-smog-smothers-cities-stops-flights-closes-roads-20161220-gteuz4.html.
[6] Meng, J.; Liu, J.; Fan, S.; Kang, C.; Yi, K.; Cheng, Y.; Shen, X.; Tao, S. Potential health benefits of controlling dust emissions in Beijing. Environ. Pollut.2016, 213, 850–859.
[7] Zhang, H.; Wang, S.; Hao, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, S.; Chai, F.; Li, M. Air pollution and control action in Beijing. J. Clean. Prod. 2016, 112, 1519–1527.
[8] Rauschmayer, F.; Bauler, T.; Schäpke, N. Towards a thick understanding of sustainability transitions – Linking transition management, capabilities and social practices. Ecol. Econ.2015, 109, 211–221.
[9] Shove, E.; Walker, G. Governing transitions in the sustainability of everyday life. Res. Policy2010, 39, 471–476.
[10] Loorbach, D. Transition management for sustainable development: A prescriptive, complexity-based governance framework. Governance2010, 23, 161–183.
[11] Wolfram, M.; Frantzeskaki, N. Cities and systemic change for sustainability: Prevailing epistemologies and an emerging research agenda. Sustain. 2016, 8.
[12] Chen, W.; Lei, Y. Path analysis of factors in energy-related CO2 emissions from Beijing’s transportation sector. Transp. Res. Part D Transp. Environ.2017, 50, 473–487.
[13] Wang, Z.; Liu, W. Determinants of CO2 emissions from household daily travel in Beijing, China: Individual travel characteristic perspectives. Appl. Energy2015, 158, 292–299.
[14] Batterman, S.; Xu, L.; Chen, F.; Chen, F.; Zhong, X. Characteristics of PM2.5 concentrations across Beijing during 2013–2015. Atmos. Environ.2016, 145, 104–114.
[15] Tian, X.; Chang, M.; Tanikawa, H.; Shi, F.; Imura, H. Structural decomposition analysis of the carbonization process in Beijing: A regional explanation of rapid increasing carbon dioxide emission in China. Energy Policy2013, 53, 279–286.
[16] Fan, F.; Lei, Y. Factor analysis of energy-related carbon emissions: A case study of Beijing. J. Clean. Prod.2015.
[17] Wei, J.; Huang, K.; Yang, S.; Li, Y.; Hu, T.; Zhang, Y. Driving forces analysis of energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in Beijing: An input-output structural decomposition analysis. J. Clean. Prod.2015.
[18] Vergragt, P.J.; Dendler, L.; de Jong, M.; Matus, K. Transitions to sustainable consumption and production in cities. J. Clean. Prod.2016, 134, Part, 1–12.
[19] Ritzer, G. Prosumption: Evolution, revolution, or eternal return of the same? J. Consum. Cult.2014, 14, 3–24.
[20] Tang, T.Q.; Huang, H.J.; Shang, H.Y. Influences of the driver’s bounded rationality on micro driving behavior, fuel consumption and emissions. Transp. Res. Part D Transp. Environ.2015, 41, 423–432.
[21] Warde, A. The Sociology of Consumption : Its Recent Development. 2015.
[22] Spaargaren, G. Theories of practices: Agency, technology, and culture. Exploring the relevance of practice theories for the governance of sustainable consumption practices in the new world-order. Glob. Environ. Chang.2011, 21, 813–822.
[23] Sustainability Transitions Research Network A mission statement and research agenda for the Sustainability Transitions Research Network. 2010, 1–27.
[24] Hodson, M.; Geels, F.W.; McMeekin, A. Reconfiguring urban sustainability transitions, analysing multiplicity. Sustain.2017, 9.
[25] Jones, M.; Karster, H. Gidden’s Structuration Theory and Information Systems Research. MIS Q.2008, 32, 127–157.
[26] Kullmann, K. Grounding Landscape Urbanism and New Urbanism. J. Urban Des.2015, 20, 311–313.
[27] Warde, a. Consumption and Theories of Practice. J. Consum. Cult.2005, 5, 131–153.
[28] Smith, A.; Stirling, A. Social-ecological resilience and socio-technical transitions: critical issues for sustainability governance. Bright. STEPS Cent. Work. Pap.2008, 8, 1–25.
[29] Geels, F.W. Technological transitions as evolutionary reconfiguration processes: a multi-level perspective and a case-study. Res. Policy2002, 31, 1257–1274.
[30] Geels, F.W. The multi-level perspective on sustainability transitions: Responses to seven criticisms. Environ. Innov. Soc. Transitions2011, 1, 24–40.
[31] Geels, F.W.; Sovacool, B.K.; Schwanen, T.; Sorrell, S. The socio-technical dynamics of low-carbon transitions. Joule2017.
[32] Hansen, T.; Coenen, L. The geography of sustainability transitions: Review, synthesis and reflections on an emergent research field. Environ. Innov. Soc. Transitions2015, 17, 92–109.
[33] Geels, F.W. A socio-technical analysis of low-carbon transitions: introducing the multi-level perspective into transport studies. J. Transp. Geogr.2012, 24, 471–482.
[34] Markard, J.; Raven, R.; Truffer, B. Sustainability transitions: An emerging field of research and its prospects. Res. Policy2012, 41, 955–967.
[35] Rowley, J.; Slack, F. Conducting a literature review. Manag. Res. News2004, 27, 31–39.
[36] Wolfram, M. Conceptualizing urban transformative capacity: A framework for research and policy. Cities2016, 51, 121–130.
[37] Neuman, W.L. Social Research Methods: Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches; 2014; Vol. 8; ISBN 0205353118.
[38] Braun, V.; Clarke, V. Using Thematic Analysis in Psychology. Qual. Res. Psychol.2006, 3, 77–101.
[39] Potter, S. Undertaking a Literature Review. Doing Postgrad. Res.2004, 4, 411–429.
[40] Geels, F.W. Multi-Level Perspective On System Innovation: Relevance For Industrial Transformation. In Understanding Industrial Transformation; 2006; pp. 163–186 ISBN 9781402037559.
[41] Geels, F.W. Processes and patterns in transitions and system innovations: Refining the co-evolutionary multi-level perspective. Technol. Forecast. Soc. Change2005, 72, 681–696.
[42] Zhao, L.; Mao, G.; Wang, Y.; Du, H.; Zou, H.; Zuo, J.; Liu, Y.; Huisingh, D. How to achieve low/no-fossil carbon transformations: With a special focus upon mechanisms, technologies and policies. J. Clean. Prod.2016, 1–9.
[43] Martos, A.; Pacheco-Torres, R.; Ordóñez, J.; Jadraque-Gago, E. Towards successful environmental performance of sustainable cities: Intervening sectors. A review. Renew. Sustain. Energy Rev. 2016, 57, 479–495.
[44] O’Rourke, D.; Lollo, N. Transforming Consumption: From Decoupling, to Behavior Change, to System Changes for Sustainable Consumption; 2015;
[45] Li, S.; Feng, K.; Li, M. Identifying the main contributors of air pollution in Beijing. J. Clean. Prod. 2015.
[46] Yang, Z.; Cai, J.; Ottens, H.F.L.; Sliuzas, R. Beijing. Cities2013, 31, 491–506.
[47] Yang, Z.; Fan, Y.; Zheng, S. Determinants of household carbon emissions: Pathway toward eco-community in Beijing. Habitat Int.2016, 57, 175–186.
[48] Gu, C.; Shen, J. Transformation of urban socio-spatial structure in socialist market economies: The case of Beijing. Habitat Int.2003, 27, 107–122.
[49] Liu, W.; Oosterveer, P.; Spaargaren, G. Promoting sustainable consumption in China: a conceptual framework and research review. J. Clean. Prod.2016, 134, Part, 13–21.
[50] Delmas, M.A.; Pekovic, S. Resource efficiency strategies and market conditions. Long Range Plann.2015, 48, 80–94.
[51] Jin, Y.; Denman, S.; Deng, D.; Rong, X.; Ma, M.; Wan, L.; Mao, Q.; Zhao, L.; Long, Y. Environmental impacts of transformative land use and transport developments in the Greater Beijing Region: Insights from a new dynamic spatial equilibrium model. Transp. Res. Part D Transp. Environ.2017, 52, 548–561.
[52] Ma, J.; Liu, Z.; Chai, Y. The impact of urban form on CO2 emission from work and non-work trips: The case of Beijing, China. Habitat Int.2015, 47, 1–10.
[53] Ma, J.; Heppenstall, A.; Harland, K.; Mitchell, G. Synthesising carbon emission for mega-cities: A static spatial microsimulation of transport CO2 from urban travel in Beijing. Comput. Environ. Urban Syst.2014, 45, 78–88.
[54] Zhu, X.; Li, R. An Analysis of Decoupling and Influencing Factors of Carbon Emissions from the Transportation Sector in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Area, China. Sustainability2017, 9, 722.
[55] Dai, Y.; Gao, H.O. Energy consumption in China’s logistics industry: A decomposition analysis using the LMDI approach. Transp. Res. Part D Transp. Environ.2016, 46, 69–80.
[56] Ahmad, A.; Zhao, Y.; Shahbaz, M.; Bano, S.; Zhang, Z.; Wang, S.; Liu, Y. Carbon emissions, energy consumption and economic growth: An aggregate and disaggregate analysis of the Indian economy. Energy Policy2016, 96, 131–143.
[57] Mao, Z.; Zhang, S.; Li, X. Low carbon supply chain firm integration and firm performance in China. J. Clean. Prod.2017, 153, 354–361.
[58] Yang, D.; Lu, Y.; Zhu, W.; Su, C. Going green: How different advertising appeals impact green consumption behavior. J. Bus. Res.2015, 68, 2663–2675.
[59] Tukker, A. Product services for a resource-efficient and circular economy – A review. J. Clean. Prod. 2015, 97, 76–91.
[60] Chriss, J.J. Nudging and Social Marketing. Society2015, 52, 54–61.
[61] Schanes, K.; Giljum, S.; Hertwich, E. Low carbon lifestyles: A framework to structure consumption strategies and options to reduce carbon footprints. J. Clean. Prod.2016, 139, 1033–1043.
[62] Lehner, M.; Mont, O.; Heiskanen, E. Nudging – A promising tool for sustainable consumption behaviour? J. Clean. Prod.2016, 134, 166–177.
[63] Brooks, J.S.; Wilson, C. The influence of contextual cues on the perceived status of consumption-reducing behavior. Ecol. Econ.2015, 117, 108–117.
[64] Carfagna, L.B.; Dubois, E.A.; Fitzmaurice, C.; Ouimette, M.Y.; Schor, J.B.; Willis, M.; Laidley, T. An emerging eco-habitus: The reconfiguration of high cultural capital practices among ethical consumers. J. Consum. Cult.2014, 14, 158–178.
[65] Zhu, Q.; Li, Y.; Geng, Y.; Qi, Y. Green food consumption intention, behaviors and influencing factors among Chinese consumers. Food Qual. Prefer.2013, 28, 279–286.
[66] Xu, B.; Lin, B. Reducing carbon dioxide emissions in China’s manufacturing industry: A dynamic vector autoregression approach. J. Clean. Prod.2016, 131, 594–606.
[67] Li, Y.; Beeton, R.J.S.; Sigler, T.; Halog, A. Modelling the transition toward urban sustainability: A case study of the industrial city of Jinchang, China. J. Clean. Prod.2016, 134, 22–30.
[68] Shen, Z.; Sun, J.; Cao, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Q.; Lei, Y.; Gao, J.; Huang, R.J.; Liu, S.; Huang, Y.; et al. Chemical profiles of urban fugitive dust PM2.5 samples in Northern Chinese cities. Sci. Total Environ.2016, 569–570, 619–626.
[69] Boons, F.; Lüdeke-Freund, F. Business models for sustainable innovation: State-of-the-art and steps towards a research agenda. J. Clean. Prod.2013, 45, 9–19.
[70] Fan, F.; Lei, Y. Decomposition analysis of energy-related carbon emissions from the transportation sector in Beijing. Transp. Res. Part D Transp. Environ.2016, 42, 135–145.
[71] de Jong, M.; Yu, C.; Joss, S.; Wennersten, R.; Yu, L.; Zhang, X.; Ma, X. Eco city development in China: addressing the policy implementation challenge. J. Clean. Prod.2016, 134, 31–41.
[72] Zukin, S.; Smith Maguire, J. Consumers and consumption. Annu. Rev. Sociol.2009, 30, 173–197.
[73] Fri, R.W.; Savitz, M.L. Rethinking energy innovation and social science; 2014; Vol. 1;.
[74] Grabs, J.; Langen, N.; Maschkowski, G.; Schäpke, N. Understanding role models for change: a multilevel analysis of success factors of grassroots initiatives for sustainable consumption. J. Clean. Prod.2016, 134, 98–111.
[75] Sattar, U.; Zhang, D. Reconfiguring Energy Consumption Practices in Beijing: Integrating Pathways to Sustainability. Int. J. Appl. Sociol.2018, 8, 1–5.
[76] Martiskainen, M. The role of community leadership in the development of grassroots innovations. Environ. Innov. Soc. Transitions2015, 22, 78–89.
[77] Purtik, H.; Zimmerling, E.; Welpe, I.M. Cooperatives as catalysts for sustainable neighborhoods – a qualitative analysis of the participatory development process toward a 2000-Watt Society. J. Clean. Prod.2016, 134, 112–123.
[78] Echegaray, F. Corporate mobilization of political consumerism in developing societies. J. Clean. Prod.2016, 134, 124–136.
[79] Watkins, L.; Aitken, R.; Mather, D. Conscientious consumers: a relationship between moral foundations, political orientation and sustainable consumption. J. Clean. Prod.2016, 134, Part, 137–146.
[80] Platon, R.; Dehkordi, V.R.; Martel, J. Hourly prediction of a building’s electricity consumption using case-based reasoning, artificial neural networks and principal component analysis. Energy Build.2015, 92, 10–18.
[81] Liu, X.; Gao, X. A survey analysis of low carbon technology diffusion in China’s iron & steel industry. J. Clean. Prod.2016, 129, 88–101.
[82] Zhao, R.; Zhou, X.; Jin, Q.; Wang, Y.; Liu, C. Enterprises’ compliance with government carbon reduction labelling policy using a system dynamics approach. J. Clean. Prod. 2015.
[83] Brown, M.A. Enhancing efficiency and renewables with smart grid technologies and policies. Futures2014, 58, 21–33.
[84] Zhao, Z.; Liu, Y.; Wang, F.; Li, X.; Deng, S.; Xu, J.; Wei, W.; Wang, F. Life cycle assessment of primary energy demand and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of four propylene production pathways in China. J. Clean. Prod. 2015.
[85] Ding, N.; Yang, J.; Liu, J. Substance flow analysis of aluminum industry in mainland China. J. Clean. Prod.2016, 133, 1167–1180.
[86] Meng, X.; Wen, Z.; Qian, Y.; Yu, H. Evaluation of cleaner production technology integration for the Chinese herbal medicine industry using carbon flow analysis. J. Clean. Prod. 2015.
[87] Allevi, E.; Oggioni, G.; Riccardi, R.; Rocco, M. Evaluating the carbon leakage effect on cement sector under different climate policies. J. Clean. Prod. 2015.
[88] Liu, J.Y.; Xia, Y.; Fan, Y.; Lin, S.M.; Wu, J. Assessment of a green credit policy aimed at energy-intensive industries in China based on a financial CGE model. J. Clean. Prod. 2015.
[89] Zhou, X.; Feng, C. The impact of environmental regulation on fossil energy consumption in China: Direct and indirect effects. J. Clean. Prod.2017, 142, 3174–3183.
[90] Bäckström, K. “Shopping as leisure: An exploration of manifoldness and dynamics in consumers shopping experiences.” J. Retail. Consum. Serv.2011, 18, 200–209.
[91] Swilley, E.; Goldsmith, R.E. Black Friday and Cyber Monday: Understanding consumer intentions on two major shopping days. J. Retail. Consum. Serv.2013, 20, 43–50.
[92] Wu, J.H.; Li, Q.; Wei, K.K. Alibaba???s IT platform and electronic commerce synergy in driving ???Singles??? Day??? J. Organ. Comput. Electron. Commer.2016, 26, 193–202.
[93] Podoshen, J.S.; Li, L.; Zhang, J. Materialism and conspicuous consumption in China: A cross-cultural examination. Int. J. Consum. Stud.2011, 35, 17–25.
[94] Rohde, R.A.; Muller, R.A. Air pollution in China: Mapping of concentrations and sources. PLoS One2015, 10.
[95] Lang, D.J.; Wiek, A.; Bergmann, M.; Stauffacher, M.; Martens, P.; Moll, P.; Swilling, M.; Thomas, C.J. Transdisciplinary research in sustainability science: Practice, principles, and challenges. Sustain. Sci.2012, 7, 25–43.
[96] Popa, F.; Guillermin, M.; Dedeurwaerdere, T. A pragmatist approach to transdisciplinarity in sustainability research: From complex systems theory to reflexive science. Futures2015, 65, 45–56.
[97] Sattar, U. How Socio-Technical Landscape Can Innovate Energy Transitions in Cities? A Conceptual Framework. Int. J. Res. Innov. Soc. Sci.2020, IV, 210–214.
[98] Lim, K.F. “Socialism with Chinese characteristics”: Uneven development, variegated neoliberalization and the dialectical differentiation of state spatiality. Prog. Hum. Geogr.2013, 38, 221–247.
[99] Mahapatra, S.K.; Ratha, K.C. Paris Climate Accord: Miles to Go. J. Int. Dev.2017, 29, 147–154.
[100] Wang, Z.; Yang, Y. Features and influencing factors of carbon emissions indicators in the perspective of residential consumption: Evidence from Beijing, China. Ecol. Indic.2016, 61, Part 2, 634–645.
[101] Wang, Z.; Liu, W. The impacts of individual behavior on household daily travel carbon emissions in Beijing, China. In Proceedings of the Energy Procedia; 2014; Vol. 61, pp. 1318–1322.
[102] Guo, B.; Geng, Y.; Franke, B.; Hao, H.; Liu, Y.; Chiu, A. Uncovering China’s transport CO2 emission patterns at the regional level. Energy Policy 2014.
[103] Huang, A.L. Beijing: A media capital in the making. Chinese J. Commun.2012, 5, 178–193.
[104] Mol, A.P.J. Sustainability as global attractor: The greening of the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Glob. Networks2010, 10, 510–528.
[105] Lorek, S.; Fuchs, D. Strong sustainable consumption governance – Precondition for a degrowth path? J. Clean. Prod.2013, 38, 36–43.
[106] Geels, F.W.; McMeekin, A.; Mylan, J.; Southerton, D. A critical appraisal of Sustainable Consumption and Production research: The reformist, revolutionary and reconfiguration positions. Glob. Environ. Chang.2015, 34, 1–12.
[107] Feng, K.; Hubacek, K.; Sun, L.; Liu, Z. Consumption-based CO2 accounting of China’s megacities: The case of Beijing, Tianjin, Shanghai and Chongqing. Ecol. Indic.2014, 47, 26–31.
[108] Sattar, U. How Societies Move on? Conceptualising Societal Transition Processes and Its Implications on Climate Change Adaptation. Eur. Online J. Nat. Soc. Sci.2020, 9, 61–90.

Usman Sattar “Conceptualizing the Contextual Dynamics of Carbonization in Beijing: A Multilevel Perspective” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.207-217 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/207-217.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Fiscal Policy and Economic Growth in Nigerian Economy

Cookey, Boma Clement and Okorie, Stanley – April 2020 Page No.: 218-225

The study examined the relationship between Fiscal policy instrument and economic growth in Nigerian economy from 1980 to 2017. The study was based on the Keynesian theory in which fiscal policy has significant effect on output and employment. The study used secondary data collected from various resources and the Engle-Granger Error Correction model analysis techniques. The empirical model consists of a multiple regression model which has real gross domestic product growth as the dependent variable and government capital expenditure, recurrent expenditure, budget deficit and none-oil tax revenue as the independent variables. The test of unit root results revealed that all the variables had unit root at levels. However, they became stationary after 1st differencing. The result from the Johansen co-integration test shows that there is a long run relationship between fiscal policy instruments and economic growth. Analysis of the error correction model revealed that government expenditure, both capital and recurrent, have positive and significant impact on economic growth; while budget deficit and non-oil tax have negative and significant impact on economic growth.Changes in the size and levels of fiscal policy instruments accounted for 85% variation in the level of economic growth during the period under review. It was therefore recommended that government reduce deficit financing and non-oil tax.

Page(s): 218-225                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 05 May 2020

 Cookey, Boma Clement
Department of Economics Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria

 Okorie, Stanley
Department of Economics Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria

[1] Abu-Bader, S & Abu-Qarn, A.S. (2003). Government expenditures, military spending and economic growth: Causality evidence from Egypt, Israel, and Syria. Journal of Policy Modeling, 25(6-7): 567 – 83.
[2] Akpan, N.I. (2005). Government expenditure and economic growth in Nigeria: A disaggregated approach. CBN Economic and Financial Review, 43(1): 61-67.
[3] Appah, E. (2010). The Relationship between fiscal policy and Economic growth in Nigeria (1991 – 2005). International Journal of Economic Development Research and Investment, 12.
[4] Babalola, S.J., & Aminu, U. (2011). Fiscal policy and economic growth relationship in Nigeria. International Journal of Business and social Sciences ,2(17).
[5] Badawi, A (2003) Private capital formation and public investment in Sudan: testing the substitutability and complementarity hypotheses in a growth framework, Journal of Internationl Development, Vol(15)6,pp.783-799
[6] Bahmani-Oskooee, M &Brooks T. J.(1999) cointegration approach to estimating bilateral trade elasticities between U.S. and her trading partners,International Economic Journal Vol (13), 4 pp. 119-127
[7] Buhari, A.L. (1993). Straight to Point ICAN/Polytechnic Public Finance. University of Ilorin, Nigeria: UniIlorin press.
[8] Central Bank of Nigeria. (2010). Annual report and financial statements. Statistical Bulletin, 21.
[9] Engle, R.F. & Granger, C.W.J. (1987). Co-integration and error correction representation and testing. Econometrics, 55(2):pp. 251 – 76.
[10] FIRS. (1993). Taxation reform in democratic Nigeria.
[11] Ghani, E & Din, M. (2006). the impact of public investment on economic growth in Pakistan, The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 45(1), Pp. 87-98
[12] Gujarati, D.N. (2006). Essentials of Econometrics (3rd ed.). Boston: McGraw-hill International Edition.
[13] International Monetary Fund. (2009). Deflation, economic growth, BOP. Celebrating the spirit of small enterprise.
[14] Jhingan, M.L. (1997). Macro-Economic theory (11th ed.). Delhi: Vrinda Publication (P) Ltd.
[15] Keynes, J.M. (1936). The general theory of employment, interest and money. Harcourt and Burice: London.
[16] Medee, P.N., &Nenbee, S.G. (2011). Econometric analysis of the impact of fiscal policy variables on Nigeria’s economic growth (1970 – 2009). International Journal of Economic Development, research and Investment, 2 (1), 171 – 183.
[17] Musaba, E; Chilonda, P ,&Matchaya, G. (2013). Impact of government sectoral expenditure on economic growth in Malawi, 1980-2007. Journal of Economics and Sustainable Development, 4(2):71-78.
[18] Okoro, A.S. (2013). Government spending and economic growth in Nigeria, 1980 – 2011. Global Journal of Management and Business Research, Economics and Commerce, 13(5): 20-29.
[19] Oluwatobi, S.O. &Ogunrinola, I.O. (2011). Government expenditure on human capital development: Implications for economic growth in Nigeria. Journal of Sustainable Development, 4(3): 123-36.
[20] Omitogun, O., &Ayinla, T.A. (2007). Fiscal policy and Nigerian economic growth. Journal of Research in National Development, 5(2).
[21] Osuala, A.E. (2010). Econometrics, Theory and problems. Nigeria: Toni Prints Services, Aba.
[22] Pesaran, M.H., & Shin, Y. (1999). An autoregressive distributed lag modeling approach to co-integration analysis, Chapter 11. In S. Strom (Ed.), Economic Theory in the 20th century. Cambrige: The Ragnar Frisch Centennial symposium Cambrige University Press. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/ CCOL521633230.011.
[23] Tang, C. F, (2007). The stability of money demand function in Japan: Evidence from rolling cointegration approach, MPRA Paper 19807, University Library of Munich, Germany.
[24] World development indicators. Washington, D.C.: The World Bank

Cookey, Boma Clement and Okorie, Stanley “Fiscal Policy and Economic Growth in Nigerian Economy” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.218-225 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/218-225.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Moral Values in Teacher Education: Exploring Conceptions among Tanzanian Teacher Educators and Trainees

Timotheo Elinihaki – April 2020 Page No.: 226-234

This paper intends to present briefly my PhD study titled, “Moral Values in Teacher Education: Conceptions among Tanzanian Teacher Educators (TE) and Teacher Trainees (TT)”. The intention is to explore some of the imperative literatures reviewed in the study, methods for inquiry and some of the chief findings in all the four objectives of the actual study. Finally, the paper presents the main recommendations of the actual study including action to be taken and a suggestion for further research.

Page(s): 226-234                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 08 May 2020

 Timotheo Elinihaki
The Open University of Tanzania Faculty of Education P.O. Box 23409, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

[1] Anangisye , W. A. L. (2010). Promoting teacher ethics in colleges of teacher education in Tanzania: Practices and challenges. African Journal of Teacher Education. 1(1): 64 – 77.
[2] Anangisye , W. A. L. (2011). Why are teachers motivated to behave unprofessionally? A qualitative-data-based-inquiry on educational stakeholders experiences in Tanzania. A Journal of Contemporary Research, 8(1), 1-23
[3] Baraka, M.J., Paul, T.J., & John, S.S. (2015). Complexities holding back Muslims and Christians to promote significance moral values in schools and colleges in Kenya. Journal on Religious Studies. 13(1): 401-500.
[4] Betwel, O. (2013). The nature of teacher professional misconduct in Tanzaniaa public primary schools: The case of Sumbawanga municipal and rural district. International Journal of Education, 5(1), 81-93
[5] Buzzelli, Z. & Johnston, O. (2012). Role of teacher educators in developing their professionalism in Asia. Journal of Educational Psychology. 3(1):11-19.
[6] Campbell, E. (2013). The ethical teacher. Maidenhead, UK: Open University Press.
[7] Creswell, J.W. (2015). Research Design: Qualitative and Mixed Approach, 3rd edition. London: Sage Publications.
[8] Docking, P. (2010). Appropriateness of moral values in improving behaviors of teacher trainees in colleges of teachers’ education in Zimbambwe. Journal of Educational Psychology. 9(2):20-29.
[9] Eshiwami B.C. (2013). Challenges coupled with the teaching moral education in schools and colleges in Rwanda. Journal of Humanities and Social Science. 18(3): 43-52
[10] Fussy, D. (2012). The effectiveness of school heads in institutionalizing teacher ethics in Tanzania. Unpublished M.A. Dissertastion, University of Dar es Salaam.
[11] Immaculate, N. (2010). The effect of teachers’ leadership role on students’ discipline in secondary schools in Wakison district. Unpublished M.A. Dissertation Kampala: Makerere University.
[12] Kim, M. (2013). Cultivating teachers’ morality and the pedagogy of emotional rationality. Australian Journal of Teacher Education, 38 (1), 12 – 26.
[13] Klaassen, C. (2007). The moral role of teachers investigated: What did we learn? Paper presented at the 2007 Annual Convention of the American Educational Research Association. Chicago.
[14] Liang, C-H. (2010). Teachers‟ and Pupils‟ Perceptions of Sex Education in Taiwan and England: A Comparative study. PhD Thesis, University Warwick, Warwick, UK. Retrieved from: http://go.warwick.ac.uk/wrap/3761
[15] Lickona, T. (2011). Educating for character: How our schools can teach respect and responsibility. (2nd ed.). New York: Bantam Books.
[16] Lindner, S. (2014). Tanzania; The overview of corruption and anticorruption. [http://www.transparency.org/press.htm] site visited on 17/5/2015.
[17] Lumpkin, A. (2008). Teachers as a role model: Teaching Character and Moral Virtues. Briston: McGraw Hill.
[18] Ministry of Education and Vocational Training (2011). Teachers dismissed from the service for various diplomacy offences in the year 2008/2009 and 2010/2011 in the country. Dar es Salaam: teachers Service Department.
[19] National Counsel of Technical Education (2013). Tanzania Teacher Education Curriculum 2013. Dar es Salaam: National Counsel of Technical Education
[20] Ndibalema, P. (2013). Stakeholders’ attitude towards the prevalence and problems associated to primary school teachers’ professional misconducts in Tanzania: The case of Chamwino District. Journal of International Academic Research for Multidisciplinary, 1(7), 31-54.
[21] Noddings, N. (2013). Educating moral people: A caring alternative to character education. (2rd ed). New York: Teachers College Press.
[22] Nyabul, P. (2009). Moral education and the condition of Africa: Thought and practice. A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya (PAK) Premier Issue, 1(1), 31-42.
[23] Oladipo, S.E (2009). Moral education of the child: Whose responsibility? In Journal of Science, 20(2), 149-156.
[24] Pantic, N., & Wubbels, T. (2012). The role of teachers in inculcating moral values: Operationalisation of concepts. Journal of Belief and Values Studies in Religion and Education, 33(1), 55 – 69.
[25] Sabasi, S. M. (2011). Challenges facing government seconary school teachers in implementation of professional code of conduct in Tanzania: a case of Kilimanjaro Region. Unpublished M.A. Dissertation, University of Dar es Salaam.
[26] Sacher, C. (2014). Character education in teacher education programs. University of Saskatchewan, 2nd edition.
[27] Sanderse, W. (2013). The meaning of role modeling in moral and character education, Journal of Moral Education, 42(1), 28 – 42.
[28] Sharma, A. N. (2014). Can character be taught? A dialogue, 5th edition. Berkeley, CA: McCutchat Publishing Cor.
[29] Sintrock, J.W.(2010). Gender difference among youth’s moral maladjusted behaviour in Nigerian secondary schools. International Journal for the Adolescent of Counselling. 22:189-196.
[30] Thornberg, R. (2008). Significance of embedded values in school rules and regulations. NewYork.
[31] Torney-Purta S., Tim J.D., & Kam L., (2011). A study on how behaviour taught in American schools made conducts of citizens. Journal of Educational Psychology. 56(2):18-30.
[32] Yin, R.K. (2012). Application of Case Study Research. London: Sage Publications Inc.

Timotheo Elinihaki “Moral Values in Teacher Education: Exploring Conceptions among Tanzanian Teacher Educators and Trainees” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.226-234 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/226-234.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

An Examination of Coronavirus Pandemic Nexus on Ghana’s Economic Outlook

Ephraim Armstrong Awinbugri (Ph.D.), Benjamin Akese Debrah – April 2020 Page No.: 235-239

The research was to examine coronavirus pandemic nexus on Ghana’s economic outlook. The researchers employed quantitative research using secondary data emanating from excerpts of the 2020 budget statement presented by the Finance Minister, Ken Ofori-Atta and the subsequent statement presented to parliament after the outbreak of the virus. The researchers found that the overall fiscal deficit will augment from the programmed GHȼ18.9 billion (4.7% of GDP) to GHȼ30.2 billion (7.8% of revised GDP). The primary balance will correspondingly worsen from a surplus of GHȼ2,811 billion (0.7% of GDP) to a deficit of GHȼ5.6 billion (1.4% of GDP) and a general decline in tax and non-tax revenue, following drastic fall in prices of crude oil from $63.21 a barrel to $22.9 a barrel, cocoa $2,440/tons to $2,253/tons except Gold which had a price increase from $1,479/toz to $1,621.6/toz. Additionally, estimated GDP of 6.8% has since been revised to 2.6%/1.5%. Similarly, the hospitality industry, foreign direct investments, trade and industry have been adversely affected following measures such as lockdown of key commercial hubs in Ghana from operations to avoid further spread, closure of borders amongst others. The researchers recommend that government should ensure fiscal discipline despite 2020 being an election year as well as strict adherence to the Fiscal Responsibility Act 2018 (Act 982)

Page(s): 235-239                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 08 May 2020

 Ephraim Armstrong Awinbugri (Ph.D.)
Accountant/Research & Seminar Coordinator, Agogo Presbyterian Women’s College of Education

 Benjamin Akese Debrah
Banker, Republic Bank Ghana Ltd, Kumasi

[1] John Ashton (2020). The pandemic of coronavirus: tackling the latest plague. Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine; 2020, Vol. 113(3) 123–124
[2] Jon Cohen and Kai Kupferschmidt (2020). Strategies shift as coronavirus pandemic looms.http://science.sciencemag.org/content/sci/367/6481/959.full
[3] Ministry of Finance (2020). Budget Statement for the 2020 Fiscal Year
[4] Ministry of Finance (2020).Economic Impact of the Covid-19 Pandemic on the Economy of Ghana.

Ephraim Armstrong Awinbugri (Ph.D.), Benjamin Akese Debrah “An Examination of Coronavirus Pandemic Nexus on Ghana’s Economic Outlook” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.235-239 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/235-239.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Innovative Financing Options for Health Care in Nigeria: Implications for achieving Universal Health Care Coverage (UHC)

Rifkatu NGHARGBU, PhD, Fadila JUMARE, PhD – April 2020 Page No.: 240-244

Recent global health challenges due to coronavirus (COVID-19) epidemic point to the fact that health system strengthening through health financing is indispensable. Government expenditure on the health sector based on budgetary allocation is very low at less than 6% compared to the recommended 15% by the Abuja Declaration. However, innovative health care financing is a winning way to raise revenue to enhance health care delivery for the achievement of Universal Health Care Coverage (UHC). This paper examined the prospects of various innovative financing options for the health sector that Nigeria can leverage on as alternative ways to finance the health sector. This was carried out by reviewing different options in terms of its components, justification, income generating capacity and implementation strategies. Some of the options include; Excise taxes on foods high in salt, fat or sugar contents, levies on mobile phone use, currency/financial institutions levies, sintaxes on consumption of tobacco, alcohol and hard drugs, luxury items, diaspora funds and catastrophic health fund. Cross country analysis was carried on the various identified financing options. Drawing inspiration from any or hybrid of the country models surveyed in this paper, Nigerian National Assembly (NASS) can establish an act to facilitate innovative financing for the Nigerian health sector.

Page(s): 240-244                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 08 May 2020

 Rifkatu NGHARGBU, PhD
Department of Economic Development and Social Studies, National Institute for Legislative and Democratic Studies, National Assembly Abuja, Nigeria

 Fadila JUMARE, PhD
Department of Economic Development and Social Studies, National Institute for Legislative and Democratic Studies, National Assembly Abuja, Nigeria

[1] Aregbeshola BS, Khan SM. (2018) Out-of-pocket payments, catastrophic health expenditure and poverty among households in Nigeria Int J Health Policy Manag. 2;7(9):798–806.
Brand Spur(2017) Nigeria ranks 4th in soft drinks consumption globally. Online material accessed from https://brandspurng.com/2017/03/30/nigeria-ranks-4th-in-soft-drinks-consumption-globally/
[2] Christian A. (2019) Nigeria is making more millionaires than ever. Online publication accessed from https://weetracker.com/2019/02/02/nigeria-is-making-more-millionaires-than-ever/
[3] Health Policy Project (2011) Improving Financial Access to Maternal, Newborn and Child Health Services for the Poor in Nigeria. Nigeria health financing technical report of workshop, Tinapa Calabar November 1-3, 2011 accessed fromhttps://www.healthpolicyproject.com/pubs/97_NigeriaHealthFinancingTechnicalReportfinal.pdf
[4] Health Policy Project (2020) Improving financial access to health care services in for the poor in Nigeria. Health policybrief for Nigeria accessed from http://www.healthpolicyproject.com/pubs/97_innovativefinancingmechanism.pdf
[5] Olakunde BO. (2012) Public health care financing in Nigeria: Which way forward? Annals of Nigerian Medicine Vol. 6:4-10.Available from: http://www.anmjournal.com/text.asp?2012/6/1/4/100199
[6] Oyebade W. (2018) Nigeria: Abuja-Lagos Flight Route Fourth Busiest in Africa. The Guardian News Paper publication from https://allafrica.com/stories/201805250043.html
[7] Premium Times (2017). Nigerian airports record 9.2 million passengers, 140,552 aircraft movement in nine months. Premium Times Agency Report accessed from https://www.premiumtimesng.com/business/business-news/253834-nigerian-airports-record-9-2-millionpassengers-140552-aircraft-movement-nine-months.html
[8] Statista (2019) Consumption of alcohol per capita in Africa in 2019, by country (in litres per capita)online material accessed from https://www.statista.com/statistics/1038427/alcohol-per-capita-consumption-african-countries/
[9] Stenberg K., Elovainio R., Chisholm D., Fuhr D., Anne-Marie Perucic A., Rekve D. and Yurekli A. (2010). Responding to the challenge of resource mobilization – mechanisms for raising additional domestic resources for health. World Health Report (2010) Background Paper, 13
[10] Uzochukwu B, Ughasoro M D, Etiaba E, Okwuosa C, Envuladu E, Onwujekwe O E. ( 2015) Health care financing in Nigeria: Implications for achieving universal health coverage. Nigeria Journal of Clinical Practice [serial online] 2015 [cited 2020 Apr 16];18:437-44. Available from: http://www.njcponline.com/text.asp?2015/18/4/437/154196
[11] Wikipedia (2020) Innovative financing accessed from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Innovative_financing

Rifkatu NGHARGBU, PhD, Fadila JUMARE, PhD, ROTKANG, Dimlong Dimang “Innovative Financing Options for Health Care in Nigeria: Implications for achieving Universal Health Care Coverage (UHC)” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.240-244 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/240-244.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Peace and War in Ilaje-Ugbo/Arogbo-Ijaw Relations from the Pre-Colonial Era Up to 1999

Oluwafunke Adeola ADELEYE, David Olanrewaju OGORU, Johnson Olaosebikan AREMU (PhD) – April 2020 Page No.: 245-253

This paper examined the twin factors of peace and war that have defined inter-group relations between the Arogbo-Ijaw and Ilaje-Ugbo communities in present-day Ondo State, Nigeria. The specific objectives of the study are to: identify the elements of intergroup relations between the two communities; analyse the dynamic nature of relations between the two peoples; highlight the remote and immediate causes of conflict and war in their relations and; suggest ways of restoring harmony and peaceful co-existence between the two ethic groups. Data for the study was generated through primary and secondary sources. The primary sources include archival materials, private diaries of some community leaders as well as unstructured interviews conducted with some informants. These were purposively selected based on their presumed knowledge of the subject-matter of the paper. Secondary data was generated from relevant textbooks and journal articles, as well as newspaper publications, magazines and government publications. These were analysed using qualitative technique of content analysis. Findings revealed that the Ilaje and Ijaw communities have lived together for long as neighbours right from the pre-colonial era till date. They have related in peace through socioeconomic and political interactions for the most part of their existence. The paper noted further that, on at least three occasions, 1848, 1914 and 1998; the two groups were engaged in conflicts and war. These came with attendant carnage and wanton destruction of property. It concluded that only a sincere and careful intervention of Government and Non-Governmental Organisations can bring about a lasting peace in their relationship in the face of conflicting ethnic nationalism of the two groups.

Page(s): 245-253                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 08 May 2020

 Oluwafunke Adeola ADELEYE
Department of History and International Studies, Ekiti State University, Ado Ekiti, Nigeria

 David Olanrewaju OGORU
Department of History and International Studies, Ekiti State University, Ado Ekiti, Nigeria

 Johnson Olaosebikan AREMU (PhD)
Department of History and International Studies, Ekiti State University, Ado Ekiti, Nigeria

[1] Afigbo,A.E.(1987).The Igbo and their Neighbours: Inter-Group Relations in South Eastern Nigeria to 1953. Ibadan: University Press Ltd.
[2] Afolabi, M.A. (2006).“Inter Group Relations in the 20th Century Nigeria: A Historical Survey”in Akinwumi, O., Okpeh,O., Je’adeyibe, G.D. Eds. Inter-Group Relations in Nigeria during the 19th and 20th Centuries, Markurdi: Aboki Publishers.
[3] Ajetunmobi,R.O.(2003).Coastal Yorubaland of Nigeria, 1500-1900: Migrations, Settlements and Socio-Political Development. Lagos: RAYTEL, 2003.
[4] Amasuomo, J.O.M. (2014).”Zion Brand Cherubim and Seraphim’s Churches in the Establishment of Primary Schools in Bayelsa State, Nigeria”. African Research Review, 8(1).
[5] Ayoyo, D.D.“Sociological Post-Mortem of Issues in the Arogbo-Ijaw-Ilaje Conflict ,European Scientific Journal, Vol.11, No.17, 2015, 319-337.
[6] Babatunde, Abosede. (2009).“OilExploitation and Conflict in the Nigeria’s Niger Delta-A Study of Ilaje, Ondo State, Nigeria”Journal of Sustainable Development in Africa Vol.11, No.4,134-159.
[7] Egboworomo,T.E.(2001).“Solution to Ilaje/Ijaw War Rehabilitation Problems for the Empowerment and Development of Ilajeland.”Paper Presented during an Ilaje Summit, Igbokoda, OndoState, 22 September 2001.
[8] Ehinmore,O.M.(2014).“Boundary Conflict and Security Challenges in the Western coast of the Niger-Delta: The Ilaje-Ijo war factor,1998 -1999,” International Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences,Vol.4, No.8(1), 276-283.
[9] Eshonfonie, G.A.(2009).The ArogboIjawsofNigeria.Ibadan:End-TimePublishers,2009.
[10] Falola, T., Mahadi, A., Uhomoibhi, M., and Anyanwu, U. (1989). History of Nigeria 1: Nigeria before 1800AD. Lagos: LearnAfrica.
[11] Ikime, O.Niger Delta Rivalry: Itsẹkiri-Urhobo relations and the European presence,1884-1936. London: Longman,1969.
[12] Isike, Christopher Afoke. (2009). Feminising the Peace Process: A Comparative Analysis of Women and Conflict in the Niger-Delta (Nigeria) and Kwazulu-Natal (SouthAfrica).”Ph.D dissertation., University of KwaZulu-Natal.
[13] Ofili, F.I. (2016). “Inter-group Relations in Nigeria: The Dynamics and Complexities”. International Journal of Development and Management Review, Vol. 11.
[14] Okpeh, O.O. (2006)“Conceptual and Theoretical Issues Arising from Studies in Inter-Group Relations in Nigeria in the 20thcentury in Akinwumi, Olayemi, Okpeh, Ochayio., Gwamma, D.J, Intergroup Relations in Nigeria during the 19th and 20thCenturies,Markurdi: Aboki Publishers.
[15] Smith, Robert. (1970)“The Canoe in West African History,”Journal of African History Vol.11 Issue04October.515-533.
[16] The Comet News, Thursday, August 28, 2003. “On the Ijaw/Ilaje Dispute

Oluwafunke Adeola ADELEYE, David Olanrewaju OGORU, Johnson Olaosebikan AREMU (PhD) “Peace and War in Ilaje-Ugbo/Arogbo-Ijaw Relations from the Pre-Colonial Era Up to 1999” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.245-253 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/245-253.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

External Debt and Economic Growth in Nigeria

GEORGE-ANOKWURU, Chioma Chidinma, INIMINO, Edet Etim – April 2020 Page No.: 254-265

External debt may help or hurt the country depending on how it is used. Thus, this paper focused on the impact of external debt on economic growth in Nigeria from 1980 to 2017. Secondary data on real gross domestic product, external debt, external debt service and exchange rate were sourced from CBN statistical bulletin. The Augmented Dickey-Fuller unit root test and Autoregressive Distributed Lag techniques were used as the main analytical tools. The result of the unit root test revealed that the variables were stationary at order zero and one, which satisfied the requirement to employ the ARDL Bounds testing approach. The ARDL Bounds test revealed the existence of long run relationship among the variables. Furthermore, the result revealed that external debt and external debt service have negative and significant relationship with economic growth in Nigeria both in the long run and short run. However, exchange rate has positive and significant relationship with economic growth in Nigeria during the period of study both in the long run and short run. In conclusion, debt is an important development resource but its misuse can be disastrous as had been the Nigerian experience before it got out of the debt trap in 2005. Therefore, government should ensure that the terms of borrowing and the projects for which the borrowed funds are put should be those that benefit the economy and the people. Government should also ensure that debt proceeds are efficiently managed so that Nigeria can avoid a repeat of the ugly history of debt overhang.

Page(s): 254-265                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 08 May 2020

 GEORGE-ANOKWURU, Chioma Chidinma
Department of Economics, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria

 INIMINO, Edet Etim
Department of Economics, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Uyo, Nigeria

[1] Ademola, S. S., Tajudeen, A. O. &Adewumi, Z. A. (2018). External debt and economic growth of Nigeria: An empirical investigation. South Asian Journal of Social Studies and Economics, 1(2), 1-11.
[2] Ajayi, L. B. &Oke, M. O. (2012). Effect of external debt on economic growth and development ofNigeria.International Journal of Business and Social Science, 3(12), 297- 304.
[3] Ajie, H. A., Akekere, J. &Ewubare, D. B. (2014).Praxis of Public Sector Economics and Finance. Port Harcourt: Pearl Publishers.
[4] Akram (2016). Public debt and pro-poor economic growth evidence from South Asian countries, Economic Research-EkonomskaIstraživanja, 29(1), 746-757. African Research Review, 11(4), 156-173.
[5] Al Kharusi, S. & Ada, M. S. (2018). External debt and economic growth: The case of emerging economy. Journal of Economic Integration, 33(1), 1141-1157.
[6] Anyafo, A. M. (1996). Public finance in a developing economy: The Nigerian Case. Enugu, Nigeria: Department of Banking & Finance, University of Nigeria.
[7] Anyanwu, J. C. (1997). Nigerian public finance. Jubilee Educational Publishers, Onisha
[8] Ayadi F. S. &Ayadi F.O. (2008). The impact of external debt on economic growth: A comparative study of Nigeria and South Africa. Journal of Sustainable Development in Africa, Volume 10, No.3.
[9] Borensztein, E. (1990). Debt overhang, debt reduction and investment: The case of the Philippines. International Monetary Fund Working Paper No. WP/90/77, September 30
[10] CBN (Central Bank of Nigeria) (2003). Contemporary economic policy issues in Nigeria, Abuja.
[11] CBN (Central Bank of Nigeria) (2007). Statistical Bulletin, Abuja: Central Bank of Nigeria, Vol. 18, December 2007.
[12] Central Bank of Nigeria (1994) the design and Implementation of macroeconomic policy. CBN. Abuja.
[13] Central Bank of Nigeria (1997). Inflation in Nigeria.CBN Briefs.
[14] Central Bank of Nigeria (2010). Annual report and statement of account. Abuja.
[15] Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN, 2013). Annual economic report. 31st December, 2013.
[16] Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN, 2013). Understanding monetary policy series No 36.Monetary department, 10th anniversary commemorative edition.
[17] Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN, 2014). Annual economic report. 31st December, 2014.
[18] Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN, 2015). Annual economic report. 31st December, 2015.
[19] Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN, 2016). Annual economic report. 31st December, 2016.
[20] Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN, 2017). Annual economic report. 31st December, 2017.
[21] Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN, 2018). Annual economic report. 31st December, 2018.
[22] Claessens, S. (1996). The debt laffercurve: Some empirical estimates. World Dev. 18(12), 38-45.
[23] Claessens, S., Detragiache, E., Kanbur, R. & Wickham, P. (1996). Analytical aspects of the debt problems of heavily indebted poor Countries.Paper presented to IMF/World Bank seminar, Pp. 100-105.
[24] Debt Management Office (DMO) (2005). Nigeria’s debt relief deal with the Paris Club.
[25] Dickey, D. A., & Fuller, W. A. (1979). Distribution of the estimators for autoregressive time series with a unit root.Journal of the American Statistical Association, 74(1), 427- 431.
[26] Ekpo, A. H. (2017). The Nigerian economy: Current recession and beyond. 33rd Convocation lecture at Bayero University, Kano, Friday, March 17, 2017.
[27] Elbadawi, A. I., Ndulu, J. B. &Ndung’u, N. (1996). Debt overhang and economic growth in Sub-Saharan Africa.A paper presented to the IMF/World Bank conference on External Financing for Low Income Countries, Pp. 23-24.
[28] Engel, F. R. & Granger, C. W. J. (1987). Co-integration and error correction representations,estimation, and testing. Econometrics, 53:251–276.
[29] Ezirim, C. B. (2005). Finance Dynamics: Principles, techniques and application 3rd EditionMarkowitz Centre for Research and Development University of Port Harcourt.
[30] Gbosi, N. G. (2012). Modern labour economics and policy analysis 2nd edition Pack publishers, Ebonyi State, Nigeria.
[31] Gbosi, N. G. (2015). Contemporary macroeconomic problems and stabilization policies (2nd edition).Spirit and truth publishers, Benin City, Nigeria.
[32] Herber, B. E. (1979). Modern public finance. Richard Irwin I.
[33] Ibi, E. E. &Aganyi, A. (2015). Impacts of external debt on economic growth in Nigeria: A VAR Approach. Journal of Business Management and Administration Vol. 3(1), 1-5.
[34] Iyoha M. A. (1997). An econometric study of debt overhang debt reduction, investment and economic growth in Nigeria. National centre for economic management and administration (NCEMA) monograph series No 8 Ibadan.
[35] Jhingan, M. L. (2007). The economics of development and planning.VRINDA publications (P) LTD. B-5, Ashish Complex (opp. Ahlcon Public School), MayurVihar, Phase-1, Delhi-110 091.
[36] Mbah, S. A., Umunna, G. &Agu, O. C. (2016). Impact of external debt on economic growth in Nigeria: AnARDL bounds testing approach. Journal of Economics and Sustainable Development, 7(10), 16-26.
[37] Moh’d AL-Tamimi, K. A. &Jaradat, M. S. (2019). Impact of external debt on economic growth in Jordan for the period (2010-2017).International Journal of Economics and Finance, 11(4), 114-118.
[38] Ndubuisi, N. (2017). Analysis of the impact of external debt on economic growth in an emerging economy: Evidence from Nigeria. African Research Review, 11(4), 156 -173.
[39] Nwannebuike, U. S., Ike, U. J. &Onuka, O. I. (2016). External debt and economic growth: The Nigeria experience. European Journal of Accounting Auditing and Finance Research, 4(2), 33-48.
[40] Obayori, J. B., Krokeyi, W. S. &Kakain, S. (2019). External debt and economic growth inNigeria.International Journal of Science and Management Studies (IJSMS), 2(2), 1-6.
[41] Obayori, J. B., Krokeyi, W. S. &Kakain, S. (2019). External debt and economic growth in Nigeria.InternationalJournal of Science and Management Studies (IJSMS), 2(2), 1-6.
[42] Ochalibe, A. I. (2017). External debt and economic development: policy implications and poverty reduction in NIGERIA.International Journal of Academic Research and Reflection, 5(1), 1-15.
[43] Ochalibe, A. I., Awoderu, B. K. &Onyia, C. C. (2017). External debt and economic development: Policy implications and poverty reduction in Nigeria. International Journal of Academic Research and Reflection, 5(1), 1-15.
[44] Odubuasi, A. C.Uzoka, P. U. &Anichebe, A. S. (2018). External debt and economic growth in Nigeria.Journal of Accounting and Financial Management, 4(6), 98-108.
[45] Ohale, L. and Onyema, J. I. (2002). Foundations of macroeconomics.Springfield publishers, Nigeria.
[46] Omoruyi, S. E. (1996). Nigeria debt management and control problems and prospects.Economics and Finance Review 31(4).Central Bank of Nigeria.
[47] Omoruyi, S. E. (2005). Debt burden (sustainability) indicators. Presentation paper at regional course on debt recording and statistical analysis.
[48] Pesaran, M. H. and Shin, Y. (1999). An autoregressive distributed lag modeling approach to co-integrationAnalysis. Econometrics and Economic Theory in the 20th Century: The Ragnar Frisch CentennialSymposium, Strom, S. (ed.) Cambridge University Press.
[49] Pesaran, M. H., Shin, Y. and Smith, R. (2001). Bounds testing approaches to the analysis of level relationships.Journal ofApplied Econometrics, 16, 289–326.
[50] Sulaiman, L. A. &Azeez, B. A. (2012). Effect of external debt on economic growth of Nigeria.Journal of Economics and Sustainable Development, 3(8), 71-79.
[51] Todaro, M. P. &Smith, S. C. (2011). Economic development.Eleventh edition. Pearson Education Limited, Edinburg. Grate, Harlaw, England.
[52] Tom-Ekine, N. T. (2011). Macroeconomics: Dimensions of competitive indicators and policy performance. Dominus printing Co, #7 Udi Street, Port Harcout, Rivers State, Nigeria.
[53] Udeh, S. N., Ugwu, J. I. &Onwuka, I. O. (2016). External debt and economic growth: The Nigeria experience. European Journal ofAccounting Auditing and Finance Research.4(2), 33-48.
[54] Udoka, C. O. and Anyingang, R. A. (2010). Relationship between external debt management policies and economic growth in Nigeria (1970-2006).International Journal of Financial Research, 1(1), 2- 20.
[55] Umo, J. U. (2012). Economics: An African Perspective2nd Edition. Millennium text publishers limited Plot 6B, Block 22, Humanities Road, Unilag Estate, Magodo, Isheri, Lagos, Nigeria.
[56] Zaman, B. &Arslan, M. (2014). The role of external debt on economic growth: Evidence from Pakistan economy. Journal of Economics and Sustainable Development, 5(24), 140-147.
[57] Zaman, R. &Arslan, M. (2014). The role of external debt on economic growth: Evidence from Pakistan Economy. International Journal of Innovation and Sustainable Development, 5(24), 140-147.

GEORGE-ANOKWURU, Chioma Chidinma, INIMINO, Edet Etim “External Debt and Economic Growth in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.254-265 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/254-265.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

New Product Development Practices and Growth of Small and Medium Enterprises in Greater Kampala Metropolitan Area, Uganda

Benson Tukundane, Muhammad Kibuuka, Arthur Sunday – April 2020 Page No.: 266-271

Small and medium enterprises play an important role in the economies of developed and developing countries across the globe. SMEs contribute approximately 20% of GDP in most developing countries. Thus, their growth and survival has become of great concern for most developing countries. Previous studies have indicated that new product development practices have been identified as a successful tool for small and medium enterprises towards satisfying the changing needs of the market and to remain competitive. Apparently, due to a weak link between new product development and Growth of SMEs in Uganda, it appears that there is need for a greater emphasis on studies that link new product development and growth of SMEs. In this study mixed methods approach and cross-sectional research designs were used to establish the effect of new product development on growth of small and medium enterprises in greater Kampala metropolitan area on a sample of 226 top administrators of SMEs. Findings revealed approximately a large correlation between new product development practices and growth of SMEs. Linear regression results revealed that 31.92% of growth of SMEs according to this study was explained by variations in new product development practices.

Page(s): 266-271                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 13 May 2020

  Benson Tukundane
Kampala International University, College of Economics and Management, P. O. Box 20000, Kampala, Uganda

  Muhammad Kibuuka
Kampala International University, College of Economics and Management, P. O. Box 20000, Kampala, Uganda

  Arthur Sunday
Kampala International University, College of Economics and Management, P. O. Box 20000, Kampala, Uganda

[1] Britain G. Chapter III History of Micro , Small and Medium Industries. In 2018. p. 63–75.
[2] (No Title) [Internet]. [cited 2020 Mar 26]. Available from: https://shodhganga.inflibnet.ac.in/bitstream/10603/192583/10/10_chapter 3.pdf
[3] The History:Cottage Industry Concept of Small Business, SME Management, Business Management [Internet]. [cited 2020 Mar 26]. Available from: https://www.zeepedia.com/read.php?the_history_cottage_industry_concept_of_small_business_sme_management&b=57&c=1
[4] OECD Cm. Enhancing The Contributions Of Smes In A Global And. In 2017. p. 7–8.
[5] Olughor RJ. Effect of Innovation on the Performance of SMEs Organizations in Nigeria. Int J Manag Financ. 2015;5(3):90–5.
[6] Khurana A, Rosenthal SR. Towards Holistic “Front Ends” In New Product Development. J Prod Innov Manag [Internet]. 2003 Jan 1 [cited 2020 Apr 25];15(1):57–74. Available from: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/1540-5885.1510057
[7] Andreanne Léger Sushmita Swaminathan. Discussion Papers Andreanne Léger Sushmita Swaminathan Innovation Theories : Relevance and Implications for Developing Country Innovation. Innov Theor Relev Implic Dev Ctry Innov. 2007;(November).
[8] Motilewa Bolanle Deborah OM& Ado. A Review of the Impacts of SMEs as Social Agents of Economic Liberations in Developing Economies. J Int Rev Manag Bus Res. 2015;4(3):903–14.
[9] He X, Yi Y, Wei Z. New product development capabilities in China: the moderating role of TMT cooperative behavior. Asian Bus Manag. 2019 Apr 2;18(2):73–97.
[10] Okundaye K, Fan SK, Dwyer RJ. Impact of information and communication technology in Nigerian small-to medium-sized enterprises. J Econ Financ Adm Sci. 2019 Apr 29;24(47):29–46.
[11] Azanedo L, Garcia-Garcia G, Stone J, Rahimifard S. An Overview of Current Challenges in New Food Product Development. Sustainability [Internet]. 2020 Apr 21 [cited 2020 Apr 24];12(8):3364. Available from: https://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/12/8/3364
[12] Hossain M, Ibrahim Y. Towards the Factors affecting Small Firm Growth : Review of Previous Studies. Int J Acad Res Bus Soc Sci. 2016;6(5):217–35.
[13] Tushabomwe-Kazooba C. Causes of small business failure in Uganda: A case study from Bushenyi and Mbarara towns. African Stud Q. 2006;8(4):27–35.
[14] Kappel EKI and R. Business Constraints And Growth Potential Of Micro. Bus Manag Rev J. 2007;11(1):1–29.
[15] Uganda MSME Policy. Final Draft Of Uganda Micro, Small And Medium Enterprise ( MSME ) Policy Sustainable MSMES For Wealth Creation And Socio-Economic Transformation. 2015;(June):1–37.
[16] Station D. Important Facts About New product development. J Prod Brand Manag [Internet]. 2012;(July). Available from: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/10610421199600002
[17] Cooper RG, Edgett SJ. Developing a Product Innovation and Technology Strategy for Your Business. Res Technol Manag. 2010;53(3):33–40.
[18] Darroch J. Knowledge management, innovation and firm performance. J Knowl Manag [Internet]. 2005;9(3):101–15. Available from: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/10.1108/13673270510602809
[19] InnoSuTra. Innovative Production Strategies New Product Development Methods. Vol. 6. 2008.
[20] Page AL. Assessing New Product Development Practices and Performance : Establishing Crucial Norms. Prod Innov Manag. 1993;10:273–90.
[21] Isabel M, José A. Open innovation in automotive SMEs suppliers : an opportunity for new. Netw Sci Journals from Lat Am Caribbean, Spain Port. 2016;50:142–57.
[22] Rendani MW. Masters Research Program.
[23] OR K, AA; A, AV A. New Product Development and Consumer Brand Adoption in SMEs Manufacturing Industry in Ogun State Nigeria International Journal of Economics &. Int J Econ Manag Sci. 2018;7(1):1–4.
[24] Steven Pattinson, David Preece MD. Facilitating collaboration in the new product development process of science-based SMEs : a communities of practice perspective. Sheff Hallam Univ Res Arch. 2015;(November):0–39.
[25] Dikko M. Establishing Construct Validity and Reliability : Pilot Testing of a Qualitative Interview for Research in Takaful ( Islamic Insurance ). How to Artic. 2016;21(3):521–8.
[26] Krejcie R V, Morgan DW. Activities. 1970;38:607–10.
[27] Amin ME. Social Science Research. Conception, Methodology and Analysis. Makerere University Printery. Makerere University Printery; 2005.
[28] Wade VM. Likert-type scale response anchors. Clemson International Institute for Tourism & Research Development, Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management. Clemson University. 2006. p. 4–5.
[29] Schwarz N;, Knäuper B;, Hippler H-J, Neumann N-, Clark E;, Leslie. www.ssoar.info Rating scales: numeric values may change the meaning of scale labels [Internet]. 1990 [cited 2020 Mar 15]. Available from: https://nbn-resolving.org/urn:nbn:de:0168-ssoar-67274
[30] spss – Is 0 a valid value in a Likert scale? – Cross Validated [Internet]. [cited 2020 Mar 15]. Available from: https://stats.stackexchange.com/questions/32389/is-0-a-valid-value-in-a-likert-scale
[31] Gable, R. K. and MBW. Instrument Developing in the Effective domain. Boston: Kluwer. 1993.
[32] Cohen JW. Statistical power analysis for the behavioral sciences. second. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates; 1998.

Benson Tukundane, Muhammad Kibuuka, Arthur Sunday “New Product Development Practices and Growth of Small and Medium Enterprises in Greater Kampala Metropolitan Area, Uganda” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.266-271 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/266-271.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Consumer Science Teachers’ Perspectives on Inclusion of Disabled Learners in Mainstream Classes in Eswatini Schools

Mpofu Molyn, Shongwe Nomfundo – April 2020 Page No.: 272-277

The study explored Consumer Science teachers’ understanding of inclusion of learners with disabilities into the main stream classes. The study further examined the challenges faced by Consumer teachers in the teaching of Consumer Science to physically disabled learners. The study employed a qualitative approach using an exploratory research design. The study had a sample of twenty (20) participants purposively selecting five (5) participants from each of the four regions of Eswatini. Data were collected using face-to-face interviews and focus group discussions. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. The study findings revealed the lack of teacher training to deal with learners with disabilities in inclusive classes coupled with lack of appropriate resources and infrastructure. The study concluded that few teachers who were teaching inclusive classes were not well equipped for such classes. The study recommends the provision of in-service training to enhance the teaching of physically disabled learners.

Page(s): 272-277                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 13 May 2020

 Mpofu Molyn
Department of Consumer Science Education and Community Development, University of Eswatini, Eswatini

 Shongwe Nomfundo
Department of Consumer Science Education and Community Development, University of Eswatini, Eswatini

[1]. Barry-Power, D. (2010). The Inclusion of Students with Disabilities in Mainstream Post-Primary Physical Education from the Perspective of the Physical Education Teacher.Thesis Submitted in Fulfillment of the Requirement for the Degree of Master of Arts by Research.
[2]. Campbell, J., Gilmore, L.&Cuskelly, M. (2003). Changing Student Teachers’ Attitudes towards Disability and Inclusion.Journal of Intellectual and Development Disability Vol. 28, No. 4 pp. 369-379
[3]. Essays, U.K. (2013). Teacher Roles in Inclusive Education. Education Essay. http://www.uniassignment.com/essaysamples/education/teachers_roles-in-inclusive.
[4]. European Commission. (2015). Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee of the Regions. A European Agenda on Inclusion. Directorate-General for Communications Networks, Content and Technology European Commission.
[5]. Gama, N. &Thwala, S. K. (2016). Swazi Teachers’ Challenges in Including Learners with Dyslexia in Mainstream Classrooms Montessori Life Primary School. Journal of Humanities and Social Science, (21) 6:35-42.
[6]. Greene, B.L. (2017). Teachers’ Attitudes toward Inclusive Classrooms. Doctoral Study Submitted in Partial Fulfilment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Education. Walden University.
[7]. Konza, D. (2008). Inclusion of Students with Disabilities in new Times: Responding to the Challenges.Australia:University of Wollongong ,Faculty of Social Sciences.
[8]. McMillan, N. M. (2008). Inclusive Education: The Benefits and the Obstacles.An analytical review submitted to the Department of Education and Human Development of the State University of New York College.
[9]. Ministry of Education and Training. (2011). Swaziland Education and Training Sector Policy (EDSEC). Mbabane. Government of Swaziland.
[10]. Monje L. D. (2017). General Education Teachers’ Attitudes about Inclusion. A Dissertation Submitted to the Graduate College in Partial Fulfilment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Education Special Education and Literacy Studies. Western Michigan University.
[11]. Mulinge, D.M. (2016). Teachers’ Perceptions towards Inclusion of Children with Special Needs into Mainstream Classrooms in Kenya. Masters Dissertation, Department of Special Needs Education Faculty of Educational Sciences. University of Oslo.
[12]. Muwana, F. C. (2012). Zambian Student Teachers’ Attitudes toward Including Students with Disabilities in General Education Classrooms. Dissertation Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Special Education. University of Zambia.
[13]. Tyagi, G. (2016). Role of Teacher in Inclusive Education. The International Journal of Education and Applied Research (IJEAR). Volume 6, Issue 1.
[14]. UNESCO. (1994). Access and Quality: World Conference on Special Needs Education. Salamanca, Spain: UNESCO.
[15]. Wogamon, L. S. (2013). Examining the Relationships between Secondary General Education Teachers’ Attitudes toward Inclusion, Professional Development, and Support from Special Education Personnel. A Dissertation Presented in Partial Fulfillment Of the Requirements for the Degree Doctor of Education.Australia: University of Wollongong.
[16]. Woodcock, S. (2013). Trainee Teachers’ Attitudes towards Students with Specific Learning Disabilities. Australian Journal of Teacher Education, (38)8:23-31.
[17]. Zwane, S. L. (2016). Teacher Training for Inclusivity at Selected School in Gege Branch of Schools, Swaziland.Dissertation submitted in accordance with the requirements for the degree of Master of Education in the subject Inclusive Education at the UNISA.

Mpofu Molyn, Shongwe Nomfundo “Consumer Science Teachers’ Perspectives on Inclusion of Disabled Learners in Mainstream Classes in Eswatini Schools” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.272-277 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/272-277.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Effect of Precipitation on Food Security in Kasebwera Parish, Butenga Sub County, Bukomansimbi District, Uganda

Henry Stanley Mbowa, Specioza Asiimwe, Beatrice Birungi – April 2020 Page No.: 278-287

Over 800 million people in the world are food insecure where 180 (23%) million are found in the Sub Saharan Africa. The study establishes the relationship between precipitation and food security in Kassebwera parish, Butenga Sub County, Bukomansimbi district, Uganda. The study employs both cross-sectional and descriptive survey designs which included mixed methods data collection approaches. The study targets 1996 people from who 322 respondents were determined using Krejcie and Morgan sample size formula. Data was collected through observation, interview and questionnaire. Quantitative data was organized, edited and coded and entered into the SPSS for analysis into descriptive and inferential statistics while qualitative data was transcribed as per the tools, grouped into themes, categorized and analysed using content value analysis. Results reveal that, an increase in precipitation by 100% retards food security by 58.7%. Therefore, precipitation had a negative correlation to food security which implies that in the area, precipitation (rainfall, hailstorms and drizzle) had significant effect on food security. There is a negative significant relationship between precipitation and food security with correlation coefficient of (r = -0.587; p > 0.000).The study recommends that, the government, district in collaboration with the NGOs should sensitize, create awareness and build capacity of farmers in Soil and water conservation practices, implement and enforce supportive environment and natural resources law and policies.

Page(s): 278-287                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 May 2020

 Henry Stanley Mbowa
Kampala University, Uganda

 Specioza Asiimwe
Kampala University, Uganda

 Beatrice Birungi
Kampala University, Uganda

[1] Ahuja, R., (2005). Research Methods, New Delhi, Rawat Publications
[2] Akudugu, A.M., Dittoh, S &Mahama, S.E. (2012). The implication of climate change of food security and rural livelihoods: Experiences from Northern Ghana. A paper in the journal of environment and earth science, SSN 2224-3216, Vol.2, No.3, 2012. www.iiste.org
[3] Amin, M. A., (2005). Social Science Research, Conception, methodology and analysis. Kampala, Makerere University Press
[4] Arya, D., Jacobs, L.C., Razavieh, A., (20002). Introduction of Research in Education. Belmont, CA, Wordsworth
[5] Bailey, K. (2012). Methods of Social Research. 4th Edition. New York.
[6] Correspondent for Bukedde TV, Agawiiki at 1.00PM (24th, March, 2019). Deforestation has increased high rates of drought in Kyankwanzi and Kiboga districts.
[7] Correspondent for Bukedde TV, AgataliikoNfuufu at 10.00PM, (15th, September, 2018). Hailstorms occurred in Bugiri and destroyed crops
[8] Correspondent for NBS TV New at 09.00PM, (11th, October, 2018). Mudslides killed and displaced people in Bukalasi in Buduuda.
[9] Correspondent for NTV Akawungeenzi at 07.00PM, (17th. September, 2018). Heavy Hailstorms occurred and destroyed crops in Kyengera Town Council.
[10] Creswell & Plano, Clark (2011). Best Practices for Mixed Methods Research in the HealthSciences. thttps://www2.jabsom.hawaii.edu/native/docs/tsudocs/Best Practices for Mixed Methods Research
[11] Daily Monitor (2018). Government loses 200 billion as drought devastates on country. AGENCIES. Downloaded on 3/8/2018 from www.monitor.co.ug.
[12] Devillis, R. F., (2003). Scale development, Theory and applications (2nd Ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA, Sage
[13] DfID. (2008). Climate change in Uganda: Understanding the implications and appraising the response, LTS International pp (1-48). Edinburg.
[14] Fahim, H &Haidary, E. (2018). Farmers in War-torn Afghanistan hit by worst drought in decades. Retrieved from www.phys.org on 28th Oct, 2018.
[15] FAO. (2008). Climate change and food security. A framework document. Rome-Italy. FAO Inter Departmental Working Group on Climate Change, VialeDellieTerme di Carucalla, Rome Italy.
[16] GOU. (2017). National food security assessment report for January, 2017.
[17] http://catolog.data.ug, http://www.diva-gis.org/data. Created in QQGIS 2.18, 2019
[18] Kato, J. (2018). Let us prepare for the dry season now (Ed). Harvest money, p.18. The New Vision. November, 2.
[19] Kaur, J. (2017). Impact of climate change on agricultural productivity and food security, resulting in poverty in India. A master’s Thesis University of Ca’Foscarri, Venezia.
[20] Khalafallah, M.R. (2006). Impact of drought on food security: Comparative study of sorghum production in Gezira, vs North Kordofan and North Darfur. Unpublished MSc. thesis, University of Khartoum.
[21] Kisekka, C. (2016). Uganda: Residents cry as Rugunda fails to deliver food relief. The Monitor, November 6, 2016. Kampala. Retrieved from http://africa.com/stories on 11 April, 2018
[22] Kisekka, C. (2016). Uganda: Prime minister’s visit leaves residents frustrated. The Daily Monitor, November 11, 2016. Retrieved from www.monitor.com on 10 April, 2018
[23] Kombo, D. K., & Tromp, D. L. A., (2006). Proposal and Thesis Writing, Nairobi, Kenya, An introduction Paulines Publications Africa
[24] Kothari, C. R., (2004). Research Methodology. Methods and techniques (2nd Ed.), WishwaPrakashan.
[25] Krejcie, R. V. and Morgan, D. W. (1970). Determining sample size for research activities, Educational and psychological measurement, 30, 608, Sage Publications.
[26] Lolemtum, T.J., Mugalavai, M.E &Obiri, A.J. (2017). Impact of drought on food security in West Pokot County, Kenya. IJPRPs Vol. 7, Issue 6, June, 2017. ISSN 2250-315. P9 (1-9).
[27] Lule, A.J (2016). UPC calls for interventions on climate change. The New Vision, November, 21. Retrieved on 11th April, 2018 from www.newvision.co.ug
[28] McQueen, R &Knussen, C. (2002). Research Methods for Social Sciences: An introduction. Pearson Education Limited, Prentice Hall.
[29] Murali, J &Afifi, T. (2014). Rainfall variability, food security and human mobility in the Janjgir-Champa district of Chhattisgarh state, India, Climate and Development, 6:1, 28-37, DOI: 10.1080/17565529.2013.867248
[30] Mukisa (2018). Insufficient rains affected farmers in Kyannamukaaka and Buwunga Sub Counties, Masaka District. Salt TV, November, 3rd 2018
[31] Musoke, R. (2017). Hunger in Uganda. Does country have a food or problem? The Independent Magazine, February 27. Analysis on hunger. Retrieved from www.independent.co.ug/hunger-in-uganda on 18 March, 2017
[32] Nabunya, M. (2017). Contribution of Agroforesrty practices to reducing farmers’ vulnerability to climate variability in Rakai district Uganda. Unpublished thesis, Universitat Dresden. www.agroforestrynetwork.org. Retrieved on 27th September, 2019.
[33] Nakitende, H. (2016). Hunger: A deeper crisis that threatens to plunge millions into poverty. The Sunrise, November 18. Retrieved from http://www.sunrise.ug on 11 April, 2018
[34] Oso, Y. and Onen, D. (2005). A general Guide to writing Research Proposal and Report. Kisumu, Kenya.
[35] Palatino, M. (2010).Floods and Food Security in Thailand, Vietnam and the Philippines
[36] Saunders, M., Lewis, P &Thornhill, A. (2007). Research methods for business students. 4th Edition Pearson Education Limited
[37] Ssali, M.J. (2005). Uganda: Drought hits Masaka district, ruins farming. The Monitor, All Africa Global Media. Retrieved from allAfrica.com on 9th April, 2018.
[38] Stake, R.E. (2010). Quantitative research: Studying how things work. New York. NY: Guilford Press, 244 pages.
[39] Uganda IPC Technical Working Group (2017). Integrated food security and livelihoods phase classification (IPC) analysis for Uganda: Evidence and standards for better food security and livelihoods decisions, Government of Uganda (January – March, 2017).

Henry Stanley Mbowa, Specioza Asiimwe, Beatrice Birungi “Effect of Precipitation on Food Security in Kasebwera Parish, Butenga Sub County, Bukomansimbi District, Uganda” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.278-287 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/278-287.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Analyzing the Role of Road Infrastructure for the Development of Fresh Fruit Industry in Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan

Yousuf Ali , Dr. Arif Alam, Sadaf Riaz, Zulfiqar Ali, Iftikhar Ali – April 2020 Page No.: 288-293

Gilgit-Baltistan (GB) is one of the major contributors to the fresh fruit industry in Pakistan however, the production of fresh fruits is low as compare to other parts of the country. This low production is attributed to several factors like remoteness, poor infrastructure (road), inadequate local markets and traditional practices by farmers, etc. This study was aimed to develop linkages between road infrastructure and fresh fruit industry of GB. The study employed a mixed-method based on primary and secondary data. Primary data was collected from the field through face to face interviews using a well-structured questionnaire and secondary data was collected from different sources i.e. books, articles and reports. The data was collected from 100 respondents comprised of farmers, shopkeepers and retailers. Finally, the collected data was analyzed on excel sheet and presented in the form of graphs and tables. The results have shown significant linkages between road infrastructure and the fresh fruit industry in GB. Furthermore, the findings revealed that the major hurdles for fresh fruits production in GB are lack of transportation, low price, climate change, lack of market information, lack of government services, lack of cultivatable land, a traditional method of production, pest and disease, lack of industries and lack of technical expertise. The opinion of respondents shows that improvement and development of road infrastructure will open new opportunities for local people to boost their fresh fruits production and uplift their livelihoods.

Page(s): 288-293                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 May 2020

 Yousuf Ali
Graduate Student, Department of Development Studies COMSATS University, Islamabad Pakistan (Abbottabad Campus)

 Dr. Arif Alam
Assistant Professor, Department of Development Studies, COMSATS University, Islamabad Pakistan (Abbottabad Campus)

 Sadaf Riaz
MS Scholar, Department of Development Studies COMSATS University, Islamabad Pakistan (Abbottabad Campus)

 Zulfiqar Ali
MS Scholar, College of Economics and Management, Zhejiang Ocean University, Zhoushan, Zhejiang, China

 Iftikhar Ali
Development Policy Scholar, KDI School of Public Policy and Management, South Korea

[1] Sendall. A, Mir. M, Khabir.A, (2013). Apricot Value Chain Assessment: Final Report For The Agribusiness Project
[2] Aftab, S. 2007. Retail Markets. Ministry Of Commerce, Islamabad. Pakistan.
[3] Arish U. Khanjanuary (2015)Pak-China Economic Corridor:The Hopes And Realityinstitute Of Regional Studies, Islamabad
[4] Development Authority, Manila, Philippines. World Bank. (2005). Philippines: Meeting
[5] Dr. Ali Asghar Hashmi Shafiullah (2003) Agriculture And Food Security IUCN, Northern Areas Programme IUCN, Northern Areas Programme IUCN, Northern Areas Programmewing, Ministry Of Finance, Islamabad.
[6] Golettie, F., A. Raisuddin, And N. Farid, 1995, “Structural Determinants Of Market Integration: The Case Of Rice Market In Bangladesh,” Developing Economics, Vol. 33 (2) : 185-202.
[7] Government Of Pakistan. 2008. Agricultural Statistics Of Pakistan 2007-08. Ministry Of Food, Agriculture And Livestock. Islamabad. Pakistan
[8] Government Of Pakistan. 2009. Economic Survey Of Pakistan (2008-09). Economic Advisor’s Naheed, G., D. H. Kazmi, &G. Rasul. Seasonal Variation Of Rainy Days In Pakistan) Pakistan Journal Of Meteorology (Vol. 9, Issue 18: Jan 2013)
[9] Hanif, sM. And S. A. Khan. 2004. Agricultural Perspective And Policy. Ministry Of Food, Agriculture And Livestock, Islamabad.Infrastructure Challenges. The World Bank, Washington, D.C.
[10] Khan. M., F. Abbas And K. Mushtaq. 2007. Improving Apple Cultivation And Marketing. Business And Economic Review. The Daily Dawn, Islamabad. 28.
[11] Khushk, A. M. And Sheikh, A. D. 2004. Structure, Conduct And Performance Of The Marketing Systems Margins And Seasonal Price Variations Of Selected Fruits And Vegetables In Pakistan, Parc, Islamabad.
[12] M ZiauddinHttps://Tribune.Com.Pk/Story/1414256/Cpec-Boost-Agricultu /
[13] Mohyuddin, Q. 1989. Marketing Of Major Fruits (Citrus & Mango) In Punjab. Deptt. Of Agri. Marketing, University Of Agriculture, Faisalabad.
[14] Muhammad Aurangzaib Khan (May 26, 2010)(Report On Enterprise Based Survey Of Horticulture Sector)United Nations Industrial Development
[15] Muhammad Zafar Khan (2016) Agrobiodiversty In Gilgit Baltistan On Verge On The Verge Extension Reseach Gate Organization
[16] Safdar Sail (The China-Pakistan Economic Corridor: An Assessment Of Potential Threats And Constraints)
[17] Saiful Muhammad, Ali Javaid January.(2015) Mountain Fruits (MF): Assisting Mountain Fruits In Conducting A Feasibility Study Of Fruit Pulping/Processing In Gilgit Baltistan.
[18] SaqlainAbbass&Abdul Tahir Wazir. (2011). ( Impact Of Fruit Production On The Wealth Of Farmer OfGilgit-Baltistan )International Islamic University Islamabad

Yousuf Ali , Dr. Arif Alam, Sadaf Riaz, Zulfiqar Ali, Iftikhar Ali “Analyzing the Role of Road Infrastructure for the Development of Fresh Fruit Industry in Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.288-293 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/288-293.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Extenuating Loans Non-Performance, Best Practice Perspective of Banks in Bono East of Ghana

Ezekiel Nibenong Seudib, Felix Tengan Dassah, Stephen Kwasi Adjei – April 2020 Page No.: 294-307

Pandemonium in the Banking industry which emanates largely from loans portfolios is eventually catching the attention of stakeholders of banks. Perpetual loan defaulters are predators of financial institutions as they comb round for banks with feebler systems to play their tricks on. It is therefore important for banks to build and maintain a continuous resilient system that will either expose or cut them off. The study fundamentally examined best practices that have been embraced by Banks for mitigation of loans non-performance. The purposive sampling method of data collection was used to select ten credit administrators from five banks within the Bono East region of Ghana.Questionnaire and structured interview are the main instruments that were used for the data collection. The data collected was analysed using the ‘Statistical Product and Service Solution’ (SPSS). The findings from the research indicates that, insisting on collateral security with an affidavit cover by banks to be used to secure each loan granted, coupled with active monitoring is an effective way of preventing loan from going bad. Also, giving clear credit payment schedules to clients together with regular sending of written notices to loan defaulters were found to be effective credit collection strategies. On the basis of the findings, it was recommended that management of banks within the Bono East Region and beyond must come out with a credit risk management policy that is geared towards the granting of current loans whiles cutting down drastically the approval of loans which have the possibility of becoming doubtful or loss in the long run; by ensuring that clients provide collateral security before credit(s) endorsement.

Page(s): 294-307                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 May 2020

 Ezekiel Nibenong Seudib
Accounts Department of Offuman BACCSOD Ltd, Ghana

 Felix Tengan Dassah
Our Lady of Grace Senior High School, Mamponteng, Ghana

 Stephen Kwasi Adjei
University of Energy & Natural Resources, Sunyani Ghana

[1]. Aballey, F. B. (2009). Bad loans portfolio: the case of ADB (Doctoral dissertation).
[2]. Abedi, S. (2000). Highway to Success, Credit Management: Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology.
[3]. Achou, F.T. &Tengue, N.C. (2008). Bank performance and credit Risk management”. University of Skovde. Retrieved November 13, 2019.
[4]. Afriyie, H. O. &Akotey, J. O. (2012). Credit risk management and profitability of selected rural banks in Ghana. Ghana. Catholic University College of Ghana.
[5]. Aikman, D. P. (2008). Funding liquidity risk in quantitative model of systemic stability. Working Bank of England.
[6]. Alexander, G. J., &Baptista, A. M. (2009). Stress testing by financial intermediaries: Implications for portfolio selection and asset pricing. Journal of Financial Intermediation, 18(1), 65-92.
[7]. Amidu, M., & Hinson, R. (2006). Credit risk, capital structure and lending decisions of banks in Ghana.
[8]. Awunyo-Vitor, D. (2012). Determinants of loan repayment default among farmers in Ghana.
[9]. Bailey, M. (Ed.). (2004). Consumer credit quality: underwriting, scoring, fraud prevention and collections. White Box Publishing.
[10]. Bessis, J. (2011). Risk management in banking. John Wiley & Sons.
[11]. Bryman, A., & Bell, E. (2007). Business Research Methods second edition Oxford University Press UK.
[12]. Burton, D. (2012). Credit and consumer society. Routledge.
[13]. Chelagat, K. N. (2012). Determinants of Loan Defaults by Small and Medium Enterprises among Commercial Banks in Kenya. Unpublished MBA project, University of Nairobi.
[14]. Churchill &Coster (2001). “Making Microfinance work”. International labour office/training centre.
[15]. Cooper, R. D. & Schindler, S. P. (2008). Business Research Methods. New York, McGraw Hill.
[16]. Dekker, B. (2008). Consumer Credit Quality: Underwriting, scoring, fraud prevention and collections. White Box Publishing.
[17]. Ekumah, E. K., &Essel, T. (2003). Information is power: The problem with credit accessibility in rural banks in Ghana. IFLIP Research paper, 03-12.
[18]. Eppy, I. (2005). Perceived information asymmetry, bank lending approaches and bank credit accessibility by smes in Uganda. Unpublished thesis) Makerere University.
[19]. Fatemi, A., &Fooladi, I. (2006). Credit risk management: a survey of practices. Managerial Finance.
[20]. Gallati, R. (2003). Risk management and capital adequacy. McGraw Hill Professional.
[21]. Giesecke, K. (2004). Credit risk modeling and valuation: An introduction. Available at SSRN 479323.
[22]. Hainz, C., &Fidrmuc, J. (2009). Default Rates in the Loan Market for SMEs: Evidence from Slovakia.
[23]. Hilbers, P. & Jones, N. T. (2004). Stress testing financial system. international monetary fund publication services 700 19Th street N.W. Washington.
[24]. Hinder, J. (2008). Consumer Credit Quality: Underwriting, scoring, fraud prevention and collections. White Box Publishing
[25]. Hobbs, B. (2010). Credit union debt is a time bomb for the whole sector. The International Journal of Human Resource Management.
[26]. Honohan, P. (2009). Resolving Ireland’s banking crisis. The Economic and Social Review, 40(2), 207-231.
[27]. Inkumbi, M. (2009). Beyond the 5Cs of Lending. Accounting, Auditing and Accountability Journal, 16(4), 640-661.
[28]. Karim, M. Z. A., Chan, S. G., & Hassan, S. (2010). Bank efficiency and non-performing loans: Evidence from Malaysia and Singapore. Prague Economic Papers, 2(1), 118-132.
[29]. Kariuki, J. N. (2010). Effective collection policy. Nairobi: KASNEB Publishers.
[30]. Mensah, L. (2011). Consumer Credit Quality: Underwriting, scoring, fraud prevention and collections. White Box Publishing.
[31]. Mensah, L. (2018). Increasing bad loans due to high interest rates. published on Citi Business.
[32]. Munene, H. N., &Guyo, S. H. (2013). Factors influencing loan repayment default in micro-finance institutions: the experience of Imenti North District, Kenya.
[33]. Myers, S. C., Brealey, R. A., & Allen, F. (2008). Principles of Corporate Finance. New York: McGraw-Hill.
[34]. Nair, A., &Fissha, A. (2010). Rural banking: The case of rural and community banks in Ghana. World Bank.
[35]. Nawaz, M., Munir, S., Siddiqui, S. A., Tahseen-ul-Ahad, F. A., Asif, M., &Ateeq, M. (2012). Credit risk and the performance of Nigerian banks. Interdisciplinary Journal of contemporary research in Business, 4(7), 49-63.
[36]. Obamuyi, T. M. (2009). An Exploratory Study of Loan Delinquency among Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in Ondo State, Nigeria. Labour and management in development, 8.
[37]. Onaolapo, A. R. (2012). Analysis of credit risk management efficiency in Nigeria commercial banking sector, (2004-2009). Far East Journal of Marketing and Management, 2(1), 39-52.
[38]. Orua, E. A. (2009). The relationship of capital structure and financial performance of microfinance institutions in Kenya. Journal of development and Agricultural Economics
[39]. Raghavan, R. S. (2003). Risk Management in Banking. Accessed 26/12/2019.
[40]. Sindani, R. (2012). An overview of fraud and money laundering in the East Africa financial services industry. Nairobi: Deloitte Forensic.
[41]. Tetteh, F. L. (2012). Evaluation of credit risk management practices in Ghana commercial bank limited. Unpublished master‟ s thesis). Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi.
[42]. Thomas, L. C. (2009). Consumer credit models: pricing, profit and portfolios: pricing, profit and portfolios. OUP Oxford.
[43]. Wilkinson, G., &Tingay, J. (2004). The use of Affordability Data–Does it add Real Value. Readings in Credit Scoring, eds. Thomas, LC; Edelman, DB; Crook, JN Oxford University Press. Oxford, UK.

Ezekiel Nibenong Seudib, Felix Tengan Dassah, Stephen Kwasi Adjei “Extenuating Loans Non-Performance, Best Practice Perspective of Banks in Bono East of Ghana” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.294-307 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/294-307.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Counselling the Traumatized and Depressed. A Catholicon for Marital Instability: Implications for Counselling

Barr. (Mrs) Mary L. Effiong, Ph.D, Edidiong Ime Inyang – April 2020 Page No.: 308-316

Counselling the Traumatized and Depressed: A Catholicon for Marital Instability: Implications for Counselling.
The researcher, a scholar of family life, in quest to battle with societal menace called marital instability decides to investigate whether counselling the traumatized and the depressed can go a long way to inhibit marital instability, thereby promote marital stability. In determining these, the researcher decides to use sub-variables like marital communication mood and marital sex, then through purposive sampling techniques obtained with the aid of Planning, Research and Statistics (P.R.S) Directorate,1500 married civil servants which is 25% of six thousand and ten (6010) population married civil servants from 20 parent ministries in Akwa Ibom state of Nigeria .The researcher during the course of the research formulated and tested 2 research questions which are: How does communication mood of traumatized and depressed couples influence their marital stability? And how does marital sex of traumatized and depressed couples influence their marital stability. In like manner, 2 null hypotheses which are: The communication mood and marital sex does significantly influence the marital stability of the traumatized and the depressed couples. The researcher used Ex-post facto research design then marital communication and Rational Emotive Behavioral Therapy theories by Bateson and Albert Ellis served as the theoretical basis. The researcher developed instrument titled, Communication Moods and Marital Sex of Traumatized and Depressed Couple Questionnaire (CMSTDCQ) of 20 items was utilized to generate data. Two experts comprising of one subject specialist and a lecturer from test and measurement unit, were used face validation of this instrument. The instrument underwent reliability test using Alpha Cronbach. The two null hypotheses for the study were tested at 0.05 alpha level of significance using independent test after organizing and analyzing the data collected for the study. The result showed that all the null hypotheses were rejected meaning that, communication mood and marital sex of the traumatized and depressed significantly influence their marital stability. From the finding, it was established that better communication mood and marital sex life is key for marital stability and as such, the researcher recommended amongst others that; for effective output from civil servants, government should periodically organize and sponsor workshop, seminar for civil servants in Nigeria on importance and effectiveness of communication and marital sex to marital stability. Then added that, this workshop/seminar should be carried out by a seasoned professional family counsellor.

Page(s): 308-316                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 May 2020

 Barr. (Mrs) Mary L. Effiong
Director Center for Counselling and Human Development, Obong University, Obong-ntak, Etim-Ekpo LGA, Akwa-Ibom State, Nigeria

 Edidiong Ime Inyang
Department of Communication and Humanities Studies, University of Port Harcourt, Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria

[1] Anyanwu, T. (2012). Save Your Marriage From Collapse. Uyo: Placid Communications Limited.
[2] Bassey, O. (2019). The Effect of Psychological Trauma on Children and Adolescent. Eket: Mfon-Iso Publishers.
[3] Bemon̄, P. (2019). Ideal Healing Environment. World-wide Professional Strategies, 7(5), 60-8.
[4] Bless, C. (2018). The Gleryical Concern in Marriage and Family Life. Aba: St. James.
[5] Bright, O. and Mayor, N. (2001). Unstable Marriage and the Future of the Nation. Uyo: Gooday Press.
[6] Brue, S. (2004). Employment, Family and Perceptions of Marital Quality among Husbands and Wives. Journal of Family Issues, (2), 189-212.
[7] Clarks, (2018). “Psychiatric Drugs as Agents of Trauma”. The Internet National Journal of Risk and Safety in Medicine, 22(4), 95-207. Archived from the Original on 28th January 2013. Retrieved, 5th December 2012.
[8] Collins, G. (2007). Christian Counselling: A Comprehensive Guide (3rd edition). Mexico City: Thomas Nelson.
[9] Daniel, P. and Daniel, B. (2013). Marriage Life and Sexual In-balance. The Journal of Sexual Research, 25(4), 130-140.
[10] Dawak, H. (2015). There is a Place Called Tomorrow. Nigeria: Destiny Foundation.
[11] Dowindle, K. (2018). Effect of Childhood Family Background on Adult Marital Quality and Perceived Stability. American Journal of Sociology, 101,408-437.
[12] Effiong, M. and Denga, D. (2011). Marriage Counselling in Nigeria: Pertinent Legal and Psycho-Social Issues. Calabar: Rapid Educational Publishers Limited.
[13] Egnew, R. (2005). The Meaning of Healing: Transcending Suffering, Ann Fam Med-3(3), 255-62.
[14] Ekran, M. (1998). Family Happiness- A Study of First Marriage and Marriage after Divorce. Unpublished Doctoral Dissertation. Lagos: University of Lagos.
[15] Gotman, P. (2006). Communication for Marital Development. Ibadan: Heinemann Educational Books, Nig. Limited.
[16] Hagee, J. (2005). What every man wants in a woman. Texas: Racheal Campbell.
[17] Hareniga, M. (2007). For Women in Marriage. Eket: Prince Press.
[18] Jayakody, U., Rukmalie, H., Stauffeer, E. and Dawn, O. (2014). Mental Health Problems among Single Mothers: Implication for Work and Welfare Reforms. Journal of Social Issues, 56(4), 617-634.
[19] John, K. (2018). Interest in Marital Instability. Oron: Imo-Abado.
[20] Klange, N. (2003). Communication: A Determination for Marital Stability among Couples. Unpublished Master’s Thesis. University of Uyo.
[21] Kofi, C. (2018). Marriage and Marital Strengths for Enduring Marriages. Journal of Family Relations, 56, 20-28.
[22] Lahaye, T. (2002). Me and You for Marriage. Colorado: Harvest House Publishers.
[23] Landis, J. and Landis, M. (1997). Building a Successful Marriage (7th edition). Eaglewood Cliffs, N.J: Prentices.
[24] Louis, L. and Lowrani, C. (2018). The Imperative of Counselling as a Toll for Traumatized and Depressed. Medical Journal, 48(1), 1-6.
[25] Martins, I. (1980). Autonomy and Relatedness in Marital Achievement. Journal of Marital Affairs, (1), 120-135.
[26] Morgan, H. (1975). The Total Woman. Illinois: Tyndale House Publishers.
[27] Myther, L. (2002). The Psychology of Marital Happiness. Abuja: Da Defad Press.
[28] Nwakwo, O. (2017). Stress, Sexual Functioning and Marital Stability. Journal of Marriage, 282-290.
[29] Ochoemalam, P., Chima, A., Justin, H., Ikpeazu, E. and Igboanusi, H. (2003). Conception Analysis of Pandemic Pain. Medical Forum, 26(3), 30-6.
[30] Okoye, M. (2001).Correlates of Dissatisfactions in Marriage. Marriage and Family, 32-38.
[31] Onyeme, C. (2002). What a Virtuous: Her Pride and Peace. Journal of Family Life, (1), 15-25.
[32] Peters H. (2019). Next Generation Care through Marriages. New York: Brummer and Mageh.
[33] The Holy Bible, King James Version.
[34] Udofia, I. (2015).Harmony in the Home in the Face of Marital Challenges. Uyo: El-shaddai.
[35] Udoh, O. and Joseph, E. (2005). Foundation of Educational Research. Ikot Ekpene: Joe Graph Publications
[36] Uwe, E. (2017). Family Counselling: Mellowing the Fire in the Hearth for Family Homeostasis. Calabar: University of Calabar Press.
[37] Williams, C. (2013). Spill Over From Family Work: The Neglected Side of the Work-Family Interface. Human Relations, 37, 425-442.

Augustus Nzili Mutua, Dr. Kirui Caleb “Counselling the Traumatized and Depressed. A Catholicon for Marital Instability: Implications for Counselling ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 4, pp.308-316 April 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-4/308-316.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Paper Submission Deadline

Subscribe to Our Newsletter

Sign up for our newsletter, to get updates regarding the Call for Paper, Papers & Research.

[contact-form-7 id="3011" title="Newsletter"]

Subscribe to Our Newsletter

Sign up for our newsletter, to get updates regarding the Call for Paper, Papers & Research.


Track Your Paper

Enter the following details to get the information about your paper

[contact-form-7 id="5710" title="Track Paper"]