Qualitative Research Method of Intercultural Contact Adaptation to Cruise Ship Crews from Yogyakarta, Indonesia
Arief Nuryana, St. Tri Guntur Narwaya – October 2020 – Page No.: 01-07

Working in a multicultural environment today is a common thing, but the challenge of cultural shock is still something that has yet to find the right solution. This is because each organization is different in dealing with the cultural shock that occurs. The subject of this research is the Carnival cruise ship crew which consists of more than seventy crews from different countries, which is a challenge for crews from Indonesia who work on it. Using qualitative descriptive methods from the results of online interviews with five cruise ship crews who have experience working between three to five contracts. This research is to understand the adaptation process of intercultural communication and the barriers to intercultural communication experienced by Carnival crews from Indonesia. The result of this research is the existence of adaptation by divergence and convergence, both verbal and nonverbal in the adaptation process of intercultural communication. These results can enrich the theme in the umbrella of qualitative research models in the field of communication science as well as related theories from human science about intercultural social life. This relationship is understood to be useful from a practical aspect, especially for prospective cruise ship crew before starting their adventure working on a cruise ship

Page(s): 01-07                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 25 October 2020

 Arief Nuryana
Department of Communication Science and Multimedia, Universitas Mercubuana Yogyakarta, Indonesia

 St. Tri Guntur Narwaya
Department of Communication Science and Multimedia, Universitas Mercubuana Yogyakarta, Indonesia

[1]. Chen, G. M., &Starosta, W. (1998). A review of the concept of intercultural awareness
[2]. Collier, M. J. (1989). Cultural and intercultural communication competence: Current approaches and directions for future research. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 13(3), 287-302.
[3]. Coupland, N., Coupland, J., & Giles, H. (1991). Language,
[4]. society and the elderly: Discourse, identity and ageing. Basil Blackwell.
[5]. Dennett, A. (2018). Identity Construction in Transient Spaces: hospitality work on-board cruise ships. Tourism in Marine Environments, 13(4), 231-241.
[6]. Etikan, I., Musa, S. A., &Alkassim, R. S. (2016). Comparison of convenience sampling and purposive sampling. American journal of theoretical and applied statistics, 5(1), 1-4.
[7]. Gibson, P., & Perkins, L. (2015). A question of equilibrium: cruise employees at sea. Tourism in Marine Environments, 10(3-4), 255-265.
[8]. Glanz, L., Williams, R., &Hoeksema, L. (2001). Sensemaking in expatriation—A theoretical basis. Thunderbird International Business Review, 43(1), 101-120.
[9]. Habermas, J. (2011). The political”: the rational meaning of a questionable inheritance of political theology. Power Relig. Public Sphere.
[10]. Huang, J., & Hsu, C. H. (2009). Interaction among fellow cruise passengers: Diverse experiences and impacts. Journal of Travel & Tourism Marketing, 26(5-6), 547-567.
[11]. Jacobson, E. H. (1963). Sojourn research: A definition of the field. Journal of Social Issues.
[12]. Jeong, J. Y., & Hyun, S. S. (2019). Roles of passengers’ engagement memory and two-way communication in the premium price and information cost perceptions of a luxury cruise. Tourism Management Perspectives, 32, 100559.
[13]. Kaminakis, K., Karantinou, K., Koritos, C., &Gounaris, S. (2019). Hospitality servicescape effects on customer-employee interactions: A multilevel study. Tourism Management, 72, 130-144.
[14]. Kepler, J. Z. (1983). Americans abroad: A handbook for living and working overseas. Praeger Publishers.
[15]. Kim, Y. Y., 2001. Becoming Intercultural. An Integrative Theory of Communication and Cross-Cultural Adaptation. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.
[16]. Leff, J. H. (2019). The Evolving Relationship Between Ship Attributes and Expert Ratings of the Overall Cruise Experience from 1999 to 2019.
[17]. Littlejohn, S. W., & Foss, K. A. (2009). Encyclopedia of communication theory (Vol. 1). Sage.
[18]. Littlejohn, S. W., & Foss, K. A. (2011). Theories of human communication. Long Grove, IL. Waveland Press, Inc, 30, 32.
[19]. Lustig, M. W., & Koester, J. 2003. Intercultural Competence: Interpersonal Communication Across Culture. 4th edition. New York: Harper Collins.
[20]. Lysgaard, S. (1955). Adjustment in a foreign society: Norwegian Fulbright grantees visiting the United States. International Social Science Bulletin, 7, 45-51. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 53(1), 126-131.
[21]. Mehdizadeh, N., & Scott, G. (2005). Adjustment problems of Iranian international students in Scotland. International Education Journal, 6(4), 484-493.
[22]. Miles, M. B., & Huberman, A. M. (1994). Qualitative data analysis: An expanded sourcebook. sage.
[23]. Nash, J. (1967). The logic of behavior: curing in a Maya Indian town. Human Organization, 26(3), 132-140.
[24]. Oberg, K. (1960). Cultural shock: Adjustment to new cultural environments. Practical anthropology, (4), 177-182.
[25]. Radic, A. (2019). Occupational and health safety on cruise ships: dimensions of injuries among crew members. Australian Journal of Maritime & Ocean Affairs, 11(1), 51-60.
[26]. Radic, A., Arjona-Fuentes, J. M., Ariza-Montes, A., Han, H., & Law, R. (2020). Job demands–job resources (JD-R) model, work engagement, and well-being of cruise ship employees. International Journal of Hospitality Management, 88, 102518.
[27]. Sehkaran, S. N., &Sevcikova, D. (2011). ‘All Aboard’: motivating service employees on cruise ships. Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Management, 18(1), 70-78.
[28]. Torbion, I. 1982. Living abroad. New York: Wiley
[29]. Tubbs, S. L. (2005). Moss, Sylvia. Human Communication.
[30]. Ward, C. A., Bochner, S., &Furnham, A. (2001). The psychology of culture shock. Psychology Press.
[31]. West, R., & Turner, L. H. (2010). Understanding interpersonal communication: Making choices in changing times. Cengage learning.
[32]. Yang, G., Liu, Z., Seada, K., Pang, H. Y., Joki, A., Yang, J., … &Boda, P. P. (2008). Social Proximity Networks on Cruise Ships. In MIRW (pp. 105-114).

Arief Nuryana, St. Tri Guntur Narwaya “Qualitative Research Method of Intercultural Contact Adaptation to Cruise Ship Crews from Yogyakarta, Indonesia” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4-issue 10, pp.01-07 October 2020 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/01-07.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

To the Bottom of the Heap: Decoding Symbols of Initiation Rituals in the Lunda Traditional Society

Dr. Sylvester Mutunda- October 2020 Page No.: 08-14

The Lunda initiation ritual is examined against the theoretical background of Victor Turner’s adaptation (1967, 1968, 1969, 1974) of Arnold van Gennep’s model (1960), according to which every rite of passage is consisting of three stages: separation; liminality, a state of being “betwixt and between”; and aggregation, the phase of re-admission and return to society with a new, transformed status. The main features of Lunda rites of passages and the sequences characterizing them are outlined. The paper then decodes and discusses the meanings of and values of male and female puberty rites symbols. It is suggested that considering their significance and values, the performance and the ritual celebration conducted during the initiation period are of great importance in the Lunda day to day lives.

Page(s): 08-14                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 October 2020

 Dr. Sylvester Mutunda
Department of Literature and Languages. The University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia.

[1] Bell, C. (1989). Ritual, Change and Changing Rituals. Worship, (63): 31-41.
[2] . ___. (1992). Ritual Theory, Ritual Practice. New York: Oxford.
[3] Brelsford, W. V. (1965). The Tribes of Zambia. Lusaka: Government Printers.
[4] Eliade, M. (1958). Rites and Symbols of Initiation: The Mysteries of Birth and Rebirth. New York: Harper & Row.
[5] Fisher, M. K. (1984). Lunda-Ndembu Handbook, 4th Edition. Chingola, Zambia: Christian Literature Press.
[6] Gennep Van, Arnold. (1960). The Rites of Passage. Translated from French by Monica B. Vizedom and Gabriel L. Caffee. Illinois: The University of Chicago Press.
[7] Kashoki, M. E. (1978). “The Language situation in Zambia”. In S. Ohannessian and M. E. Kashiki (Eds). Language in Zambia, pp. 9-46. Lusaka: International African Institute.
[8] Mbiti, J. S. (1970). African Religions and Philosophy. Garden City, New York: Anchor Books.
[9] McCulloch, M. (1951). The Southern Lunda and Related Peoples. Waterloo Place, London: International African Institute.
[10] Mutunda, S. (2011). Personal Names in Lunda Cultural Milieu. International Journal of Innovative Interdisciplinary Research, (1): 14-22.
[11] Pritchett James A. (2001). The Lunda-Ndembu: Style, Change, and Social Transformation in South Central Africa. Madison, Wisconsin: The University of Wisconsin Press.
[12] Read, M. (1956). The Ngoni of Nyasaland. London: Oxford University Press.
[13] Shorter, A. (1987). Signs and symbols in initiation. Nairobi: CHEA.
[14] Skjonsberg, E. (1989). Change in an African Village. USA: Kmarian Press.
[15] Spring, A. (1976). Women’s Rituals and Natality among the Luvale of Zambia. PhD. Dissertation, University of Cornell.
[16] Taylor Scott D. (2006). Culture and Customs of Zambia. Westport, Connecticut. Greenwood Press.
[17] Turner, C. H. (1912). “The Early Christian Ministry and the Didache”. In Studies in Early Church History, pp. 1-31. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
[18] Turner, E. (1987). “The Milk Tree.” In The Spirits and the Drums: A Memoir of Africa. Tucson, Arizona: The University of Arizona Press.
[19] Turner, V. W. (1963). Lunda Medicine and the Treatment of Disease. Livingstone: The Rhodes-Livingstone Museum.
[20] ___. (1967). The Forest of Symbols: Aspects of Ndembu Ritual. Ithaca: Cornell
University Press.
[21] ___. (1968). The Drums of Affliction: A Study of Religious Processes among the Ndembu of Zambia. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
[22] ___. (1969). The Ritual Process: Structure and Anti-Structure. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
[23] ___. (1973). Symbols in African Ritual. Science, 179 (4078): 1100-1105.
[24] ___. (1974). Dramas, Fields, and Metaphors: Symbolic Action in Human Society. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
[25] Turner, V. & Turner, E. L. B. (ed.) (1985). On the Edge of the Bush: Anthropology as Experience. Tucson, Arizona: University of Arizona Press.
[26] Vansina, Jan (1968). Kingdoms of the Savana. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.
[27] Verhoeven, Marc (2002). Transformation and Society: The Changing Role of Ritual and Symbolism in the PPNB and the PN in the Levant, Syria and South-East Anatolia. Paléorient, 28 (1): 5-13.
[28] whattoexpect.com, retrieved on 15/05/ 2020.

Dr. Sylvester Mutunda “To the Bottom of the Heap: Decoding Symbols of Initiation Rituals in the Lunda Traditional Society ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.08-14 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/08-14.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Impact of Government Expenditure on Agriculture on Agricultural Sector Output in Nigeria (1981-2018)
EDEH, Chukwudi Emmanuel, Ph.D. OGBODO, Joseph Charles Ph.D., ONYEKWELU, Uche Lucy Ph.D., – October 2020 – Page No.: 15-26

The present study evaluated the impact of government expenditure on agriculture on agricultural sector output in Nigeria for the period 1981-2018with time series data obtained from the Central Bank of Nigeria Statistical Bulletin and Annual Reports. Agricultural value added was specified as a function of labour force, capital expenditure, recurrent expenditure, agricultural loans, average annual rainfall, interest rate and economic reforms. The Augmented Dickey-Fuller unit root test used to test for stationarity of the data reveals that the time series data were stationary at I(0) and I(1). Bound test cointegration indicates a long run relationship in the model. The result of the ARDL model technique analysis reveals that capital expenditure is positively related to agricultural output and it is also statistically significant at 5 % in the current year (P(t) = 0.0080). It was understood that the impact of capital expenditure on agricultural output begins to weaken after one year (P(t) = 0.0815). However, recurrent expenditure has a negative and insignificant impact on agricultural output (P(t) = 0.6657). The study recommends that governments at all levels should intensify and increase expenditure on capital items in Agriculture sector. Procurement of capital expenditure by government should be effectively monitored. This will ensure that the right and durable equipment are procured. With respect to recurrent expenditure which negates output in the agricultural output, there is need for reorganization of overhead expenditures in the sector. Close monitoring and cut of overhead spending in the agricultural should be instituted in all government agencies related to agriculture in Nigeria.

Page(s): 15-26                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 October 2020

 EDEH, Chukwudi Emmanuel, Ph.D
Department of Economics, Faculty of Social Sciences Enugu State University of Science and Technology, Agbani Enugu

  OGBODO, Joseph Charles Ph.D.
Department of Economics, Faculty of Social Sciences Enugu State University of Science and Technology, Agbani Enugu

  ONYEKWELU, Uche Lucy Ph.D
Department of Accountancy, Faculty of Management Sciences Enugu State University of Science and Technology, Agbani Enugu

[1] Aigheyisi, O. S. (2013). The relative impacts of federal capital and recurrent expenditures on Nigeria’s Economy (1980-2011). American Journal of Economics 3(5), 210-221.
[2] Aina, G. O. & Omojola, J.T. (2017). Assessment of the Effect of Government Expenditure on
[3] Agricultural Output in Nigeria (1980-2013), International Journal of Innovative Agriculture & Biology Research, 5(4), 1-7
[4] Apata, T. G. (2019). Public spending mechanisms and gross domestic product (GDP) growth
[5] in the agricultural sector (1970–2016): Lessons for Nigeria from agricultural policy progressions in China, Bulletin of Geography. Socio-economic Series, 44(44), 57-72. DOI: http://doi.org/10.2478/bog-2019-0015.
[6] CBN Annual Reports various issues
[7] De, U. K. & Dkhar, D. S. (2018). Public Expenditure and Agricultural Production in
[8] Meghalaya, India: An Application of Bounds Testing Approach to Co-Integration and Error Correction Model, International Journal of Environmental Sciences and Natural Resources, 8(2), 71-78
[9] Iganiga, B. O. & Unemhilin, D. O. (2011). The Impact of Federal Government Agricultural
[10] Expenditure on Agricultural Output in Nigeria, Kamla-Raj Journal of Economics, 2(2), 81-88
[11] Ilyas, M., Hafiz, K. A., Afzal, M. & Tahir, M., (2010) Determinants of manufacturing value
[12] added in Pakistan: an application of bounds testing approach to cointegration, Pakistan Economic and Social Review, 48(2)209-223
[13] Ogen, O. (2003). Patterns of Economic Growth and Development in Nigeria since
[14] 1960 in S. O. Arifalo and Gboyega Ajayi (eds.), Essays in Nigerian Contemporary History. Lagos: First Academic Publishers
[15] Okorie, U. E., Osabuohien, E. S., & Oaikhenan, H. E. (2020). Electricity Consumption,
[16] Public Agricultural Expenditure and Output in Nigeria: A Time Series Dynamic Approach, International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, 10(2), 113-123.
[17] Olorunfemi, S. (2008). Public Investment and Economic Growth in Nigeria: An Autoregressive model, Journal of international Finance and Economics, 8(2),
[18] Osabohien, R., Adeleye, N. & De Alwis, T. (2020). Agro-financing and food production in Nigeria, Heliyon 6, e04001. doi.org/10.1016/j.heliyon.2020.e04001
[19] Pesaran, M. H., Shin Y. & Smith, R. (2001). Bounds testing approaches to the analysis of level relationships. In: Journal of Applied Econometrics 16 (3), 289-326.
[20] Solow, R. M. (1956). A Contribution to the Theory of Economic Growth. Quarterly Journal of Economics, 70(1) 65-94.
[21] Swan T. (1956). Economic Growth and Capital Accumulation. Economic Record 32 (63), 334-361.
[22] Udoh, E. (2011) An examination of Public Expenditure, Private investment and Agricultural
[23] Sector Growth in Nigeria: Bounds Testing Approach, International Journal of Business and Social Science, 2(13), 285-292.
[24] Zirra, C. T. O. & Ezie, O. (2017). Government Fiscal Policy and Agricultural Sector Outputs
[25] in Nigeria: Evidence from Fully Modified Ordinary Least Square (FMOLS), Journal of Research in Business, Economics and Management, 8(2), 1434-1440
[26] Wang X. and Wen,Y. (2013). Is Government Spending a Free Lunch?—
[27] Evidence from China‖, Research Division, Federal Reserve Bank of St Louis, Working Paper Series, 2013-013A, 2013 [Online]. Available: http:// research. stlouisfed. org/ wp / 2013/2013-013.pdf

EDEH, Chukwudi Emmanuel, Ph.D. OGBODO, Joseph Charles Ph.D., ONYEKWELU, Uche Lucy Ph.D. “Impact of Government Expenditure on Agriculture on Agricultural Sector Output in Nigeria (1981-2018)” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.15-26 October 2020 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/15-26.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Effect of Price Skimming Strategies and Profitability of the Commercial Banks in Kericho County, Kenya

Lasoi Maryleen Chepkemoi, Robert Cheruiyot – October 2020 Page No.: 27-31

Profitability of banking sector in Kenya has been declining since 2013. Some of the factors include high competition, capping of interest, pricing strategies among others. Pricing strategies in banking has not been considered despite underlying symptoms of declining growth in assets, loan and deposit. Therefore, there is need to investigate the pricing strategies used in commercial banks in Kenya. The study sought to establish the effect of pricing strategies on profitability of commercial banks in Kericho County, Kenya. The study adopted a descriptive survey design. The design is chosen because the target population was dispersed over a wide geographical area. The design was useful in helping the researcher to obtain both quantitative and qualitative data from the target population. The target respondents were 62 comprising of members of the pricing committees, who include the heads of strategy and planning, the general managers, marketing managers, sales managers, and finance managers in KCB, Equity, Standard Chartered, Co-operative, SBM Bank, Barclays, Trans-national bank, Sidian, DTB, National bank and Family Bank Kenya. The researcher used census sampling design to select 62 respondents representing the whole targeted population. Both closed and open ended questionnaires were utilized in data collection. Data analysis was done using ANOVA and multiple regression analysis with the help of Statistical Package for Social Science version 21.0. The study found out that there was significant relationship between price skimming strategies and profitability of the commercial banks. The study concluded that price skimming strategy provided new product to commercial banks and hence increased profitability. The study recommended that price skimming should be encouraged through encouraging product segmentation since it enables organization to develop new produces.

Page(s): 27-31                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 October 2020

 Lasoi Maryleen Chepkemoi
Department of Accounting and Finance, School of Business, Kenyatta University, Kenya

 Robert Cheruiyot
Department of Accounting and Finance, School of Business, Kenyatta University, Kenya

[1] Bett, S. (2018). Pricing Strategy and Customer Satisfaction: An Assessment of Loyalty and Retention of Customers in Kenyan Commercial Banks. IJARKE Business & Management Journal) , 168-171
[2] Chantapong, S. (2005). Cost Efficiency of Domestic and Foreign Banks in Thailand: Evidence from Panel Data. Germany: University of Hannove Report
[3] Grygorenko, O. (2009). Effects of Price Setting on Bank Performance: The case of Ukraine, KyivSchool of Economics. Ukraine: Kyiv University
[4] Guerreiro, R., Comachione, E., & Kassai, C. (2012). Determining the ‘plus’ in cost plus pricing: A time-based management approach. JAMAR , 10(1); 1-15
[5] Hutt, M., & Speh, T. (2010). Business Marketing Managemnt 10th Edition. South Western University: Library of Congress
[6] Kosmidou, A., Tanna, G., & Pasiouras, F. (2006). Determinants of profitability of domestic UK commercial banks: Panel evidence from the period 1995-2002. UK: Williams and Sons
[7] Muzammil, H. (2014). Market Skimming Pricing: An examination of elements supporting high price for new products in Pakistan. European Journal of Business and Management , 6(23), 180-187
[8] Muzammil, H. (2014). Market Skimming Pricing: An examination of elements supporting high price for new products in Pakistan. European Journal of Business and Management , 6(23), 180-187
[9] Netseva-Porcheva. (2017). Value based pricing: A success factor in the competitive struggle. Članci Review Paper , 227-236
[10] Nyaga, P., & Muema, W. (2017). Effect of skimming price strategy on the profitability of insurance firms in Kenya. International Journal of Finance and Accounting , 2(6), 79-92
[11] Nyaga, P., & Muema, W. (2017). Effect of skimming price strategy on the profitability of insurance firms in Kenya. International Journal of Finance and Accounting , 2(6), 79-92
[12] Sammut-Bonnici, T., & Channon, D. (2014). Pricing Strategy. UK: John Wiley & Sons Ltd
[13] Shavandi, H., & Zare, A. (2013). Analyzing the price skimming strategy for new product pricing. Scientia Iranica , 20(6), 2100-2108
[14] Thi, K., Khanh, V., Thuy, V., & Thuy, D. (2018). Factors influencing the cost-based pricing method: The empirical study of Vietnamese feed mills. Economic Annals , 171(5-6), 29-37
[15] Toni, D., Milan, G., Saciloto, E., & Larentis, F. (2017). Pricing strategies and levels and their impact on corporate profitability. Revista de Administração , 52, 120-133
[16] Wang, H. (2014). Theories for competitive advantage. In H. Hasan, Being Practical with Theory: A Window into Business Research (pp. 33-43). Australia: Wollongong

Lasoi Maryleen Chepkemoi, Robert Cheruiyot “Effect of Price Skimming Strategies and Profitability of the Commercial Banks in Kericho County, Kenya International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.27-31 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/27-31.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

A Study on the Potential of Legal System in Safeguarding the Right to Education of Street Children in Sri Lanka

Samarakoon A.S – October 2020 Page No.: 32-36

uneducated street children are a challenge to the national growth of a country. Education can be consider as a mechanism which can increase the national growth. Although there is free education in srilanka, there are a large number of children like street children , who lose their education due to other expenses. . This study aims to find out whether sri Lankan legal system is potential to protect the right to education of street children. The research problem is whether the existing legal system is potential to protect the right to education of street children. The objectives of this study are, to identify the existing legal framework for right to education of street children in srilanka,, to identify the problem of legal framework in related to right to education and to propose the necessary amendments to existing legal framework to fill the gaps. Combination of black letter methodology and comparative analysis with indian legal framework is also taken as a research methodology. For the qualitative analysis primary data are1978 srilanka constitution, penal code no 2 of 1883, children and young person’s ordinance no 48 0f 1939, the adoption of children ordinance No. 24 of 1941, Education ordinance No. 31 of 1939, prevention of domestic violence Act No. 34 of 2005, and international covenant on civil and political rights. and for secondary data including web articles and journal articles.

Page(s): 32-36                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 October 2020

 Samarakoon A.S
General Sir John Kotelawala Defence University, Sri Lanka

[1] Convention on the right of the child[online] [accessed on 13 thjune 2020] Available at:<https://www.ohchr.org/en/professionalinterest/pages/crc.aspx>.
[2] Constitution of India (1950).p3[online] Available at;https://www.india.gov.in/sites/upload_files/npi/files/coi_part_full.pdf ( accessed on 14 thjune 2020)
[3] constitution of Democratic socialistic republic of srilanka 1978,c3. Availabeat;https://www.parliament.lk/files/pdf/constitution.pdf(Accessed on 13 th June 2020)
[4] Children and young person’s act (1956)[online]Available at; http://hrlibrary.umn.edu/research/srilanka/statutes/Children_and_Young_Persons_Ordinance.pdf( accessed on 13 th June 2020)
[5] Neranjiwijewardane, chamaravisankasenarathne (2013) street children in Colombo;what brings them to and sustains them on the street? Sri lanka journal of child health [online] Available on; https://www.researchgate.net/publication/263430060_Street_children_in_Colombo_What_brings_them_to_and_sustains_them_on_the_streets
[6] Penal code of Democratic socialistic republic of srilanka(1883)[online]availableat;https://www.lawnet.gov.lk/1948/12/31/penal-code-3/
[7] Right of children to free and compulsory education Act, India, (2009).c1. Available at;https://www.tiss.edu/uploads/files/The_Right_of_Children_to_Free_and_Compulsory_Education_Act_2009.pdf( accessed on 14 th June 2020)
[8] Sri Lanka Education Ordinance 1939. P3. Available at:http://www.commonlii.org/lk/legis/consol_act/e381147.pdf( Accessed on 13 th June 2020)
[9] The constitution of Democratic socialistic republic of srilanka 1978,c3. Availabeat;https://www.parliament.lk/files/pdf/constitution.pdf(Accessed on 13 th June 2020)
[10] Wijewardane BVN. (2008)Deviant behaviors of street children with special reference to Colombo fort and pettahCeylon medical journal
[11] YeohE.Chu K. (2012).Literacy,Education and Economic Development in contemporary china. SSRN,[online]Available at; https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2207559 [Accessed 5thjune 2020]

Samarakoon A.S “A Study on the Potential of Legal System in Safeguarding the Right to Education of Street Children in Sri Lanka” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.32-36 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/32-36.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Study on how rural and urban communities understand the risks of Agro-chemicals in foods

W. A. S. Wijekoon & G. W. P. Prasad- October 2020 Page No.: 37-41

Food production is an essential factor in the growing population of the world. Base on this factor, various methods are used to accelerate food production and productivity in different contexts. In that process, chemicals are used on a large scale at different stages. Today this situation is affecting various aspects of human lives and it is also affecting to change the buying patterns of the consumers. Considering this, a study has been conducted on how rural and urban communities perceive the risks of agro-chemicals in food when food purchases. The main purpose of this is to identify how rural and urban communities perceive the risks of agro-chemicals in food, and as a sub-objective, how much consumers are aware of the agro-chemicals in foods and how chemicals in foods effect on the behavior of consumers. It can also be called whether the way is informed. The impact of agro- chemicals in food exposure on rural and urban communities is a matter of concern and a comparative study is being conducted in Passara and Maharagama Divisional Secretariats. Information were obtained from 200 houses by covering 100 houses equally in each Divisional Secretariat Division through questionnaires and interviews. The findings of the study revealed that, only 100% of the urban population buys food, 62% of the rural population buys where they cultivate the rest of 38% on their own. Almost all urban dwellers who buy food when they are aware of the dangers of agro- chemicals contained food. The main problem facing the people is the high cost of agrochemical free food. Although this is not considered by most of the urban community, it has been a decisive factor in focusing on the rural community. Most respondents had expressed interest in healthy and nutritionally rich food as well as environmental concerns and sustainability. The most important consideration when buying food is the family’s preferences and low cost, respectively. Most food buyers are at an optimal level of awareness of the chemical risks in foods. Also, although awareness of the dangers of chemicals in foods is similar in urban and rural areas, it can be concluded that the response to food purchases is different in urban and rural areas.

Page(s): 37-41                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 October 2020

 W. A. S. Wijekoon
Department of Sociology, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Sri Lanka

  G. W. P. Prasad
Department of Sociology, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Sri Lanka

[1] Gunasekara, P. D. (1994). Local farming. Colombo: S. Godage publications.
[2] Wijekoon, W. A. S & Prasad, G. W. P. (2020). The Influence of Chemical Risk Communication on Consumer Behavior in Purchasing Foods: A Psychological Study. Vidyodaya Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences, 05(01), 57-67. https://doi.org/10.31357/fhss/vjhss.v05i01.06.
[3] Dumea, A. (2012). (2018 April 13). Factors Influencing Consumption of Organic Food in Romania. Retrieved from https://ideas.repec.org/a/scm/usvaep/v12y2012i1(15) 107-113.html
[4] Europian Food Safety Authority. (2016). (2018 May 10). Food is essential to life. Retrieved from: http://www.efsa.europa.eu/

W. A. S. Wijekoon & G. W. P. Prasad “Study on how rural and urban communities understand the risks of Agro-chemicals in foods” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.37-41 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/37-41.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Analysis of the Implementation of Planning, Budgeting and Reporting (SIMRAL) Information Systems on Acceleration of Regional Development in West Pakpak Regency
Anna Suriaty Manik, Tarmizi, Agus Purwoko- October 2020 – Page No.: 42-49

This study aims to analyze the effect of the Planning, Budgeting, and Reporting Management Information System (SIMRAL) on the acceleration of regional development in Pakpak Barat Regency. The research was conducted in West Pakpak Regency, North Sumatra Province on the Analysis of the Implementation of SIMRAL on the Acceleration of Regional Development in West Pakpak Regency. The method of analysis used in this research is multiple regression analysis methods using 112 respondents. The implementation of the SIMRAL with the dimensions of human resources, infrastructure, institutions and budgets, and IT services has a positive and significant impact on the acceleration of regional development in West Pakpak Regency. This can be explained that before the existence of SIMRAL, the annual Regional Revenue and Expenditure Budget (APBD) of Pakpak Barat Regency was passed in February and activities started running on average in April. After the existence of SIMRAL, it shows that the legalization process and activities planned in the APBD will run on time and according to schedule, namely implemented in February, so that the acceleration of development can be carried out by the Regional Medium-Term Development Plan (RPJMD) and the Regional Long-Term Development Plan (RPJPD) of Regional Districts.

Page(s): 42-49                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 01 November 2020

 Anna Suriaty Manik
Department of Regional and Rural Development Planning, University of Sumatera Utara,North Sumatra, Indonesia

  Tarmizi
Department of Regional and Rural Development Planning, University of Sumatera Utara,North Sumatra, Indonesia

  Agus Purwoko
Department of Regional and Rural Development Planning, University of Sumatera Utara,North Sumatra, Indonesia

[1] Adisasnita, R. 2006. Pembangunan Perdesaan dan Perkotaan. Yogyakarta: Graha Ilmu.
[2] Ariza I. 2014. Perancangan Sistem Informasi Perencanaan Pembangunan Daerah Kabupaten Kubu Raya. Pontianak (ID): Universitas Tanjungpura. (Jurnal Sistem dan Teknologi Informasi Vol 3 No.1)
[3] Agustino, L. 2012. Dasar-Dasar Kebijakan Publik. Alfabeta: Bandung
[4] Anselm, S. & J. Corbin. 2003. Dasar-Dasar Penelitian Kualitatif. Yogyakarta: Pustaka Pelajar.
[5] Arikunto, S. 2006. Prosedur Penelitian Suatu Pendekatan Praktek. Jakarta: PT. Rineka Cipta.
[6] Azwar, S. 1998. Metode Penelitian, Edisi I, Cetakan I. Yogyakarta : Pustaka Pelajar
[7] Browne dan Wildavsky. 2004. Teori Implementasi.
[8] Budiman, A. N., 2001, Prinsip-Prinsip Sistem Informasi Manajemen, Raja Grafindo Persada, Jakarta.
[9] Davis, G. B. 1995. Sistem Informasi Manajemen. PT. Pustaka Binaman Pressindo
[10] Dunn, W. N. 2000. Pengantar Analisa Kebijakan Publik. Yogyakarta: Gadjah Mada Press.
[11] Edward III, George C. 1980. Implementing Public Policy, Congressional Quarterly Press, Washington.
[12] Mulyanto. H.R. 2008. Prinsip-Prinsip Pengembangan Wilayah. Graha Ilmu. Yogyakarta
[13] Nasution, S, 2002, Metode Research: Penelitian Ilmiah. Jakarta : Bumi Aksara.
[14] Peraturan Bupati Pakpak Barat Nomor 35 Tahun 2017 tentang Penganggaran dan Pelaporan secara Online (SIMRAL)
[15] Sirojuzilam. 2005. Regional Planning and Development. Wahana Hijau. Jurnal Perencanaan dan Pengembangan Wilayah. Vol.1 Nomor 1 Agustus 2005.
[16] Sirojuzilam dan Mahalli, K. 2010. Regional. Pembangunan, Perencanaan dan Ekonomi. USU Press. Medan.
[17] Sugiyono. 2010. Metode Penelitian Pendidikan Pendekatan Kuantitatif, Kulaitatif dan R & D. Bandung : CV. Alfa Beta.
[18] Wahab, S.A. 2004. Analisis Kebijaksanaan: dari Formulasi ke Implementasi Kebijaksanaan Negara. Jakarta: Bumi Aksara.

Anna Suriaty Manik, Tarmizi, Agus Purwoko “Analysis of the Implementation of Planning, Budgeting and Reporting (SIMRAL) Information Systems on Acceleration of Regional Development in West Pakpak Regency.” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.42-49 October 2020 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/42-49.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Analysis of the Development of Coffee Farmers on Economic Improvement Post Eruption of Mount Sinabung in Payung Sub-District, Karo Regency

Bintang Hartini Nataria , Sirojuzilam, Agus Purwoko – October 2020 Page No.: 50-57

This study aims to analyze the effect of coffee farmer development on improving the economy in the Payung Sub-district. The results of data analysis indicate that the development of coffee farmers has a significant and positive effect on improving the economy in Payung District. The research findings show that the results of hypothesis testing through the t-test say that the development of coffee farmers has a significant and positive effect on improving the economy in Payung District. Therefore, it was decided that Ha was accepted.

Page(s): 50-57                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 01 November 2020

 Bintang Hartini Nataria Department of Regional and Rural Development Planning, University of Sumatera Utara,North Sumatra, Indonesia

  Sirojuzilam Department of Regional and Rural Development Planning, University of Sumatera Utara,North Sumatra, Indonesia

  Agus PurwokoDepartment of Regional and Rural Development Planning, University of Sumatera Utara,North Sumatra, Indonesia

[1] Albina, G, Nainggolan, H, Ginting, M. 2018. Analisis Efesiensi dan Identifikasi Faktor Sosial, Ekonomi dan Teknis yang Mempengaruhi Konversi Usahatani Jeruk ke Usahatani Kopi di Kecamatan Barusjahe Kabupaten Karo. Jurnal AGRIFO, Vol. 3, No. 1. April 2018. Medan. Universitas HKBP Nommensen
[2] Ginting, E, Afifuddin, S, Rahmanta. 2014. Pengaruh Program Pengembangan Infrastruktur Sosial Ekonomi Wilayah (Pisew) terhadap Pengembangan Wilayah di Kecamatan Naman Teran Kabupaten Karo. Jurnal Pasca Sarjana PWD, Vol 17, No 4, Oktober 2014. Medan.Universitas Sumatera Utara.
[3] Herawaty, R. 2018. Analisis Sektor Ekonomi Potensial dalam Pembangunan Wilayah Kabupaten Karo. Jurnal Konsep Bisnis dan Managemen, Vol 5, No.39, November 2018. Medan. Fungsional Statistis BPS Provinsi Sumatera Utara.
[4] ————-2018. Badan Pusat Statistik Kabupaten Karo. Medan. E’ Karya.
[5] ————-2018. Badan Pusat Statistik Kecamatan Payung. Medan. E’Karya.
[6] Jayadinata, J. 1999. Tata Guna Tanah dalam Perencanaan Pedesaan Perkotaan dan Wilayah. Bandung. Institute Teknologi Bandung.
[7] Junaidi, Y, Yamin, M. 2010. Faktor-faktor yang Mempengaruhi Pola Usahatani Diversifikasi dan Hubungannya dengan Pendapatan Usahatani Kopi di Sumatera Selatan. Pembangunan Manusia (4) : 1-9.
[8] Nugroho, I, Dahuri, R. 2004. Pembangunan Wilayah: Perspektif Ekonomi, Social, dan Lingkungan. Jakarta. Pustaka LP3ES.
[9] Saragih JR. 2011. Kopi dan Pengembangan Wilayah. http://www.analisadaily.com/newsead/2011/06/06/2856/kopi_dan_pengemban gan_wilayah/#.UQ46avL_mSp. [15 Juni 2011].
[10] Sembiring, A, Sitanggang, D, Purnasari, N, Budiman, I. Peningkatan Kesejahteraan Petani Kopi melalui Pengolahan Pasca Panen Di Desa Lingga Kabupaten Karo, dalam wahana Inovasi Universitas Prima Indonesia, Vol 8, No.2, Juli 2019. Medan. Universitas Prima Indonesia
[11] Sugiyono, 2017. Metode Penelitian Kuantitatif, Kualitaif. Bandung. Alfabeta.
[12] Sumaryanto, B, Sudaryanto. 2009. Perubahan Pendapatan Rumah Tangga Perdesaan: Analisis Data Patanas Tahun 1995 dan 2007. Prosiding Seminar Nasional Dinamika Pembangunan Pertanian dan Perdesaan: Tantangan dan Peluang bagi Peningkatan Kesejahteraan Petani. Pusat Analisis Sosial Ekonomi dan Kebijakan Pertanian. Bogor.
[13] Syamsul, M. 2005. Model-Model Kuantitatif Untuk Perencanaan Pembangunan Ekonomi Daerah: Konsep dan Aplikasi. Bogor. IPB Press.
[14] Syatori, T, Ghozali, N. 2012. Metode Penelitian Kuantitatif. Bandung. Pustaka Setia.
[15] Zulkarnain, B. 2003. Membangun Ekonomi Rakyat : Persepsi Tentang Pemberdayaan Ekonomi Rakyat. Yogyakarta. Adicita Karya Nusa.

Bintang Hartini Nataria, Sirojuzilam, Agus Purwoko “Analysis of the Development of Coffee Farmers on Economic Improvement Post Eruption of Mount Sinabung in Payung Sub-District, Karo Regency” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.50-57 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/50-57.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Influence of Political Decentralization on Service Delivery of County Governments in Kenya

Emmah Bosibori Manwari, Willy Mwangi Muturi- October 2020 Page No.: 58-68

Although the devolved system is based on the constitutional mandates and responsibilities, jitters still prevail due to the challenges of managing the tribal diversity in some counties, marginalization of minorities, handling of natural resources as well as discrimination in allocation of resources as results of political dilemma. The general objective of the study was to sought out the influence of political decentralization on the service delivery of the county governments in Kenya. The study was guided by the following Specific objectives; To determine the influence of legislative powers on the service delivery, To find out the influence of Political stability on the service delivery, To establish the influence of statutory reforms on the service delivery and to find out the influence of citizen Participation on the service delivery of the county governments in Kenya. The study adopted descriptive research design. The results showed that there is a statistically significant influence of legislative powers, Political stability, statutory reforms and citizen Participation on quality of service delivery in county governments in Kenya ensure the rights of public participation are observed to promote democratic processes and that guide on flexibility required to ensure change from the public contribution is felt

Page(s): 58-68                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 01 November 2020

 Emmah Bosibori Manwari
Department of Entrepreneurship, Technology, Leadership and Management /Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology

 Willy Mwangi Muturi
Department of Entrepreneurship, Technology, Leadership and Management /Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology

[1] Alornyeku, F. K. (2011). The Impact Of Bureaucracy On Public Service Delivery: A Study of Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly. (Executive Masters of Public Administration), Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology.
[2] Olatona, J. B., and Olomola, P. A. (2015). Analysis of Fiscal Decentralization and Public Service Delivery in Nigeria. Journal of Economics and Sustainable Development, 6(9).
[3] Andrews, R. (2012). New public management and citizens’ perceptions of local service efficiency, responsiveness, equity and effectiveness. COCOPS Working Paper No. 7.
[4] Armstrong, A. (1998). A comparative analysis: New public management-the way ahead. Aust. Journal Public Administration, 57, 12-24.
[5] Constitution of Kenya (2010). The Constitution of Kenya. Nairobi. Government printer.
[6] Burugu, N. J. (2010). The County: Understanding Devolution and Governance in Kenya.Lecor
[7] Kosec, K., and Mogues, T. (2015). The Impact of Decentralization on Public Service Delivery: A Spatial Regression Discontinuity Approach. International Food Policy Research Institute.
[8] Osborne, D., &Gaebler, T. (1992). Reinventing government: How the entrepreneurial spirit is transforming the public sector. .New York: Penguin Books.
[9] Dickovick, T. J., &Riedl, R. B. (2010). Comparative Assessment of Decentralization In Africa:
[10] Batchelor, S., Smith, J., and Fleming, J. (2014). Decentralization In Sub- Saharan Africa: Prevalence, Scope And Challenges. Working Paper 2.
[11] ICJ Kenya. (2013). Handbook on devolution. The Kenyan Section of the International Commission of Jurists.
[12] Kobia, M., and Bagaka, O. (2014). Separation of powers in Kenya’s devolved administrative system: Opportunities and challenges. Commonwealth Governance Handbook.
[13] Kotter, P. J. (2008). A sense of Urgency, Havard Business Press, Boston MA.
[14] Balunywa, W., Nangoli, S., Mugerwa, G. W., Teko, J., and Mayoka, K. G. (2014). An analysis of fiscal decentralization as a strategy for improving revenue performance in Ugandan Local Governments Journal of Research in International Business and Management, 4(2), 28-36.
[15] Saavedra, P. A. (2010). A Study of the Impact of Decentralization on Access to Service Delivery. (Doctor in Philosophy in the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies and the School of Public Policy), Georgia State University.

Emmah Bosibori Manwari, Willy Mwangi Muturi “Influence of Political Decentralization on Service Delivery of County Governments in Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.58-68 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/58-68.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

E-learning in Tertiary Education in Ghana: Exploring Its Nuggets and Nuances for Stakeholder Engagement

Davis Mawuena Aweso, Ephraim Armstrong Awinbugri (Ph.D), Nicholas Aning Boadu, Francis Kwesi Nsakwa, Edmond Nyarko-Nkrumah- October 2020 Page No.: 69-74

Electronic teaching and learning continue to soar across all levels of education in Ghana especially following the emergence of covid-19. To this end, plethora of Colleges and Universities are interested in how to best engage e-learners as regards course content. This study explores the dynamics through which taking courses via e-learning medium utilizes student engagement, juxtaposing data from the Ministry of Education-Ghana. Data was analyzed using a series of ordinary least squares regression models, also controlling for relevant student and institutional traits. The results corroborated several significant correlations between e-learning and final years student engagement in Ghana’s tertiary institutions. Those students taking quite a number of online courses were more likely to engage in quantitative reasoning than their other counterparts. Nonetheless, they were less likely to engage in collaborative learning, student-faculty interactions, and discussions with diverse others, compared to their more traditional classroom counterparts. The students with greater numbers of online courses also indicated less exposure to effective teaching practices and lower quality of interactions. The relationship between these engagement indicators and the percentage of classes taken online suggests that an online environment might benefit certain types of engagement but may also be somewhat of a deterrent to others. Institutions should consider these findings when designing online course content and encourage faculty to contemplate ways of encouraging student engagement across a variety of delivery types. Higher learning institutions should blend e-learning with traditional learning so as to fully expose variety of learners to the merits and somewhat demerits of either modes. More importantly, as majority of students who enjoyed the lofty Free Senior High School policy await admissions in tertiary institutions, the researchers recommend that e-learning batch of students be concurrently admitted with normal classroom delivery students so as to ensure increased intake and further ensure no qualified student is left behind due to infrastructural deficit. With this, whilst students are in school for traditional face-to-face sessions, their counterparts are home for e-learning with this practice being rotated on semester basis until such a time infrastructural deficit are addressed.

Page(s): 69-74                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 01 November 2020

 Davis Mawuena Aweso
Agogo Presbyterian Women’s College of Education, Education Department,Ghana

  Ephraim Armstrong Awinbugri (Ph.D)
University of Education, Winneba-IDeL, Ghana

 Nicholas Aning Boadu Nsakwa
Agogo Presbyterian Women’s College of Education, Social Studies Department, Ghana

  Francis Kwesi Nsakwa
Gabriel-Wettey University of Education, Winneba-IDeL-Kasoa Study Centre

  Edmond Nyarko-Nkrumah
Agogo Presbyterian Women’s College of Education, Mathematics/IT Department, Ghana

[1] Allen, E., & Seaman, J. (2013). Changing course: Ten years of tracking online education in the United States. Babson Park, MA: Babson Survey Research Group
[2] Amber D. Dumford & Angie L. Miller (2018). Online learning in higher education: exploring advantages and disadvantages for engagement. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12528-018-9179-z
[3] Anaya, G. (1999). College impact on student learning: Comparing the use of self-reported gains, standardized test scores, and college grades. Research in Higher Education, 40, 499–526.
[4] Astin, A. W. (1993). What matters in college? Four critical years revisited. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
[5] Armstrong, E. A., Boadu, A. N., Nkrumah, N. E., Aweso, M. D., Nottinson, A. F., Samuel Baah–Duodu, S., Wotortsi, E., Afari, B. J., Amoh-Yeboah, R. & Dogli, C. P. (2020). “Coronavirus (COVID- 19) Pandemic and Online Learning Nexus in Colleges of Education in Ashanti-Brong Ahafo Regions (ASHBA), Ghana” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 5, pp.392-396 May 2020 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-5/392-396.pdf
[6] Baird, L. (2005). College environments and climates: Assessments and their theoretical assumptions.Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research, 10, 507–537.
[7] Cabrera, A. F., Crissman, J. L., Bernal, E. M., Nora, A., Terenzini, P. T., & Pascarella, E. T. (2002). Collaborative learning: Its impact on college students’ development and diversity. Journal of College Student Development, 43(1), 20–34.
[8] Chen, P. D., Lambert, A. D., & Guidry, K. R. (2010). Engaging online learners: The impact of web-based learning technology on student engagement. Computers & Education, 54, 1222–1232.
[9] Cohen, V. L. (2003). Distance learning instruction: A new model of assessment. Journal of Computing in Higher Education, 14(2), 98–120.
[10] Dominguez, P. S., & Ridley, D. R. (2001). Assessing distance education courses and discipline differences in effectiveness. Journal of Instructional Psychology, 28(1), 15–19.
[11] Drysdale, J. S., Graham, C. R., Spring, K. J., & Halverson, L. R. (2013). An analysis of research trends in dissertations and theses studying blended learning. Internet and Higher Education, 17, 90–100. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.iheduc.2012.11.003.
[12] Evans, C. (2014). Twitter for teaching: Can social media be used to enhance the process of learning? British Journal of Educational Technology, 45(5), 902–915.
[13] Field, A. (2009). Discovering statistics using SPSS (3rd ed.). London: Sage Publications.
[14] Friedman, J. (2014). Online education by discipline: A graduate student’s guide. Retrieved from http:// www.usnews.com/education/online-education/articles/2014/09/17/online-education-by-discipline-a-graduate-students-guide.
[15] Han, I., & Shin, W. S. (2016). The use of a mobile learning management system and academic achievement of online students. Computers & Education, 102, 79–89. https://doi.org/10.1016/j. compedu.2016.07.003.
[16] Hayek, J. C., Carini, R. M., O’Day, P. T., & Kuh, G. D. (2002). Triumph or tragedy: Comparing student engagement levels of members of Greek-letter organizations and other students. Journal of College Student Development, 43(5), 643–663.
[17] Henrie, C. R., Halverson, L. R., & Graham, C. R. (2015). Measuring student engagement in technology-mediated learning: A review. Computers & Education, 90, 36–53. https://doi.org/10.1016/j. compedu.2015.09.005.
[18] Hu, S., & Kuh, G. D. (2001). Computing experience and good practices in undergraduate education: Does the degree of campus ‘‘wiredness’’ matter? Education Policy Analysis Archives, 9(49). http://epaa. asu.edu/epaa/v9n49.html.
[19] Jacob, S., & Radhai, S. (2016). Trends in ICT e-learning: Challenges and expectations. International Journal of Innovative Research & Development, 5(2), 196–201.
[20] Junco, R. (2012). The relationship between frequency of Facebook use, participation in Facebook activities, and student engagement. Computers & Education, 58(1), 162–171.
[21] Junco, R., Elavsky, C. M., & Heiberger, G. (2013). Putting Twitter to the test: Assessing outcomes for student collaboration, engagement, and success. British Journal of Educational Technology, 44(2), 273–287.
[22] Junco, R., Heiberger, G., & Loken, E. (2010). The effect of Twitter on college student engagement and grades. Journal of Computer Assisted learning. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2729.2010.00387.x.
[23] Kent, C., Laslo, E., & Rafaeli, S. (2016). Interactivity in online discussions and learning outcomes.
[24] Computers & Education, 97, 116–128. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2016.03.002.
[25] Kim, K. J., & Bonk, C. J. (2006). The future of online teaching and learning in higher education: The survey says…. Educause Quarterly, 4, 22–30.
[26] Kuh, G. D. (2001). The National Survey of Student Engagement: Conceptual framework and overview of psychometric properties. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University, Center for Postsecondary Research.
[27] Kuh, G. D., & Hu, S. (2001a). The effects of student-faculty interaction in the 1990s. Review of Higher Education, 24(3), 309–332.
[28] Kuh, G. D., & Hu, S. (2001b). The relationships between computer and information technology use, student learning, and other college experiences. Journal of College Student Development, 42, 217–232.
[29] Pukkaew, C. (2013). Assessment of the effectiveness of internet-based distance learning through the VClass e-Education platform. International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 14(4), 255–276.
[30] Restauri, S. L., King, F. L., & Nelson, J. G. (2001). Assessment of students’ ratings for two methodologies of teaching via distance learning: An evaluative approach based on accreditation. ERIC document 460-148, reports-research (143).
[31] Richardson, J. T. E., Morgan, A., & Woodley, A. (1999). Approaches to studying distance education. Higher Education, 37, 23–55.
[32] Robinson, C. C., & Hullinger, H. (2008). New benchmarks in higher education: Student engagement in online learning. Journal of Education for Business, 84(2), 101–108.
[33] Serwatka, J. A. (2002). Improving student performance in distance learning courses. Technological Horizons in Education THE Journal, 29(9), 48–51.
[34] Shuey, S. (2002). Assessing online learning in higher education. Journal of Instruction Delivery Systems, 16, 13–18.
[35] Stallings, D. (2002). Measuring success in the virtual university. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 28, 47–53.
[36] Tabachnick, B. G., & Fidell, L. S. (2001). Using multivariate statistics (4th ed.). Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Davis Mawuena Aweso, Ephraim Armstrong Awinbugri (Ph.D), Nicholas Aning Boadu, Francis Kwesi Nsakwa, Edmond Nyarko-Nkrumah, “E-learning in Tertiary Education in Ghana: Exploring Its Nuggets and Nuances for Stakeholder Engagement ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.69-74 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/69-74.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Real-Time Situation of Covid-19 Pandemic between MCO, CMCO and RMCO Using Geographic Information System (GIS): Study Case in Malaysia

Mohd Sahrul Syukri Yahya, Edie Ezwan Mohd Safian, Burhaida Burhan – October 2020 Page No.: 75-81

Globally, the most infectious disease was the new term of coronavirus disease by COVID-19 in all countries from the end of the year in 2019 until August 2020. Until now, COVID-19 not yet to solve and no meet vaccine. At the end of December 2019, there was an international cluster of cases involving Novel Coronavirus in Wuhan, China. The worldwide number of active cases and deaths is rising, especially in the top countries such as the United States (U.S), Brazil, and India. In Malaysia, these cases of COVID-19 have significantly decreased the number of active infections and deaths from May to August 2020. COVID-19 has a significant effect on human life, socio-economic growth, and public relation. It is focused at older age groups and individuals with various health problem conditions such as cancer, respiratory problems, diabetes, hypertension, and heart-related issues. Therefore, the World Health Organization (WHO) has formally declared COVID-19 as an international critical case. The research uses GIS software to analyse COVID-19’s spatial-temporal of real time situation between Movement Control Order (MCO) in Malaysia. COVID-19 information obtained between on 27 February until August 2020 and analysed using ArcGIS software 10.5 and SPSS for statistical analysis. Real time situation conducted to show distribution and changing patterns of the COVID-19 pandemic within MCO implemented. As a result, Kuala Lumpur was the most affected state in Malaysia as of 19 August 2020, followed by Selangor, Negeri Sembilan, and Johor. Regardless of the infection chain ratio, the favourable cases in each Malaysia’s affected state are rising every day. The Malaysian Government attempted to split the infection chain ratio affected by COVID-19 via the lockdown definition. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technologies have played a significant role in spatial information, spatial tracking of confirmed cases, active case, death, and discharge cases, and real time for predicting the magnitude of the spread. Monitoring, evaluating, and planning using geospatial analysis are essential for controlling COVID-19 within the country especially in the developing countries.

Page(s): 75-81                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 November 2020

  Mohd Sahrul Syukri Yahya
Faculty of Technology Management and Business, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, 86400 Parit Raja, Batu Pahat, Johor Malaysia

  Edie Ezwan Mohd Safian
Faculty of Technology Management and Business, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, 86400 Parit Raja, Batu Pahat, Johor Malaysia

  Burhaida Burhan
Faculty of Technology Management and Business, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, 86400 Parit Raja, Batu Pahat, Johor Malaysia

[1] DOSM (Department of Statistics Malaysia). (2011). Population Distribution and Basic Demographic Characteristic Report 2010.
[2] Franch-Pardo, I., Napoletano, B. M., Rosete-Verges, F., & Billa, L. (2020). Spatial analysis and GIS in the study of COVID-19. A review. Science of the Total Environment, 739. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.140033
[3] Jiang, S., Shi, Z., Shu, Y., Song, J., Gao, G. F., Tan, W., & Guo, D. (2020, March 21). A distinct name is needed for the new coronavirus. The Lancet. Lancet Publishing Group. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30419-0
[4] K, R. (2020). Application of GIS in COVID -19 Monitoring and Surveillance. International Journal for Research in Applied Science and Engineering Technology, 8(5), 1435–1440. https://doi.org/10.22214/ijraset.2020.5231
[5] Kumar, K., Saho, S., Bharti, B. K., & Walker, S. (2020). Spatial distribution and impact assessment of COVID-19 on human health using geospatial technologies in India. International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research and Development, 7(5), 57 – 64.
[6] Li, Q., Guan, X., Wu, P., Wang, X., Zhou, L., Tong, Y., Ren, R., Leung, K., Lau, E.S., Wong, J.Y., Xing, X., Xiang, N., Wu, Y., Li, C., Chen, Q., Li, D., Liu, T., Zhao, J., Li, M., Tu, W., Chen, C., Jin, L., Yang, R., Wang, Q., Zhou, S., Wang, R., Liu, H., Luo, Y., Liu, Y., Shao, G., Li, H., Tao, Z., Yang, Y., Deng, Z., Liu, B., Ma, Z., Zhang, Y., Shi, G., Lam, T.T., Wu, J.T., Gao, G.F., Cowling, B.J., Yang, B., Leung, G.M., & Feng, Z. (2020). Early Transmission Dynamics in Wuhan, China, of Novel Coronavirus–Infected Pneumonia. The New England Journal of Medicine, 382, 1199 – 1207.
[7] Likassa, H. T. (2020). The Impacts of Covariates on Spatial Distribution of CORONA Virus 2019 (COVID-19): WHO Data through Multivariate Analysis of Covariance (MANCOVA). Eurasian Journal of Medicine and Oncology. https://doi.org/10.14744/ejmo.2019.81104
[8] Ma, X.; Wang, D.; Xu, W, G.; Gao, F; Tan, W., (2019). A novel coronavirus from patients with pneumonia in China. N. Engl. J. Med., A brief report. Massachusetts Medical Society.
[9] Mackenzie, J.S., & Smith, D.W. (2020). COVID-19: a novel zoonotic disease caused by a coronavirus from China: what we know and what we don’t. Microbiology Australia.
[10] MOH (Ministry of Health). (2020). The Current Situation of COVID-19 Pandemic in Malaysia. Ministry of Health for Malaysia. http://covid-19.moh.gov.my/
[11] Mo, C., Tan, D., Mai, T., Bei, C., Qin, J., Pang, W., & Zhang, Z. (2020). An analysis of spatiotemporal pattern for COIVD-19 in China based on space-time cube. Journal of Medical Virology. https://doi.org/10.1002/jmv.25834
[12] Murugesan, B., Karuppannan, S., Mengistie, A. T., Ranganathan, M., & Gopalakrishnan, G. (2020). Distribution and Trend Analysis of COVID-19 in India: Geospatial Approach. Journal of Geographical Studies, 1–9. https://doi.org/10.21523/gcj5.20040101
[13] Sarfo, A.K., & Karuppannan, S. (2020). Application of Geospatial Technologies in the COVID-19 Fight of Ghana. Transactions of the Indian National Academy of Engineering, 1 – 12.
[14] Tang, W., Liao, H., Marley, G., Wang, Z., Cheng, W., Wu, D., & Yu, R. (2020). The Changing Patterns of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in China: A Tempogeographic Analysis of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 Epidemic. Clinical Infectious Diseases. https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciaa423
[15] WHO (World Health Organization). 2020. Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) situation reports. Accessed 12 July 2020.
[16] WHO (World Health Organization). 2020. WHO Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) Dashboard. Accessed 18 July 2020.
[17] Xie, X., Naminse, E. Y., Liu, S., & Yi, Q. (2020). The spatial and temporal pattern of COVID-19 and its effect on humans’ development in China. Global Journal of Environmental Science and Management, 6(Special Issue (Covid-19)), 107–118. https://doi.org/10.22034/GJESM.2019.06.SI.10
[18] Yang, W., Deng, M., Li, C., & Huang, J. (2020). Spatio-temporal patterns of the 2019-ncov epidemic at the county level in hubei province, china. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17(7). https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072563
[19] Yuniarti, D, H., I, D., E, B., & Iswamdi, U. (2020). Mapping the High Risk Populations Against Coronavirus Disease 2019 in Padang West Sumatra Indonesia. International Journals of Sciences and High Technologies, 20, 50–58. Retrieved from http://ijpsat.ijsht-journals.org
[20] Zhu, N., Zhang, D., Wang, W., Li, X., Yang, B., Song, J., … Tan, W. (2020). A novel coronavirus from patients with pneumonia in China, 2019. New England Journal of Medicine, 382(8), 727–733. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa2001017

Mohd Sahrul Syukri Yahya, Edie Ezwan Mohd Safian, Burhaida Burhan, “The Real-Time Situation of Covid-19 Pandemic between MCO, CMCO and RMCO Using Geographic Information System (GIS): Study Case in Malaysia” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.75-81 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/75-81.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Managerial Selection and Placement as Tools of Enterprise’s Effectiveness

Lawal Muhammad Shagari, Bashar Umar, Samaila Mukhtar- October 2020 Page No.: 82-85

Most business organizations that are folding up in Nigeria today are victims of ineffectiveness. The vision and mission of their establishment have remained rather unattainable because they lacked capability for goal accomplishment. This is commonly found where managerial selection and placement procedures employed have been defective. Human resources remain one of the most active of all resources. To a considerable extent, it determines organizational performance. Managers in particular give enterprise the right focus and direction. This paper appraises the role of managerial selection and placement in organizational effectiveness. Selection process and problem of making the right selection, and coupled with appropriate motivational packages, it can be an enduring strategy for accomplishing enterprise’s goals and remaining relevant to all stakeholders.

Page(s): 82-85                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 03 November 2020

 Lawal Muhammad Shagari
College of Administrative and Business Studies Umaru Ali Shinkafi Polytechnic, Sokoto-Nigeria

 Bashar Umar
College of Administrative and Business Studies Umaru Ali Shinkafi Polytechnic, Sokoto-Nigeria

  Samaila Mukhtar
College of Administrative and Business Studies Umaru Ali Shinkafi Polytechnic, Sokoto-Nigeria

[1] Akibu, I. A & Adebayo, T. O (2001):” The role of job analysis in the selection process” at the school of business studies, being a paper presented at a National Conference, December. Pp. 1-8.
[2] Babatunde J. O (2002): Business policy, Organizational strategy and development process, Ilorin: P. 25
[3] Carroll S. J & Tosi H. L (2007): Organizational Behavior, Chicago: St Clair Press. Pp. 278-279.
[4] Drake J.D (2012): Interviewing for managers US: American Management Association Inc. Pp. 14-18 Heinemann Ltd.
[5] Gurker P. F (2007): The practice of management. London.
[6] William Ghiselli E. E (2007): “The validity of a personnel interview and Personnel psychology, No. 4. Pp. 389-394.
[7] Koontz H., O’Donnell C., and Weihrich H. (1980): Management, 7th edition. London: McGraw- Hill international books company. Pp. 535.
[8] Matterson M. T. (2006):” Employment Testing: Where we Stand?” The personnel administrator. Vol. No. 3. Pp. 27-29.
[9] Odiorne G. S and Miller E. L (2006): “Selection by Objectives: A new approach to Managerial Selection” Management of Personnel Quarterly, Vol. 5, No. 3. Pp. 2-10.

Lawal Muhammad Shagari, Bashar Umar, Samaila Mukhtar “Managerial Selection and Placement as Tools of Enterprise’s Effectiveness” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.82-85 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/82-85.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Students’ Perception of School Rules and Regulations as a Quest for Good Governance. A Case Study of a Peri-Urban Mixed Secondary School in North-Rift Kenya

Hellen Jepchirchir Mettoh – October 2020 Page No.: 86-93

The purpose of this study was to investigate students’ perception of school rules and regulations with regard to teacher-student relationship. The theoretical framework adopted was informed by Etzioni’s (1961) Compliance Theory. The philosophical orientation was relativist ontology and constructivist episte-mology. While methodology was case study. Unstructured inter-views were used in data collection followed by data transcrip-tions. To uphold trustworthiness of the study, “the member check” was used to check validity while reliability was enhanced through cross checking the transcripts for obvious mistakes. Piloting was carried out with form 4 students; 3 male and 3 fe-males at a peri-urban mixed secondary school in South Rift-Kenya and ethical considerations were observed throughout the study. Data were analyzed thematically and the results were presented as reported by the participants with the aid of thematic networks. The study found out that the students’ perception of school rules and regulations with regard to teacher-student rela-tionship was generally negative. Teacher-student conflicts were as a result of excessive force that teachers used on the students. Their inhuman, discriminative and impolite nature made stu-dents to oppose them. On the basis of the findings, the researcher recommended that teachers ought to take their time in explaining school rules and regulations to their students and avoid casting them in steel. Besides teachers ought to shun discrimination and harshness in enforcing of school rules and regulations and uphold dialogue.

Page(s): 86-93                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 03 November 2020

 Hellen Jepchirchir Mettoh
School of Education, Bomet University College, P.O Box 701-20400, Bomet, Nairobi, Kenya

[1] Attride-stirling, J. (2001). Thematic Networks: An Analytic Tool for Qualitative Research; London: Sage Publications, vol. 1(3): 385-405. (2001) 1:3.
[2] Bäckman, E., & Trafford, B. (2007). Democratic Governance of Schools. Strasbourg: Council of Europe Publishing.
[3] Bellingham, R. (2003). Ethical Leadership. Rebuilding Trust in Corporations. Amherst: HRD Press Inc.
[4] Bloomberg, L. D., and Volpe, M. (2012). Completing Your Qualitative Dissertation. A Road Map from Beginning to End. USA. Sage Publications.
[5] Blum, R. (2007). Best Practices: Building Blocks for Enhancing School
Environment. John Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.
[6] Chein, I. (1981). Appendix: An Introduction to Sampling. In L. H. Kidder
(Ed.), Selltiz, Wrightsman & Cook’s Research Methods in Social Relations (4th ed.). (pp. 418–441). Austin, TX: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.
[7] Creswell, J. W. (2009). Research Design. Qualitative, Quantitative and Mixed Methods Approaches. (3rd ed). London: Sage Publications.
[8] deMarrais, K. (2004). Qualitative Interview Studies: Learning Through Experience. In K. deMarrais & S. D. Lapan (Eds.), Foundations for Research (pp. 51–68). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.
[9] Dornyei, Z. (2007). Research Methods in Applied Linguistics: Qualitative Quantitative and Mixed Methodologies. Oxford University Press.
[10] Eriksson, P. & Kovalainen, A. (2008). Qualitative Methods in Business Research. London. Sage Publications Ltd.
[11] Etzioni, A. (1961). A Comparative Analysis of Complex Organizations: On Power, Involvement, and their Correlates. Free Press of Glencoe, New York.
[12] Henricsson, L., & Rydell, A. (2004). Elementary School Children with Behavior Problems: Teacher-Child Relations and Self-Perception. A Prospective Study. Merrill- Palmer Quarterly, 50, 111-138.
[13] Hosie, A., (2007). “I Hated Everything about School”: An Examination of the Relationship Between Dislike of School, Teenage Pregnancy and Educational Disengagement. Social Policy and Society, 6:333-347.
[14] Huddleston, T. (2007). From Student Voice to Shared Responsibility: Effective Practice in Democratic School Governance in European Schools. London: Citizenship Foundation.
[15] Jeruto, T.K., & Kiprop, C. J. (2011). Extent of Student Participation in Decision Making in Secondary Schools in Kenya. International Journal of Humanities and Social Science Vol. 1 No. 21
[16] Kamau, J., & Njenga, G. (2009). Negative Attitude and its Hindrance on Effective Implementation of School Rules and Regulations in Secondary Schools in Kenya, A Case Study of Kiambaa Constituency, Central Province. University of Nairobi: Unpublished M.Ed Thesis.
[17] Kats, G. (2006). Greening Americas Schools: Costs and Benefits. USA: A Capital E. Report. Retrieved on 20/1/2020 from http://www.usgbe.org.
[18] Kiptoo, (2020, February, 1st) Saturday Nation, p. 18. Nairobi, Kenya.
[19] Kelly, C., & Dikkers, S. (2016). “Framing Feedback for School Improvement around Distributed Leadership.” Education Administration Quarterly 52 (3): 392-422. Doi: 10: 1177/00131.61×16638416.
[20] Lutomia, G., and Sikolia, L. (2006). Handling Problems Facing Youth in Learning Institutions. Nairobi, Uzima Publishing House.
[21] Kombo, D.S., & Tromp, D.L., (2006). Proposal and Thesis writing. An Introduction. Nairobi, Paulines Publications, Africa.
[22] Lincoln,Y.S. & Guba, E.G. (1985). Naturalistic Inquiry. Thousand Oaks, CA:Sage.
[23] Magadla, M. (2007). The Role of theLearner in the School Governing Body:Perceptions and Experiences of Principals,
Educators, Parents and Learners. Unpublished Med Thesis: University of Kwazulu- Natal.
[24] Manefield, J., Robyn, C., Moor, J., & Mahar, C. (2007). Student Voice: A Historical perspective and New Directions. Paper No 10. Department of Education. Melbourne.
[25] Marchand, G., & Skinner, E. A. (2007). Motivational Dynamics of Children’s Academic Help-Seeking and Concealment. Journal of Educational Psychology, 99, 65-82.
[26] [26] Markham, W.A., & Aveyard, P. (2003). A New Theory of Health Promoting Schools, Based on Human Functioning, School Organization and Pedagogic Practice. Social Science and Medicine, 56:1209-1220.
[27] Merriam, S. B. (2009). Qualitative Research: A Guide to Design and Implementation. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
[28] Merriam, S, B., & Tisdell, E, J. (2015). Qualitative Research. A Guide to Design and Implementation 4th edition. Copyright, 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Published by Jossey-Bass A Wiley Brand, One Montgomery Street, Suite 1000, an Francisco, CA 94104-4594—www.wiley.com,www.josseybass. com/highereducation.
[29] Ministry of Education (2012). Form Four School Register, Nairobi, Government Printers.
[30] Naidoo, J. P. (2005). Educational Decentralization and School Governance in South Africa: From Policy to Practice. Paris: International Institute for Educational Planning.
[31] Nchogu, E. (n.d). https://www.afrocave.com/secondary-school-strikes-in-kenya/retrieved 30/9/2020
[32] Neff, K. D., & Helwig, C.C. (2002). A Constructive Approach to Understanding the Development of Reasoning about Rights and Authority within Cultural Contexts. Cognitive Development, 17: 1429-50.
[33] Njozela, D. (2008). Teachers’ Implicit Mental Models of Learners’ Cognitive and Moral Development with Reference to the Inclusion of Learners in the Governing Bodies of Schools. M.ed Thesis: University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg.
[34] O’Connor, E., Dearing, E., & Collins, B.A. (2011). Teacher-Child Relationship and Behavior Problem.
[35] Ong‘ondo, C, O. (2005). “Student Participation in the Decision-Making Process.” Commonwealth Foundation.
[36] Ong’ondo, O. C. (2010). Pedagogical Practice and Support of Student Teachers during the Practicum. Deutschland, Lambert Academic Publishers.
[37] Patton, M. Q. (2015). Qualitative Research and Evaluation Methods (4th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
[38] Pérez-Expósito, L. (2015). Scope and Quality of Student Participation in School: Towards an Analytical Framework for Adolescents, 20:3,346-374, International Journal of Adolescence and Youth, 20(3), 346-374. doi: 10.1080/02673843.2015.1009920
[39] Polonski, M. J., &Waller, D. S. 2005). Designing and Managing a Research Project. A Bussiness Student’s Guide. California: Sage publications, Inc.
[40] Renuka, N. (2012). Experiences and Practices of School Principals in Creating, Leading and Governing Democratic Schools. Unpublished thesis. University of KwaZulu-Natal.
[41] Richards, K. (2003). Qualitative Inquiry in TESOL. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
[42] Silverman, D. (2006). Doing Qualitative Research. 2nd ed. Sage Publications, Inc, Thousand Oaks
[43] Sithole, S. (2008). The Participation of Students in Democratic School Governance.
[44] Shreiber, R.S., & Stern, P.N. (2001). Using Grounded Theory in Nursing. New York. Springer Publishing.
[45] Song, D., & Liu, W. (2007). Research on the Characteristics of Teacher-Student Relationship in Elementary and Middle Schools. Psychological Science, 30(4), 873-877.
[46] Sushila, B. (2004). Management and Evaluation of Schools. Oxford University Press, East Africa Limited, Kenya.
[47] Thornberg, R. (2006b). Vardepedagogik I skolan Vardag: Interactive Regelarberte Mellan Larave Och Elever (Value Education in the Everyday Life of School: Interactional Rule-Practice between Teachers and Students). Linkoping University. Linkoping Studies in Education and Psychology Dissertation No. 105.
[48] Wainnyb, C. (2006). “Moral Development in Culture: Diversity, Tolerance and Justice. In Handbook of Moral Development, Edited by: Killen, M. and Smetana. J.G. 211-40. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaun Associates.
[49] Waldron, L.M. (2005). The Messy Nature of Discipline and Zero Tolerance Policies. Sociological Studies of Children and Youth, 11:81-114.
[50] Yin, R. K. (2003). Case Study Research Design and Methods. (3rd ed.). London: Sage Publications.

Hellen Jepchirchir Mettoh “Students’ Perception of School Rules and Regulations as a Quest for Good Governance. A Case Study of a Peri-Urban Mixed Secondary School in North-Rift Kenya International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.86-93 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/86-93.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Contending with Boko-Haram, Insurgency in Nigeria: Lessons, from The US Zero-tolerance migration foreign policy, and nation-building approach

Ugonma Joy Kalu Ugbor – October 2020 Page No.: 94-101

There is a growing contentious debate among scholars, on the continuous Boko Haram insurgency in Nigeria, despite the effort of the government and interventions of the international community in waging war against insurgency in African. In the literature, there is insignificant agreement among scholars on the major reasons for the continuous Boko haram insurgence in Nigeria and the nature of Nigeria’s nation-building approach and migration foreign policy. Drawing lessons from US experience on nation-building and Zero-tolerance migration foreign policy. The study contends that Nigeria’s weak response to nation-building and meager migration policy had resulted in the constant insurgency in the country. The study accentuates or high light, the idea of incorrigible leadership style to ex-ray the attitude of leaders towards nations building and migration policy.

Page(s): 94-101                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 November 2020

  Ugonma Joy Kalu Ugbor
Department of Political Science, University of Nigeria, Nsukka

[1] Abramitzky, R., and Boustan, L., (2017) Immigration in American Economic History. HHs public Access 55(4) 1311-1345 doi.101257/jel. 20151189.
[2] Alege, S.O and Ojoduwa, J (2019) Conflict; National integration and the Bolo-haram insurgency in Niger: An overview. Canadian social science 5(9) 1-10. http// doi.10.3968/11289.
[3] Aduke, E (2019) The military and the challenges of nation-building in Nigeria, European Journal of social Sciences studies 4(3). http/www.doi.10.5281/zenodo.32285321.
[4] Asaebill, C.N (2011). The option of economic diplomacy in Nigeria’s foreign policy international journal of Humanities and social science 1(17) 279.
[5] Amoa, A. B, and Uzodike, U. (2015) Nigeria, Afro centrism, and conflict resolution; after five decades-how far, African studies Quartley journal 15(44) 1-3.
[6] Arango, J (2019) Explaining migration: a critical view. Journal of social science Retrieved from http://wwwdoi.org/101111/ISSj.12183.
[7] Beach, L. R (1993) Broading the decision making: The role of pre-choice screening of option. Journal of psychological science Sage pub.com.4,215-220.
[8] Carolyn Stephenson, “Nation Building: Beyond Intractability Knowledge Base,’’ January 2005. https://www.beyondintractabilityorg.
[9] Bappy, H.Y (2016) Nigeria’s Military failure against the Boko-haram insurgency. Security Journal 25(2) 146-158. https://doi.org/10.1080/10246029.20161151799.
[10] Beine, M., Boucher. A Burgoon, B (2018) comparing immigration policies: An overview from IMPALA Data base. International migration Review 50(4) 827-363.
[11] Bolarinwa, J. S (2017) International Reactions and Actions on Military and Insurgency in Nigeria since 1999. Insight Africa, 10(1) 98-116. http// Doi.1177/09950878/7741050.
[12] Bourgon,J (2010) The History and Future of Nation-building: Building Capacity for Public Result. International Review of Administrative Sciences, 76, (2)197-218. https://doi.org/101177/0020852309365666
[13] Carling, J and Collinis, F (2017) Aspiration, desire and drivers of migration. Journal of Ethic and migration studies 44 (6) http/www/doi.org/101080/1367183x.2017.1384134.
[14] Clark, E (2007 January 5th) Nigeria problems and challenges of Nigerian foreign policy. vanguard https//alfica.com.
[15] Dail, PW (1998). Immigration and migration in America: social impact and social response retrieved from https://www.nchi.nlm.nih.gov
[16] Eschbach, K. and Waters, M.C (1995) immigration and ethnic and racial inequality in the United States. Annual Review of Sociology 21,419-446.
[17] Felter, C., Renwick, D., and cheathan, A., (2020) The US Immigration Debate council on the foreign relation. Retrieved from http: ww.cfr.org.
[18] Gambari I.A. (2008) The challenges of nation-building. The case of Nigeria retrieves from www.mafng.org.
[19] Henderson, T (2018) Venezuelan Immigrants Gets Trump Sympathy but no Status Pew Research . Retrieved from https://www.pewtrusts.org.
[20] Hoban, B (2018). The State of U.S. immigration policy and how to improve it brooking. Retrieved from brooking.s.edu. -dewer.
[21] Hoefte, R. and Veenendaal, W (2019) The challenges of nation-building and Nation Branding in multi-ethnic Suriname. Nationalism and Ethnic Politics 25(2) 173-190. https://doi.org110.1080/135377113.2019.1602371.
[22] Hutchful, E.L (2000) Understanding the African security crisis. Applied knowledge serves Ed Musha and Fayomi, Pluto press. London
[23] Istifanu, A.J. and Makama, J.G. (2017) Is legally migrant on the rise among Nigerians? A wake-up call Archives of Medicine and Surgery 2, 35-37 retrieved from www.archms.org.
[24] Jayasundera, P.B., 92014). Challenges to a rising nation at the defense retrieve from dbsjeyarafi.com.
[25] Kagame, P. (2010) challenges of nation- building in Africa. Retrieves from http://www.realclearword.com.
[26] Lope2, G, Black, K and Radford, J (2018) key findings of U.S. immigrants. Retrieved from https//www.pewresearch.org.
[27] Nicholson, M. D (2017) The Facts on Immigration Today Center for American Progress. Retrieved from. https://www/-americanprogess.org.
[28] O’Neill, P.E (2006) The European Union and migration: Security versus identity defense studies journal 6(3) 322-350.
[29] Ogunnubi, O and Uzodike, U.O 92016) Can Nigeria be African’s hegemony? African security Review 25(2) 110-128. http://doi.org/10.1080246029.2016.1467473.
[30] Onapajo, H and Uzodike, U. O (2012) Boko-haram terrorism in Nigeria. African security Review 21(30 24-39. http:// doi.org 10.108010246029.2012.
[31] Osumah, O. and Aghedo, I (2014) Insurgency in Nigeris; A comparative study of Niger Delta and Boko-haram unprisings. Asian and African Studies 50(2). http:// doi.org10./177/0021909614520726.
[32] Osaretinm, I and Ajebon (2012) The United States and Nigerial relation; Diplomatic Rowover official Terroist labe. Global Journal of social science 11(1) 23-61.http// doi.org/10.4314/915.v1111.6
[33] Sinclair, M. (1983). An analysis of Nigeria, a foreign policy the evolution of political paranoia’ African Institute of International Affairs. http://www.africaportal.org.document.
[34] Soest, C. V and Juan, A.D. (2018) Dealing with New security threats in Africa GIGA focus African. http//www.giga-hanburg.de.
[35] Stephenson, C (2005) Nation Building: Beyond Intractability Knowledge. Retrieved from https://www.beyondintractabilityorg.
[36] Sumption, S. (2011) Filling labor shortages through immigration; An overview of shortages list and their implication. Migration policy Institute. Retrieved from https://www.migration policy.org/ articles>.
[37] Taylor, A. (2018) Trump wants America’s migration problem to be like Europe’s. The Washington Post. Retrieve from Washington post.com.
[38] Vietti, F (2013) Human insecurity: Understanding international migration from human security perspective. Journal of migration and human security 1(1) 17-31.
[39] Weeraratne,S (2017) Theorizig the Expansion of the Boko-haram Insurgency in Nigeria. Terrorism and political Violence 24(4) 610-634. http://doi.org/10.1080/09546553.2015.1005742.
[40] Zickute, J and Valianiene V.K (2018) Theoretical insight on the migration process from economic behaviour’s perspective, Science direct 2(13) 873-878.

Ugonma Joy Kalu Ugbor “Contending with Boko-Haram, Insurgency in Nigeria: Lessons, from The US Zero-tolerance migration foreign policy, and nation-building approach” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.94-101 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/94-101.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Influence of Political and Economic Changes on Social Policy in Tanzania: The Shift between the Three Political and Economic Regimes
Salum Rashid Mohamed – October 2020 – Page No.: 102-110

The article looked at the influence of political and economic changes to social policy. It used desk review to explore the interaction between political and economic changes and social policy in the context of Tanzania, from after independence to date. It appears that there is close interaction between the two variables. Across the history of Tanzania, political and economic changes, such as change from mono-party to multiparty political system and from socialism to liberalism, have been producing direct effects to social policy. Immediately after independence the country continued with the economic and political systems inherited from colonial regime, which were basically capitalistic and multiparty systems respectively. Social policy in this era was more market based, but received slight changes compared to colonial period to reflect few changes introduced by the new government. Socialism (ujamaa) period witnessed significant developments of social policy as a result of changes in political and economic policies. The state played its paternalistic role by ensuring provision of free basic services to people as required by ujamaa policy. However, the economic crises in 1970s and 1980s that led to collapse of ujamaa policy marked the beginning of liberalism, following the intervention by the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. Here we witnessed a negative effect, at least in temporary bases, in terms of people’s welfare (due to state disengagement in free service delivery) but with more positive effect in terms of engagement of people in the policy making process, probably due to growth of democracy stimulated by multiparty political system. The recent developments have realised significant economic developments which consequently improved social services delivery by the state. In general, effects of political and economic policies in Tanzania are well reflected in its social policy across the history.

Page(s): 102-110                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 4 November 2020

 Salum Rashid Mohamed
Institute of Social Sciences, University of Kocaeli, Turkey

[1] Aikaeli, J. and Moshi, H. (2016). Social Policy in a Historical Perspective: Shifting Approaches to Social Provisioning,. THDR 2017: Background Paper No. 6, The Economic and Social Research Foundation (ESRF), Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania;
[2] Babeiya, E. (2011). Trade Unions and Democratization in Tanzania: End of an Era?. Journal of Politics and Law Vol. 4, No. 1; March 2011;
[3] Bienefeld, M. A., (1979). Trade Unions, the Labour Process, and the Tanzanian State. The Journal of Modern African Studies, Vol. 17, No. 4 (Dec., 1979), pp. 553-593;
[4] Bigsten, A. and Danielsson, A. (1999). Is Tanzania an Emerging Economy? A report for the OECD project “Emerging Africa”. Sweden;
[5] CCM (Chama Cha Mapinduzi). (2020). The CCM Manifesto for the 2020 General Election. Dodoma, Tanzania;
[6] Coulson, A. (2013). Tanzania A Political Economy. Second Edition, Oxford University Press, UK;
[7] Hunter, E. (2015). Political Thought and the Public Sphere in Tanzania: Freedom, Democracy and Citizenship in the Era of Decolonization. African Studies, Cambridge University Press, New York;
[8] Ibhawoh, B. and Dibua, J. I. (2003). Deconstructing Ujamaa: The Legacy of Julius Nyerere in the Quest for Social and Economic Development in Africa. Africa Journal of Political Science. Vol. 8. No.1;
[9] Kida, T. and Wuyts, M. (2015). Social Policy in the Context of Economic Transformation: A Concept Note For Tanzania Human Development Report 2017. The Economic and Social Research Foundation (ESRF), Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania;
[10] Lene B. (1994). Education in the development of Tanzania 1919 – 1990. Eastern African Studies, Ohio University Press;
[11] Maliyamkono, T. L. and Bagachwa M. S. D. (1990). The Second Economy in Tanzania. James Currey, London, cited in fastonline.org, Accessed 20 July 2020;
[12] Mattee A. Z. (2007). Current Policy Making Processes in Tanzania, Study On Options for Pastoralists to Secure Their Livelihoods. Report submitted to CORDS;
[13] Mchomvu, A. S. T. et al. (1998). Social Policy and Research Practice in Tanzania. Journal of Social Development in Africa (1998), 13, 2, 45-53;
[14] Mittelman, J. H., (1981). Underdevelopment and the Transition to Socialism Mozambique and Tanzania. Academic Press, New York;
[15] Mohamed I. A. et al. (2018). Financing Social Protection in Tanzania. World Bank Publication, Washington DC;
[16] Nesnick, I. N. (1981). The Long Transition, Building Socialism in Tanzania. Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data, London;
[17] Ngowi H. P. (2009). Economic development and change in Tanzania since independence: The political leadership factor, African Journal of Political Science and International Relations Vol. 3 (4), pp. 259-267, May, 2009;
[18] Nord, R. et al. (2009). Tanzania, The Story of an African Transition. International Monetary Fund, Washington DC;
[19] OECD. (2013). Overview of progress and policy challenges in Tanzania. in OECD Investment Policy Reviews: Tanzania 2013, OECD Publishing. http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264204348-6-en;
[20] Ofcansky, T. P. and Yeager, R. (1997). Historical Dictionary of Tanzania. Scarecrow Press, London;
[21] Osei-Hwedie, K. (1998). The Dynamics of Social Policy Practice in Eastern and Southern Africa. Journal of Social Development in Africa (1998), 13,2,5-20;
[22] Stein, H. (1985). Theories of the State in Tanzania: A Critical Assessment. The Journal of Modern African Studies, Vol. 23, No. 1: 105 – 123;
[23] TANU. (1967). The Arusha Declaration and TANU’s Policy on Socialism and Self-reliance. Dar es Salaam, Tanzania;
[24] TEN (Tanzania Education Network). (2009), The Contribution of Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) to the Development of Education in Tanzania, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania;
[25] THDR. (2014). Tanzania Human Development Report 2014: Economic Transformation for Human Development. Economic and Social Research Foundation, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania;
[26] URT (United Republic of Tanzania). (1999). The Tanzania Development Vision 2025. Planning Commission, Dar es Salaam;
[27] Utz, R. J. (edit). (2008). Sustaining and Sharing Economic Growth in Tanzania. The World Bank, Washington DC;
[28] Wangwe S. M. and Rweyemamu D. C. (2001). The State of Tanzania’s Social Sector in the Development Context. Economic and Social Research Foundation (ESRF), Paper Presented During the CSSC Stakeholders Consultation in Bagamoyo, Tanzania, Dar es Salaam;
[29] World Bank. (2017). United Republic of Tanzania Systematic Country Diagnostic: To the Next Level of Development. World Bank, Washington, DC;
[30] Yonu, M. (2008). Popular Histories of Independence and Ujamaa in Tanzania. A these submitted to the University of Western Cape in partial fulfilment of the Master degree programme;
[31] http://www.catholicsocialteaching.org.uk/principles. Accessed 17 August 2020;
[32] http://www.conservapedia.com/Fabian_Socialism. Accessed 17 August 2020;
[33] http://www.fastonline.org/CD3WD_40/HDLHTML/EDUCRES/DEP18E/EN/CH04.HTM. Accessed 20 July 2020;
[34] http://www.ntz.info/gen/n01559.html. Accessed 5 August 2020;
[35] http://www.un.org/esa/agenda21/natlinfo/countr/tanzania/social.htm. Accessed 10 October 2020;
[36] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catholic_social_teaching. Accessed 17 August 2020.

Salum Rashid Mohamed “The Influence of Political and Economic Changes on Social Policy in Tanzania: The Shift between the Three Political and Economic Regimes” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.102-110 October 2020 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/102-110.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

COVID-19, Climate Change and Challenges: Bangladesh Perspective to Fight against the Pandemic Condition

Abu Taher Muhammad Abdullah, Israt Jahan – October 2020 Page No.: 111-125

This study investigated the impacts of COVID-19 and climate change, and the challenges of these events from Bangladesh’s perspective with the qualitative method of research. Thematic analysis followed for synthesizing data collected from secondary sources. The total number of deaths found in Bangladesh 4,881 (1.4%), whereas 943,433 (4%) deaths found globally from COVID-19 disease. The highest number of deaths in a day was 64 in Bangladesh on 30th June 2020. The maximum rate of confirmed cases from COVID-19 infection was 26.7% in people between 31-40 years of age group. Whether male represented more confirmed cases (M=72%, F=28%) and deaths (M=78%, F=22%) than female. Death tolled highest at Dhaka City in Bangladesh, estimating 1547 persons. There are 7,155 beds and 370 ICU beds for COVID-19 patients. Due to climate change effect the air of Dhaka city become unbreathable, hence, COVID-19 patients require fresh air with healthy lungs to survive. Cyclone Amphan took the lives of 31 people, affecting approximately Tk 1,100 crore damages amid the COVID-19 outbreak. Floods affected a total of 2,246,472 people in 18 districts and heavy rainfall rampaged Rohingya camps in Cox’s Bazar. Predominantly, challenges encountered from COVID-19 and climate change are more population; lack of ‘testing, tracing and isolating’, ‘Health Care Services’, coordination and awareness; difficulty in policing and management of Rohingyas, natural calamities, and transport bans. However, this research is not beyond the limitation of empirical observation which will be a future endeavor in the field.

Page(s): 111-125                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 November 2020

 Abu Taher Muhammad Abdullah
Additonal Superintendent of Police, District Police, Thakurgaon, Bangladesh, Studied MA Criminology, School of Sociology and Social Policy, University of Nottingham, UK

  Israt Jahan,
MA Digital Media, School of Computing and Digital Media, London Metropolitan University, UK

[1] Adnan, M. S. G., Abdullah, A. Y. M., Dewan, A., and Hall, J. W. (2020). The effects of changing land use and flood hazard on poverty in coastal Bangladesh. Land Use Policy, 99, 104868.
[2] Alam, M. S., Alam, M. Z., Nazir, K. N. H., and Bhuiyan, M. A. B. (2020). The emergence of novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Bangladesh: Present status, challenges, and future management. Journal of Advanced Veterinary and Animal Research, 7(2), 198-208.
[3] Aljazeera (2020). ‘Cyclone Amphan: India, Bangladesh begin clean-up operation’. Aljazeera, May 22, 2020.
[4] Anwar, S., Nasrullah, M., and Hosen, M. J. (2020). COVID-19 and Bangladesh: Challenges and How to Address Them. Frontiers in public health, 8, 154.
[5] Arora, S., Bhaukhandi, K.D., and Mishra, P.K. (2020). Coronavirus lockdown helped the environment to bounce back. The Science of the total environment, Vol. 742:140573.
[6] BBC News (2020). Amphan: Kolkata devastated as cyclone kills scores in India and Bangladesh. BBC News, 21 May, 2020.
[7] Bakhshi, P., and Chaudhary, R. (2020). Responsible Business Conduct for The Sustainable Development Goals: Lessons from Covid-19. International Journal of Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity, 11(1), 2835.
[8] Banik, R., Rahman, M., Hossain, M.M., Sikder, M.T. and Gozal, D. (2020) COVID-19 pandemic and Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh: What are the major concerns? Global Public Health, 15(10):1578-1581.
[9] Belay, E.D., Kile, J.C., Hall, A.J., Barton-Behravesh, C., Parsons, M.B., Salyer, S., and Walke, H. (2017). Zoonotic Disease Programs for Enhancing Global Health Security. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(13): S65-S70.
[10] Birchall, J. (2014). Qualitative Inquiry as a Method to Extract Personal Narratives: Approach to Research into Organizational Climate Change Mitigation. Qualitative Report, 19(38).
[11] Bodrud-Doza, M., Shammi, M., Bahlman, L., Islam, A. R. M., and Rahman, M. (2020). Psychosocial and socio-economic crisis in Bangladesh due to COVID-19 pandemic: a perception-based assessment. Frontiers in public health, 8, 341.
[12] Bryan, D.C., Macdonald, P., Ambwani, S., Cardi, V., Rowlands, K., Willmott, D., & Treasure, J. (2020). Exploring the ways in which COVID‐19 and lockdown has affected the lives of adult patients with anorexia nervosa and their carers. European Eating Disorders Review, 2020;1–10.
[13] Cannell, J. J., Vieth, R., Umhau, J. C., Holick, M. F., Grant, W. B., Madronich, S., Garland, C.F. & Giovannucci, E. (2006). Epidemic influenza and vitamin D. Epidemiology & Infection, 134(6):1129-1140.
[14] CARE (Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere) (2020). ‘Bangladesh: Monsoon Floods 2020 Coordinated Preliminary Impact and Needs Assessment’, Needs Assessment Working Group (NAWG), 25 July, 2020.
[15] Castleberry, A., and Nolen, A. (2018). Thematic analysis of qualitative research data: Is it as easy as it sounds? Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning, pp.1-9.
[16] Chowdhury, F. R., Ibrahim, Q. S. U., Bari, M. S., Alam, M. J., Dunachie, S. J., Rodriguez-Morales, A. J., & Patwary, M. I. (2018). The association between temperature, rainfall and humidity with common climate-sensitive infectious diseases in Bangladesh. PLoS One, 13(6), e0199579.
[17] Chowdhury, S. R., Sunna, T. C., and Sanjoy, S. (2020a). Response to COVID-19 in Bangladesh: Strategies to Resist the Growing Trend of COVID-19 in a Less Restricted Situation. Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, 1010539520951689.
[18] Chowdhury, S. R., Sunna, T. C., and Ahmed, S. (2020b). Telemedicine is an important aspect of healthcare services amid COVID‐19 outbreak: Its barriers in Bangladesh and strategies to overcome. The International journal of health planning and management, 2020;1–9.
[19] Coşkun, H., Yıldırım, N., and Gündüz, S. (2020). The spread of COVID-19 virus through population density and wind in Turkey cities, Science of the Total Environment, 751:1-6.
[20] De, J., & Bandyopadhyay, S. (2020). Focus 64–Smart Governance in times of extreme Natural Disasters: An Introspection. The ‘After Phase’ of Super Cyclone Amphan in India and Bangladesh. In Proceedings of the South Asia Democratic Forum (SADF), Brussels, Belgium, Vol. 18:1-13.
[21] Dhaka Tribune (2020a). Cyclone Amphan: Death toll rises to 31. Dhaka Tribune, May 22, 2020.
[22] Dhaka Tribune (2020b). Cyclone Amphan: Death toll rises to 26. Dhaka Tribune, May 21, 2020.
[23] Dowling, R., Lloyd, K., & Suchet-Pearson, S. (2016). Qualitative methods 1: Enriching the interview. Progress in human geography, 40(5): 679-686.
[24] Eccles, R. (2002). An explanation for the seasonality of acute upper respiratory tract viral infections. Acta oto-laryngologica, 122(2):183-191.
[25] Ebrahim, S. H., Rahman, N. M., Imtiaz, R., Gozzer, E., Alqahtani, S. A., Ahmed, Y., & Memish, Z. A. (2020). Forward planning for disaster-related mass gatherings amid COVID-19. The Lancet Planetary Health, 4(9), e379-e380.
[26] European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Operations (ECHO) (2020). ‘Bangladesh- Severe Weather (DG ECHO, ISCG, BMD), ECHO Daily Flash of 24 August 2020. August 24, 2020.
[27] Fauci, A.S., Lane, H.C., and Redfield, R.R. (2020). Covid-19— Navigating the Uncharted The new England journal of medicine, 382:1268-1269.
[28] Fuhrmann, C. (2010). The effects of weather and climate on the seasonality of influenza: what we know and what we need to know. Geography Compass, 4 (7):718–730.
[29] Gholipour, B. (2013). What 11 Billion People Mean for Disease Outbreaks. Live Science, November 25, 2013.
[30] Goel, S., Hawi, S., Goel, G., Thakur, V. K., Agrawal, A., Hoskins, C., Pearce, O., Hussain, T., Upadhyay, H.M., Cross, G., & Barber, A. H. (2020). Resilient and agile engineering solutions to address societal challenges such as coronavirus pandemic. Materials Today Chemistry, 17, 100300.
[31] Goss, M., Swain, D.L., Abatzoglou, J.T., Sarhadi, A., Kolden, C.A., Williams, A.P., and Diffenbaugh, N.S. (2020). Climate change is increasing the risk of extreme autumn wildfire conditions across California. Environmental Research Letters, 15 (2020) 094016.
[32] Habib, M.A. (2020). Regent and JKG scams: Is this the face of a new normal in healthcare? The Daily Star, July 15, 2020.
[33] Hallema, D.W., Robinne, F.N., and McNulty, S.G. (2020). Pandemic spotlight on urban water quality, Ecological Processes, 9:1-3.
[34] Hasina, S. (2020). ‘A third of my country was just underwater. The world must act on climate’. The Guardian, September 22, 2020.
[35] Hochman, A., Alpert, P., Negev, M., Abdeen, Z., Abdeen, A. M., Pinto, J. G., & Levine, H. (2020). The relationship between cyclonic weather regimes and seasonal influenza over the Eastern Mediterranean. Science of The Total Environment, 75(141686):1-9.
[36] Hossain, M. S., Arshad, M., Qian, L., Kächele, H., Khan, I., Islam, M. D. I., & Mahboob, M. G. (2020). Climate change impacts on farmland value in Bangladesh. Ecological Indicators, 112, 106181.
[37] Hossain, Z. and Jahan, D. (2020). ‘Bangladeshi Farmers Respond to COVID-19 with Innovation and Sustainability’. International Centre for Climate Change and Development (ICCCAD), June 15, 2020.
[38] Htoon, K. Z., San, S. S. S., Khan, M. S. A., Radhakrishnan, M., & Zevenbergen, C. (2020). Coping with flood disasters: new lessons from COVID-19? Myanmar Water Portal, June 16, 2020.
[39] Huda, A. S. N., Mekhilef, S., & Ahsan, A. (2014). Biomass energy in Bangladesh: Current status and prospects. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 30, 504-517.
[40] International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) (2020a). ‘Bangladesh: Cyclone Amphan’. Operation Update Report (DREF Operation n° MDRBD024). May 23, 2020.
[41] International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) (2020b). ‘Bangladesh: Floods’. Emergency Plan of Action (EPoA) (DREF Operation n° MDRBD025), July16, 2020.
[42] Institute of Epidemiology, Disease Control and Research (IEDCR) (2020). COVID-19: General Information. https://iedcr.gov.bd/covid-19/covid-19-general-information
[43] Islam, M.S., Tusher, T.R., Roy, S., and Rahman, M. (2020a). Impacts of nationwide lockdown due to COVID-19 outbreak on air quality in Bangladesh: a spatiotemporal analysis. Air Qual Atmos Health, 1-13.
[44] Islam, S. D. U., Bodrud-Doza, M., Khan, R. M., Haque, M. A., & Mamun, M. A. (2020b). Exploring COVID-19 stress and its factors in Bangladesh: A perception-based study. Heliyon, 6(7), e04399.
[45] Islam, T. and Kibria, M.G. (2020). Challenges to the prevention of COVID-19 spread in slums of Bangladesh. Journal of Public Health,42(3):637-638.
[46] Jones, K.E., Patel, N. G., Levy, M.A., Storeygard, A., Balk, D., Gittleman, J.L., and Daszak, P. (2008). “Global Trends in Emerging Infectious Diseases”. Nature, 451(7181):990–93.
[47] Khan, M. G., Yezdani, U., Chakravorty, A., & Shukla, T. (2020). Efforts and Challenges paved by India to confront of Corona Virus (COVID-19). Bangladesh Journal of Medical Science, 88-S.
[48] Kalina, M., and Tilley, E. (2020). “This is our next problem”: cleaning up from the covid-19 response. Waste Management, 1-5.
[49] Kanya, P. (2020). ‘Where Covid-19 and climate change intersect’, The Business Standard, 05 June, 2020.
[50] Khunti, K., Singh, A. K., Pareek, M., & Hanif, W. (2020). Is ethnicity linked to incidence or outcomes of covid-19? BMJ, 369.
[51] Kirchdoerfer, R.N., Cottrell, C.A., Wang, N., Pallesen, J., Yassine, H.M., Turner, H.L., Corbett, K.S., Graham, B.S., McLellan, J.S., and Ward, A.B. (2016). Pre-fusion structure of a human coronavirus spike protein. Nature, 531(7592):118–121.
[52] Kuckertz, A., Brändle, L., Gaudig, A., Hinderer, S., Reyes, C. A. M., Prochotta, A., Steinbrink, K.M., & Berger, E. S. (2020). Startups in times of crisis–A rapid response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Journal of Business Venturing Insights, e00169.
[53] Lai, C.C., Shih, T.P., Ko, W.C., Tang, H.J., and Hsueh, P.R., (2020). Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and corona virus disease-2019 (COVID-19): the epidemic and the challenges. International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents, 55(3):105924.
[54] Lam, T.T.Y., Shum, M.H.H., Zhu, H.C., Tong, Y.G., Ni, X.B., Liao, Y.S., Wei, W., Cheung, W.Y.M., Li, W.J., Li, L.F., Leung, G.M., Holmes, E.C., Hu, Y.L. and Guan, Y. (2020). Identification of 2019-nCoV related coronaviruses in Malayan pangolins in southern China. BioRxiv, 1-22.
[55] Lawless, B. and Chen, Y.W. (2018). Developing a Method of Critical Thematic Analysis for Qualitative Communication Inquiry, Howard Journal of Communications, Vol.0, No,0, pp.1-15.
[56] Lázár, A.N., Nicholls, R.J., Hall, J.W., Barbour, E.J., and Haque, A. (2020). Contrasting development trajectories for coastal Bangladesh to the end of century. Regional Environmental Change, 20 (93):1-14.
[57] Li, B., Yang, J., Zhao, F., Zhi, L., Wang, X., Liu, L., Bi, Z., and Zhao, Y. (2020). Prevalence and impact of cardiovascular metabolic diseases on COVID-19 in China. Clinical Research in Cardiology, 109:531-538.
[58] Liu, Q., Luo, D., Haase, J. E., Guo, Q., Wang, X. Q., Liu, S., Xia, L., Liu, Z., Yang, J., and Yang, B. X. (2020). The experiences of health-care providers during the COVID-19 crisis in China: a qualitative study. The Lancet Global Health, Vol.8 (6): e790-e798.
[59] Lorentzen, H. F., Benfield, T., Stisen, S., & Rahbek, C. (2020). COVID-19 is possibly a consequence of the anthropogenic biodiversity crisis and climate changes. Danish Medical Journal, 67(5), [A205025].
[60] Lowen, A.C., and Steel, J. (2010). Roles of humidity and temperature in shap¬ing influenza seasonality. Journal of Virology, 88 (14):7692–95.
[61] Lu, R., Zhao, X., Li, J., Niu, P., Yang, B., Wu, H., Wang, W., Song, H., Huang, B., Zhu, N., Bi, Y., Ma, X., Zhan, F., Wang, L., Hu, T., Zhou, H., Zhao, L., Chen, J., Meng, Y., Wang, J., Lin, Y., Yuan, J., Xie, Z., Ma, J., Liu, W.J., Wang, D., Xu, W., Holmes, E.C., Gao, G.F., Wu, G., Chen, W., Shi, W., and Tan, W. (2020). Genomic characterisation and epidemiology of 2019 novel coronavirus: implications for virus origins and receptor binding. Lancet, 395(10224):565–574.
[62] Luby, S.P., Rahman, M., Hossain, M.J., Blum, L.S., Husain, M.M., Gurley, E., Khan, R., Ahmed, B.N., Rahman, S., Nahar, N., Kenah, E., Comer, J.A., and Ksiazek, T.G. (2020). Foodborne transmission of Nipah virus, Bangladesh. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(6):1888–1894.
[63] Mantzari, E., Rubin, G. J., & Marteau, T. M. (2020). Is risk compensation threatening public health in the covid-19 pandemic? BMJ, 370:1-4.
[64] Manzanedo, R. D. and Manning, P. (2020) COVID-19: Lessons for the climate change emergency. Science of the Total Environment, 742 (2020) 140563.
[65] Masrur, A., Yu, M., Luo, W., & Dewan, A. (2020). Space-time patterns, change, and propagation of COVID-19 risk relative to the intervention scenarios in Bangladesh. International journal of environmental research and public health, 17(16), 5911.
[66] Masum, M. H., & Pal, S. K. (2020). Statistical evaluation of selected air quality parameters influenced by COVID-19 lockdown. Global Journal of Environmental Science and Management, 6(Special Issue (Covid-19)), 85-94.
[67] Martineau, A.R., Jolliffe, D.A., Hooper, R.L., Greenberg, L., Aloia, J.F., Bergman, P., Dubnov-Raz, G., Esposito, S., Ganmaa, D., Ginde, A.A., Goodall, E.C., Grant, C.C., Griffiths, C.J., Janssens, W., Laaksi, I., Manaseki-Holland, S., Mauger, D., Murdoch, D.R., Neale, R., Rees, R.J., Simpson, S., Stelmach, I., Kumar, G.T., Urashima, M., and Camargo, C.A. (2017). Vitamin D supplementation to prevent acute respiratory tract infections: systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data. BMJ, 356(i6583):1-4.
[68] Merzon, E., Tworowski, D., Gorohovski, A., Vinker, S., Golan Cohen, A., Green, I., & Frenkel‐Morgenstern, M. (2020). Low plasma 25 (OH) vitamin D level is associated with increased risk of COVID‐19 infection: an Israeli population‐based study. The FEBS journal, 287(17):3693-3702.
[69] Mende, M. and Misra, V. (2020), “Time to Flatten the Curves on COVID-19 and Climate Change. Marketing Can Help,” Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, 0743915620930695, 1-3.
[70] Miller, A., Reandelar, M. J., Fasciglione, K., Roumenova, V., Li, Y., & Otazu, G. H. (2020). Correlation between universal BCG vaccination policy and reduced morbidity and mortality for COVID-19: an epidemiological study. MedRxiv, 2020.03.24.20042937, 1-9.
[71] Mitra, P. and Yengkhom, S. (2020). ‘Kolkata: Covid-19 spike after migration, cyclone Amphan’. The Time of India, June 5, 2020.
[72] Mohiuddin, A.K. (2020). A Pandemic Review of Covid-19 Situation in Bangladesh. Journal of Bioscience & Biomedical Engineering, Vol.1(1):1-9.
[73] Monjur, M. R., & Hassan, M. Z. (2020). Early phases of COVID-19 management in a low-income country: Bangladesh. Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, 41(9):1116-1117.
[74] Morshed, M. S., Al Mosabbir, A., Chowdhury, P., Ashadullah, S. M., & Hossain, M. S. (2020). Clinical manifestations of patients with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) attending at hospitals in Bangladesh. MedRxiv, 2020.07.30.20165100, 1-11.
[75] Naughton, S., Kavanagh, S., Lynch, M., & Rowan, N. J. (2020). Synchronizing use of sophisticated wet-laboratory and in-field handheld technologies for real-time monitoring of key microalgae, bacteria and physicochemical parameters influencing efficacy of water quality in a freshwater aquaculture recirculation system: A case study from the Republic of Ireland. Aquaculture, 735377.
[76] Oxford Analytica (2020). Bangladesh will send more Rohingya to remote island. Emerald Expert Briefings, (oxan-db). May 26, 2020.
[77] Patel, K. (2020). ‘Intense Flooding in Bangladesh’. NASA Earth Observatory, July 25, 2020.
[78] Pawlowski, A. (2020). Covid-19, Environmental Engineering and the End of the World as We Know it. Problemy Ekorozwoju, 15(2):7-14, 2020.
[79] Pierce, D. W., Kalansky, J. F., & Cayan, D. R. (2018). Climate, Drought, and Sea Level Rise Scenarios for California’s Fourth Climate Change Assessment. Scripps Institution of Oceanography), California Energy Commission, Sacramento, CA. Rep. CNRA‐CEC‐2018‐006, pp.78.
[80] Pillai, V.S., Krishna, G., and Veettil, M.V. (2020). Nipah Virus: Past Outbreaks and Future Containment. Viruses, 12(4), 465.
[81] Price, S. (2020). Floods compound COVID-19 emergency. Green Left Weekly, No. 1276(16).
[82] Rana, M. S., Rony, M. A. T., Aktar, N., Hossain, K., Shuvo, T. A., Begum, S., & Hosna, A. U. (2020). Effect of COVID-19 in Bangladesh: Challenge and Overcome. Journal of Applied Science, Engineering, Technology, and Education, 3(1), 53-68.
[83] Reiner, R. C., King, A. A., Emch, M., Yunus, M., Faruque, A. S. G., & Pascual, M. (2012). Highly localized sensitivity to climate forcing drives endemic cholera in a megacity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 109(6), 2033-2036.
[84] Robroek, B.J.M., Jassey, V.E., Payne, R.J., Martí, M., Bragazza, L., Bleeker, A., Buttler, A., Caporn, S.J.M., Dise, N.B., Kattge, J., Zajac, K., Svensson, B.H., Ruijven, J.V., and Verhoven, J.T.A. (2017). Taxonomic and functional turnover are decoupled in European peat bogs. Nature Communications, 8(1161):1-9.
[85] Roman-Stork, H. L., & Subrahmanyam, B. (2020). The Impact of the Madden–Julian Oscillation on Cyclone Amphan (2020) and Southwest Monsoon Onset. Remote Sensing, 12(18), 3011.
[86] Ross, S. W., Lauer, C. W., Miles, W. S., Green, J. M., Christmas, A. B., May, A. K., & Matthews, B. D. (2020). Maximizing the calm before the storm: tiered surgical response plan for novel coronavirus (COVID-19). Journal of the American College of Surgeons, Vol. 230(6):1080-1091.e3.
[87] Rowan, N. J., & Galanakis, C. M. (2020). Unlocking challenges and opportunities presented by COVID-19 pandemic for cross-cutting disruption in agri-food and green deal innovations: Quo Vadis? Science of The Total Environment, 141362.
[88] Roy, R. (2020). ‘Navigating COVID-19 impacts on climate change’, The Financial Express, April 24, 2020.
[89] Şahin, M. (2020). Impact of weather on COVID-19 pandemic in Turkey. Science of The Total Environment, 20 (728), 138810.
[90] Sakamoto, M., Begum, S., & Ahmed, T. (2020). Vulnerabilities to COVID-19 in Bangladesh and a reconsideration of sustainable development goals. Sustainability, 12(13), 5296.
[91] Salam, A. (2020). Impact and Correlation of Air Quality and Climate Variables with COVID-19 Morbidity and Mortality in Dhaka, Bangladesh. MedRxiv, 2020.09.12.20193086,1-28.
[92] Sang, P., Tian, S. H., Meng, Z. H., & Yang, L. Q. (2020). Anti-HIV drug repurposing against SARS-CoV-2. RSC Advances, 10(27):15775-15783.
[93] Simpson, C. R., Steiner, M. F., Cezard, G., Bansal, N., Fischbacher, C., Douglas, A., Bhopal., & Sheikh, A. (2015). Ethnic variations in morbidity and mortality from lower respiratory tract infections: a retrospective cohort study. Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, 108(10):406-417.
[94] Son, C., Hegde, S., Smith, A., Wang, X., & Sasangohar, F. (2020). Effects of COVID-19 on College Students’ Mental Health in the United States: Interview Survey Study. Journal of medical internet research, 22(9), e21279.
[95] Shultz, J. M., Fugate, C., & Galea, S. (2020). Cascading risks of COVID-19 resurgence during an active 2020 Atlantic hurricane season. JAMA, 324(10), 935-936.
[96] Sultana, P., Paul M. Thompson, P.M. and Wesselink, A. (2020). Coping and resilience in riverine Bangladesh. Environmental Hazards, 19(1): 70-89.
[97] Tillin, T., Forouhi, N. G., McKeigue, P. M., & Chaturvedi, N. (2012). Southall And Brent REvisited: Cohort profile of SABRE, a UK population-based comparison of cardiovascular disease and diabetes in people of European, Indian Asian and African Caribbean origins. International journal of epidemiology, 41(1), 33-42.
[98] The Business Standard (2020). Amphan leaves trail of damage in coastal districts, 20 killed. May 22, 2020.
[99] The Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS) (2020). Coronavirus COVID-19 Dashboard, 2020. The Directorate General of Health Services, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of The People’s Republic of Bangladesh, September 18, 2020. http://103.247.238.92/webportal/pages/covid19.php
[100] The Guardian (2020).’A critical situation’: Bangladesh in crisis as monsoon floods follow super-cyclone. July 18, 2020.
[101] Thorne, S. (2000). Data analysis in qualitative research. Evidence Based Nursing, 3: 68-70.
[102] United Nations (2020). Cyclone Amphan’s trail of destruction in Bangladesh and India. Retrieved from UN News: Global perspective Human stories. May 21, 2020.
[103] UN Resident Coordinator for Bangladesh (UNRC) (2020). Office of the UN Resident Coordinator Flash Update No. 1, Bangladesh. 2020 Severe Monsoon Floods. July 18, 2020.
[104] UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UNOCHA) (2020). Asia and the Pacific: Weekly Regional Humanitarian Snapshot (7 – 13 July 2020). July 14, 2020.
[105] Verhoeven, V., Tsakitzidis, G., Philips, H., & Van Royen, P. (2020). Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the core functions of primary care: will the cure be worse than the disease? A qualitative interview study in Flemish GPs. BMJ open, 10(6), e039674.
[106] Wei, Q., Wang, Y., Ma, J., Han, J., Jiang, M., Zhao, L., Yei, F., Song, J., Liu, B., Wu, L., Tan, W., Wu, G., Gao, G.F. & Liu, J. (2020). Description of the First Strain of 2019-nCoV, C-Tan-nCoV Wuhan Strain—National Pathogen Resource Center, China, 2020. China CDC Weekly, 2(6), 81-82.
[107] Wang, J., Tang, K., Feng, K., Lv, W., Chen, K., and Wang, F. (2020). High temperature and high humid¬ity reduce the transmission of COVID-19. https://doi.rg/10.2139/ssrn.3551767
[108] Whitmarsh, L. (2009). What’s in a name? Commonalities and differences in public understanding of “climate change” and “global warming”. Public understanding of science, 18(4), 401-420.
[109] Willem, L., Van Kerckhove, K., Chao, D.L., Hens, N., and Beutels, P. (2012). A nice day for an infection? Weather conditions and social contact patterns relevant to influenza transmission. PLoS One, 7 (11), e48695.
[110] World Health Organization (WHO) (2020a). ‘Weekly Operational Update on COVID-19’. September 08, 2020.
[111] World Health Organization (WHO) (2020b). WHO Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) Dashboard. https://covid19.who.int/
[112] World Health Organization (WHO) (2020c). ‘WHO Bangladesh COVID-19 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Update (MMWU)’. COVID-19 Bangladesh situation reports. Situation reports October 2020. Situation report – 29. September 14, 2020.
[113] Worldometer (2020). COVID-19 Coronavirus Pandemic. September 18, 2020. https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/
[114] Xia, J., Tong, J., Liu, M., Shen, Y., & Guo, D. (2020). Evaluation of coronavirus in tears and conjunctival secretions of patients with SARS‐CoV‐2 infection. Journal of medical virology, 92(6), 589-594.
[115] Xu, X., Chen, P., Wang, J., Feng, J., Zhou, H., Li, X., Zhong, W., and Hao, P. (2020). Evolution of the novel coronavirus from the ongoing Wuhan outbreak and modelling of its spike protein for risk of human transmission. Science China Life Sciences, 63:457-460.
[116] Yoo, S., & Managi, S. (2020). Global mortality benefits of COVID-19 action. Technological forecasting and social change, 160, 120231.
[117] Zhang, L, Shen FM, Chen F, Lin Z. Origin and evolution of the 2019 novel coronavirus. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 1-2.
[118] Zu, Z.Y., Jiang, M.D., Xu, P.P., Chen, W., Ni, Q.Q., Lu, G.M. and Zhang, L.J. (2020). Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19): A Perspective from China. Radiology, 200490, E15-E25.

Abu Taher Muhammad Abdullah, Israt Jahan “COVID-19, Climate Change and Challenges: Bangladesh Perspective to Fight against the Pandemic Condition International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.111-125 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/111-125.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

An Analysis of Financial Inclusion and Economic Growth in Nigeria; An ARDL Approach

Kenechukwu J. Nwisienyi, Onyeka A. Obi- October 2020 Page No.: 126-134

The study investigated the relationship between financial inclusion and the Nigerian economic growth using an annual time series data for the periods 2004 to 2018. The Auto Regressive Distributive Lag bounds test for cointegration and Error Correction model was applied to examine the long run relationship of the variables. The result showed that there is cointegration amongst the variables. The Number of ATMs per 100,000 adults was found to be positively and significantly correlated with economic growth while borrowers from commercial banks per 1000 adults and lending interest rates were significantly negative to economic growth. The study found depositors with banks per 1000 adults to be insignificant. The study recommends, amongst other things, that effective campaign or awareness should be made to increase financial literacy and/or awareness. Again, transaction costs and financial obligations attached to using financial services or products should be reviewed downwards to accommodate the proportion of the population that is poor.

Page(s): 126-134                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 November 2020

 Kenechukwu J. Nwisienyi
School of Financial Studies, Department of Banking and Finance, Federal Polytechnic Oko Anambra State, Nigeria

  Onyeka A. Obi
School of Financial Studies, Department of Banking and Finance, Federal Polytechnic Oko Anambra State, Nigeria

[1] Aina S. and Oluyombo O. (2014) The Economy of Financial Inclusion in Nigeria: Theory, Practice and Policy. Researchgate Publications.
[2] Aro-Gordon S. (2016) Effectiveness of Financial Inclusion Strategy in Nigeria. 2nd International Conference on Inclusive Economic Growth and Sustainable Development. November 18-19, Mysuru, India. Retrieved from sdmimd.ac.in/pdfs/IEC2016_Paper110.pdf
[3] Babajide A. A., Adegboye F. B. and Omankhanlen A. E. (2015) Financial Inclusion and Economic Growth in Nigeria. International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, 5(3), 629 – 637. Retrieved from http://www.econjournals.com/index.php/ijefi/article/view/1154/pdf
[4] Balele, N. P. (2019). The impact of financial inclusion on economic growth in sub-saharan africa. Journal of Applied Economics and Business, 7(4), 51 – 68. Retrieved from http://www.aebjournal.org/articles/0704/070404.pdf
[5] Bigirimana, M. & Hongyi, X. (2018) Research on relationship between financial inclusion and economic growth of Rwanda: Evidence from commercial banks with ARDL approach. International Journal of Innovation and Economic Development, 4(1), 7 – 18. Retrieved from https://researchleap.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/01.Ready-Research-on-Relationship-between-Financial-Inclusion-and-Economic-Growth-of-Rwanda.pdf
[6] CBN (2012a) National Financial Inclusion Strategy; Summary Report. Retrieved from https://www.cbn.gov.ng/Out/2012/publications/reports/dfd/CBN-Summary%20Report%20of-Financial%20Inclusion%20in%20Nigeria-final.pdf.
[7] CBN (2012) Statistical bulletin
[8] CBN (2013a) Financial Inclusion in Nigeria: Issues and Challenges. Retrieved from https://www.cbn.gov.ng/out/2014/rsd/occasional%20paper%20no.%2045%20issues%20and%20challenges.pdf
[9] CBN (2013b). Nigeria Payments System Vision 2020. Retrieved from https://www.cbn.gov.ng/icps2013/papers/NIGERIA_PAYMENTS_SYSTEM_VISION_2020%5Bv2%5D.pdf
[10] CBN (2019). Statistical bulletin
[11] EFInA (2019) EFInA Access to Financial Services in Nigeria (A2F) 2018 Survey. Retrieved from https://www.efina.org.ng/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/A2F-2018-Key-Findings-11_01_19.pdf
[12] Engle, R. F. & Granger, C. W. J. (1987). Cointegration and error correction: Representation, estimation and testing. Econometrica, 55(2), 251 – 276. Retrieved from http://www.ntuzov.com/Nik_Site/Niks_files/Research/papers/stat_arb/EG_1987.pdf
[13] Enueshike, P. & Okpebru, O. (2020). Effects of financial inclusion on economic growth in Nigeria (2000 – 2018). IOSR Journal of Research & Method in Education (IOSR-JRME), 10(1), 44 – 49. Retrieved from https://www.iosrjournals.org/iosr-jrme/papers/Vol-10%20Issue-1/Series-1/E1001014449.pdf
[14] FDC (2016) Potential Impact of Financial Inclusion on Economic Growth in Nigeria. Retrieved from https://www.proshareng.com/news/Nigeria%20Economy/Potential-Impact-of-Financial-Inclusion-on-Economic-Growth-in-Nigeria—FDC/30136
[15] Financial Times (n.a) Financial inclusion; Middle East and Africa. Retrieved from https://www.ft.com/reports/financial-inclusion-middle-east-africa
[16] Global Microscope (2018). New study on financial inclusion, the 2018 Global Microscope, shows countries in Latin America and Asia provide the best environments for financial progress. Retrieved from https://www.3blmedia.com/News/New-Study-Financial-Inclusion-2018-Global-Microscope-Shows-Countries-Latin-America-and-Asia
[17] Global Partnership for Financial Inclusion (GPFI)(2012) G20 Financial Inclusion Indicators. Retrieved from http://www.gpfi.org/sites/default/files/G20%20Set%20of%20Financial%20Inclusion%20Indicators.pdf
[18] Ibrahim, A. O. B., Akano, A. I. & Kazeem, H. S. (2015). “To what extent does banks’ credit stimulate economic growth? Evidence from Nigeria”. Journal of Research in National Development, 13(1), 128-139.
[19] Khan H. R. (2011) Financial Inclusion and Financial Stability: Are They Two Sides of the Same Coin? Address by Shri H R Khan, Deputy Governor of the Reserve Bank of India, at BANCON 2011, organized by the Indian Bankers Association and Indian Overseas Bank, Chennai, 4 November 2011.
[20] Klapper, L. & Hess, J. (2019). New findex notes showcase digital financial inclusion in Sub-Saharan Africa. Retrieved from https://blogs.worldbank.org/africacan/new-findex-notes-showcase-digital-financial-inclusion-sub-saharan-africa
[21] Loo, M. K. (2019). Enhancing financial inclusion in ASEAN: Identifying the best growth markets for Fintech. Journal of Risk Financial Management, 12(4), 181. Retrieved from https://www.mdpi.com/1911-8074/12/4/181/htm
[22] Mbutor O. M. and Ibrahim A. U. (2013) The Impact of Financial Inclusion on Monetary Policy in Nigeria. Journal of Economics and International Finance, 5(8), 318 – 326. Retrieved from http://www.academicjournals.org/article/article1383581296_Mbutor%20and%20Uba.pdf
[23] McGath, T. (2018). M-PESA: How Kenya revolutionized mobile payments. Retrieved from https://mag.n26.com/m-pesa-how-kenya-revolutionized-mobile-payments-56786bc09ef
[24] MercyCorps (2014) Financial Inclusion; Approaches and Principles. Retrieved from https://www.mercycorps.org/sites/default/files/Financial%20Inclusion%20Approach%20and%20Principles%20-%20June%202014.pdf
[25] Montanez, A. M. (2020). Latin America: financial inclusion score 2019, by country. Retrieved from https://www.statista.com/statistics/1048825/financial-inclusion-score-country/#statisticContainer
[26] Narayan, M. (2018). Payments Innovation for Financial Inclusion. Retrieved from https://www.euromoney.com/article/b1b0b757nr1flf/payments-innovation-for-financial-inclusion
[27] Nwanne T. F. (2015) Relationship between Financial Inclusion and Economic Growth in Nigerian Rural Dwellers. International Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship Research, 3(7), 17 – 27. Retrieved from http://www.eajournals.org/wp-content/uploads/Relationship-between-Financial-Inclusion-and-Economic-Growth-in-Nigerian-Rural-Dwellers.pdf
[28] Odeniran, S. O. & Udeaja, E. A. (2010). Financial sector development and economic growth: Empirical evidence from Nigeria. Economic and Financial Review, 48(3), 91-124.
[29] Okaro, C. S. (2016). Financial inclusion and Nigerian economy (1990-2015). Journal of Policy and Development Studies (JPDS), 10(4), 50 – 65. Retrieved from https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/Delivery.cfm/SSRN_ID2919965_code2645310.pdf?abstractid=2919965&mirid=1
[30] Okoye, L. U., Adetiloye, K. A., Erin, O. & Modebe, N. J. (2017). Financial inclusion as a strategy for enhanced economic growth and Development. Journal of Internet Banking and Commerce, 22(8), 1 – 14. Retrieved from http://www.icommercecentral.com/open-access/financial-inclusion-as-a-strategy-for-enhanced-economic-growth-and development.pdf
[31] Okoye, V., Nwisienyi, K. J. & Obi, O. (2019) Emerging financial technological innovation and economic growth in Nigeria. EPRA International Journal of Research and Development (IJRD), 4(9), 153 – 162. Retrieved from https://eprajournals.com/jpanel/upload/1022pm_26.Dr.%20Okoye%20Victor-3629-1.pdf
[32] Onalo, U., Lizam, M. & Kaseri, A. (2017). Financial inclusion and the Nigerian economy: Empirical evidences. Asian Journal of Economics, Business and Accounting, 4(4), 1 – 10. Retrieved from https://www.journalajeba.com/index.php/AJEBA/article/download/10135/18166
[33] Otiwu, K. C., Okere, P. A., Uzowuru, L. N. & Ozuzu, P. N. (2018). Financial inclusion and economic growth of Nigeria (the Microfinance option). International Journal for Innovation Education and Research, 6(2), 61 – 74. Retrieved from https://ijier.net/index.php/ijier/article/view/949
[34] Pesaran, M. H., Shin, Y. & Smith, R. J. (2001). Bounds testing approaches to the analysis of level relationships. Journal of Applied Econometrics, 16(3), 289–326. Retrieved from https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/jae.616
[35] Phillips, P. C. B. and Perron, P. (1988). Testing for a Unit Root in Time Series Regression. Biometrika. 75 (2), 335 – 346. Retrieved from http://cowles.yale.edu/sites/default/files/files/pub/d07/d0795-r.pdf
[36] Shrestha, M. B. & Bhatta, G. R. (2018). Selecting appropriate methodological framework for time series data analysis. The Journal of Finance and Data Science, 4(2), 71 – 89. Retrieved from https://reader.elsevier.com/reader/sd/pii/S2405918817300405?token=AE2D517F58EED0D46C6E05C1E7D5A9436EF5F692231207916F93B6411FEB2A61164327B9B2674AA3EABF630C920DEBBB
[37] Standard Chartered Bank (2014) Financial Inclusion: Reaching the Unbanked. Retrieved from https://www.sc.com/en/resources/global-en/pdf/Research/Financial_Inclusion__Reaching_the_unbanked_04_09_14.pdf
[38] Uruakpa, N. I, Kalu, U. E. & Ufomadu, O. A. (2019). Impact of financial inclusion on economic growth of Nigeria. International Journal of Sustainable Development, 12(2), 46 – 58. Retrieved from http://www.arcnjournals.org/images/COMB-SPECIAL-EDITION-ARCN-IJSD-12-2-4.pdf
[39] World Bank (2018a). Global Findex. Retrieved from https://globalfindex.worldbank.org/
[40] World Bank (2018b). Financial inclusion on the rise, but gaps remain; Global Findex Database Shows. Retrieved from https://www.worldbank.org/en/news/press-release/2018/04/19/financial-inclusion-on-the-rise-but-gaps-remain-global-findex-database-shows
[41] World Bank (n.a). Universal Financial Access 2020. Retrieved from https://ufa.worldbank.org/en/global-progress#ssa

Kenechukwu J. Nwisienyi, Onyeka A. Obi “An Analysis of Financial Inclusion and Economic Growth in Nigeria; An ARDL Approach” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.126-134 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/126-134.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Innovation and Entrepreneurship Education in UK and Enlightenment

Deng Yifan, Zhu Yongjin, Xiong Zijun, Zhan Ting – October 2020 Page No.: 135-138

The achievement of innovation and entrepreneurship in Britain depends on the well organized innovation and entrepreneurship education. This paper introduced the British entrepreneurship development and summarized the characteristics of innovation and entrepreneurship educational system. Then, this paper showed some enlightenment to China.

Page(s): 135-138                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 November 2020

 Deng Yifan
College of Foreign Studies, Hubei Normal University

 Zhu Yongjin
College of Foreign Studies, Hubei Normal University

 Xiong Zijun
College of Foreign Studies, Hubei Normal University

 Zhan Ting
College of Foreign Studies, Hubei Normal University

[1] Peng Yuan et al. (2019). External Support Systems for Entrepreneurship and Innovation Education: The Experience of Seven Developed Countries[J].Education Research Monthly, 26-32.
[2] Xie Pin et al. (2018). The Status Quo and Inspiration of Innovation and Entrepreneurship Education in Britain[J].Journal of World Education, 42-51.
[3] Sun xiuli. (2019). The Research and Inspiration of Innovation and Entrepreneurship Education System in British Universities[J].Journal of Guangdong University of Foreign Studies, 138-144.
[4] Hu Yizhou.(2017).Research on Entrepreneurship Education for Graduate Students in British Universities[D].Hunan University.
[5] Li Ru.(2016).Research on Entrepreneurship Education in Higher Education in UK [D].Guangxi Normal University.
[6] The Global Entrepreneurship and Devel-opment Institute. Global Entrepreneurship Index [EB/OL]. http://thegedi.org/global-entrepreneurship-and-development-index/, 2018-03-10.
[7] Quality Assurance Agency. Enterpriseand Entrepreneurship Education: Guidance for UK Higher Education Providers [EB/OL]. http://www.qaa.ac.uk/en/Publications/Documents/Enterprise-and -entrpreneurship-education-2018.pdf, 2018-01-01.

Deng Yifan, Zhu Yongjin, Xiong Zijun, Zhan Ting “The Innovation and Entrepreneurship Education in UK and Enlightenment” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 10, pp.135-138 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/135-138.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Effect of the Money Mass on the Macroeconomic Performance of the PAZF: Experience of CEMAC Countries

Ulrich Vianney Elisée KAGUENDO October 2020 Page No.: 139-151

This study aims to analyze the effect of monetary mass on the macroeconomic performance in the countries of the Economic and Monetary Community of the States of Central Africa over the period from 1991 to 2016. We propose an econometric panel model applied to data from secondary sources in the 6 countries of the CEMAC “World development Indicator” area (WDI, 2017). First, we perform the preliminary tests (unit root tests, homogeneity test) and estimate the parameters of the model by the Generalized Method of Moment (GMM) in a system. Specifically, four results major emerge from our work. First, the rate of growth of the money mass has a statistically significant impact on the rate of economic growth in the sub region. Second, the growth of money mass has a significantly positive influence on the level of inflation in CEMAC countries. Third, money mass has a positive effect on employment. Fourth, domestic investment is the engine of economic growth for countries in the sub region. So monetary policy is not neutral in the CEMAC zone.

Page(s): 139-151                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 05 November 2020

  Ulrich Vianney Elisée KAGUENDO
Dschang School of Economics And Management in the University of Dschang
Researcher-Assistant at the Laboratoire de Recherche en Economie Fondamentale et Appliquée (LAREFA)

[1] Africa Development Indicators (2017), “World Bank database”.
[2] Akerlof, G. A. etYellen, J. L. (1985), « A Near-Rational Model of the Business Cycle, with Wage and Price Inertia », Quarterly Journal of Economics, supplement.
[3] Amadou Bobbo (2016), “Régime de change et cyclicité budgétaire dans les pays africains”, l’actualité économique, revue d’analyse économique, vol. n°3.
[4] Arellano M. (1989), « A note on the Anderson-Hsiao estimation for panel data », economic letters, n°31, pp. 337-341.
[5] Arellano M. et Bond S. (1991), « Some tests of specification for panel data: Monte-Carlo evidence and application to employment equations», Review of economic studies, vol. 58, n°2 pp. 277-297.
[6] Arellano M. etBover O. (1995), « Another look at the instrumental variable estimation of error- compnents models», Journal of Economtrics, vol. 68, issue1, july, pp. 29-51.
[7] Beitone A et al (2008): “Dictionnaire des Sciences Economiques”, 2nd ed, www.armandcolin.com, pp. 329-330.
[8] Bernanke B. etMihov (1995): «Mesuring monetary policy», Federal reserve Bank of San Francisco working paper, pp. 95-09.
[9] Berg, A., Charry, L., & Portillo, R. (2013), “the Monetary Transmission Mechanism inthe Tropics: A Narrative Approach” (IMF Working Paper No. WP/13/197). International Monetary Fund.
[10] Bikai and Essiane (2018), “Monetary policy, monetary stability and economic growth in CEMAC: a Bayesian SVAR approach”, BEAC, Research Directorate.
[11] Bikai J.L. and Kenkouo G.A. (2015), “Analysis and evaluation of monetary policy transmission channels in the CEMAC: an SVAR and SPVAR approach”, BEAC Working Paper BWP n° 02/15 January.
[12] Blundell R. et Bond S. (1998), «Initial Conditions and Moment Restrictions in Dynamic Panel Data Models», Journal of Econometrics, Vol. 87, No. 1, pp. 115-143.
[13] Buigut, S. (2009), “Monetary Policy Transmission Mechanism: Implications for the proposed East African Community (EAC) Monetary Union”. Presented at the CSAE Conference. Canova, F. (2007). Methods for Applied Macroeconomic Research. Princeton University Press.
[14] Campell T. S. (l978), «Monetary policy and bank portfolio composition: An analysis of their impact on GDP », Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Vol n°(2), (May), pp. 239- 251.
[15] Cheng, K. C. (2006), “A VAR Analysis of Kenya’s Monetary Policy Transmission Mechanism: How Does the Central Bank’s REPO Rate Affect the Economy?” (IMF Working Paper No. WP/06/300). International Monetary Fund.
[16] Davoodi, H. R., Dixit, S., & Pinter, G. (2013), “Monetary Transmission Mechanism in theEast African Community: An Empirical Investigation” (IMF Working Paper No. WP/13/39).International Monetary Fund.
[17] Dimitrijevic, B., & Louvre, I. (2013), “Essay on Monetary Policy and Economic Growth” Journal of Central Banking Theory and Practice, 1, 111–138. Estrella, A. (2015). The Price
[18] Puzzle and VAR Identification. Macroeconomic Dynamics, 19, 1880–1887.
[19] Douzounet M. (2007), “Réformes monétaires et croissance économique en zone CEMAC”, Journal of Economic Literature.
[20] Fisher S. (1993), «The Role of Macroeconomic Factors in Growth”, Journal of Monetary.
[21] FoudaEkobena S.Y. (2013), ” Politique monétaire et croissance économique en zone CEMAC : Une approche en données de panel “, October, Faculté de Sciences Economiques et de
[22] Gestion, Université de Yaoundé 2, CAMEROON. Laboratoire d’Analyse et de Recherche en Economie Appliquée (LAREA), Email: kockfouda@yahoo.fr.
[23] Friedman, M. (1956), « The Quantity Theory of Money: A Restatement », in Studies in the Quantity theory of Money, ed. M. Friedman, Chicago University Press.
[24] Friedman M. (1968), « The role of monetary policy », in American Economic Review, vol.58 n°1 mars, pp.1-17.
[25] Friedman M. (1976), « Nobel lectures inflation and unemployment », journal of political Economy, vol.85 june, pp.451-472.
[26] Gertler M. et Gilchrist S. (1993), «The raie of credit market imperfections in monetary transmission mechanism: Arguments and evidence», Scandinavian Journal of Economies, Vol.95, pp 43-63.
[27] Gordon et al. (1983), «Rules, Discretion and Reputation in a Model ofMonetary Policy », NBER Working Paper n° 1079.
[28] Im K.S., Pesaran M.H. et Shin Y. (2003), «Testing for unit roots in heterogeneous panels, Journal of Econometrics, vol. 115, n°1, pp 53-74.
[29] Jayati G. (2007) “Macroeconomic and growth policies, an application to five OECD countries” Centre for Economic Studies and Planning School of Social Sciences Jawaharlal Nehru University New Delhi, India.
[30] Judd F. et Rudebush (1998), «Taylors Rule and the Fed», Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Fransisco, n°3 pp. 3-14.
[31] Kahn M. et Knight M. (1991), «Stabilization Programs in Developing Countries: A Formal Framework», in Kahn M., Montiel P., Haque N. éd «Macroeconomic Models for Adjustment in Developing Countries», IMF, Washington D.C., pp. 38-85.
[32] Keynes, J. M. (1936), Théorie générale de l’emploi, de l’intérêt et de la monnaie, ed. Payot, Paris.
[33] Keungne K.L. and Ousman A. M. (2014), “Croissance monétaire, Croissance réelle et Inflation
[34] dans l’Union Monétaire d’Afrique Centrale: Quelques évidences empiriques”, BEAC WorkingPaper (BWP), No. 03/15 November.
[35] King M. (2002), «No money, no inflation-the role of money in the economy», Bank of England, Quarterly bulletin, été 2002.
[36] Krause S. (2003), «Measuring monetary Policy Efficiency in European Union countries:
[37] Levine R. etLoayza N. (1999), «Finance and the sources of growth», Word bank, working paper, june.
[38] Levy M. (1998), «Monetary policy stability, disinflation and economic performance», Nations Banc Montgomery Securities Shadow Open Market Committee, (September).
[39] Lucas, R. Jr (1972),“Econometric Test of Natural Rate Hypothesis”, in The Econometric of Price Determination, Board of Governors of Federal Reserve System.
[40] Lucas R. E. (1988), «On the mechanisms of economic development », Journal of Monetary Economics, n°22, pp. 3- 42.
[41] Mallaye D. (2009), ” Réformes monétaires et croissance économique en zone CEMAC “, MPRA Paper n°19621, posted 28, December,University of Yaoundé IISoa. Online at http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/19621.
[42] Mankiw G. (2003), “Macroeconomics”, 2nd edition, translation of the American edition by Jean Houard.
[43] Mankiw, N. G. (1985), « Small menu costs and large business cycles: a macroeconomicmodel of monopoly », Quarterly Journal of Economics, may.
[44] Mantsie R. W. (2003), “inflation and growth in CEMAC countries”. UniversitéMarienNgouabi, Brazzaville-Congo.
[45] Mishkin F. (2010), « The Economics of Money, Banking and Financial Markets», 9èéd University of Columbia ( Etats-Unies ), pp. 76-84.
[46] Mishra, P., Montiel, P., &Sengupta, R. (2016), « Monetary Transmission in Developing Countries: Evidence from India».(IMF WorkingPaper No. WP/16/167). International MonetaryFund.
[47] Mouhoubi S. (1991), “Rôle de la politique monétaire dans un contexte d’ajustement économique” Revue Financière du CAEM vol 12 n°1, pp. 1-13.
[48] Mounkala, USA. (2013), “Estimating the demand for money in CEMAC”. (BEACWorkingPaper No. BWP N°01/15). Bank of Central African States.
[49] Mundell, R. A. (1968). « Man and Economics: The Science of Choice». McGraw-Hill Company.
[50] Ngerebo-A, T. A. (2016), “Monetary Policy and Inflation in Nigeria”. International Journal of Finance and Accounting, 5(2), 67–76.
[51] Nubukpo K. (2007), “L’efficacité de la politique monétaire en situation d’incertitude et d’extraversion: le cas de l’Union Economique et Monétaire Ouest Africaine (UEMOA)”, the European journal of developmentResearch, Volume 19, Issue 3, pp. 480-495.
[52] Ondo Ossa A. (2005), ” Effets anti-keynésiens et Ajustement (le cas de la zone CEMAC) “, Economie et Gestion, n° spécial, pp. 22-78.
[53] Orphanides A. (2002), «Monetary policy IU les and Great Inflation», Board of Government of’ the Federal Reserve System (January).
[54] Phelps E. (1968), «Money Wage Dynamics and Labor Market Equilibrium», Journal of Political Economy, August, pp. 678-711.
[55] Phillips A. W. (1958), « The Relationship between Unemployment and the Rate of Change of Money Wages in the United Kingdom, 1861-1957», Economica, p. 25.
[56] Pitcher L. Bank of Canada Working Paper 98-17, “Asymmetric Effects of Monetary Policy on Employment,” Bank of Canada Working Paper 98-17, September.
[57] Ramsey V. (1993), «How important is the credit channel in transmission of monetary policy? », CRCS on Public Policy, Vo1.39, (December), pp 1-46.
[58] Reynard, S. (2007), “Maintaining low inflation: Money, interest rates, and policy stance”. Journal of Monetary Economics, 54(5), 1441–1471.
[59] Romer P. (1986), « Increasing returns and Long-Run Growth », Journal of Political Economy, vol. 94, n°5, October, pp.1002-37.
[60] Romer C etRomer D. (1990), «New evidence on the monetary transmission mechanism», Banking Papers on Economic Activity pp. 149-198.
[61] PREF- CEMAC, (2017), “Programme des Réformes Economiques et Financières de la Communauté Economique et Monétaire des Etats de l’Afrique Centrale”.
[62] Saxegaard, M. (2006),«Excess Liquidity and Effectiveness of Monetary Policy: Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa»(IMF Working Paper No. WP/06/115). IMF.
[63] Shari S. (2007), “Macroeconomic and Growth Policy”, United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, June.
[64] Sims, C. (1992), “Interpreting the Macroeconomic Time Series Facts: The Effects of Monetary Policy”, (Cowles Foundation Discussion Paper No. 1011).
[65] Svensson, L. E. O. (1997), “Inflation Forecast targeting: Implementing and monitoring”
[66] Solow R. (1956), «A contribution to the theory of economic growth», Quartely Journal of Economics, n°70, pp. 5-94.
[67] Stiglitz, J. E. (1987), «The Causes and Consequences of the Dependency of Quality onPrices », Journal of Economic Literature, March.
[68] Stiglitz, J. E. (1984), «Price Rigidities and Market Structure », American Economic Review,May.
[69] Taylor J. B. (l993), «Discretion Versus Poliey Rules in praetiee». Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on public policy, vol. 39, pp 195-214.
[70] Uanguta E et S. Ikhide (2002), «Monetary poliey transmission meehanism 111 Namibia», BON Working Paper N° 2/02, (November), 18p.www.beac.org.

Ulrich Vianney Elisée KAGUENDO “Effect of the Money Mass on the Macroeconomic Performance of the PAZF: Experience of CEMAC Countries” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.139-151 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/139-151.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Analysis of the Effect of Resource Based View Model As A Source of Competitive Advantage on Organization Performance

Ibrahim Makina, Judith Nabwire Oundo – October 2020 Page No.: 152-155

This paper takes a theoretical examination of the concepts of Resource Based View model as a source of competitive advantage on performance of an organization. Organizations perform different depending on the resources they own. These resources include; human resources, financial resources, technological resources and skills that employees have. An organization that has unique resources and hard to be copied in the industry then it is said to have competitive advantage. The major contributor of the resource based view model was Michael Porter (1980). Resource of the organization becomes a source of competitive advantage in two ways; organization can use resources to charge higher prices in order to increase financial performance. Secondly, a firm can use its resources to lobby barriers of new entrants in the industry. The purpose of the study was to examine the applicability of the Resource Based View in different organizations. The study utilized Desktop analysis methodology through Meta analysis. From the reviewed literature it was revealed that different organizations are endowed with different resources, they can use these resources to better performance. It was further revealed that Organizations that have non-substitutable resources can use them as a source of competitive advantage. It was further revealed that RBV has a positive impact on organization performance. The study is relevant to different policy makers in decision making; it also provides foundation for further studies. In conclusion organization that strives to have their resources become hard to be copied realizes better performance it also acts as a source of competitive advantage. The study recommends that organizations should maximize resources they have and make them hard to be copied in order to realize competitive advantage.

Page(s): 152-155                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 05 November 2020

 Ibrahim Makina
PhD Candidate, School of Business and Economics, Kisii University, Kenya Judith Nabwire Oundo University of Nairobi

 Judith Nabwire Oundo
University of Nairobi, Kenya

[1] Adnan, M., Abdulhamid, T., & Solail, B. (2018). Predicting Firm Performance Through Resource Based Framework. European Journal of Business and Management ISSN 2222-1905 VOl.10, No.1, 2018.
[2] Barney, J. (2001). is the Resource-based View a Useful Perspective for Strategic Management Research.
[3] Barney.J. (1986). Strategic Factor Markets: Expectations, Luck and Business Strategy.
[4] Barney.J. (1991). Firm Resources and Sustained Competitive Advantage. Journal of Management 1991 Vol 17, No. 1, 99-120.
[5] Bohnekamp, T., (2013). The Effect of the Resource Based View on Decisions in Supply Management Theses Conference June 27th 2013 Enschede, Netherlands.
[6] Foss.N. (1998). Resource-Based Perspective: An Assessment and Diagnosis of Problems.
[7] Hitt, M. A., Xu, K., Carnes, C. M., (2015). Resource Based Theory in Operations Management Research. Journal of Operations Management DOI:10. 1016/j.JOM.2015.
[8] Ismail .I. A., Rose, R., G., Uli, J., & Abdallah, H. (2012). The Relationship Between Organizational Resources, Capabilities, Systems and Competitive Advantage. . Asian Academy of Management vol.17,No.1,151-173.
[9] Lo.Y. H.,(2012 ). Managing Capabilities, Organizational Culture and Organizational Performance: The Resource Based Perspective in Chinese Lodging Industry. PerformancJournal of International Management Studies, Volume 7 Number 1.
[10] Ongeti, J, W., & Machuki, V, N., (2018). Organizational Resource and Performance of Kenyan State Corporations. European Scientific Journal Vol.14, No. 34 ISSN: 1857-7881.
[11] Tontiset, N. (2015). The Impact of Institutional Theory and Resource Based View Perspectives on Environmental Management System and Firm Performance. Journal of Management DOI. 10.18374/E J M -15-1.4

Ibrahim Makina,Judith Nabwire Oundo, “Analysis of the Effect of Resource Based View Model As A Source of Competitive Advantage on Organization Performance” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.152-155 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/152-155.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Economic Analysis of Palm Wine Production in ILA Local Government Area of Osun State, Nigeria

Isaac, O. Oyewo, Adekunle, Q. Yusuff, Esther. O, Oladipupo-Alade, Ajoke. R, Aduloju, Hafsoh. O Shaib-Rahim, Afolake, E. Robert – October 2020 Page No.: 156-161

The study was carried out to evaluate the analysis of palm wine production in Ila Orangun local government area of Osun State. Structured questionnaire and interview schedules were designed to obtain information on socio economic characteristics of palm wine tappers, factors influencing palm wine tapping, determinants of palm wine production and challenges encountered by palm wine tappers in the study area. Sixty palm wine tappers were randomly selected from six villages which includes Ila Orangun, Isinmi Olootu, Gaa Fulani, Oyi ayegunle, Ajaba, and Ejigbo Orangun. Data collected were analyzed using descriptive analysis (frequency and percentage) and inferential statistics. The result revealed that majorities (80.0%) of the tappers were male, 41.7% had no formal education, 80% of them were married and majorities (53.4%) were between the age ranges of 41-50 years. Most (73.7%) engage in tapping and production of palm wine for commercial purposes, 73.4% had production years of tapping experience range from 5-10 years, 91.7% of the palm tree tapped in this area are matured at 7 years of growing maturity, majority (71.7%) of the tappers do not mix additives with their palm wine. The multiple regressions revealed that number of palm trees tapped (p =0.001), age of tappers (p =0.005) and gender (p =0.001) were the significant and major determinants of palm wine production in the study. Major challenges encountered by tappers in the study area include poor extension service (78.3%), inadequate capital (65.0%), poor marketing service (60.0%), inadequate credit facilities (55.0%), and poor storage facilities (55.0%). Palm wine tapping had contributed to the cultural and economic growth of the study area. It is however recommended that palm wine tapping should be encouraged and standardize so as to restructure the effective production of palm wine in the study area

Page(s): 156-161                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 05 November 2020

 Isaac, O. Oyewo
Department of Agricultural Technology, Federal College of Forestry, Ibadan, Nigeria

 Adekunle, Q. Yusuff
Department of Horticulture and Landscape Technology, Federal College of Forestry, Ibadan, Nigeria

 Esther. O, Oladipupo-Alade
Forestry Research Institute of Nigeria, Jericho Hill Ibadan Oyo State Nigeria

 Ajoke. R, Aduloju
Department of Agricultural Technology, Federal College of Forestry, Ibadan, Nigeria

 Hafsoh. O Shaib-Rahim
Department of Agricultural Technology, Federal College of Forestry, Ibadan, Nigeria

 Afolake, E. Robert
Department of Agricultural Technology, Federal College of Forestry, Ibadan, Nigeria

[1] Adakaren, B., and Eneh, F. K. (2001): Economic Importance of Raphia Palms in Nigeria; A Review. Journal of Applied Sciences 5(4): 3154-3166.
[2] Adakaren, B (2014). Raphia palm wine marketing in South-South Nigeria. A thesis submitted to the Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, for the award of Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D) Degree in Agricultural Economics. Pp 129
[3] Ajibefun, I.A, Daramola, A.G (2003). Determinants of technical and allocative efficiency of micro-enterprises: Firm-level evidence from Nigeria. African Development Bank. 353-395.
[4] Akachukwu, C. O. (2001): Production and Utilization of Wine Palm (Raphia hookeri Mann and Wendl), An Important Wetland Species Occasionally Visited by Honey Bees. Proc. Aquatic Sci. Pp 282-297
[5] Central Bank of Nigeria CBN (2006). Annual Report and Statement of Accounts Abuja Nigeria. http://www.cenbank.org
[6] Ewuim, S. C, Akunne, C.E, Anumba, A.I, Etaga, H.O (2011). Insects associated with wine from raffia palm (raphia hookeri) in Alor, Nigeria. Animal Research International. 8(1): 1328-1336.
[7] Keay, W. J. (1965). An Outline of Nigerian Vegetation. Federal Ministry of Information Lagos, Nigeria.
[8] Ndon, D. S. (2003): The Raphia Palm. Concept Publications ltd, Lagos, Nigeria. P17 NIFOR Pull
[9] Nwaiwu, I, Odii, M, Ohajianya, D, Eze, C, Oguoma, N, Ibekwe, C, Henri-Ukoha, A, Kadiri, F, Amaechi, C, Oguh, J. (2010). Comparative Analysis of the Productivity of Sustainable Cassava Farming under External and Internal Input use in Imo State, Nigeria. New York Science Journal. 3(10): 12 -16
[10] Obahiagbon, F. I and Osagie, A.U (2007). Sugar and macro-minerals composition of sap produced by Raphia hookeri palms. African Journal of Biotechnology. 6 (6): 744-750
[11] Obahiagbon, F.I (2009) A review of the origin, morphology, cultivation, economic products, health and physiological implications of raphia palm. African Journal of Food Science. 3(13): 447-453.
[12] Ogbonna, K. H. (2000): Nigerian Raphia Palm Sap: The Past, Present and Future. Afr. J. Envt. Studies. 1 and 2, 53-58
[13] Otedoh, M.O (1990). Sweet Raphia Palm Wine. The Nigerian Field. 55: 59-64

Isaac, O. Oyewo, Adekunle, Q. Yusuff, Esther. O, Oladipupo-Alade, Ajoke. R, Aduloju, Hafsoh. O Shaib-Rahim, Afolake, E. Robert “Economic Analysis of Palm Wine Production in ILA Local Government Area of Osun State, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 10, pp.156-161 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/156-161.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Remedies in Administrative Law; The Sri Lankan Experience

W.M.C.P Godage, K.A.A.N Thilakarathna – October 2020 – Page No.:162-168

Administrative remedies can be identified as a set of remedies that provides redress against violations of right by those who are wielding administrative authority which is granted to them by a statute of the parliament or any other law deriving its authority which can be linked to an Act of Parliament. When one considers the development of these administrative remedies from a Sri Lankan perspective, it is evident that the influence of English law as a former British colony, is present in her jurisprudence pertaining to the development of the said remedies. While during the colonial period, following English decisions and principles were the sine qua non when it came to the practices of the Courts. However, after gaining independence and establishing an independent judiciary by breaking the bonds with the Privy Council in 1971, the Sri Lankan judiciary formulated a set of principles and rules concerning the granting of administrative remedies based on a Constitutional provision. This paper examines both the history and contemporary practices of the Courts in granting administrative remedies for those who seek administrative redress.

Page(s):162-168                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 06 November 2020

 W.M.C.P Godage
Deputy Registrar, Institute of Human Resource Advancement, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka

 K.A.A.N Thilakarathna
Lecturer in Law, Institute of Human Resource Advancement, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka

[1] Cooray, L.J.M. ‘Durayappah v. Fernando. A Revival of Natural Justice in Ceylon’ (1969) 18 International and Comparative Law Quarterly 757
[2] Cooray, L.J.M. ‘The Twilight of Judicial Control of Executive Action in Sri Lanka’ (1976) 18 Malaya L Rev 230
[3] De Smith, S ‘The Prerogative Writs’ (1951) 11 Cambridge LJ 40
[4] Friedman, W. Law in a Changing Society (2nd End, Colombia University Press 1972)
[5] Gomez, M. ‘The Modern Benchmarks of SRI Lankan Public Law’ (2001) 118 S African LJ 581
[6] Jenks, E. ‘Prerogative Writs in English Law’ (1922-1923) 32 Yale LJ 523
[7] Jones, D and De Villiers, A. Principles of Administrative Law (2nd Edn, Carswell 1994)
[8] Leyland, P and Anthony, G. Textbook on Administrative Law (7th Edn, OUP 2012)
[9] Scarlett, F ‘Habeas Corpus’ (1967) 18 Mercer L Rev 354
[10] Schwartz, B. French Administrative Law and the Common-law World (1st Edn, New York University Press 1954)
[11] Taylor, A, English History 1914-1945 (Rev Edn, OUP 2001)
[12] Thilakarathna, K. ‘Environmental Protection through Judicial Review: The Sri Lankan Experience’ (2019) 17 Sabaragamuwa University Journal 15
[13] Turrone, R. ‘Quo Warranto’ (1963) 15 Hastings LJ 222
[14] Wade, W and Forsyth, C. Administrative Law (11th Edn, OUP 2014)

W.M.C.P Godage, K.A.A.N Thilakarathna “Remedies in Administrative Law; The Sri Lankan Experience” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 10, pp.162-168 October 2020 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/162-168.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Government Corruption, Politics of Prebendalism and Democratic Governance in Quebec, Canada

William Hermann Arrey, Ph.D. October 2020 Page No.: 169-184

This paper exposes the negative consequences of government corruption and the politics of prebendalism on democratic governance in Quebec, Canada. Relevant information was obtained through a desk-based research, making use of secondary data. Moreover, by adopted the theory of prebendalism as the theoretical framework of analysis, the paper finds out that, to a great extent, top level political offices and some government institutions have simply become a route to riches for politicians in Quebec. Many stay in power ‘merely to enjoy’ the benefits of illicit enrichment accumulating from the political offices they occupy. It has been uncovered that government corruption carved within political parties (and other government institutions), driven by the politics of prebendalism has curtailed the development of a strong democratic governance mode that can work for both the leaders and the led. The central argument supported by the analysis in this paper is that, politicians’ struggle to occupy state offices by electoral competition, with the premeditated mindset of using such offices as prebends, to be ‘swiftly exploited’ in a variety of formal and informal networks for person gains, produces a very ‘thin’ version of democracy, antithetical to the principles of democratic governance. Hence, the findings of this paper are important in our understanding of the mutually reinforcing nature of several dimensions of politico-economic behavior, motivated by a system of prebendal politics, which is socio-politically and economically destructive to democratic governance and development not only in ‘emerging’ but also in advanced democracies. As such, the analytical and public policy insight developed in this paper has important democratic implications not only for Quebec, Canada but also for other advanced democracies experiencing similar democratic governance challenges.

Page(s): 169-184                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 06 November 2020

  William Hermann Arrey, Ph.D.
Senior Lecturer Chair, Department of Peace and Development Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences and International Relations Protestant University of Central Africa.Yaoundé, Cameroon

[1] Anderson, C. J., and Tverdova, Y.V. (2003), “Corruption, Political Allegiances, and Attitudes toward Government in Contemporary Democracies.” American Journal of Political Science 47(1): 91–109.
[2] Ayoade Mni, J.A.A., Nwabuzor, E.J. and Sambo, A. (1992), Democracy and the New Local Government System in Nigeria, Abuja: Centre for Democratic Studies
[3] Banerjee, S. (2016), Michael Applebaum was ‘open to corruption,’ says former aide. https://www.macleans.ca/news/canada/michael-applebaum-was-open-to-corruption-says-former-aide/ (Accessed: 02 October 2020).
[4] Banerjee, S. (2017). Ex-Montreal mayor Michael Applebaum found guilty on eight charges. https://www.macleans.ca/news/canada/ex-montreal-mayor-michael-applebaum-found-guilty-on-eight-charges/ (date accessed: 02 October 2020).
[5] Bayart, J-F. (1993) The State in Africa: The Politics of the Belly, New York: Longman.
Beare, M. (2003) Critical Reflections on Transnational Organized Crime, Money Laundering, and Corruption, Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
[6] Beetham, D. (1992) “Liberal Democracy and the Limits of Democratization”, Political Studies, XL:40-53.
[7] Bowler, S. and Jeffrey A. Karp, J.A. (2004), “Politicians, Scandals, and Trust in Government.” Political Behavior 26(3): 271–87.
[8] Boisvert, A.L., Dent, P. and Quraishi, O.B. (2014). Corruption in Canada: Definition and Enforcement. Public Safety Canada, Report No. 16.
[9] Brooks, S. (2012). Canadian Democracy (seventh ed.), Ontario: Oxford University Press.
[10] Brown, M. B. (2006), “Citizen Panels and the Concept of Representation”, Journal of Political Philosophy , 14: 203–225.
[11] Budge, I. and Mckay, D. (1994) Developing Democracy. London: Sage Publications.
[12] Chabal, P. and Daloz, J. (1999) African Issues, Africa Works: Disorder as Political Instrument, Oxford: James Curry.
[13] CBC News (Undated): https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/sure-the-upac-scandal-is-labyrinthine-but-here-s-why-we-should-care-1.4531315 (date accessed: 02 October, 2020)
[14] Carty, R. K., Cross, W. and Young, L. (2000), Rebuilding Canadian Party Politics. Vancouver: UBC Press.
[15] ___________ (2001), “Canadian Party Politics in the New Century,” Journal of Canadian Studies, 35 (4) : 23–39.
[16] Chafe, K.S. (1994) “The Problematic of African Democracy in Nigeria”, In Afrika Zamani, No.2 CODESRIA publications.
[17] Cornwell, A. and Gaventa, J. (2000) “From Users and Choosers to Makers and Shapers: Repositioning Participation in Social Policy”, IDS Bulletin 31(4):50-62.
[18] CPAC (undated) Shocking Corruption : Quebec in the Charbonneau Era. https://www.cpac.ca/en/programs/documentaries/episodes/25638382/ (date accessed: 02 October 2020).
[19] Diamond, L. (1994) “Towards democratic Consolidation”, Journal of Democracy 5(3): 15.
[20] Diamond, L. and Plattner, M.F. (1996). The Global Resurgence of Democracy. Baltimore and London: The John Hopkins University Press.
[21] Eagles, M. and Carty, R. K. (2003), Small Worlds and Local Strongholds in Canadian Federal Politics: Deviations from General Patterns of Party Support in the 2000 Election. Paper presented at the CPSA, Halifax 30 May–1 June.
[22] Eisenstadt, S.N. and Roniger, L. (1981) The Study of Patron-Client Relations and Recent Developments in Sociological Theory. In SN. Eisenstadt and R. Lemarchad (eds.), Political Clientelism, Patronage and Development,. Beverly Hills: Sage. pp. 271-298
[23] Fraser-Moleketi, G. (2009) “Towards a Common Understanding of Corruption in Africa’. Public Policy and Public Administration”, 24 (3): 331-335
[24] Gidengil, E., Blais, A., Nadeau, R. and Nevitte, N. (1999), “Making Sense of Regional Voting in the 1997 Canadian Federal Election: Liberal and Reform Support Outside Quebec”, Canadian Journal of Political Science, 32 (2) : 247–272.
[25] Gill, G. (2000) The Dynamics of Democratization: Elites, Civil Society and the Transition Process, London: Macmillan Press ltd.
[26] Held, D. (1992), “Democracy: From City State to Cosmopolitan Order”, Political Studies, XL(Special issue): 10-39.
[27] Hepburn, E. (2010): “Small Worlds in Canada and Europe: A Comparison of Regional Party Systems in Quebec, Bavaria and Scotland”, Regional & Federal Studies, 20 (4-5):,527-544
[28] Hindess, B. (1999) Representation Ingrafted Upon Democracy. Annual Hanna Arendt Lecture, University of Southampton, June 1999.
[29] Igbinedion, S. A. (2009), “A critical Appraisal of Mechanism for Prosecuting Grand Corruption Offenders Under the United Nations Convention Against Corruption.” Manchester Journal of International Economic Law. In In Boisvert, A.L., Dent, P. and Quraishi, O.B. (2014). Corruption in Canada: Definition and Enforcement. Public Safety Canada, Report No. 16.
[30] Kamrava, M. (1995) “Political Culture and New definition of the Third World” Third World Quarterly, (16) 4: 691-701.
[31] Kay L. and Jorge L. (2010), Parties and Democracy in Canada; Regional Fragmentation, Institutional Inertia, and Democratic Deficit, Santa Barbara: PRAEGER
[32] Linz, J.J. (1996 a) The Perils of Presidentialism. In L. Diamond and MF. Plattner (eds) The Global Resurgence of Democracy, Baltimore and London: The John Hopkins University Press, pp 124-142.
[33] _______ (1996b) The Virtues of Parliamentarism. In L. Diamond and MF. Plattner (eds) The Global Resurgence of Democracy, Baltimore and London: The John Hopkins University Press, pp. 154-161.
[34] Lijphart, A. (1996) Constitutional Choices for New Democracies. In L. Diamond and M F. Plattner (eds) The Global Resurgence of Democracy. Baltimore and London: The John Hopkins University Press, pp. 162-174
[35] Maclean’s (2017) Ex-Montreal mayor Applebaum sentenced to one year in jail. https://www.macleans.ca/news/canada/ex-montreal-mayor-applebaum-sentenced-to-one-year-in-jail/ (date accessed: 02 October 2020)
[36] Manzetti, L., and Wilson, C.J. ( 2007). “Why Do Corrupt Governments Maintain Public Support?” Comparative Political Studies 40(8): 949–970.
[37] Mainwaring, S.P. and Welna, C. (2003) Democratic Accountability in Latin America, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Mainwaring, S. (1998) “Party Systems in the third wave” Journal of Democracy 9(3): 67-81.
[38] March, J.G. and Olsen. J.P. (1995) Democratic Governance, New York: The Free Press.
[39] Moen, E. and Eriksen, S. (2010) Political Economy Analysis with a Legitimacy Twist What is it and why does it matter, Oslo: NORAD.
[40] Moen, E. (2003) Private Sector Involvement in Policy Making in a Poverty-Stricken Liberal Democracy, Working Paper N. 2003/04, Oslo : Centre for Development, University of Oslo.
[41] Montambeault, F. (2011), “Overcoming Clientelism through Local Participatory Institutions in Mexico: What type of Participation?” Latin American Politics and Society, 53(1):91-124.
[42] Nicholls, C. et al.,(2006), Corruption and Misuse of Public Office. Oxford: Oxford University
[43] Joseph, R. A. (1983). “Class, State, and Prebendal Politics in Nigeria,” The Journal of Commonwealth & Comparative Politics 21(1): 21-38.
[44] Joseph, R. (2013) Prebendalism and Dysfunctionality in Nigeria. Op-Ed. https://www.brookings.edu/opinions/prebendalism-and-dysfunctionality-in-nigeria/ (date accessed: 06 October 2020).
[45] Joseph, R. A. (1987) Democracy and Prebendal Politics in Nigeria: The Rise and fall of the Second Republic. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
[46] Kamrava, M. (1995) “Political Culture and New definition of the Third World” Third World Quarterly, (16) 4: 691-701
[47] Panetta, A. and Banerje, S. (2012). Gilles Vaillancourt Quits: Mayor of Laval Resigns Amid Quebec Corruption Scandal. https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/11/09/gilles-vaillancourt-quits-mayor-laval_n_2101603.html?utm_hp_ref=ca-quebec-corruption-scandal (date accessed 02 October 2020).
[48] [48]. Panetta, A. and Blatchford, A. (2013), Montreal’s Interim Mayor Faces Fraud Charges, http://globalnews.ca/news/647472/montreal-mayor-arrested-by-quebec-corruptionpolice/ (Date consulted: 10 July 2014)
[49] Patriquin, M. (2010), Quebec: “The most corrupt province, why does Quebec claim so many of the nation’s political scandals?” Macleans, < http://www2.macleans.ca/2010/09/24/the-most-corrupt-province/> (Consulted: 25 June, 2013)
[50] __________ (2015) No one can deny it now: Quebec is facing a corruption crisis. https://www.macleans.ca/news/canada/quebecs-now-undeniable-corruption-crisis/ (date accessed 05 October 2020).
[51] Petry, F. (2002), Le Parti québécois Bilan des engagements électoraux 1994–2000. Sainte-Foy: Les Presses de l’Universite´ Laval, Québec
[52] Philip, G. (2003) Latin America. In P. Burnell (ed.) Democratization Through the Looking Glass. Manchester: Manchester University Press.
[53] Quinones, E. (2003), “L’évolution du droit international en matière de corruption: La Convention de L’OCDE. In Boisvert, A.L., Dent, P. and Quraishi, O.B. (2014). Corruption in Canada: Definition and Enforcement. Public Safety Canada, Report No. 16.
[54] Rayside, D. (1978), “Federalism and the Party System: Provincial and Federal Liberals in the Province of Quebec,” Canadian Journal of Political Science, 11(3): 499–528.
[55] Riga, A. (2019). A decade of upheaval in Quebec politics: Religion, corruption, the CAQ, activist youth. Montreal Gazette, of 28 December 2019. https://montrealgazette.com/news/quebec/a-decade-of-upheaval-in-quebec-politics-religion-corruption-the-caq-activist-youth (date accessed, 06 October 2020).
[56] Schedler, A., Diamond, L. and Plattner, M.F. (1999) The Self-Restraining State, Power and Accountability in New Democracies, Boulder: Lynne Reinner.
[57] Scott, M. (2004) Deepening Local Democracy in the Commonwealth. London: Commonwealth Policy Studies Unit.
[58] Shugart, M. and Carey, J. (1992). Presidents and Assemblies: Constitutional Design and Electoral Dynamics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
[59] Stoker, G. (2006), Why Politics Matters: Making Democracy Work. New York: Palgrave Macmillan
[60] Tambulasi R. and Kayuni, H.(2007),“Decentralization Opening a New Window for Corruption: An Accountability Assessment of Malawi’s Five Years of Democratic Local Governance System”. Journal of Asian and African Studies 42(2):163-183
[61] The Canadian Press (2020). Canada slips in global corruption ranking in aftermath of SNC-Lavalin scandal. https://montreal.ctvnews.ca/canada-slips-in-global-corruption-ranking-in-aftermath-of-snc-lavalin-scandal-1.4782290 (date accessed: 02 October 2020).
[62] The Economist (2012) Heads start to roll in a Canadian corruption scandal. More may follow. https://www.economist.com/the-americas/2012/11/17/cleaning-up (Date accessed: 02 October 2020).
[63] Transparency International (1998) http://www.transparancy.de/mission.html (Date accessed: (Date accessed: 05 October 2020).
[64] Transparency International: 2019 Corruption Perception Index. https://www.transparency.org/en/press/2019-cpi-efforts-stagnate-in-G7# (Date accessed: 02 October 2020).
[65] Tripp, A.M. (2001) “Women’s Movements and Challenges to Neopatrimonial Rule: Preliminary Observations from Africa”, Development and Change, 32 (1): 33-54.
[66] UNDP (1997) Reconceptualizing Governance, Discussion Paper 2. Management Development and Governance Division, Bureau for Policy and Program Support
[67] UNDP (2014) Democratic Governance and Diverging Pathways to More Inclusive Societies. 2013 Year in review. http://www.undp.org/content/dam/undp/library/Democratic%20Governance/2013-DG-Year-in-review.pdf (Date accessed: 02 October 2020).
[68] UNODC (2004) Anti-corruption toolkit, (3rd Edition), Vienna,: United Nations,
[69] Van Ryzin, G.G. and Lavena, C.F. (2013), “Social and Political Consequences of Administrative Corruption: A Study of Public Perceptions in Spain”, Public Administration Review, 73 (1): 85–94.
[70] Valiante, G (2019) Quebec anti-corruption unit lacks skills to investigate complex crimes, report says. https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/upac-report-resources-financial-crime-1.5173423 (date accessed: 02 October 2020).
[71] Whitehead, L. (2002) Democratization: Theory and Experience, Oxford: Oxford University Press
[72] Wills, A. (2019) The SNC-Lavalin guilty plea deal allows everyone to move forward – finally. https://www.theglobeandmail.com/business/commentary/article-the-snc-lavalin-guilty-plea-deal-allows-everyone-to-move-forward/ (date accessed 02 October 2020).
[73] Williams, G. (2003) Fragments of Democracy: ‘Nationalism, Development and the State in Africa’, Democracy and Governance Research Program, Occasional Paper 3, South Africa: Human Sciences Research Council Publishers (HSRC).
[74] Yingling, M.P. (2013), “Conventional and Unconventional Corruption: Analysis and Solutions for the United States and Kenya”. Duquesne Law Review, 51: 263. In In Boisvert, A.L., Dent, P. and Quraishi, O.B. (2014). Corruption in Canada: Definition and Enforcement. Public Safety Canada, Report No. 16.

William Hermann Arrey, Ph.D. “Government Corruption, Politics of Prebendalism and Democratic Governance in Quebec, Canada” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.169-184 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/169-184.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Assessing the Influence of Formal Training Practices on innovation performance of Pharmaceutical Firms in Kenya

Nandwa J. Musambayi, Henry Bwisa & Elizabeth Nambuswa October 2020 Page No.: 185-195

The study was conducted by exploring the influences of formal training practices as a component of innovation firm performance. It considered the influences of formal training practices as one of the factors of the innovation performance of pharmaceutical firms in Kenya. The choice of the pharmaceutical industry was thought to be suitable for study due to its knowledge-intensity nature. This research study applied an ex post facto research design aimed at achieving the objectives of the study. The population of interest in this case included a sample of pharmaceutical firms in the city of Nairobi involved in manufacturing in particular, and an input from those in marketing and distribution of prescription medicines. The population of interest for study constituted selected pharmaceutical firms in Nairobi. A sample of 163 respondents was thought to suffice for this study. A data collection form or questionnaires were used to collect data from respondents for analysis. Interview schedules and analysis of secondary data were also used. Quantitative data was analyzed by both descriptive and inferential statistical methods. For purposes of inference, regression model was performed on the variables (Formal training practices vs. innovation performance in Pharmaceutical firms.) All P-values were accompanied by a 95% confidence interval around the calculated odds ratio. Qualitative data was also analyzed. Data was presented in the form of tables, charts, figures and adopted an econometric approach to test the degree of correlation between the variables by employing the multiple regression analysis. Data was coded to facilitate analysis. It was analyzed with the aid SPSS software version 20. Data was categorized and arranged to determine how independent and dependent variables relate. The study findings indicated that that there was a significant relationship between formal training and innovation performance of pharmaceutical firms (p=0.003). The study concluded that the variable formal training was found to be significant in innovation performance of pharmaceutical firms in Kenya. One of the recommendations is that further studies could be carried out on a formal training to enhance knowledge-driven culture within which innovations can be incubated and shared to enhance innovation and creative thinking.

Page(s): 185-195                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 06 November 2020

 Nandwa J. Musambayi
School of Business and Management Sciences, Department of Business Management, University of Eldoret, Kenya

  Henry Bwisa
Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Kenya

  Elizabeth Nambuswa
Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Kenya

[1] Aghion, P. L., Boustan, Hoxby, C., & Vandenbussche, J. (2014). The causal impact of education on economic growth: Evidence from the United States. Brooking Papers on Economic Activity Conference Draft
[2] Aghion, R., & Howitt, R. (2014). Value creation in innovation ecosystems: How the structure of technological interdependence affects firm performance in new technology generations. Strategic Management Journal, 31(3), 306-333.
[3] Andries, P., Czarnitzki, D. (2014). Small firm innovation performance and employee involvement. Small Bus Econ 43(4), 21–38. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11187-014-9577-1
[4] Ayalew, Mulu M., Zeleke, Amare S., (2018). Modeling the impact of entrepreneurial attitude on self-employment intention among engineering students in Ethiopia. J Innov Entrep, ISSN 2192-5372, Springer, Heidelberg, Vol. 7, Iss. 8, pp. 1-27, doi. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13731-018-0088-1
[5] Banerjee, U. & Chaudhury, S. (2010). Actualizing innovation effort: the impact of market knowledge diffusion in a dynamic system of competition. Journal of Marketing, 68(3), 1-20.
[6] Batarseh, F.S., Usher, J.M. and Daspit, J.J. (2017), “Absorptive capacity in virtual teams: examining the influence on diversity and innovation”, Journal of Knowledge Management, Vol. 21 No. 6, pp. 1342-1361. https://doi.org/10.1108/JKM-06-2016-0221
[7] Bhatti, M. A., & Kaur, S., (2010). “The Role Individual and Training Design Factors on Training Transfer”, Journal of European Industrial Training, Vol. 34 No. 7 pp. 656-672
[8] Bauernschuster, S., Falck, O. & Heblich, S. (2014). Training and innovation. Journal of Human Capital Vol. 3, No. 4, pg. 323–353.
[9] [Braunerhjelm, P., Ács, Z. J., Audretsch, D. B., & Carlsson, Bo. (2015). “The missing link: knowledge diffusion and entrepreneurship in endogenous growth”. In Global Entrepreneurship, Institutions and Incentives: The Mason Years. . Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing. doi: https://doi.org/10.4337/9781784718053.00014
[10] Braunerhjelm, P. J. (2010). ‘‘Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Economic Growth – past experience, current knowledge and policy implications,” Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of Innovation 224, Royal Institute of Technology, CESIS – Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies.
[11] Bulle, I. D. (2016). Intellectual Property Protection and Innovation Performance of Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Firms in Kenya. U.o.N erepository.uonbi.ac.ke
[12] Carneiro, Q. (2013). Predicting the entrepreneurial intentions of non-business majors: A preliminary investigation. In Proceedings of the USASBE/SBI Conference, Tucson, AZ (pp. 14-17).
[13] Cohen, M., & Levinthal, G. (2015). Knowledge management practices within a knowledge-intensive firm: the significance of the people management dimension. Journal of European Industrial Training, 24(2/3/4), 241-253.
[14] Cole, H. (2011). The New Production of Knowledge – the Dynamics of Science and Research in Contemporary Societies, SAGA Publications.
[15] Cooper, D. R., & Schindler, P. S. (2011). Business Research Methods, 7th ed. USA: Mconal-Graw Hill International
[16] Crépon, B., Duguet, E., & Mairesse, J. (2013). Research investment, innovation and productivity: An econometric analysis at the firm level. Economics of Innovation and New Technology Vol. 7, No. 2, pg. 115–158.
[17] Crescenzi, R., Gagliardi, L., & Percoco, M. (2013). Social Capital and the Innovative Performance of Italian Provinces. Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, 45(4), 908–929. https://doi.org/10.1068/a45221
[18] [Davies, Q. Webeza, Q. and Dorothy, S, (2014). Problems of explanation in economic sociology, in N.Nohria & R.G. Eccles (eds.), pp. 25-56.
[19] Dostie, B. S. (2014). Don’t go it alone: Alliance network composition and startups’ performance in Canadian biotechnology. Strategic management journal, 21(3), 267-294.
[20] Emilie-Pauline Gallié & Diégo Legros, “French firms’ strategies for protecting their intellectual property” (2012) 41:2 Research Policy 780
[21] Filieri, R. and Alguezaui, S. (2014), “Structural social capital and innovation. Is knowledge transfer the missing link ?”, Journal of Knowledge Management, Vol. 18 No. 4, pp. 728-757. https://doi.org/10.1108/JKM-08-2013-0329
[22] Freel, D. (2015). Actualizing innovation effort: the impact of market knowledge diffusion in a dynamic system of competition. Journal of Marketing, 68(3), 1-20.
[23] Goedhuys, Micheline & Veugelers, Reinhilde, 2012. “Innovation strategies, process and product innovations and growth: Firm-level evidence from Brazil,” Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, Vol. 23(4), pages 516-529.
[24] Goedhuys,M.,Veugelers, R.,(2012).Innovation strategies, process and product innovations and growth:firm-levelevidencefromBrazil.Struct.ChangeEcon.Dyn.23(4),516–529
[25] Goedhuys,M.,Sleuwaegen,L.,(2010).High growth entrepreneurial firms in Africa : a quintile regression approach.SmallBus.Econ.34(1),31–51
[26] Gonzàlez, X., D. Miles-Touya, and C. Pazò (2012).R&D, Worker Training, and Innovation: Firm-level evidence. Working Paper #1203, Universidade de Vigo, Departamento de Economìa Aplicada.
[27] Guston, W. (2016). Empirical Studies of Innovative Activity. Handbook of Economics of Innovation and Technological Change. P. Stoneman. Oxford, Basil Blackwell Ltd.: 182-265.
[28] Hagedoorn, J., & Wang, N. (2012). Is there complementarity or substitutability between internal and external R&D strategies?. Research policy, 41(6), 1072-1083.
[29] Hanson, C. J. (2014). Formal Training in Nascent Small U.S. Firms and Its Impact on Organization Level Performance, University of Minnesota
[30] Hartmut Hirsch-Kreinsen & Isabel Schwinge (ed.),Knowledge-Intensive Entrepreneurship in Low-Tech Industries, chapter 2, pages 17-41, Edward Elgar Publishing.
[31] Henderson, R., & Clark, K. (2016). Architectural innovation: The reconfiguration of existing product technologies and the failure of established firms. Administrative Science Quarterly, 35, 9-30.
[32] Inkinen, H., Kianto, A., Vanhala, M. (2015). Knowledge Management Practices and Innovation Performance in Finland. Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 10, issue 4. pp. 432-455. DOI: 10.1108/BJM-10-2014-0178
[33] Jansen, J. J. P., Tempelaar, M. P., Van Den Bosch, F. A. J., & Volberda, H. W. (2013). Structural Differentiation and Ambidexterity: The Mediating Role of Integration Mechanisms. Organization Science, 20(4), 797-811.
[34] Knight, J., Weir, S., & Woldehanna, T. (2013). The role of education in facilitating risk-taking and innovation in agriculture. Journal of Development Studies, 39(6), 1–22. doi:10.1080/0022038031233129356
[35] Lim K., Falk M.R. (2016) Absorptive Capacity. In: Augier M., Teece D. (eds) The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Strategic Management. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-349-94848-2_310-1
[36] Lam, R. B. (2015). Multiple regressions in psychological research and practice. Psychological Bulletin,69, 161–182.
[37] Leiva, J.C. and Brenes-Sanchez, R. (2018), “The influence of knowledge related to innovative performance”, Journal of Economics, Finance and Administrative Science, Vol. 23 No. 45, pp. 138-149.https://doi.org/10.1108/JEFAS-11-2017-0106
[38] Lennick, E. (2012). Commercial knowledge transfers from universities to firms: improving the effectiveness of university–industry collaboration. The Journal of High Technology Management Research, 14(1), 111-133.
[39] Liu, X., & Buck, T. (2012). Innovation performance and channels for international technology spillovers: Evidence from Chinese high-tech industries. Research Policy, 36(3), 355–366. doi:10.1016/j.respol.2011.12.003
[40] Lundvall, B.-Å. (2013). Innovation as an Interactive Process – from user-producer Interaction to National Systems of Innovation. Technical Change and Economic Theory. G. Dosi, C. Freeman, R. Nelson, G. Silverberg and L. Soete. London, Pinter Publishers.
[41] Martyn, Denscombe (2014). The Good Research Guide: For Small-scale Social Research Projects. McGraw-Hill Education (UK), 2014 M08 1 – 356 pages
[42] Michie, B., and Sheehan, R. Kabala (2013). Schumpeterian Conjectures: A Moderate Support from Various Innovation Measures. Determinants of innovation. A. Kleinknecht. London, Macmillan Press Ltd.: 63-150.
[43] Meetei, L. A. (2019). Start-up Venture: Journey of a First-time Entrepreneur. Vision, 23(1), 91–100. https://doi.org/10.1177/0972262918821525
[44] Mohnen, S.M, & Dagenais, G. R. (2014). Multi-depot relief dissemination problem model and its algorithm under variable roadway network structure. Jisuanji Yingyong Yanjiu, 28(6), 2016-2019.
[45] Mowery, D. and N. Rosernberg (2014). Technology and the Pursuit of Economic Growth. New York, Cambridge University Press.
[46] Moreira, F. G., Torkomian, A. L. V., & Soares, T. J. (2016). Exploration and firms’ innovative performance-How does this relationship work?. Revista Brasileira de Gestão de Negócios, 18(61), 392-415. doi:10.7819/rbgn.v18i61.2635
[47] Mubashar Farooq and Muhamamd Aslam Khan (2011). “Impact of Training and Feedback on Employee Performance” Far East Journal of Psychology and Business Vol. 5 No. 1 pp23-33
[48] Narin, F., K. Hamilton, D. Olivastro (2017). The Increasing Linkage between U.S.
[49] Nassazi, A. (2013). Effects of training on Employee performance. Evidence from Uganda. Business Economics and Tourism. Vaasan Ammattikorkeakoulu University of Applied Sciences, Koulutus, Suorituskyky, Uganda
[50] Norbäck, P. J. & Persson, L. (2010), ‘The Organization of the Innovation Industry: Entrepreneurs, Venture Capitalists, and Oligopolists’, Journal of the European Economic Association, Vol.7, pg. 1261-1290
[51] Santamaría, L., Nieto, M. J., & Barge-Gil, A. (2014). Beyond formal R&D: Taking advantage of other sources of innovation in low- and medium-technology industries. Research Policy, 38(3), 507–517. doi:10.1016/j.respol.2013.10.004
[52] Shiferaw, R.M. Effects of short-term training on pastoral community employment creation and livelihood improvement: a study on selected Ethiopian pastoral areas. J Innov Entrep 9, 17 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1186/s13731-020-00128-2
[53] Teece, D. and G. Pisano (2014). The Dynamic Capabilities of Firms: an Introduction. Industrial and Corporate Change 3(3): 537-556.
[54] Toner, S. M. (2014). Multiple regression in psychological research and practice. Psychological Bulletin,69, 161–182.
[55] Uden, A. V., Knoben, J. & Vermeulen, P. (2014). Human capital and innovation in developing countries: a firm level study
[56] Varsakelis, O. (2016). Practical Research Methods: A user friendly guide to research. How to Books Ltd, 3 Newtec Place, United Kingdom
[57] Wang, L., Li, Z. Knowledge flows from public science to industrial technologies. J Technol Transf (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10961-019-09738-9
[58] Wognum, A. A. M. (2011). Vertical Integration of HRD Policy within Companies. Human Resource Development International; Vol. 4, No.3, pg. 407–421.
[59] Wright, P.,& Geroy, D. G. (2011). Changing the mindset: the training myth and the need for word-class performance. International Journal of Human Resource Management; Vol. 12, No. 4, pg. 586–600.
[60] Yannis D. Caloghirou & Aimilia Protogerou & Aggelos Tsakanikas, 2014. “Exploring knowledge-intensive entrepreneurship in high-tech and low-tech manufacturing sectors: differences and similarities,” Chapters, in: [50]
[61] Zheng, G., Zhu, L., Liu, C. et al. TMT social capital, network position and innovation: the nature of micro-macro links. Front. Bus. Res. China 13, 3 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1186/s11782-019-0047-0
[62] Zou, B., Guo, F., & Guo, J. (2016). Absorptive capacity, technological innovation, and product life cycle: a system dynamics model. SpringerPlus, 5(1), 1662. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40064-016-3328-5

Nandwa J. Musambayi, Henry Bwisa & Elizabeth Nambuswa “Assessing the Influence of Formal Training Practices on innovation performance of Pharmaceutical Firms in Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.185-195 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/185-195.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

A Review of Wild Animal Habitat Types in Africa

Okeke, A.N. and Ijeomah H.M – October 2020 Page No.: 196-200

This review aims to give a comprehensive summary of wild animal habitats found in Africa. IUCN in their report observed how important habitat is and emphasized that the worst threat to a wild animal is the loss of habitat. Habitat of wild animals requires four basic components which are food, cover, water, and space for reproduction (nesting), protection against predators, and competitors. When these components were in good proportion and well distributed, it can meet the needs of wild animals. Any wild animal that is outside its habitat finds it difficult to adapt, survive, and reproduce. This work reviews types of habitats found in Africa as well as adaptive wild animals that inhabit them. Some of these wild animal’s habitats include savanna, mountain, and rocks, tropical rain forest, desert, aquatic (Wetland), caves and holes, arboreal, grassland, and coral reefs. Each wild animal also possesses adaptive features that enable it to survive in a specific habitat.

Page(s): 196-200                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 06 November 2020

 Okeke, A.N.
Department of Forestry and Wildlife, Federal University of Technology Owerri, Imo State Nigeria

  Ijeomah H.M
Dept of Forestry and Wildlife Management, University of Port Harcourt, P.M.B. 5323 Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria.

[1] Borrow, N. A. & Demey R. S. (2012). “A guide to the Wild Animal Habitat in Western Africa”. Princeton University Press.
[2] Calenge, C. (2006). The Package “Adehabitat” for the R Software: A Tool for the analysis of space and habitat use by animals. Ecol. Model. 197:516-519.
[3] Campos, Z. M. (2013). Effect of habitat on the survival of eggs and sex ratio of hatchlings of Caiman (Crocodilus Yacare) In the Pantanal. Braz. J. Herp. 27:127-132.
[4] Chandler, M., Johansson P. (2014). Pantanal Conservation Research Initiative. Annual Report 2004. Earthwatch, p. 124.
[5] Cumming, H. M. & Cumming G.S. (2013). Ungulate community structure and ecological processes: Body size, hoof area, and trampling in African Savannas. Oecologia. 134: 560-568.
[6] Desbiez, A. L. (2007). Wildlife Conservation in the Pantanal: Habitat alteration, invasive species, and bushmeat hunting. In. Ph.D. Thesis. Durrell Institute of Conservation And Ecology (DICE), University Of Kent, Canterbury.
[7] Erickson, W.P. (2012). Resource Selection by Animals, Statistical Design And Analysis For Field Studies. Second Edn. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, the Netherlands.
[8] Garshelis, D. L. (2000). Delusions In Habitat Evaluation: Measuring Use, Selection, And Importance. In: Research Techniques In Animal Ecology: Controversies And Consequences (Eds. Boitani L & Fuller TK), Pp. 111-164. Columbia University Press, New York.
[9] Gustavvson, K., Lonergan S. C., Ruitenbeek J. (2012). Measuring space contributions to ecological wildlife production – use of an index of captured ecosystem value. Ecol. Econ. 41: 479-490.
[10] Hoffmann, C.C. & Baattrup P.A. (2007). Re-establishing freshwater wetlands in Denmark. Ecol. Eng. 30: 157-166.
[11] IUCN (2018). Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2019-1 Table 7. Report of Species status in Conservation of Biodiversity J. Anim. Ecol. 75: 64-79.
[12] Keay, R.J. (2009). Wildlife of Nigeria. A preview version of Nigerian wildlife habitat (1960, 1964) by R. W. J Keay, C. F. A Onochie, and D. P Strandfield. Claridon Press Oxford University Press: pp: 476.
[13] Manu, S.A. (2000). Effects of habitat fragmentation on the distribution of forest birds in southwestern Nigeria with particular reference to the Ibadan Malimbes and other Malimbes, Ph.D. thesis. The University of Oxford.
[14] Mitsch, W.J. (2015). Wetland Creation, Restoration, and Conservation: A Wetland Invitational at the Olentangy River Wetland Research Park. Ecol. Engi. 24: 243-251.
[15] Morrison, M.L. (2012). Wildlife Restoration: Techniques for Habitat Analysis and Animal Monitoring. Island Press, Washington.
[16] Nigerian Environmental Analysis, (2002) Biodiversity and Forestry (BIOFOR) Indefinite Quantity Contract (IQC). (USAID BIOFOR, London, and Abuja.
[17] Oates, J.F, Gippoliti, S., Groves C.P. (2018) Cercocebus torquatus habitat The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2018
[18] Ogunjemite, B.G, Afolayan, T.A, Agbelusi, E.A (2005). Habitat Structure of Chimpanzee Community in Ise Forest Reserve, Ekiti State, South-western Nigeria, Afr. J. Ecol 43: 396-399.
[19] Petit, L.J, Petit D.R, Christian, D.G, Powell, H.D. W. (2009). wildlife communities of natural and modified habitats in Panama. Ecography 22: 292-304.
[20] Ron, S.R. (2008). Biogeographic Area Relationships of Lowland Neotropical Rainforest Based On Raw Distributions of Vertebrate Groups. Biol. J. Linn. Soci. 71: 379-402.
[21] Salami, M.E. (2007). Application of remote sensing and GIS in land use/land cover mapping and change detection in habitat a part of southwestern Nigeria. African Journal of Environmental Science and Technology 1: 099- 109.
[22] Sutherland, W.J. (2009). From Individual Behavior to Population Ecology. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
[23] Thiollay, J.M. (2005). The role of habitat types in the conservation of rain forest bird diversity in Sumatra. Conservation Biology 9: 335-353.
[24] Yarrow, Y.B. & Yarrow, E.G. (1999). Wildlife Habitat – an overview | ScienceDirect Topics. Florida. https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/earth-and-planetary-sciences/wildlife-habitat.
[25] Vavra, M. (2005). Livestock Grazing and Wildlife: Developing Compatibilities. Rangeland Ecol. Manage. 58: 128-134.

Okeke, A.N. and Ijeomah H.M “A Review of Wild Animal Habitat Types in Africa” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.196-200 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/196-200.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Non-Performing Loans and Performance of Deposits Money Banks in Nigeria

Okoli, Chukwudi Francis, Ifurueze, Meshack S, Nweze, Augustine U – October 2020 Page No.: 201-211

The study examined the relationship between non-performing loans and performance of deposits money banks in Nigeria. The specific objectives of the study are to: determine the relationship between non-performing loans to total loans and performance of deposits money banks; ascertain the relationship between liquid assets to total assets and performance of deposits money banks. Ten (10) banks were selected from the Nigeria Stock Exchange (NSE). The data used were secondary data and were drawn from 2009 to 2018. The data used were sourced from the bank’s annual report and Nigerian Stock Exchange fact book. The data collected were analysed using correlation matrix. The results show that non-performing loans to total loans have no significant relationship with performance of deposits money banks in Nigeria; whereas liquid assets to total assets have significant relationship with performance of deposits money banks in Nigeria. The study, therefore among others recommends that the Regulatory agency such as the Central Bank of Nigeria and the Nigerian Deposit Insurance Corporation should formulate rules that will reduce the occurrence of Loans for which repayment of principal or interest has been overdue for three months or more. Since non-performing loans to total loans have negative relationship with performance of deposits money banks in Nigeria.

Page(s): 201-211                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 06 November 2020

 Okoli, Chukwudi Francis
Department of Accountancy, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Anambra State, Nigeria.

 Ifurueze, Meshack S
Department of Accountancy,Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Anambra State, Nigeria

  Nweze, Augustine U.
Department of Accountancy, Enugu State University of Science and Technology, Enugu State, Nigeria

[1] Albertazzi, U. & Gambacorta, L., (2009). Bank profitability and the business cycle. Journal of Financial Stability 5, 393–409.
[2] Andrieş, A.M., Cocriş, V., & Ursu, S.G.,(2012). Determinants of bank performance in CEE countries. Review of Economic and Business Studies 5, 165–177.
[3] Albulescu, C. T. (2015). Banks’ Profitability and Financial Soundness Indicators: A Macro-Level Investigation in Emerging Countries. Procedia Economics and Finance 23, 203 – 209
[4] Almayatah, S. A. (2018). The Impact of Islamic Banks on Financial Soundness Indicators. International Review of Management and Marketing, 8(3), 26-31.
[5] Athanasoglou, P.P., Brissimis, S.N., & Delis, M.D., (2008). Bank-specific, industry-specific and macroeconomic determinants of bank profitability. Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money 18, 121–136.
[6] Babihuga, R., (2007). Macroeconomic and financial soundness indicators: An empirical investigation”, IMF Working Paper, WP/07/115. Barth, J.R., Caprio, G., & Levine, R. (2004). Bank regulation and supervision: what works best? Journal of Financial Intermediation, 13, 205-248.
[7] Berger, A.N., (1995). The relationship between capital and earnings in banking. Journal of Money, Credit and Banking 27, 432 456.
[8] Berger, A.N. & De Young, R. (1997). Problem loans and cost efficiency in commercial banks. Journal of Banking and Finance, 21(6), 849-870.
[9] Berger, A. & Humphrey, D., (1997). Efficiency of financial institutions: International survey and directions for future research. European Journal of Operational Research 98, 175–212.
[10] Bikker, J.A., & Metzemakers, P.A.J., (2005). Bank provisioning behaviour and procyclicality. Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money 15, 141–157.
[11] Bouvatier, V., & Lepetit, L., (2008). Banks’ procyclical behaviour: does provisioning matter? Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money 18, 513–526.
[12] Brissimis, S.N., Delis M.D., & Papanikolaou, N.I., (2008). Exploring the nexus between banking sector reform and performance: Evidence from newly acceded EU countries. Journal of Banking and Finance 32, 2674–2683.
[13] Cihak, M. & Schaeck, K (2010). How well do aggregate prudential ratios identify banking system problems?. Journal of Financial Stability, 6, 130-44.
[14] Demirgüç-Kunt, A., & Huizinga, H., (1999). Determinants of commercial bank interest margins and profitability: some international evidence. World Bank Economic Review 13, 379–408.
[15] Dietrich, A., & Wanzenried, G., (2011). Determinants of bank profitability before and during the crisis: Evidence from Switzerland. Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money 21, 307–327.
[16] Diamond, D.V. & Dybvig, P. (1983). Bank runs, deposit insurance, and liquidity, Journal of Political Economy, 91, 401-419.
[17] Edwards, J.K. (1997). Ethical foundations of financial regulations’, working paper, No.1620.
[18] Ezike, J. E. and M. O. Oke (2013). Capital Adequacy Standards, Basel Accord and Bank Performance: The Nigerian Experience (A Case Study of Selected Banks in Nigeria), Asian Economic and Financial Review, 3(2), 146-159.
[19] Fapohunda, F. M. & Eragbhe, E. (2017). Regulation, Financial Development, Financial Soundness and Banks Performance in Nigeria. Journal of Finance and Accounting, 5(3), 88-92. Available online at http://pubs.sciepub.com/jfa/5/3/3
[20] García-Herrero, A., Gavilá, S., & Santabárbara, D., (2009). What explains the low profitability of Chinese banks? Journal of Banking and Finance, 33, 2080–2092.
[21] Grigorian, D., & Manole, V., (2006). Determinants of commercial bank performance in transition: An application of data envelopment analysis. Comparative Economic Studies 48, 497–522.
[22] Hmweck, G.A., & Kilcollin, T.E., (1984). Bank Profitability and Interest Rate Risk. Journal of Economics and Business 36, 77–84.
[23] Iannotta, G., Nocera, G., & Sironi, A.,( 2007). Ownership structure, risk and performance in the European banking industry. Journal of Banking and Finance 31, 2127–2149.
[24] Ikpefan, O. A. (2012). Bank Capitalization and Performance in Nigeria Banking Industry (1986-2006): Empirical Evidence. European Journal of Accounting Auditing and Finance Research, Vol.1, No.4, pp.12-32, December 2012. Available at: www.ea-journals.org
[25] Ikpefan, O. A. (2013). Capital Adequacy, Management and Performance in the Nigerian Commercial Bank (1986-2006). African Journal of Business Management, Vol. 7(30), pp. 2938-2950, 14 August, 2013 DOI: 10.5897/AJBM09.258
[26] IMF (2006). Financial Soundness Indicators: Compilation Guide, International Monetary Fund, March 2006
[27] Ishaya, L. C., & Abduljeleel, B. O. (2014). Capital structure and profitability of Nigerian quoted firms: The agency cost theory perspective. American International Journal of Social Science, 3(1), 140-158.
[28] Isik, I., & Hassan, K., (2003). Financial deregulation and total factor productivity change: An empirical study of Turkish commercial banks. Journal of Banking and Finance 27, 1455–1485.
[29] Jacques, K., & Nigro, P., (1997). Risk-based capital, portfolio risk and bank capital: a simultaneous equations approach. Journal of Economics and Business 49, 533–547.
[30] Jansen, T. & Micheal, W. (1994). Financial regulations and its significance for microfinance in the Latin America and The Caribbean Kosmidou, K., (2008). The determinants of banks’ profits in Greece during the period of EU financial integration. Managerial Finance 34, 146–159.
[31] Javed, T., Younas, W., & Imran, M. (2014). Impact of capital structure on firm performance: Evidence from Pakistani firms. International Journal of Academic Research in Economics and Management Sciences, 3(5), 28-52.
[32] Kaanya and Pastory (2013). Credit Risk and Commercial Banks Performance in Tanzania: A Panel Data Analysis. Research Journal of Finance and Accounting ISSN 2222-1697 (Paper) ISSN 2222-2847 (Online). Available at: www.iiste.org
[33] Kargi, H. S. (2011). Credit Risk and the Performance of Nigerian Banks, Department of Accounting, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria. Available at: www.google.com.
[34] Kayode, O. F., Obamuyi, T. M., & Owoputi, J. A. (2015). Credit Risk and Bank Performance in Nigeria. IOSR Journal of Economics and Finance (IOSR-JEF)e-ISSN: 2321-5933, p-ISSN: 2321-5925.Volume 6, Issue 2. Ver. II (Mar.-Apr. 2015), PP 21-28. Available at: www.iosrjournals.org.
[35] Lee, C.-C., & Hsieh, M.-F., (2013). The impact of bank capital on profitability and risk in Asian banking. Journal of International Money and Finance 32, 251–281.
[36] Michael, E. I.; Etukafia, N. I.; Akpabio, E. E. & Etuk, M. I. (2018). Capital Adequacy and the Value of Banks in Nigeria: A Post-Consolidation Review, Journal of Finance and Bank Management, 6(2), 64 – 75.
[37] Mirzaei, A., Moore, T., & Liu, G., (2013). Does market structure matter on banks’ profitability and stability? Emerging vs. advanced economies. Journal of Banking and Finance 37, 2920–2937.
[38] Nawaz,M., & Munir, S. (2012. Credit Risk And The Performance Of Nigerian Banks. Interdisciplinary Journal of Contemporary Research In Business. Vol 4, No 7, November 2012.
[39] Olalekan, A., & Adeyinka, S. (2013). Capital adequacy and banks’ profitability: AN empirical evidence from Nigeria. American International Journal of Contemporary Research, 3(10), 87-93.
[40] Osinubi, I.S. (2006). “Structural Reforms in the Nigerian Banking Industry: Effects of Recapitalization on Financial Performance of Selected Banks,” 1st International Conference 15-17 2006 (eds), Published by Department of Banking and Finance, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ago-Iwoye, pp 395- 406.
[41] Pasiouras, F., & Kosmidou, K., (2007). Factors influencing the profitability of domestic and foreign commercial banks in the European Union. Research in International Business and Finance 21, 222–237.
[42] Restoy, F. (2017). Financial soundness indicators – looking beyond the lessons learned from the crisis. Keynote address at the Users’ Workshop on Financial Soundness Indicators International Monetary Fund, Washington DC, 26 April 2017.
[43] Rivard, R.J. and Thomas, C. R. (1997):The Effect of Interstate Banking on Large Bank holding Company Profitability and Risk, Journal of Economics and Business, 49(1): 61-67.
[44] Short, B., (1979). The relation between commercial bank profit rates and banking concentration in Canada, Western Europe and Japan. Journal of Banking and Finance 3, 209–219.
[45] Tochukwu, O. R. (2016). Capital Adequacy and Risk Management: A Study of the Nigerian Banking Sector. International. Journal of Innovative Science, Engineering & Technology, Vol. 3 Issue 7, July 2016 ISSN (Online) 2348 – 7968. Available at: www.ijiset.com
[46] Yildirim, S.H., Philippatos, G., (2007). Efficiency of Banks: Recent Evidence from the Transition Economies of Europe, 1993–2000. The European Journal of Finance 13, 123–143.

Okoli, Chukwudi Francis , Ifurueze, Meshack S, Nweze, Augustine U “Non-Performing Loans and Performance of Deposits Money Banks in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.201-211 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/201-211.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Liquidity and Performance of Deposits Money Banks in Nigeria

Okoli, Chukwudi Francis, Ifurueze, Meshack S. Nweze, Augustine U – October 2020 Page No.: 212-222

The study examined the relationship between liquidity and performance of deposits money banks in Nigeria. The specific objectives of the study are to: determine the relationship between liquid assets to total assets and performance of deposits money banks; examine the relationship between liquid assets to short-term liabilities and performance of deposits money banks in Nigeria. Ten (10) banks were selected from the Nigeria Stock Exchange (NSE). The data used were secondary data and were drawn from 2009 to 2018. The panel data used were sourced from the bank’s annual report and Nigerian Stock Exchange fact book. The panel data collected were analysed using Ordinary Least Square Method. The results show that liquid assets to total assets and liquid assets to short-term liabilities have insignificant relationship with performance of deposits money banks in Nigeria. The study, therefore among others recommends that the Regulatory agency such as the Central Bank of Nigeria and the Nigerian Deposit Insurance Corporation should formulate rules (fiscal policy) that will enable the deposit-taking sector to withstand unexpected financial shocks and also improve their performance.

Page(s): 212-222                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 06 November 2020

 Okoli, Chukwudi Francis
Department of Accountancy, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Anambra State, Nigeria.

  Ifurueze, Meshack S
Department of Accountancy, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Anambra State, Nigeria.

  Nweze, Augustine U
Department of Accountancy,Enugu State University of Science and Technology, Enugu State, Nigeria.

[1] Akeem, L. B., Terer, E., Kiyanjui, M. W., & Kayode, A. M. (2014). Effects of capital structure on firm’s performance: Empirical study of manufacturing companies in Nigeria. Journal of Finance and Investment Analysis, 3 (4)39-57.
[2] Akosah, N. K., Loloh, F. W., Lawson, N. & Kumah, C. (2018). Measuring Financial Stability in Ghana: A New Index-Based Approach. Online at https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/86634/
[3] Albertazzi, U. & Gambacorta, L., (2009). Bank profitability and the business cycle. Journal of Financial Stability 5, 393–409.
[4] Andrieş, A.M., Cocriş, V., Ursu, S.G.,(2012). Determinants of bank performance in CEE countries. Review of Economic and Business Studies 5, 165–177.
[5] Albulescu, C. T. (2015). Banks’ Profitability and Financial Soundness Indicators: A Macro-Level Investigation in Emerging Countries. Procedia Economics and Finance 23, 203 – 209
[6] Almayatah, S. A. (2018). The Impact of Islamic Banks on Financial Soundness Indicators. International Review of Management and Marketing, 8(3), 26-31.
[7] Athanasoglou, P.P., Brissimis, S.N. & Delis, M.D., (2008). Bank-specific, industry-specific and macroeconomic determinants of bank profitability. Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money 18, 121–136.
[8] Ayad, S. S., & Mustafa, H. M. A. (2015). The effect of capital structure on profitability: An empirical analysis of listed firms in Iraq. European Journal of Accounting, Auditing and Finance Research, 3(2), 61-78.
[9] Aymen, M. M. B. (2013). Impact of capital on financial performance of banks: The case of Tunisia. Banks and Bank Systems, 8(4), 47-54.
[10] Babihuga, R., (2007). Macroeconomic and financial soundness indicators: An empirical investigation”, IMF Working Paper, WP/07/115. Barth, J.R., Caprio, G., & Levine, R. (2004). Bank regulation and supervision: what works best? Journal of Financial Intermediation, 13, 205-248.
[11] Berger, A.N., (1995). The relationship between capital and earnings in banking. Journal of Money, Credit and Banking 27, 432 456.
[12] Berger, A.N. & De Young, R. (1997). Problem loans and cost efficiency in commercial banks. Journal of Banking and Finance, 21(6), 849-870.
[13] Berger, A. & Humphrey, D., (1997). Efficiency of financial institutions: International survey and directions for future research. European Journal of Operational Research 98, 175–212.
[14] Bikker, J.A., & Metzemakers, P.A.J., (2005). Bank provisioning behaviour and procyclicality. Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money 15, 141–157.
[15] Bouvatier, V., & Lepetit, L., (2008). Banks’ procyclical behaviour: does provisioning matter? Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money 18, 513–526.
[16] Cihak, M. & Schaeck, K (2010). How well do aggregate prudential ratios identify banking system problems?. Journal of Financial Stability, 6, 130-44.
[17] Cornett, M.M., & Tehranian, H., (1994). An examination of voluntary versus involuntary security issuances by commercial banks: the impact of capital regulations on common stock returns. Journal of Financial Economics 35, 99–122.
[18] Demirgüç-Kunt, A., & Huizinga, H., (1999). Determinants of commercial bank interest margins and profitability: some international evidence. World Bank Economic Review 13, 379–408.
[19] Dietrich, A., & Wanzenried, G., (2011). Determinants of bank profitability before and during the crisis: Evidence from Switzerland. Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money 21, 307–327.
[20] Ezike, J. E. and M. O. Oke (2013). Capital Adequacy Standards, Basel Accord and Bank Performance: The Nigerian Experience (A Case Study of Selected Banks in Nigeria), Asian Economic and Financial Review, 3(2), 146-159.
[21] Fapohunda, F. M. and Eragbhe, E. (2017). Regulation, Financial Development, Financial Soundness and Banks Performance in Nigeria. Journal of Finance and Accounting, 5(3), 88-92. Available online at http://pubs.sciepub.com/jfa/5/3/3
[22] Fenty, F. & Rusdiah, I. (2015). Determinants of capital structure in Indonesian banking sector. International Journal of Business and Management Invention, 4(12), 36-44.
[23] Financial Stability Report (2014). Explanatory notes: Compilation of financial soundness indicators
[24] Hasan, B., Mainu- Ahsan, M. F. A., Rahaman, A., & Alam, N. (2014). Influence of capital structure on firm performance: Evidence from Bangladesh. International Journal of Business and Management, 9(5), 184-194.
[25] Hmweck, G.A., & Kilcollin, T.E., (1984). Bank Profitability and Interest Rate Risk. Journal of Economics and Business 36, 77–84.
[26] Ikpefan, O. A. (2012). Bank Capitalization and Performance in Nigeria Banking Industry (1986-2006): Empirical Evidence. European Journal of Accounting Auditing and Finance Research, Vol.1, No.4, pp.12-32, December 2012. Available at: www.ea-journals.org
[27] Ikpefan, O. A. (2013). Capital Adequacy, Management and Performance in the Nigerian Commercial Bank (1986-2006). African Journal of Business Management, Vol. 7(30), pp. 2938-2950, 14 August, 2013 DOI: 10.5897/AJBM09.258
[28] IMF (2006): Financial Soundness Indicators: Compilation Guide, International Monetary Fund, March 2006
[29] Ishaya, L. C., & Abduljeleel, B. O. (2014). Capital structure and profitability of Nigerian quoted firms: The agency cost theory perspective. American International Journal of Social Science, 3(1), 140-158.
[30] Jacques, K., & Nigro, P., (1997). Risk-based capital, portfolio risk and bank capital: a simultaneous equations approach. Journal of Economics and Business 49, 533–547.
[31] Javed, T., Younas, W., & Imran, M. (2014). Impact of capital structure on firm performance: Evidence from Pakistani firms. International Journal of Academic Research in Economics and Management Sciences, 3(5), 28-52.
[32] Kaanya and Pastory (2013). Credit Risk and Commercial Banks Performance in Tanzania: A Panel Data Analysis. Research Journal of Finance and Accounting ISSN 2222-1697 (Paper) ISSN 2222-2847 (Online). Available at: www.iiste.org
[33] Kargi, H. S. (2011). Credit Risk and the Performance of Nigerian Banks, Department of Accounting, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria. Available at: www.google.com.
[34] Kayode, O. F., Obamuyi, T. M., and Owoputi, J. A. (2015). Credit Risk and Bank Performance in Nigeria. IOSR Journal of Economics and Finance (IOSR-JEF)e-ISSN: 2321-5933, p-ISSN: 2321-5925.Volume 6, Issue 2. Ver. II (Mar.-Apr. 2015), PP 21-28. Available at: www.iosrjournals.org.
[35] Klaas, J., & Vagizova, V. (2014). Tools for assessing and forecasting financial stability of the commercial bank under conditions of instability. Investment Management and Financial Innovations (4), 157-163.
[36] Kosmidou, K., (2008). The determinants of banks’ profits in Greece during the period of EU financial integration. Managerial Finance 34, 146– 159.
[37] Kremmling, M.D. (2011). The influence of financial sector regulation on bank performance: a study of bank performance during the world financial crisis. Being published Dissertation written and submitted in the University of Cyprus.
[38] Lee, C.-C., & Hsieh, M.-F., (2013). The impact of bank capital on profitability and risk in Asian banking. Journal of International Money and Finance 32, 251–281.
[39] Louzis, D.P., Vouldis, A.T., & Metaxas, V.L., (2012). Macroeconomic and bank-specific determinants of non-performing loans in Greece: a comparative study of mortgage, business and consumer loan portfolios. Journal of Banking and Finance 36, 1012–1027.
[40] Mirzaei, A., Moore, T., & Liu, G., (2013). Does market structure matter on banks’ profitability and stability? Emerging vs. advanced economies. Journal of Banking and Finance 37, 2920–2937.
[41] Nawaz,M., & Munir, S. (2012. Credit Risk And The Performance Of Nigerian Banks. Interdisciplinary Journal of Contemporary Research In Business. Vol 4, No 7, November 2012.
[42] Olalekan, A., & Adeyinka, S. (2013). Capital adequacy and banks’ profitability: AN empirical evidence from Nigeria. American International Journal of Contemporary Research, 3(10), 87-93.
[43] Olaniyi, T. A., Elelu, M. O., & Abdulsalam, T. S. (2015). Impact of capital structure on corporate performance: Pre and post crisis evaluation of selected companies in us. International Journal of Accounting Research, 2(8), 1-20.
[44] Onuorah, C. A., & Nkwazema, G. O. (2016). Capital structure performance and the determinant factors in Nigeria. International Journal of Empirical Finance, 5(2), 69-77.
[45] Pasiouras, F., & Kosmidou, K., (2007). Factors influencing the profitability of domestic and foreign commercial banks in the European Union. Research in International Business and Finance 21, 222–237.
[46] Restoy, F. (2017). Financial soundness indicators – looking beyond the lessons learned from the crisis. Keynote address at the Users’ Workshop on Financial Soundness Indicators International Monetary Fund, Washington DC, 26 April 2017.
[47] Salas, V., Saurina, J., (2002). Credit risk in two institutional regimes: Spanish commercial and savings banks. Journal of Financial Services Research 22, 203–224.
[48] Salim, M. and Yardar, R. (2012). Capital structure and firm performance: evidence from Malaysian listed companies, Procedia , Social and Behaviourial Science, 65, 156 -166.
[49] Stein, J.C., (1998). An adverse-selection model of bank asset and liability management with implications for the transmission of monetary policy. The RAND Journal of Economics 29, 466–486.
[50] Sundararajan V., Enoch C., San José A., Hilbers, P., Krueger R., Moretti M., & Slack G. (2002): Financial Soundness Indicators: Analytical Aspects and Country Practices, IMF Occasional Paper No. 212
[51] Yildirim, S.H., Philippatos, G., (2007). Efficiency of Banks: Recent Evidence from the Transition Economies of Europe, 1993–2000. The European Journal of Finance 13, 123–143.

Okoli, Chukwudi Francis, Ifurueze, Meshack S. Nweze, Augustine U “Liquidity and Performance of Deposits Money Banks in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.212-222 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/212-222.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Impact of the job satisfaction on job performance of the temporary academic staff

P. G. T. N. Perera, Thesara V. P. Jayawardane – October 2020 Page No.: 223-231

Job satisfaction and job performance are the important phenomenon in human resource management in present world. The problem of this research is to find-out whether there is an impact on job satisfaction and dimension on job performance of the temporary employees working in the academic field of Sri Lanka. It will also investigate the relationship between the dimension of job performance and job satisfaction of the respondents as well as conduct a cross check of whether the former influences latter positive or negative in the long run. The research has been known for using a research framework with a pragmatic world view with survey strategy. This study has selected samples using stratified random sampling method and sample size has calculated using Taro Yamane method. 250 temporary academic staff members of the University of Kelaniya has been selected as the sample. This research is based on the analysis of primary data and data collected through structured questionnaire which was devel1oped based on measurements to find results to the research problem by analyzing the previous researches. The data analysis process includes number of methods such as frequency, reliability, descriptive, regression and correlation. The sub component named learning environment highly contributed towards the job satisfaction while the evaluation system is the lowest contributing factor for the variable named job satisfaction. Communication between the university and employees is the most affected component on the job performance while the learning environment becomes the second important component. Need of the employees are the third important component and the emotional satisfaction about the job is the least important component while the evaluation system is not affected significantly. Research has found that there is high impact of job satisfaction on job performance of temporary academic staff.

Page(s): 223-231                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 06 November 2020

 P. G. T. N. Perera
Assistant lecturer, Department of Social Statistics, University of Kelaniya

  Thesara V. P. Jayawardane
Senior Lecturer, Department of Industrial Management, University of Moratuwa.

[1] Achieng, O. P., Ochieng, I., & Owuor, S. (2014). Effect of job redesign on employee performance in commercial banks in Kisumu, Kenya. Greener Journal of business and management studies. 4 (4). 115 – 137. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.15580/GJBMS.2014.4.040714179
[2] Aroosiya, M. A. C. F., & Ali, M. A. M. H. (2013). Impact of job design on employees’ performance: with special reference to school teachers in Kalmunai zone. Journal of management. 8 (1). Retrieved from http://ir.lib.seu.ac.lk/123456789/154
[3] Bentley, P. J., Coastes, H., Dobson, I., Goedegebuure, L., & Meek, V. L. (2013). (Eds.). job satisfaction around the academic world. Netherland: Springer Netherlands. doi: 10.1007/978-94-007-5434-8
[4] Berghe, V. (2011). Job satisfaction and job performance at the work place (degree thesis, the university of ARCADA, Denmark). Retrieved from https://www.theseus.fi/handle/10024/28669
[5] Cook, S. (2008). The essential guide to employee engagement: Better business performance. Landon: Kogan page.
[6] Ellingson, J. E., Melissa, L., & Sackett, P. R. (1998). Factors related to the satisfaction and performance of temporary employees. Journal of Applied Psychology. 83 (6). Retrieved from https://psycnet.apa.org/buy/199811735006
[7] Judge, T. A., Thoresen, C. J., Bono, J. E., & Patton, G. K. (2001). The job satisfaction – job performance relationship. Psychological bulletin. 127 (3). 376 – 407. doi: 10.1037/0033-2909.127.3.376
[8] Lawler, E. E., & Poter, L. W. (1967). The effect of performance on job satisfaction. Journal of economy and society. 7 (1). 20 – 28. doi: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-232X.1967.tb01060.x
[9] Locke, E. A. (1970). Job satisfaction and job performance: A theoretical analysis. Organizational behavior and human performance. 5 (5). 484 – 500. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/0030-5073(70)90036-X
[10] Motowidlo, S. J., & Scotter, J. R. V. (1994). Evidence thet task performance should be distinguished from contextual performance. Journal of Applied Psychology. 79 (4). 475 – 480. doi: 10.1037/0021-9010.79.4.475
[11] Sonnentag, S., & Frese, M. (2005). Psychological management of individual performance. Sonnentag, S. (Ed.) Performance concepts and performance theory. (1st ed, pp. 3-17). Germany: John Wiley & sons.Ltd.
[12] Stuart, D., Galup, G. K., & James, J. J. (2008). The Impacts of job characteristics on is employee satisfaction: A comparison between permanent and temporary employees. Journal of Computer Information Systems, 48 (4). 58-68. doi: 10.1080/08874417.2008.11646035
[13] Tashakkori, A., & Teddlie, C. (Eds.). (2010). Handbook of mixed methods in social and behavioral research. (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
[14] Uddin, M.K., Akther, S. & Tumpa, A. S. (2016). Factors Influencing Job Satisfaction of Employees: A Study on Telecommunication Sector of Bangladesh. European Journal of Business and Management. 6(11). Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/304451179 _Factors_Influencing_Job_Satisfaction_of_Employees_A_Study_on_Telecommunication_ Sector_of_Bangladesh

P. G. T. N. Perera, Thesara V. P. Jayawardane “Impact of the job satisfaction on job performance of the temporary academic staff” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.223-231 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/223-231.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Importance of Peaceful- Co-existence with other Religions in Islam (with Particular Reference to Christianity)

Tijani Ahmad Ashimi – October 2020 Page No.: 232-237

Islam is a religion of peace; it is a religion to lead mankind from the depths of darkness and ignorance towards the path of light and knowledge. The literal meaning of Islam, derived from the Arabic word Salaam, means peace. The word “Islam” has another root derivation – Slim – which means surrender or submission. In short, Islam means peace acquired by humans by submitting their will to the Will of Allah. In the most serious note, one of God’s name and attribute is al-salam(The Most Peaceful), which means, peaceful co-existence and harmonious living are very important values that Islam urge Muslims to enjoy particularly with people of other faiths and religions, such as Christianity and others.. Based on this fact, the holy Qur’an is very serious in condemning any sort of ethnic or religious hostility towards other faiths, it instead promotes peaceful co-existence and religious tolerance; for the sake of humanity, love and human dignity. Thus, this humble paper by applying Quranic approach, aims to demonstrate the importance of peaceful co-existence in Islamic worldview, and how such peaceful living could be actualized in any pluralistic and multi-religious society. Finally, the paper will provide brief conclusion followed by some suggestions and recommendations.

Page(s): 232-237                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 November 2020

  Tijani Ahmad Ashimi
Assistant Professor, Dr., Department of Fundamental Interdisciplinary Studies, Kulliyyah of Islamic Revealed Knowledge and Human Sciences, International Islamic University Malaysia (IIUM)

[1] A‘li Abdul Hamīd ,B. (1991) Riyādh Salihīn,. Damascus: Darul Khair.
[2] Al- Faruqi, (1998) Islam and Other Faith, The Islamic Foundation, IIIT, USA
[3] Al –Mawrid (1989) Arabic- English Dictionary, Darul ‘Ilm Lilmalayin.
[4] Al- Qurtubi, Jami al Bayan, Shariah Academy Publication, International Islamic University, Islamabad.
[5] Cilliers, J.(2002) Building Bridges for Interfaith Dialogue, Interfaith Dialogue and Peace building, ed. David R. Smock. Washington, DC: United States Institute of Peace.
[6] Ismail Raji al- Faruqi (1998), Islam and Other Faiths, edited by Attaullah al Siddiqi. The Islamic Foudation&IIIT, Herndon, U.S.A
[7] Muhammad S. and Muhammad A. (2007) Interfaith Dialogue, A Guide for Muslims, The International Institute of Islamic Thought. Washington.
[8] Paulos M. Gregorios, Toward a new global Concourse of Religion: The need for some fresh approaches, An Address presented at the meeting of Inter-Religious federation for World Peace, Rome, April, 2001
[9] Random House Unabridged Dictionary, Copyright © 1997, by Random House, Inc
[10] Woodhead, Linda (2004). Christianity: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Tijani Ahmad Ashimi “The Importance of Peaceful- Co-existence with other Religions in Islam (with Particular Reference to Christianity)” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.232-237 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/232-237.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Proposing Solutions to Promote the Process of Enterprise Resource Planning To the Operational Efficiency of State Corporations; a Case of Kenya Ferry Services Ltd, Kenya

Robert Keng’ara, Ibrahim Makina – October 2020 Page No.: 238-248

Due to changes in the use of technology organizations are also coming up with strategies that will enable them to reduce cost of production, improve efficiency and effectiveness of its operation. One of the strategies is the use Enterprise Resource Planning Process that integrates information system that supports business process that is in position to manage the whole organizational resources. The main objective of this study was to determine the effect of enterprise resource planning processes on operations efficiency on state corporations; a case of Kenya Ferry Services Ltd, Kenya. Specific objectives were; to establish the effect of financial integration module on operation efficiency of the state corporation’s case of Kenya Ferry Services Ltd, to determine the effect of human resources modules on operations efficiency of Kenya Ferry Services Ltd and to determine the effect of material management module on operation efficiency of the Company. The study adopted descriptive research design. Target population were; H.O.D in operations department, Engineering department, Finance department, Procurement department and Monitoring and Evaluation of Kenya Ferry Services Ltd. A sample population of the study was 45 respondents that was drawn from all the departments of the organization. Primary data was collected through questionnaires while secondary data was collected from the facility archives. Collected data was analyzed through multiple regression analysis. It was revealed that there is a positive correlation between ERP and the performance of an organization. The study recommended that there is need for organizations to implement ERP in order to improve efficiency of there operations.

Page(s): 238-248                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 November 2020

 Robert Keng’ara
Kisii University, Kenya

  Ibrahim Makina
Kisii University, Kenya

[1] Elsayed, N., Ammar, S. & Mardini, G. (2019) The Impact of ERP Utilization Experience and Segmental Reporting on Corporate Performance in the UK Context Journal of Enterprise Information Systems
[2] Elgohary, E. (2019) The Role of ERP Capabilities in Achieving Competitive Advantage: An Empirical Study on Dakahlia Governorate Companies, Egypt The Electronic Journal of Information Systems in Developing Countries
[3] Duff, W.M. and Asad, M.C. (1980) Information Management: An Executive Approach, Oxford University Press, London, p. 243.
[4] Jilani, P. A., (2014) Effects of Enterprises Resource Planning Systems on Procurement Efficiency in Selected Manufacturing Organizations in Nairobi, Kenya Unpublished MBA Theses KCA University, Kenya
[5] Juma, V., (2017) Enterprise Resource Planning System and Performance of State Corporation in Kenya Kenyatta University Institutional Repository, Masters Dissertations
[6] Karimi, J., (2017) Effects of Enterprises Resource Planning Implementation on Organization Performance in the Transport Industry in Kenya Unpublished MBA Theses USIU- Africa
[7] Kavale, S., & Mujomba, M. (2015) Effects of Enterprise Resource Planning on Organizational Performance, Kenya International Journal of Advanced Research in Management and Social Sciences. Vol. 4. No. 10
[8] Munyiri, R. E., (2014) Enterprise Resource Planning Implementation and Organizational Performance in Kenyan Energy Sector Paraststals Unpublished MBA Theses University of Nairobi, Kenya.
[9] Muraya B. W., and Richard B. Nyaoga (2018) the effect of automated information systems on the Kenyan county government’s operations: A case study of Kiambu County Government, Growing Science Publishing Company p.101-112.
[10] Mushavhanamadi, K., & Mpanza, O. L. (2018) Analysing the Impact of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) in Improving Business Operations of Cooperatives Proceeding of the International Conference of Industrial Engineering and Operations Management Washington DC, USA September 27-29 2018
[11] Njihia, E., & Mwirigi. F, F.M. (2014) The Effects of Enterprise Resource Planning Systems on Firms Performance; A Survey of Commercial Banks in Kenya International Journal of Business and Commerce Vol. 3, No. 8: PP. 120-129
[12] Nyamweya, O. E., (2017)Influence of Enterprise Resource Planning Systems on Performance of Donor Funded Projects in Kenya; A case of Geothermal Development Company in Nakuru County, Kenya Unpublished MBA University of Nairobi Kenya.

Robert Keng’ara, Ibrahim Makina “Proposing Solutions to Promote the Process of Enterprise Resource Planning To the Operational Efficiency of State Corporations; a Case of Kenya Ferry Services Ltd, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-10, pp.238-248 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/238-248.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Analysis of Boko Haram Insurgency in the North East Nigeria

Saidu Tunenso Umar, PhD- October 2020 Page No.: 249-252

This Paper examines an over decade ongoing battle with insurgent groups that threatens the stability and political integrity of Nigeria an Africa’s most populous state. These articles employed the use of secondary sources of generating data by reviewing related literature in the fight against Boko Haram insurgency in North-East Nigeria. It has been revealed that poor leadership, weak institutions of governance and low democratic values and dividends are among the causes of insurgency in the region. The paper also recommends that the Nigeria government should intensify the battle against Boko Haram in the following ways: It should involve, as a matter of fact, coordination at all agency levels diplomatic military, intelligence, Para military services, the constituent units of the countries especially border authorities, civil society groups, and the traditional authorities and network of-Early Warning Systems at the levels of the African Union, ECOWAS, among other measures.

Page(s): 249-252                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 November 2020

 Saidu Tunenso Umar
Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Adamawa State University, Mubi- Nigeria

[1] Abah, D. (2017). “De-radicalization: A neglected aspect of Nigeria’s counter terrorism strategy”. Paper presented at the 5th International Africa Peace and Conflict Resolution Conference on Restorative and Community Justice: Prospects, Challenges and Lessons, organized by the Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution, Abuja.
[2] Abdu, H. (2016). Security and Governance in North-East Nigeria, CLEEN FOUNDATION, Lagos, Abuja, Owerri, Nigeria
[3] Achodo, C. C. (2019). Boko Haram insurgency: A rethink in strategic and tactical response toward resolving the crisis. Special Report, Nextier Issues, 23 January 2019.
[4] Adesoji, A. O. (2011). Between Maitatsine and Boko Haram: Islamic fundamentalism and the response of the Nigerian State. Africa Australia, 57 (4), pp. 99–119.
[5] Aduloju, A A., Abimbola, O. and Adenipekun, L. (2014). “Boko Haram insurgency in North-Eastern Nigeria and its implications for security and stability in West African sub-region”. International Journal of Development and Conflict, 4, pp. 102–107.
[6] Bukar Y. (2016). “Security and Governance in Yobe State” in Abdu, H.(ed) (2016), Security and Governance in North-East Nigeria, CLEEN FOUNDATION, Lagos, Abuja, Owerri, Nigeria
[7] Durotoye, A (2000). “The Nigerian State at a critical juncture: The dilemma of a confused agenda”. University of Leipzig papers on Africa: Politics and Economic Series, Vol. 38.
[8] Eze, O.S. (2014).” Media and reportage of Boko Haram insurgency”. The Sun, 23 April 2014.
[9] Fafowora, O. (2013). “Understanding insurgencies in Nigeria: Nature, types, dynamics and the way out”. In: Obafemi and Galadima 2013b, pp. 1–18 (Keynote address).
[10] Fawole, W.A. (2013). “Boko Haram: Origin, development and links with domestic politics”. Paper prepared for presentation at the Strategic Communications Workshop, National Defence College, Abuja, 8–13 December.
[11] Mungono, A. K. (2016). “Security and Governance in Borno State” in Abdu, H.(ed) (2016), Security and Governance in North-East Nigeria, CLEEN FOUNDATION, Lagos, Abuja, Owerri, Nigeria
[12] Oruonye. E. O. (2016). “ Security and Governance in Taraba State” in Abdu, H.(ed) (2016), Security and Governance in North-East Nigeria, CLEEN FOUNDATION, Lagos, Abuja, Owerri, Nigeria
[13] Saalah, Y. M. (2016). “Security and Governance in Bauchi State” in Abdu, H.(ed) (2016), Security and Governance in North-East Nigeria, CLEEN FOUNDATION, Lagos, Abuja, Owerri, Nigeria
[14] Uchendu, E. (2012). New Face of Islam in Eastern Nigeria and lake Chad Basin. Aboki Publishers.
[15] Umar, M. (2016) “Security and Governance in Gombe State” in Abdu, H. (ed) (2016), Security and Governance in North-East Nigeria, CLEEN FOUNDATION, Lagos, Abuja, Owerri, Nigeria
[16] Umar, T. S. (2016) “Security and Governance in Adamawa State- Nigeria”, in Abdu, H.(ed) (2016), Security and Governance in North-East Nigeria, CLEEN FOUNDATION, Lagos, Abuja, Owerri, Nigeria

Saidu Tunenso Umar, PhD “Analysis of Boko Haram Insurgency in the North East Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.249-252 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/249-252.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Evaluation of Strategies Used To Reduce Inter-Clan Conflicts in Mumias East Sub-County, Kenya

Samson Busalire, Lilian Machariah, and Robert Aengwony – October 2020 Page No.: 253-275

Inter-clan conflicts are widely spread in the world, and Africa leading in such cases. Conflict management and peace building in Kenya continues to face challenges in the current national and regional environments. Clans in Mumias East Sub-County have been in conflict from time immemorial. Strategic coordination amongst key actors has been seemingly lacking in conflict management and peace building. The objective of this study was to evaluate the strategies put in place to reduce inter-clan conflicts in Mumias East Sub-County, Kenya. The study findings reveal that mediation (56%) was the highest in ranking as a strategy put in place to reduce Inter-clan conflicts in Mumias East Sub-County followed by negotiation, litigation and arbitration. Public participation (48.2%) was ranked as the best among other strategies employed to reduce inter-clan conflicts followed by formation of social groups, improvement of social amenities and intermarriages. Inter-clan conflicts have significant influence on disruption of learning, destruction of property, stalling of development and disruption of livelihoods in the study area. There is a significant influence by the following; gender, age, occupation, marital status and level of education on inter-clan conflicts in the study area. The study recommends that relevant institutions such as National Council of Churches of Kenya (NCCK) work more closely with the community to understand the factors that lead to recurrence of conflicts to enhance sustainable peace in the area of study. Also public participation should be encouraged to bring all people on board in development projects in the area of study to avoid stagnation of development due to conflicts of interest.

Page(s): 253-275                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 November 2020

 Samson Busalire
Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology, Department of Peace and Conflict Studies P.O BOX 150 KAKAMEGA, Kenya

 Lilian Machariah
Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology, Department of Peace and Conflict Studies P.O BOX 150 KAKAMEGA, Kenya

  Robert Aengwony
Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology, Department of Peace and Conflict Studies P.O BOX 150 KAKAMEGA, Kenya

[1] ACBF Report (2004). Reconstruction and Capacity Building in Post Conflict Countries in Africa. A Summary of Lessons from Mozambique, Rwanda, Sierra Leonne and Uganda
[2] African Union (AU) (2006). Draft Policy Framework for Post-Conflict Reconstruction and Development (PCRD). http://www.africa-union.org/root/au/Conferences/ accessed on 20th October 2010
[3] Ayofe, A, A. (2009). “Controlling Conflicts in the Resource Endowed Niger Delta Communities of Nigeria”. Ibadan Journal of Social Sciences. Vol. 7 No. 1 pp 1-16
[4] Beggs, A., & Graddy, K. (2009). Anchoring effects: Evidence from art auctions. American Economic Review, 99(3), 1027–1039.Bottom,
[5] Bercovitch ,J. (2009) The SAGE Handbook of Conflict Resolution.( London, Sage
[6] Boutros, B, G. (1992). An Agenda for Peace: Preventive Diplomacy, Peacemaking and Peace-Keeping, Report of the Secretary-General. http://www.un.org/Docs/SG/agpeace.html. Retrieved on 17th January 2012
[7] Brian A. Garner, ed. (2014). “”Suit””. Black’s Law Dictionary (10th ed.). West.
[8] Broeck, J,V. (2009). Conflict Motives in Kenya’s North Rift Region. http://www.org\conflict retrieved 5th June 2013.
[9] Burton, J. (1990). Conflict: Resolution and Prevention. St. Martin’s Press: New York
[10] Cheung,S.O,(2010) Mediation for Improved Conflict Resolution Journal of Legal Affairs and Dispute Resolution in Engineering and Construction City University of Hiong Kong.
[11] Chilumo S. and Njino J.(2010) . ‘The Role of Military Interventions in Conflict Management: A Paradigm Shift for Eastern Africa Region’. International Journal for Disaster Management & Risk Reduction. Vol.3 No.1 pp 129-138.
[12] Concepts” in Introduction to Peace and Conflict Studies in West Africa. Spectrum Books contributions” . World Development journal. Vol. 37 No. 8: 1317-1325.
[13] Cramer, C. (2006). Civil War is not a Stupid Thing: Accounting for Violence in Developing Countries. Hurst & Company: London.
[14] Curia, M. (2010). “Post Election Violence: Counseling and Conflict Recovery in Trans Nzoia District” Handicapp International : Kitale
[15] Davis F, J. (2006). “Peace and Conflict Studies: An African Overview of Basic decision making. Social Cognition, 27(3), 342–364.
[16] Development and Poverty Cycle in Countries in Africa.Africa Forum on Poverty
[17] DFID (2010). Building Peaceful States and Societies. DFID Occasional Paper. www.dfid.gov.uk retrieved 10/7/2012
[18] Englebert, P and Tull, D.M. (2008). ‘Post conflict Reconstruction in Africa Flawed Ideas about Failed States’. International Security Journal, Vol. 32, No. 4 pp 106-139 accessed on 15th June 2012.
[19] Fisher, R. (1997). “Integrative conflict resolution” in I. William Zartman and J. Lewis
[20] Flemming M,C. (2006). The African Union and Conflict Management. The U.S Army War College: Philadelphia
[21] Forces’ Role in Disaster Management’. International Journal for Disaster Management &Risk Reduction. Vol.3 No.1 pp 139-146.
[22] Government of Kenya (2002). Draft National policy for the sustainable development of the arid and semi-arid lands of Kenya. Government Printer: Nairobi.
[23] Government of Kenya (2009). National Policy On Peace building And Conflict Management (Final Version).Government of Kenya Printers: Nairobi
[24] Haider, H. (2009). Community-based Approaches to Peace building in Conflict-affected and Fragile Contexts. Governance and Social Development Resource Centre: University of Birmingham.
[25] Hussein, M (2014). Clannism and Conflict among the Ajuran, Degodia and Ogaden Pastoral Somali Clans of Wajir County, Kenya.Unpublished thesis Kenyatta University.
[26] Inglis, Laura; McCabe, Kevin (2010). “The Effects of Litigation Financing Rules on Settlement Rates”. Supreme Court Economic Review. University of California, Santa Barbara.
[27] Kagwanja, P. M. (2003). ‘Facing Mount Kenya or facing Mecca? The Mungiki, ethnic violence and the politics of the Moi succession in Kenya, 1987-2002’. African Affairs Journal. Vol.2 No. 2 pp 34-42.
[28] Kamoet, A.S (2011). “The Land Question and Intra-Ethnic Conflict in Squatter Enclaves of Mt. Elgon Region, Western Kenya.” Ph.D Thesis in Conflict Resolution and Management. MMUST: Kakamega.
[29] Kenyan Human Rights Commission, (2001). The right to return: the Internally Displaced
[30] KNBS (2009). National Population Census Report. Ministry of Planning. Government Printers:Nairobi.
[31] Knowledge Management and Program Support: Harare http://wwww.acbf-pact.org)
[32] Larrick, R. P., Heath, C., & Wu, G. (2009). Goal‐induced risk taking in negotiation and
[33] Lederach, J.P (1997). Building Peace, Sustainable Reconciliation in divided Societies. US Institute of Peace Process Press: Washington, DC.
[34] Lerner, J. S., & Keltner, D. (2000). Beyond valence: Toward a model of emotion‐specific influences on judgement and choice. Cognition and Emotion, 14(4), 473–493
[35] Lewer, F, S. (1999). Conflict Sensitive Approaches to Development, Humanitarian Assistance And Peace Building. A Resource Pack: London Limited: Ibadan
[36] Losey, B. L (2011).Conflict Prevention in East Africa: The Indirect Approach. National Defense University Press: Washington, DC
[37] Mair, S. (2009). Conflict Management in Africa. Who Cares? ISPI Policy Brief. Ispipolicybrief@ispionline.it accessed on 10/7/201
[38] Maja, J.R (2009). ‘Conflict Analysis of the 2007 Post-election Violence in Kenya: The
[39] Marshall, K. (2007) Development and faith: Where Mind, Heart and Soul Work together.(Washington DC: The World Bank , 2007.
[40] Matanga, F.K (2010). ‘Kenya’s Mount Elgon Land Clashes: An Indictment of Uniformed
[41] Maynard, K. (2004) Learning from Experience: Community-Driven Development Approaches in Conflict-Affected Countries. A paper presented at the World Bank CDD Workshop:Maputo.
[42] Michaiof, S. et.al (2002). Post- Conflict Recovery in Africa. An Agenda for the African Region. Africa Region Working Paper Series No.30 http://www.worldbank.org/afr/wps. accessed on 15th June 2011
[43] Moe, T. (2010). The Causes and Dynamics of Conflict in Sub-Saharan Africa. Program Research Project. United States Army Reserve: Pennsylvania.
[44] Mugenda, A. & Mugenda, O. (2003). Research Methods: Quantitative and Qualitative
[45] Muigua K. (2015.)Empowering the Kenyan People through Alternative Dispute Resolution Mechanisms Paper Presented at the CIArb Africa Region Centenary Conference 2015, held on 15-17 July, 2015
[46] Mulu F.K (2008) The role of Regional organizations in conflict management: IGAD and the Sudanese Civil War. Catholic University of Eastern Africa, Nairobi, pp: 3-28.
[47] Munene,M.(2014) The Study Practice of Peace and Security in Africa:United Nation Publishers,Nairobi.
[48] Mwamba, P.S (2010). ‘Gaps in Eastern Congo Peace Building Process: The Role Of Peace Education and Local Tensions’. Africa Peace and Conflict Journal Vol. 3 No.2 pp 43-59. www.apcj.upeace.org accessed on 15th June 2011
[49] Mwaura, C(2005). Kenya and Uganda Pastoral Conflict Case Study. Human Development Report. Oxford University Press: New York
[50] Ochodo, C (2000). Conflict and Post Conflict Patterns, Issues, Impact on Economic
[51] Ogunsanya, K. (2007). Women Transforming Conflicts in Africa: Descriptive Studies from Burundi, Cote d’Ivoire, Sierra Leone, South Africa & Sudan. Occasional paper series.Vol. 2 No.3 ACCORD: Durban.
[52] OHCHR (2008). Fact Finding Mission to Kenya. www.humanrights.org/htm retrieved 12 June 2012.
[53] Ohiorhenuan, G. (2009). Post-Conflict Economic Recovery: Enabling Local Ingenuity. CRISE issue six. www.crise.ox.ac.uk
[54] Okoth P, G. & Ogot A, B. (2008). Conflict in Contemporary Africa. Jomo Kenyatta Foundation: Nairobi
[55] Ottaway, M. (2006). An End to Africa’s War. Rethinking International Intervention.Carnegie Endowment for International Peace: Washington, DC.
[56] Oucho, J.O (2008). Undercurrents of Post-Election Violence In Kenya: Issues In The Long-Term Agenda. School of Journalism Press and Population Studies and Research Institute: University of Nairobi.
[57] Oyugi, W. O. (1997). “Ethnicity in the electoral process: The 1992 general elections in Kenya”.African Journal of Political ScienceVol. 2, No. 1, pp. 41-69.
[58] Oyugi, W.O. (2002), “Politicized ethnic conflict in Kenya: a periodic phenomenon”, in Bujra, A.and Ahmed, A. (Eds), African Conflicts: Their Management, Resolution, and Post-Conflict Reconstruction, DPMF/OSSREA: Addis Ababa.
a. Pathfinder’. A Journal of peace and Conflict Studies Vol.1 No.1. pp 34-47.
b. Persons and the Culture of Impunity in Kenya. Kenya Human Rights Commission Nairobi.
[59] Peters, P. (2009). “Challenges in land tenure and land reform in Africa: Anthropological
[60] Pkalya et.al (2004) “Traditional Conflict Resolution Mechanisms in Pokot, Turkana, Samburu & Marakwet” inIndigenous Democracy eds Rabar, B. and Karimi, M. ITGD-EA: Nairobi.
[61] Pkalya, R. & Mohamud, A. (2006a). ed. Muli. EConflict Management in Kenya towards Policy and Strategy Formulation.A publication of Practical Action: Nairobi
[62] Pkalya, R. and Mohamud, A. (2005).An assessment of the Socio-Economic Impacts of Conflict on Pastoral and Semi Pastoral Economies in Kenya and Uganda. A publication of Practical Action: Nairobi
[63] Pottebaum, D. and Lee, C. (2007). In Control of their Future: Community-Led Reconciliation and Recovery. Paper presented at the World Bank workshop “Moving out of Poverty in Conflict- Affected Areas,” 16 April. Washington DC: World Bank.
[64] Prasad, C (2010). EffectivePost Conflict Rehabilitation to Prevent Future Conflicts in Order to Consolidate Democracy through Sustainable Peace Initiatives. International Peace Academy: Sri Lanka.Publications 2009.), p.274.
[65] Rasmussen (eds.), Peacemaking in International Conflict: Methods and Techniques. United States Institute of Peace Press: Washington D.C.Reduction Strategies: Yamoussoukro
[66] Richmond, O. (2001). “Rethinking conflict resolution: The linkage problematic between “Track I” and “Track II”. Journal of Conflict Studies Vol 21 No.2 155–61.
[67] Sears, A. (2008). A Good Book, In Theory: A Guide to Theoretical Thinking. Higher Education University of Toronto Press: North York.
[68] Séverine A. (2008). The trouble with Congo: How local disputes fuel regional violence. Foreign Affairs. United States Institute of Peace Press: Washington D.C
[69] Thania, P. (2003). Community-based Bottom-up Peacebuilding: The Development of the Life and Peace Institute’s Approach to Peacebuilding and Lessons Learned from Somalia, 1990–2000. Social Development Papers: Conflict Prevention and Reconstruction No. 14. Life and Peace Institute: Uppsala Theoretical issues. Psychological Bulletin, 108(3), 515–532.
[70] Thompson, L. L. (1990b). Negotiation behavior and outcomes: Empirical evidence and
[71] Thompson, L. L. (2009). The mind and heart of the negotiator (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River,NJ: Prentice Hall.
[72] UNDG (2007). Joint Guidance Note on Integrated Recovery Planning using Post Conflict Needs Assessments and Transitional Results Framework: http://www.undg.org/pcna accessed on 20th November 2011
[73] UNDP (2011). “Community Peace Recovery and Reconciliation” A Handbook for Generating Leadership for Sustainable Peace and Recovery among Divided Communities. Oxford University press: New York
[74] Van Dijk, E., Van Kleef, G. A., Steinel, W., & Van Beest, I. (2008). A social functional approach to emotions in bargaining: When communicating anger pays and when it backfires. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 94(4), 600–614.
[75] Werner, K (2010). “Rediscovering Indigenous Peace building Techniques: The Way to Lasting Peace?” Africa Peace and Conflict Journal Vol.3 No.2 pp 60-73 www.apcj.upeace.org. accessed on15th June 2011
[76] Zant,V.B.A,Kray ,L.J (2015) Negotiation and conflict resolution: A behavioral decision research perspective John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Published 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Samson Busalire, Lilian Machariah, and Robert Aengwony “Evaluation of Strategies Used To Reduce Inter-Clan Conflicts in Mumias East Sub-County, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-10, pp.253-275 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/253-275.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Volunteerism Declined Among University Students: Why Do They Not Volunteer?

A.N. Normah & Z.M. Lukman – October 2020 Page No.: 276-280

In this emerging economy, volunteerism has being part of important activities in many countries. It is also contributed towards the national development in producing proactive people to contribute volunteering towards community. It is one of the fundamental social activities which could be able to make our society and living condition in harmony, peace, and enjoyment. Volunteerism as an activity, is not money-oriented, but it benefitted to individual or group receiver in community and volunteers themselves. It is an altruistic activity. Globally, volunteerism has been considered a substantial development of the state, as it almost all the times enhance the social welfare system and provides help for the needed people in society. Even though it has been highly recognised as one of the influential factors for social development in many countries, unfortunately, the involvement of people in volunteerism is lately reported declined, particularly among university students. The declining participation of university students in volunteerism activity is mainly as a result of a hectic schedule, financial problem and the distance of the activity that is too far away from campus. Other factors mentioned are mobility-related problems, have no suitable time, health problems, have no required skill, and focusing only on academic achievement.

Page(s): 276-280                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 November 2020

 A.N. Normah
Faculty of Applied Social Sciences, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Kuala Nerus, Terengganu Malaysia

  Z.M. Lukman
Faculty of Applied Social Sciences, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Kuala Nerus, Terengganu Malaysia

[1] Haski-leventhal, D. (2009). Addressing social disadvantage through volunteering. The Department of the Prime Minister & Cabinet Report. Australia: Centre for Social Impact.
[2] Nurfarahin.S., Bukhari,W.M.Y., Azlini,C., Kamal, M.Y.,Normala, R. & Lukman, Z.M. (2018). The relationship between management practices and volunteer’s retaining. International Journal of Research Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS), 2 (12), 33-38.
[3] United Nations Volunteer (UNV) (2011). State of the world’s volunteerism report. United Nations.
[4] Rehberg, W. (2005). Altruistic individualists: Motivations for international volunteering among young adults in Switzerland. Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organisations,16(2),109-122.
[5] Faranadia, A. Bukhari, W.M.Y., Kamal, M.Y., Normala, R., Lukman, Z.M. & Azlini, C. (2018). International Journal of Research Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS), 2 (12), 49-53.
[6] Rodell, J.B., Breitsohl, H., Schroder, M., Keating, D.J. (2016). Employee Volunteering: A review and framework for future research. Journal of Management, 42 (1), 55-84.
[7] Gage III, R.L. & Thapa, B. (2011). Volunteer motivations and constraints among college students: Analysis of the volunteer function inventory and leisure constrains models. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, 41(3), 405-430.
[8] Tran, B. (2016). An Overview of volunteering in adolescence: Predictor, outcomes and time trends. UROP Report. Minnesota: University of Minnesota.
[9] Mardhiyyah, S., Khairudin, M., Asmidar, A. & Mohd Dasuqkhi, M.S. (2013). Empowering youth volunteerism: The importance and global motivating factors. Journal of Educational and Social Research, 3(7), 502–507.
[10] Gombe, S.K., Turiman, S., Ismi Arif, I. & Zohara, O. (2015). Empowering youth through volunteerism: The importance of global motivating factors. IOSR Journal of Humanities and Social Science (IOSR-JHSS), 20(11), 35-39.
[11] Hassan, A., Noordin, T.A. & Sulaimana S. (2010). The status on the level of environmental awareness in the concept of sustainable development amongst secondary school students. Procedia Social and Behavioral Sciences 2: 1276–1280.
[12] Simha, A., Topuzova, L.N. & Albert, J.F. (2011). V for volunteering-the journeys of undergraduate volunteers. Journal of Academic Ethics, 9, 107–126.
[13] Evelyn Lim, A.L., Wong, L.J., Sheena, B. & Manohar, M. (2020). Nature conservation volunteerism among school students. The Malaysian Forester, 83 (1), 48-63.
[14] Spanier, G.B. (2010). Creating adaptable universities. Innovate Higher Education, 35 (2), 91-99.
[15] Putnam, R.D. (2000). Bowling alone. New York: Simon and Schuster.
[16] Samnegard, E. (2011). Involving a new generation: The motives why student volunteer or not. (Thesis). Malmo University, Scania: Sweden.
[17] Siti Hawa, A. (2002). Volunteerism and the development of Malaysia social care system. Pulau Pinang: School of Health Science, University Science Malaysia: Malaysia.
[18] Adibah, A.L., Mohd Shafry, M.R., Nor Fadila, M.A. & Crystal, J.P. (2016). Kesedaran sosial dan penglibatan mahasiswa dalam program khidmat masyarakat. Jurnal Pemikir Pendidikan, 7, 89-100.
[19] Institut Penyelidikan Pembangunan Belia Malaysia (2012). Masa lapang belia mengikut aktiviti. Teks Fakta Belia. Retrieved from http://www. Ippbm.gov.my.
[20] National Youth Development Policy, 1997. Retrieved from http//www.kbs.gov.my.
[21] Azrina, M.A. & Vishalache. B. (2016). Impak kesukarelawanan dalam kalangan belia di Kuala Lumpur: Satu kajian. Jurnal Kepimpinan Pendidikan, 3(4), 25-43.
[22] U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistic (2016). Volunteering in the United States in 2015. Retrieved from http//www. bls.gov.
[23] UK Civil Society Almanac (2020). What is the demographic of volunteer? Retrieved from http//www.ncvo.org.uk.
[24] Azizan, B. (2016). Kesukarelawanan. Pustaka Qarya. Perlis: Kangar.
[25] Evans, E. & Saxton, J. (2005). The 21st Century Volunteer. A Report on the Changing Face on Volunteering in the 21st Century. London: NEPSynergy.
[26] Shaw, S. M., Bonen, A. & Mccabe, J. F. (1991). Do more constraints mean less leisure? Examining the relationship between constraints and participation. Leisure Research, 23(4), 286-300.
[27] Smith, K.A., Kirsten, H., Haski-Leventhal, D., Cnaan, R. A., Handy, F. & Brudney, J. L. (2010). Motivations and benefits of student volunteering : comparing regular, occasional and non-volunteers in five countries. Canadian Journal of Nonprofit and Social Economy Research, 1(1), 65-81.
[28] Mowen, A.J., Payne, L.L. & Scott, D. (2005) Change and stability in park visitation constraints revisited. Leisure Sciences, 27(2), 191-204.
[29] Plenty, M. & Regnier, M. (2003). Volunteer service by young people from high school through early adulthood. National Center for Education Statistics (NCES): Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education.
[30] Brewis, B., Russell, J. & Holdsworth, C. (2010). Bursting the bubble: Students, volunteering and the community. London: Institute for Volunteering Research.
[31] Abdul Latif, A., Samsudin, A.R. Latifah, P. & Faizah, A. (2012). Understanding of environmental citizenship among Malaysian youths: A study on perception and participation. Asian Social Science, 8(5), 85-92.
[32] Widjaja, E. (2010). The motivation behind volunteerism. CMC Senior Theses.
[33] Ryan, R.L., Kaplan, R. & Grese, R.E. (2001). Predicting volunteer commitment in environmental stewardship programmes. Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, 44(5), 629-648.
[34] Papadakis, K. (2004). Understanding volunteers’ motivations. (Thesis). State University of New York, New York, United States.
[35] Azizi, Y. & Noordin, Y. (2006). Belia: Sejauhmanakah budaya kesukarelawanan boleh dipupuk melalui persatuan? Skudai: Universiti Teknologi Malaysia.
[36] Holdsworth, C. (2010). Why volunteer ? Understanding motivations for student volunteering. British Journal of Educational Studies, 58(4), 421-437.
[37] Gronlund, H., Holmes, K., Kang, C., Cnaan, R.A., Handy, F., Brudney, J.L. et al. (2011). Culture values and volunteering: A cross-cultural comparison of students motivation to volunteer in 13 countries. Journal of Academic Ethics, 9(2), 87-106.
[38] Saifuddin, A. (2001). Gerakan kesukarelawanan: Menjana perubahan bermakna. Kuala Lumpur: Majlis Belia Malaysia.
[39] Hall, M., Lasby, D., Gumulka, G. & Tryon, C. (2006). Caring Canadians involved Canadians. Highlights from the 2004 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating. Ottawa: Statistics, Canada.
[40] Gaskin, K. (1999). Valuing volunteers in Europe: A comparative study of the volunteer investment and value audit. Voluntary Action, 2(1), 33-49.
[41] Crowford, D.W., Jackson, E.L. & Godbey, G. (1991). A hierarchical model of leisure constraints. Leisure Sciences, 13(4), 309-320.
[42] Lee, S., Saito, T., Takahashi, M. & Kai, I. (2007). Volunteer participation among older adults in Japan. An analysis of the determinants of participation and reason for non-participation. Archives of Gerontol and Geriatrics, 47(2),173-187.
[43] Sundeen, R.A., Raskoff, S.A. & Garcia, M.C. (2007). Differences in perceived barriers to volunteering to formal organisations: Lack of time versus lack of interest. Nonprofit Management and Leadership, 17, 279-300.
[44] Stukas, A.A. Jr., Switer, G.E., Dew, M.A., Goycoolea, J.M. & Simmons, R.G. (1999). Parental helping models, gender and service-learning. In Ferrari, J.R. & Chapman, J.G. (eds.). Educating students to make-a-difference: Community-based service-learning. Binghamton, NY: Hayworth.
[45] Gasiorek, J. & Giles, H. (2013). Communication, volunteering and ageing. A research agenda. International Journal of Communication, 7, 59-77.
[46] Jones, S.R. & Hill, K.E. (2003). Understanding patterns of commitment: Student motivation for community-service involvement. The Journal of Higher Education, 74(5), 516-539.
[47] Jackson, E.L., Crawford, D.W. & Godbey, G. (1993). Negotiation of leisure constraints. Leisure Sciences, 15(1), 1-11.

A.N. Normah¹ & Z.M. Lukman “Volunteerism Declined Among University Students: Why Do They Not Volunteer? ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.276-280 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/276-280.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Narrating the Environment in Zakes Mda’s The Heart of Redness

Nfon, Rita Gola PhD, Mbu, Dora Nyuykighan PhD- October 2020 Page No.: 281-288

The aim of this paper is to underline the relationship between the postcolonial narrative and environmental consciousness from the perspective of Zakes Mda’s The Heart of Redness. In other words, the paper stresses that the postcolonial writer, far from limiting his/her engagements to political issues, broadens their research to include the place of nature in the life of the postcolonial subject. Zakes Mda’s The Heart of Redness, in line with the above assertion, romanticizes the natural environment, hinges on the interconnectivity of the human and nonhuman forces in place and, consequently, becomes a critic of environmental harm. The article, thus, investigates into the meaning of ecology and, then, defines its relation with its surrounding human species. With a tilt towards postcolonial ecocriticism’s paradigm as articulated by Arturo Escobar and a host of others, the paper analyses Mda’s environmental concerns in The Heart of Redness from four standpoints, namely: nature representation, nature-culture matrix, nature conservation, and a move towards ecological holism. In a nutshell, the essay argues that nature is an active agent to the wellbeing of the postcolonial subject and should not be abused and misused. The article contends that the development of a postcolonial space is the result of the respect for, and the sustenance of the environmental forces in place.

Page(s): 281-288                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 November 2020

 Nfon, Rita Gola PhD
Department of English, University of Ngaoundere, Cameroon

  Mbu, Dora Nyuykighan PhD
Department of African Literature and Civilisations , University of Yaounde I, Cameroon

[1] Blair, R. (2000). Transported Landscapes: Reflections on Empire and Environment in the Pacific. In Helen Tiffin (ed.), Five Emus to the King of Siam: Environment and Empire, Amsterdam; Brill/Rodopi , pp 85 –111.
[2] Buell, L. (2005). The Future of Environmental Criticism: Environmental Crisis and Literary Imagination. Oxford; Blackwell.
[3] …. (2001). Writing for an Endangered World: Literature, Culture, and Environment in the U.S. and Beyond. Cambridge, MA; Harvard University Press.
[4] .… (1995). The Environmental Imagination: Thoreau, Nature Writing, and the Formation of American Culture. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
[5] Crosby, A. W. (1986). Ecological Imperialism: The Biological Expansion of Europe, 900-1900. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.
[6] Carter, E., James D. & Judith S. (Eds). (1993). Place and Space: Theories of Identity and Location. London, Lawrence & Wishart.
[7] … (1973). The Columbian Exchange: Biological and Cultural Consequences of 1492. Connecticut, Greenwood Press.
[8] DeLoughrey, E., Renee G., & George H. (Eds). (2005). Caribbean Literature and the Environment: Between Nature and Culture. Charlottesville; Virginia University Press.
[9] Dixon, T. (1999). “Inculcating Wilderness: Ecocomposition, Nature writing and the Regreening of the American Suburbs”. The Nature of Cities: Ecocriticism and Urban Environments (ed), Micheal Benneth & David W. Teague. Tucson; University of Arizona Press, 77-50.
[10] Escobar, A. (1995). Encountering Development: The Making and Unmaking of the Third World. Princeton; Princeton University Press.
[11] Glotfelty, C. & Harold, F. (Eds). (1996). The Ecocriticism Reader: Landmarks in Literary Ecology. Athens, University of Georgia Press.
[12] Harre, R., Jens, B., & Peter, M. (1999). Greenspeak: A Study of Environmental Discourses. Thousand Oaks, CA; Sage.
[13] Herndle, C. G., & Smart, C., Brown (Eds.) (1996). Green Culture: Environmental Rhetoric. Contemporary America. Madison; University of Wisconsin Press.
[14] Huggan, G. (2007). Postcolonialism, Ecocriticism and the Animal in Canadian Fiction. In Fiona Becket & Terry Gifford (eds.), Culture, Creativity and Environment: New Environmentalist Criticism, Amsterdam: Rodopi, pp 161–80.
[15] Williams, R. (1985). Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society. New York, Oxford University Press.
[16] … (1983). Culture and Society: 1780–1950. New York, Columbia University Press.
[17] O’Brien, S. (2007). “Back to the World: Reading Ecocriticism in a Post-colonial Context”. H. Tiffin (ed.), Five Emus to the King of Siam: Environment and Empire, Amsterdam, Rodopi, pp177–99.
[18] … (2001). Articulating a World of Difference: Ecocriticism, Postcolonialism and Globalization. In Canadian Literature, 170 (171), pp140–58.
[19] Mda, Z, (2005), The Whale Caller, Harmondsworth: Penguin.
[20] …, (2002). The Heart of Redness. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.
[21] Mukherjee, P. (2006). Surfing the Second Waves: Amitav Ghosh’s Tide Country. In New Formations, 59, pp 144–57.
[22] Nixon, R. (2005). Environmentalism and Postcolonialism. In Ania Loomba, Suvir Kaul, Matti Bunzl, Antoinette Burton & Jed Esty (eds), Postcolonial Studies and Beyond, Durham, NC: Duke University Press, pp233–51.
[23] … (1992). London Calling: V.S. Naipaul. Postcolonial Mandarin. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Nfon, Rita Gola PhD, Mbu, Dora Nyuykighan PhD “Narrating the Environment in Zakes Mda’s The Heart of Redness” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.281-288 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/281-288.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Stock Market and Exchange Rate Interactions in Nigeria: A Cointegration with Structural Break Analysis
Kenechukwu J. Nwisienyi, Onyeka A. Obi October 2020 – Page No.: 289-295

The study investigated the relationship between stock market movement and exchange rate in Nigeria using a monthly time series data for the periods 2008M1 to 2019M12. The Lee Strazicich (2003) LM unit root test and the Hatemi-J (2008) cointegration test, all allowing for the presence of more than one endogenously determined structural break, were applied to examine the stationarity and the long-run relationship of the variables respectively. The result showed the presence of two structural breaks in 2009M11 and 2011M2 following the Zt statistics of the Hatemi J. cointegration test and that there is no cointegration among the variables as reported by all the test statistics (ADF, Zt and Za) of the same cointegration test. The short-run model shows a statistically significant positive relationship between the stock market and exchange rate at lag 2 which indicates that the impact of short-run exchange rate movements of previous 2 months has a significant impact on the Nigerian stock market returns. All other variables are not influential in the short run as they returned statistically insignificant. Finally, the Pairwise Granger causality test showed no form of directional causality amongst the variables. This negates the flow and stock-oriented models.

Page(s): 289-295                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 November 2020

 Kenechukwu J. Nwisienyi
School of Financial Studies, Department of Banking and Finance,Federal Polytechnic Oko, Anambra State Nigeria

  Onyeka A. Obi
School of Financial Studies, Department of Banking and Finance,Federal Polytechnic Oko, Anambra State Nigeria

[1] Ali, H. S., Mukhtar, U. & Maniam, G. S. (2015). Dynamic links between exchange rates and stock prices in Malaysia: An asymmetric cointegration analysis. Journal of Economics and Political Economy, 2(3), 411 – 417. Retrieved from http://kspjournals.org/index.php/JEPE/article/view/357/555
[2] Bala Sani, A. R. & Hassan, A. (2018). Exchange Rate and Stock Market Interactions: Evidence from Nigeria. Arabian Journal of Business and Management Review, 8(1), 1 – 5. Retrieved from https://www.hilarispublisher.com/open-access/exchange-rate-and-stock-market-interactions-evidence-from-nigeria.pdf
[3] Branson, W., Halttunsen, H. & Masson, P. (1977). Exchange rate in the short run: The Dollar-Deutsche. Applied Economics, 24, 459-464.
[4] Central Bank of Nigeria (2019). CBN Statistical bulletin. Retrieved from https://www.cbn.gov.ng/Out/2020/STD/2019Q4%20Quarterly%20Statistical%20Bulletin%20Combined_Final.xlsx
[5] Dornbusch, R. & Fisher, S. (1980). Exchange rates and the current account. American Economic Review, 70, 960 – 971.
[6] Ejem, C. A. & Ogbonna, U. G. (2019). Modeling of volatility and daily exchange rates in Nigeria. International Journal of Economics and Financial Research, 5(11), 265 – 275. Retrieved from https://www.arpgweb.com/pdf-files/ijefr5(11)264-275.pdf
[7] Ejem, C. A. & Ogbonna, U. G. (2020). Stock prices and exchange rates relations: Evidence from the Nigerian Stock Exchange. IOSR Journal of Economics and Finance, 11(1), 1 – 13. Retrieved from http://www.iosrjournals.org/iosr-jef/papers/Vol11-Issue1/Series-4/A1101040113.pdf
[8] Enders, W. & Siklos, P. (2001). Cointegration and threshold adjustment. Journal of Business and Economic Statistics, 19(2), 166–176. doi: 10.1198/073500101316970395
[9] Gregory, A. W. & Hansen, B. E. (1996). Residual-based tests for cointegration in models with regime shifts. Journal of Econometrics, 70(1), 99 – 126. Retrieved from https://www.ssc.wisc.edu/~bhansen/papers/joe_96.pdf
[10] Hansen, B. (2001). The new econometrics of structural change: Dating breaks in U.S labor productivity. Journal of Economic Perspectives, 15(4), 117 – 128. Retrieved from https://www.aeaweb.org/articles/pdf/doi/10.1257/jep.15.4.117
[11] Hatemi-J, A. (2008). Tests for cointegration with two unknown regime shifts with an application to financial market integration. Empir Econ, 35, 497 – 505. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/18805381/Tests_for_cointegration_with_two_unknown_regime_shifts
[12] Hwang, J. (2004). Cointegration and the causality between stock prices and exchange rates of the Korean economy. International Business & Economics Research Journal, 3(4), 79 – 84. Retrieved from https://clutejournals.com/index.php/IBER/article/view/3684/3728
[13] Jamil, M. & Ullah, N. (2013). Impact of Foreign Exchange rate on stock prices. IOSR Journal of Business and Management, 7(3), 45 – 51. Retrieved from http://www.iosrjournals.org/iosr-jbm/papers/Vol7-issue3/G0734551.pdf?id=5284
[14] Kunitomo, N. (1996). Tests of unit roots and cointegration hypotheses in econometric models. Japanese Economic Review, 47(1), 79 – 109. Retrieved from https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/j.1468-5876.1996.tb00036.x
[15] Lee, J. & Strazicich, M. C. (2003). Minimum Lagrange Multiplier unit root test with two structural breaks. Review of Economics and Statistics, 85(4), 1082-1089. Retrieved from https://libres.uncg.edu/ir/asu/f/Strazicich_Mark_2003_Minimum_Lagrange.pdf
[16] Lyons, S. E. & Murinde, V. (1994). Cointegrated and Granger causality testing of hypothesis on supply leading and demand following finance. Economic Note, 23, 17-36. Retrieved from https://api.semanticscholar.org/CorpusID:157799933
[17] Miller, S. M. & Russek, F. S. (1990). Co-integration and error correction models: The temporal causality between government taxes and spending. Southern Economic Journal, 57, 221 – 229.
[18] Oji, H. (2019, October 03). 59 years after, the stock market still bogged down by neglect, crisis of confidence, illiquidity. The Guardian. Retrieved from https://guardian.ng/business-services/59-years-after-stock-market-still-bogged-down-by-neglect-crisis-of-confidence-illiquidity/
[19] Oseni, O. I. & Nwosa, P. I. (2011). Stock market volatility and macroeconomic variables volatility in Nigeria: An exponential GARCH approach. Journal of Economics and Sustainable Development, 2(10), 28 – 42. Retrieved from http://www.iiste.org/Journals/index.php/JEDS/article/download/791/694
[20] Oxley, L. & Greasley, D. (1998). Vector autoregression, cointegration, and causality: Testing for causes of the British industrial revolution. Applied Economics, 30, 1387-1397. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/2255224/Vector_autoregression_cointegration_and_causality_testing_for_causes_of_the_British_industrial_revolution
[21] Perron, P. (1989). The great crash, the oil price shock, and the unit root hypothesis. Econometrica, 57, 1361–1401.
[22] Phylaktis, K. & Ravazzolo, F. (2005). Stock prices and exchange rate dynamics. Journal of International Money and Finance, 24(7), 1031 – 1053. Retrieved from https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/b22e/1a2a3048ed687463231c6812ed144ccaf15c.pdf
[23] Rahman, L. & Uddin, J. (2008). Relationship between Stock Prices and Exchange Rates: Evidence from Bangladesh. International Journal of Business and Management, 3(9), 52 – 57. Retrieved from http://www.ccsenet.org/journal/index.php/ijbm/article/view/1261
[24] Stavarek, D. (2005), Stock prices and exchange rates in the European Union and the United States: Evidence on their mutual interactions. Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), 55, 3(4), 141-161. Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Daniel_Stavarek/publication/24115439_Stock_Prices_and_Exchange_Rates_in_the_EU_and_the_USA_Evidence_of_their_Mutual_Interactions/links/0fcfd505733be2048c000000/Stock-Prices-and-Exchange-Rates-in-the-EU-and-the-USA-Evidence-of-their-Mutual-Interactions.pdf
[25] Tsen, W. (2011). The real exchange rate determination: An empirical investigation. International Review of Economics and Finance, 20(4), 800 – 811. Retrieved from https://isiarticles.com/bundles/Article/pre/pdf/8862.pdf
[26] Türsoy, T. (2017). Causality between Stock Prices and Exchange Rates in Turkey: Empirical Evidence from the ARDL bounds test and a combined cointegration approach. International Journal of Financial Studies, 5(8), 1 – 10. Retrieved from https://www.mdpi.com/2227-7072/5/1/8/pdf
[27] Umoru, D. & Asekome, M. O. (2013). Stock prices and exchange rate variability in Nigeria: Econometric analysis of the evidence. European Scientific Journal, 9(25), 261 – 285. Retrieved from https://eujournal.org/index.php/esj/article/view/1771
[28] Zubair, A. (2013). The causal relationship between Stock Market Index and Exchange Rate: Evidence from Nigeria. CBN Journal of Applied Statistics, 4(2), 87 – 110. Retrieved from https://www.cbn.gov.ng/out/2014/sd/causal%20relationship%20between%20stock%20market%20index%20and%20exchange%20rate_evidence%20from%20nigeria.pdf

Kenechukwu J. Nwisienyi, Onyeka A. Obi “Stock Market and Exchange Rate Interactions in Nigeria: A Cointegration with Structural Break Analysis” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.289-295 October 2020 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/289-295.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The History of Mystique Building and Big Man Syndrome: The Case of Jomo Kenyatta Identity in Kenya

Daniel Daniel Simotwo – October 2020 Page No.: 296-302

The history of mystique building and bigman syndrome among prominent personalities is not a new phenomenon in the contemporary society. This paper attempts to carry out an investigation into the various claims that attends the identity of Kenya’s first president Mzee Jomo Kenyatta whose original name was known as Johnstone Kamau wa Ngengi. The paper seeks to find out the claims of various ethnic communities within and without, that Jomo Kenyatta is one of their own. Among the claims are:- is Jomo Kenyatta, a Kalenjin, a Mijikenda, a Maasai, or a descendant of Uganda’s Bunyoro Kitara kingdom’s royal family? The paper also seeks to establish whether these claims have any political motives and reasons for change of name from Johnstone Kamau wa Ngengi to Jomo Kenyatta. This paper adopts a qualitative approach by reviewing the available literature on the subject to come up with a logical conclusion. The paper examines literature on the meaning of the name Jomo and Kenyatta in the Gikuyu language vis-à-vis the Kalenjin and Maasai claims that the names have a meaning in their languages. The paper also examines literature on the claims that Kenyatta has roots among the Mijikenda and the Bunyoro Kitara’s royal family. The paper concludes that apart from the claims made by the Bonyoro Kitara royal family, no confirmation could be made, unless a DNA test is made or the Kenyatta family issue a public statement. As for the Kalenjin claims the same standard of prove is required to clarify the claims. For the Maasai claims, it was established that Kenyatta had an aunt who was married to a Maasai, though the paper was not able to identify the name of the aunt or the name of the husband of the aunt. The paper also established that the reason for name changing could be attributed to identity creation and for political mileage..

Page(s): 296-302                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 09 November 2020

  Daniel Daniel Simotwo
A lecturer at the Department of History, Political Science and Public Administration; Moi University, Kenya.

[1] Haggerty, Richard A. (1991). “Haiti: Historical. Country Studies” (2nd ed.). Washington, D.C. Federal Research Division, Library of Congress. pp. 232–235. ISBN978-0-8444-0728-9.
[2] Wright, Giles. (2015). “Francois ‘Papa Doc’Devalier”. TheDictatorship.com. Archived from the original on 18 September 2015.
[3] Niccholls, David (1996). From Dessalines to Devaliwr: Race, Collour, and National Indepence in Haiti (Revised ed.). New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press.
[4] Columbia University Press, 2012: “mobutu Sese Seko”. The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia. Columbia University Press. 2012. Retrieved 30 April 2013.
[5] Wrong, Michel (2009). In the Footsteps of Mr Kurtz: Living on the Brink of Disaster in Mobutu’s Congo. Harper Collins. ISBN 0061863610.
[6] (Kenya Factbook, 1997-1998)
[7] Polsgrove, Carol (2009). Ending British Rule in Africa: Writers in a Common Cause” (2009), p. 6.
[8] Beck, Ann (1966). Some observations of jommo Kenyatta in britain. VI. pp. 308–329. http://www.persee.fr.
[9] Oriop, Kirui (2015). Facebook August 3, 2015.
[10] Oriop, Kirui (2011). Facebook on April 5.
[11] Elizabeth Mumbi Madoka (2016). Miss Uhuru 1963: Working for Mzee Jomo Kenyatta. Kenya Literature Bureau, 2016. ISBN 9966101926.
[12] Tobias Chanji Updated Fri, August 23rd 2013 at 00:00 GMT: http://www.standardmedia.co.ke.
[13] David Odongo and New Vision Updated Fri, April 12th 2013: Ugandan Newspaper Claims Uhuru is ‘Ugandan’ http://www.standardmedia.co.ke.
[14] Murray-Brown, Jeremy (1974). Kenyatta. New York City: Fontana. ISBN 978-0006334538.
[15] Chomu and Humphry (2012). Kipchoge Arap Chomu and Giles Humphry. Unyielding Hope: The Life and Times of Koitaleel Samoei, Phoenix Publishers Ltd, Nairobi. ISBN 9966 47 8469.
[16] Archer (1998). Jules Archer. African Firebrand: Jomo Kenyatta. Messner.
[17] Murray-Brown (1974). Jeremy Murray-Brown. Kenyatta. Fontana, London.
[18] Assensoh (1998). African Political Leadership: Jomo Kenyatta, Kwame Nkrumah, and Julius K. Nyerere. By A. B. ASSENSOH. Malabar FL: Krieger, 1998. Pp. 220. $19.50, paperback (ISBN 0-89464-911-6).
[19] Berman & Lonsdale (1998). Ethnicity, Patronage and the African State: The Politics of Uncivil Nationalism: African Affairs. Vol. 97, No. 388 (Jul., 1998), pp. 305-34.
[20] Maloba (2018). Kenyatta and Britain: An Account of Political Transformation, 1929-1963: Maloba, W. O. ISBN 978-3-319-50895-5.
[21] Polsgrove (2009). Ending British rule in Africa: writers in a common cause: Carol Polsgrove. Manchester University Press, 2009 M10 15 – 186 pages.
[22] Cullen, (2016). Funeral Planning: British Involvement in the Funeral of President Jomo Kenyatta. Poppy Cullen.

Daniel Daniel Simotwo “The History of Mystique Building and Big Man Syndrome: The Case of Jomo Kenyatta Identity in Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.296-302 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/296-302.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Effect of Green Production Practices in Sustainable Development of Agro- Allied Small Businesses in Nigeria

J.C. Ihemeje, PhD; E.O. Adeleke, PhD.; M. C. Okpara, PhD.; T. C. Zwingina, PhD October 2020 Page No.: 303-308

The Nigerian market system particularly in the area of agricultural-related business has adversely been influenced by the environment. It has equally failed to deal with negative environmental externalities and undervaluing natural resources. This has led to its non-sustainability and low performance. This study evaluated the effect of green production practices on the continued survival of agro-allied businesses in Nigeria. This study was carried on 306 owners and managers of Agro-Allied small businesses within the study area. The primary and secondary data were respectively collected using questionnaire and literature and were statistically analysed. A null hypothesis was formulated that was tested using the Z-test statistical tool and the SPSS package. The findings revealed that green agricultural production would significantly affect the continued survival of agro-allied businesses in Nigeria. The study concluded that despite notable changes in legislation and regulations to protect the environment, Nigeria and various other countries are constrained with unprecedented environmental problems arising from climate change and established that environmental problems can only be solved through technological advancement by the input of ecopreneurship. The study recommended among other things, that the government of Nigeria should strengthen its external forces concerning establishing national standards for the quality of the environment and the implementation of environmental regulations; also, to provide an environment that shall strengthen the consumer movement in the country.

Page(s): 303-308                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 09 November 2020

 J.C. Ihemeje, PhD
College of Management Sciences, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike. Abia State Nigeria

  E.O. Adeleke, PhD
Accounting department, Bowen University, Iwo, Osun State, Nigeria.

  M. C. Okpara, PhD
College of Management Sciences, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike. Abia State Nigeria

  T. C. Zwingina, PhD
Faculty of Social and Management Sciences, Bingham University Karu- Abuja. FCT Abuja, Nigeria.

[1] Adesina, F. A., & Odekunle, T. O. (2011). Climate Change and Adaptation in Nigeria: Some Background to Nigeria’s Response – III. International Conference on Environmental and Agriculture Engineering. IPCBEE Vol. 15. Singapore: IACSIT Press.
[2] Adetayo, A. O., & Owolade, E. O. (2012). Climate Change and Mitigation Awareness in Small Farmers of Oyo State in Nigeria. Open Science Repository Agriculture. https://doi.org/10.7392/Agriculture.70081902.
[3] Ajani, E. N., & Igbokwe, E. M. (2013). Promoting Entrepreneurship and Diversification as a Strategy for Climate Change Adaptation Among Rural Women in Anambra State, Nigeria. Journal of Agricultural Extension. 16, 2.
[4] Ajani, E., Onwubuya, E., & Mgbenka, R. (2013). Approaches to Economic Empowerment of Rural Women for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation: Implications for Policy. Journal of Agricultural Extension, 17(1), 23–34.
[5] Akinbami, C. A. O., Olawoye, J. E., Adesina, F. A. & Nelson, V. (2019). Entrepreneurship Opportunities and Challenges for Rural Nigerian Women. Journal of Global Entrepreneurship Research. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40497-018-0141-3.
[6] Akinbami, C. A. O., Olawoye, J. O., & Adesina, F. A. (2015). Rural Women Belief System and Attitude Toward Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies in Nigeria. Climate Change Adaptation, Resilience, and Hazards. Springer.
[7] Alvarez, C. H. (2011). Create Image, Gain a Public Confidence. Consulting to Management, 21(1), 121-147.
[8] Anderson, T., & Leal. D. (2007). Enviro-Capitalism: Doing Good While Going Well. Lanham, MD: Rowman Littlefield.
[9] Atrill, F., & Mclamel, T. (2008). Profitability Management. Greenwich, CT: Information Age Publishing, 51-68.
[10] Best, F. (2009). Understanding Business (8th Ed) London: Macmillan Publishers.
[11] Beveridge, R. & Guy, S. (2005). Ecopreneur and The Messy World of Environmental Innovation. Local Environment, 10(6), 665-676.
[12] Cohen, B., & Winn, M. I. (2007). Market Imperfections, Opportunity and Sustainable Entrepreneurship. Journal of Business Venturing, 22(1), 29-49.
[13] Dorsey, M., & Boland, G. (2009). Ecopreneurship: Pre-emptive Merging. The Journal of Industrial Economics. 43(3), 323-337.
[14] Ghadeyan, O., and Omolekan, R. (2008). Ecopreneurship and Networks. Scientific Management Journal, 15(3), 113–127.
[15] Gibbs, D. (2009). Sustainability, Entrepreneurs, Ecopreneurs, and the Development of a Sustainable Economy. Greener Management International. 55, 63-78
[16] Hamsa, S. (2014). Impact of Innovation and Managing Technology-Based Business for Entrepreneurs. Issues in General Management. 12(2), 51-55.
[17] IPCC. (2007). Climate Change: Synthesis Report. Geneva: Switzerland, IPCC. Retrieved from http://www.ipcc.ch/pdf/assessment-report/ar4/syr/ar4_syr.pdf
[18] Jones, O., & Miskel, U. (2007). Ecopractices Among Firms in a Keen Industry. International Journal of Business. 9(4), 111-123.
[19] Mamman, Y., Aminu U., & Adah, O. (2013). Strategic Ecopractices in Modern Firms. Journal of Management. 12(9), 167-174
[20] McEwen, T. (2013). Ecopreneurship: As a Solution to Environmental Problems. International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences. 3(5), 264-288.
[21] Mutura, S. A. C., Nyairo, T. C., Nwangi, J.V., & Wambugu, K. L. (2016). Impact of Ecosystem Management of Manufacturing Firms in Nigeria. An International Multidisciplinary Journal, Ethiopia, 9(2), 156-167.
[22] Oskamp, S. (2000). Ecological Sustainable Future for Humanity. Journal of Social Issues, 56(3), 373-390.
[23] Porter, M. E., & Van der Linde, C. (2005). Towards a New Conception of the Environment-Competitiveness Relationship. The Journal of Economic Perspectives, 14(1), 112-123.
[24] Schaper, M. (2012). The Essence of Ecopreneurship. Greener Management International, 45 (Summer), 49-60.
[25] Tillery, F. (1999). The Gap Between the Environmental Attitude and the Behavior of Small Firms. Business Strategy and the Environment, 8(4), 238-248.
[26] Timmons, J. (1994). New Venture Creation: Entrepreneurship for the 21st Century. Boston, MA: Irwin.
[27] Yamane, T. (1967). Statistics: An Introductory Analysis. 2nd Edition, Harper and Row. New York.

J.C. Ihemeje, PhD; E.O. Adeleke, PhD.; M. C. Okpara, PhD.; T. C. Zwingina, PhD “Effect of Green Production Practices in Sustainable Development of Agro- Allied Small Businesses in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-10, pp.303-308 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/303-308.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Asymmetric Effect of Oil Price Volatility, Oil Price Revenue, and Some Other Macro-Economic Variables on Economic Growth

ALIMI Akindapo Abass, UGO Egbuta and SEUN Adegorite – October 2020 Page No.: 309-316

Globally, aside from the economic effect, the process of price fluctuation and high uncertainty associated with crude oil inclusively affects the gross domestic product, import bills, and inflation. The study evaluated the asymmetric effect of oil price volatility, oil price revenue, and some other macro-economic variables on economic growth. Secondary data were used for this study and were sourced from the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) Statistical Bulletins and World Development Indicator from 1983 to 2019. The data were analyzed using descriptive (Graphs and tables) and inferential statistics (Ordinary least square, Co-integration test, Vector Error Correction Model, and Granger Causality Test) to evaluate the study hypothesis.
The result of regression indicated that the calculated value related to probability (F (5, 31) = 175.60, Prob> F = 0.0000) and its adjusted value of R2 (0.9604), showed that oil price revenue (β =0.640034), foreign exchange (β =0.9539687) and oil price volatility (β =0.7080817) have a positive effect on Gross Domestic Product (GDP) at p≤0.05. Moreover, the granger causality test indicated that there is independence or no causation among gross domestic product (LNGDP) and interest rate (LNINTR), oil price revenue (LNOPR), gross domestic product (LNGDP) oil price volatility (LNOPV), going by the p-values which are greater than 0.05 or 5% at a lag difference of 2. Finally, t-statistics, f-statistic, and chi-square of 2.107337, 4.440867, and 4.440867 with the probability value of 0.05, 0.05, and 0.0351 indicated that F-statistic probability value implies there is long-run asymmetry among the variables
In conclusion, the finding of the analysis, therefore, showed a statistically asymmetric effect of oil price volatility, foreign exchange rate, and the interest rate on Nigeria’s economic activities. This implies that macro-economic indicators performance such as interest rate, foreign exchange rate, and oil prices influenced economic growth and found out that increases in oil prices may depress the supply of other goods by raising their cost of production because prices of oil have a direct impact on the prices of goods produced from petroleum products. Based on the above result, it is recommended that the policymakers should reduce the pressure on exchange rates and interest rates by diversifying the economy to reduce the pressure on oil, which in turn promotes economic growth. Also, there should be a review of monetary policy by the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) with the use of a contractionary monetary policy that would help to reduce the inflation rate.

Page(s): 309-316                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 09 November 2020

 ALIMI Akindapo Abass
WorldQuant University, USA

  UGO Egbuta
WorldQuant University, USA

  SEUN Adegorite
WorldQuant University, USA

[1] Badeeb, R.A., Lean, H.H., Clark, J. (2017). The evolution of the natural resource curse thesis: A critical literature survey. Resources Policy, 51, pp. 123-134.
[2] Balke, Y. (1996). Determinants of economic growth and stagnation in oil-rich Venezuela. Dutch Journal of Economics, 3(1), 3-16.
[3] Balke, N. S., Stephen P. A. B, and Mine Y (2008). An International Perspective on Oil Price Shocks and U.S. Economic Activity. Working paper, Federal Reserve Bank of Dalla
[4] Corden, W.M. and Neary, J.P.( 1982). Booming Sector and De-Industrialisation in a Small Open Economy. Econ. J. 92, 825–848.
[5] Englama, A., Duke, O. O., Ogunleye, T. S., and Ismail, F. U., 2010. Oil prices and exchange rate volatility in Nigeria: an empirical investigation. Central Bank of Nigeria, Economic and Financial Review, 48(3), 31-48.
[6] Ferderer, J. P. (1996). Oil Price Volatility and the macro-economy. Journal of Macroeconomics, 18 (1), 1-26.
[7] Gisser, M. and Goodwin, T. (1986). Crude oil and the macro-economy: Tests of Some Popular Nations. Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, 18 (1), 95–103.
[8] Greenwood-Nimmo, M, Shin Y and Till van T (2011). Nonlinear ARDL Model with Multiple Unknown Threshold Decompositions: Application to the Phillips Curve in Canada,Mimeo: Leeds University Business School.
[9] Granger, C. W. J., (1969). Investigating causal relations by econometric models and cross-spectral methods. Econometrica, 37(3), 424-438.
[10] Hamilton, J.D., 1983. Oil and the macro-economy since World War II. Journal of Political Economy. 91, 2, 228– 248.
[11] Hooker, M.A. (2002). Are oil shocks inflationary? Asymmetric and non-linear specifications versus changes in regime. Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, 34(2), 540-561.
[12] Hooker, M. A. (1986). What happened to the oil price-macroeconomy relationship? Journal of Monetary Economics. Volume 38, Issue 2, October 1996, Pages 195-21
[13] Korhonen, I. & Mehrotra, A.N. (2009) Real Exchange Rate, Output, and Oil: Case of Four Large Energy Producers. SSRN Electron.
[14] Motunrayo, O. A. & Nicholas M. O. (2020). Asymmetric effect of oil price on economic growth: Panel analysis of low-income oil-importing countries Published by Elsevier Ltd. Contents lists available at Science Direct. www.elsevier.com/locate/egyr
[15] Mork, K. A., Olsen, Ø., & Mysen, H. T. (1994). Macroeconomic responses to oil price increases and decreases in seven OECD countries. The Energy Journal, 15(4), 19–35.
[16] Mory, J.F., (1993). Oil prices and economic activity: is the relationship symmetric? The Energy Journal 14, 4, 151– 161.
[17] Mehrara, M. (2008). The asymmetric relationship between oil revenues and economic activities: The case of oil-exporting countries. Energy Policy, 36 (3), pp. 1164-1168
[18] Muhammad, J & Ghulam S. K. (2017). Impact of oil price volatility and macroeconomic variables on the economic growth of Pakistan. Review of innovation and competitiveness. Volume 3, issue 1
[19] Muhammad, M. Y. & Benedict N. A. (2019). Oil price volatility and economic growth in Nigeria. Advances in Management & Applied Economics, vol. 9, no. 6, 2019, 1-10 ISSN: 1792-7544 (print version), 1792-7552(online) Scientific Press International Limited.
[20] Oriakhi D.e and Iyoha, D. O. (2013).Oil Price Volatility and its Consequences on the Growth of the Nigerian Economy: An Examination (1970-2010). Asian Economic and Financial Review, 2013, vol. 3, issue 5, 683-702
[21] Pesaran, M. H., Shin, Y. and Smith, R. J., 2001. Bounds testing approaches to the analysis of level relationship. Journal of Applied Econometrics, 16(3), 289-326.
[22] Pesaran, H and Shin Y (1999). Autoregressive Distributed Lag Modeling Approach to Cointegration Analysis in S. Strom (eds.) Econometrics and Economic Theory of the 20th Century, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
[23] Pesaran, H, Shin Y and Richard J. Smith (2001). Bounds Testing Approaches to the Study of Level Relationships, Journal of Applied Econometrics, 16, pp. 289-326.
[24] Rafiq, S.,Salim, R., and Bloch, H.(2008). Impact of crude oil price volatility on economic activities: An empirical investigation in the Thai economy. Resources Policy, 34(1): 121-132
[25] Shin, Y, Byungcheol Yu and Greenwood-Nimmo, M. (2011). Modeling Asymmetrical Cointegration and Dynamic Multipliers in the ARDL System, in William C. Horrace and Robin C. Sickles (eds.): Festschrift in Honour of Peter Schmidt, Springer Science &Business Press, New York.
[26] Sunday O. I. (2019). Oil Price Volatility and Infrastructural Growth: Evidence from an Oil- Dependent Economy. Oradea Journal of Business and Economics, Volume IV, Issue 1
[27] Umar, B. and Lee, C. (2018). Asymmetric Impacts of Oil Price on Inflation: An Empirical Study of African OPEC Member Countries. Energies 2018, 11, 3017; doi:10.3390/en11113017 www.mdpi.com/journal/energies
[28] Zied F., Khaled G., Frédéric T., Slim C. (2016). Relationship Between Crude Oil Prices And Economic Growth In Selected OPEC Countries. The Journal of Applied Business Research. Volume 32, No 1

ALIMI Akindapo Abass, UGO Egbuta and SEUN Adegorite “Asymmetric Effect of Oil Price Volatility, Oil Price Revenue, and Some Other Macro-Economic Variables on Economic Growth” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-10, pp.309-316 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/309-316.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

A Comparison On The Compliance Of Autonomous And Non-Autonomous Higher Education Institutions Offering Hospitality Management Program To The Philippines’ Commission On Higher Education [CHED] Student Internship Program [SIPP] Requirements

Evangeline Timbang and Mary Caroline Castano – October 2020 Page No.: 317-323

The article describes the compliance of local autonomous and non-autonomous universities offering hospitality management programs on student internship requirements set by the Philippines’ Commission on Higher Education [CHED] Student Internship Program in the Philippines [SIPP], as perceived by academicians of these selected higher education institutions [HEIs]. Using independent samples t-test, the study showed that there were no significant differences in the level of compliance to CHED’s SIPP requirements between autonomous and non-autonomous HEIs. Hence, even with differences in accreditation levels among these universities, any developmental model or framework for student internship programs established for autonomous universities can be applied to non-autonomous universities.

Page(s): 317-323                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 09 November 2020

 Evangeline Timbang, MBA
The Graduate School, University of Santo Tomas, España, Manila
College of Tourism and Hospitality Management, University of Santo Tomas, España, Manila

  Mary Caroline Castano, Ph.D.
The Graduate School, University of Santo Tomas, España, Manila

[1] CHED Memorandum Order # 15 series of 2002. Amendments to CMO No. 19 Series of 2000 Entitled “General Guidelines the Implementation of the International Practicum Training Programs. Commission on Commission on Higher Education. Philippines.”
[2] CHED Memorandum Order # 23 series of 2009. Guidelines for Student Internship Program in the Philippines (SIPP) for all Programs with Practicum Subject Commission on Higher Education, Philippines.
[3] CHED Memorandum Order # 24 series of 2009. Guidelines for Student Internship Abroad Program (SIAP) for all Programs with Practicum Subject. Commission on Higher Education. Philippines.
[4] CHED Memorandum Order # 38 series of 2015. Designated Centers of Excellence. (COEs) and Centers of Development (CODs) for Various Disciplines. Commission on Higher Education, Philippines.
[5] Etzkowitz, H. (2013). Anatomy of the entrepreneurial university. Social Science Information, 52(3), 486-511. Doi: https://doi.org/10.1177/0539018413485832
[6] Muskat, M., Blackman, D., and Muskat, B. (2012). Mixed methods: combining expert interviews, cross-impact analysis and scenario development. The Electronic Journal of Business Research Methods, 10(1), 9-21.
[7] Ndou, V. (2016). Entrepreneurship education in tourism: An investigation among European Universities. Journal of Hospitality, Leisure, Sport & Tourism Education, Retrieved from: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhlste.2018.10.003
[8] Saeed, S., Yousafzai, S.Y., Yani-De-Soriano, M. & Muffatto, M. (2015), The role of perceived university support in the formation of students’ entrepreneurial intention. Journal of Small Business Management, 53(4), 1127- 1145.

Evangeline Timbang and Mary Caroline Castano, “A Comparison On The Compliance Of Autonomous And Non-Autonomous Higher Education Institutions Offering Hospitality Management Program To The Philippines’ Commission On Higher Education [CHED] Student Internship Program [SIPP] Requirements ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-10, pp.317-323 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/317-323.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

An Examination of Computer -Based Instructions (CBT) in the Teaching of Quadratic Functions and Equations in Senior High Schools in Ghana; The Case of Dwamena Akenten and Namong Senior High Schools

Edmond Nyarko- Nkrumah, Jefferson Oduro Asiamah, Paul Mensah – October 2020 Page No.: 324-329

The study examined the use of Computer -Based Instructions (CBT) in the teaching of quadratic functions and equations in Senior High Schools in Kumasi-Ghana, specifically Dwamena Akenten and Namong Senior High Schools respectively using quasi-experimental approach.The population of the study was 2070 and a stratified method of sampling was used to sample 80 students for experimental and control exercises. The students were pre-tested to ascertain their equivalence in achievement and post-tested after the interventions. The experimental group was ahead of the control group in achievement after comparing their post-test means. This led to the rejection of the null hypothesis which said that, “there is no significant difference in the achievement levels of the two groups”. The findings further revealed that students completed three times more exercises compared to what would have been expected with traditional worksheets. Moreover, teachers found that the activity was easy to administer and Control.
Hence the study concluded that the use of the ICT tools have some comparative advantage over the traditional teacher presentation.
The study concluded that the use of the ICT tools has some comparative advantage over the traditional teacher presentation. The researcher thus recommended that Computer –Based Instructions should be inculcated into the teaching and learning of Mathematics to improve upon students’ achievement levels in our schools.

Page(s): 324-329                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 09 November 2020

 Edmond Nyarko- Nkrumah
Agogo Presbyterian Women’s College of Education-Ghana

  Jefferson Oduro Asiamah
Agogo Presbyterian Women’s College of Education-Ghana

  Paul Mensah
St. Louis College of Education-Ghana

[1] Aberson, C. L., Berger, D. E., Healy, M. R., & Romero, V. L. (2002). An interactive tutorial for teaching statistical power. Journal of Statistics Education, 10(3), 15-21.
[2] Adler, J., Ball, D., Krainer, K., Lin, F. L., & Novotna, J. (2005). Reflections on an emerging field: Researching mathematics teacher education. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 60(3), 359-381
[3] Alacapinar, F. G. (2003). The effect of traditional education and education via computer on the students’ gain. Eurasian Journal of Educational Research, Winter, 10,40-45.
[4] Al-Adwan,A.,Al-Adwan,A.,&Smedley,J.(2013).Exploringstudents’acceptanceofe-learningusing technology acceptance model in Jordanian universities. International Journal of Education and Development Using Information and Communication Technology, 9(2), 4–18.
[5] Almarabeh, T. (2014). Students’ perceptions of e-learning at the University of Jordan. International Journal of Emerging Technologies in Learning, 9(3), 31–35. doi:10.3991/ijet.v9i3.3347
[6] Ansong,E.,Boateng,R.,Boateng,S.L.,&Anderson,A.B.(2017).The nature of e learning adoption by stakeholders of a university in Africa. E-Learning and Digital Media, 14(4), 226–243. doi:10.1177/2042753017731235
[7] Armstrong, E. A., Boadu, A. N., Nkrumah, N. E., Aweso, M. D., Nottinson, A. F., Samuel Baah–Duodu, S., Wotortsi, E., Afari, B. J., Amoh-Yeboah, R. & Dogli, C. P. (2020). “Coronavirus (COVID- 19) Pandemic and Online Learning Nexus in Colleges of Education in Ashanti-Brong Ahafo Regions (ASHBA), Ghana” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 5, pp.392-396 May 2020 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-5/392-396.pdf
[8] Barzel, B. (2007). New technology? New ways of teaching – no time left for that! International Journal for Technology in Mathematics Education, 14(2), 77-90. 67
[9] Bayraktar, S. (2001). A meta analysis of the effectiveness of computer assisted instruction in science education. Journal of Research and Technology on Education, 34, 173-188.
[10] Bramald, R., Miller, J., & Higgins, S. (2000). ICT, Mathematics and effective teaching. Mathematics Education Review, 12, 1–13. 68
[11] British Education Communication Technology Agency (2004). Using web-based resources in secondary Mathematics. Retrieved January 10, 2009, from http://foi.becta.org.uk/display.cfm?cfid=1476190&cftoke
[12] Carter, M. B. (2004). An analysis and comparison of the effects of computer assisted instruction versus traditional lecture instruction students attitudes and achievement in a college remedial Mathematics course. Unpublished Doctoral Thesis, University of Temple. Philadelphia. USA.
[13] CBT Report (1999). Bill communications. Retrieved, June 2009 from http://www.ittrain.com/exec-sum.html 69
[14] Cekbas, Y. H., Yakar, B., Yildirim, A., & Savran, A. (2003). The effect of computer assisted instruction on students. Turkish Journal on Educational Technology, 2(4), 52- 59.
[15] Cepni, S., Ozsevgec, T., Saydkan, F., & Emre, F. B. (2004). The comparison of achievement levels of science teaching program students at two universities. V. International Science and Mathematics Education Congress Report. 2, 1241-1246.
[16] Cepni, S., Tas, E., & Kose S. (2006). The effects of computer assisted materials on students’ cognitive levels, misconceptions and attitude toward science. Computers and Education, 46, 192-205.
[17] Cetin, U. (2007). A comparison of traditional teaching and the computer assisted education software based on ARCS motivation model in accordance with students’ achievement and permanence of learning. Unpublished Master‟s Thesis, University of Gazi, Department of Computer Education and Instructional Technology., Ankara, Turkey.
[18] Clark, R. C., & Mayer, R. E. (2016). E-learning and the science of instruction: proven guidelines for consumers and designers of multimedia learning. John Wiley & Sons. doi:10.1002/9781119239086
[19] Cotton, K. (2001). Computer assisted instruction. Retrieved January 10, 2009, from http://www.nwrel.org/scpd/sirs/5/cu10.html
[20] Demirel, A., & Yagci, E. (2006). Principles and methods of Instruction. Journal of Applied Sciences, 8, 1067-1072.
[21] Demirel, A. (2004). Planning and evaluation in instruction: Art of teaching. Ankara: Pegem Publication.
[22] De Villiers, M. (2004). The role and function of experimentation in Mathematics and Mathematics education. Canadian Journal of Science, Mathematics and Technology Education, 4(3), 397-418.
[23] Fletcher, J. D. (1990). Effectiveness and cost of interactive videodisc instruction in defense training and education. Washington DC: Institute for Defense Analyses.
[24] Flynn, P. (1989). Introducing new technology into the workplace: The dynamics of technological and organizational change. New York: McGraw Hill
[25] Halis, I. (2002). Instructional technologies and material development. New York: Nobel Publication and Distribution.
[26] Hung, Y., & Hsu, Y. (2007). Examining teachers’ CBT use in the classroom: A study in secondary schools in Taiwan. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 10(3), 233-246.
[27] Jeffries, P. R. (2001). Computer versus lecture: A comparison of two methods of teaching oral medication administration in a nursing skills laboratory. Journal of Nursing Education, 40(7), 323-29.
[28] Vululleh,P.(2018).Determinantsofstudents’elearningacceptanceindevelopingcountries:An approach based on structural equation modeling. International Journal of Education and Development Using ICT,14 (1),141–151.

Edmond Nyarko- Nkrumah, Jefferson Oduro Asiamah, Paul Mensah “An Examination of Computer -Based Instructions (CBT) in the Teaching of Quadratic Functions and Equations in Senior High Schools in Ghana; The Case of Dwamena Akenten and Namong Senior High Schools” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-10, pp.324-329 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/324-329.pdf

Download PDF

pdf


Title Community Policing and Crime Prevention in Kirinyaga County –Kenya

Muchira Joseph Mwaniki , Dr George C.O. Maroko October 2020 Page No.: 330-341

Community policing was first initiated in London in 1829 by Metropolitan Police District. The British parliament hoped to address the soaring crime rate in and around the nation’s capital when it was growing. Community policing was also initiated in South Africa in the early 1990’s. It was aimed at democratizing and legitimizing the police. Later there was a shift towards improving service delivery and tackling crime issues. The initiative succeeded in building trust between citizens and the police. Community policing is a Government funded initiative built on the premise that everyone should be working to reduce the fear of crime. According to Kenya Police data across all counties in Kenya who have implemented community policing revealed that there have been a raise in crime levels in Kirinyaga County while in counties like Nakuru where community policing is implemented, the level of crime has fallen. In Kirinyaga County crime levels have been raising for the last three years despite presence of community policing practiced as Nyumba Kumi Initiative hence the choice for research. This research work is focused on the use of community policing as a method for crime reduction in Kirinyaga County of Central Kenya. This research study was guided by the following objectives: to analyze the effectiveness of joint community-police patrols in prevention of crime in Kirinyaga County, to find out the effectiveness of youth vigilante groups as a means of crime prevention in the County and to analyze the role played by community courts process to reduce crimes in the county. The researcher employed descriptive survey research design using both qualitative and quantitative approach. A Sample of two hundred community members picked from ten wards out of twenty wards of the County making fifty percent from the county words were sampled, with joint patrol groups, youth vigilante groups, officers commanding police stations within the county and administrative officers as the respondents. The respondents were selected through cluster and purposive sampling methods comprising of government security agents. The questionnaires were distributed to the relevant respondents, filled in, collected and analyzed using both descriptive and inferential statistics and presented in form of tables, charts and graphs. The data was analyzed using various statistical soft-wares such as Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS), and Microsoft Excel. These quantitative data were complimented and triangualed with qualitative data from focus group discussions and key informant interviews. The findings indicate that joint police-community patrols as well as the engagement of vigilante groups and community courts have contributed to crime prevention in Kirinyaga County. Between the three areas of focus, the court process was found to less effective. The people of Kirinyaga County will benefit from the information resulting on from this research. The study may brought out the areas that may need more research, education and attitude change towards community policing and management measures to be put in place to reduce crime in future. The research is significant to the government of Kenya in crime prevention and management,.The study is also important for the other 47 counties of Kenya in managing crime rhrough cooperation wth members of the public. Finally the study will benefit the county government and people of Kirinyaga County by contributing to their security through community policing and crime prevention. Community policing in Kirinyaga County will help to inform the Kenya government and other counties on the success of crime prevention efforts and best methods of improving community policing.

Page(s): 330-341                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 10 November 2020

  Muchira Joseph Mwaniki
Mount Kenya University – Kenya

  Dr George C.O. Maroko
Mount Kenya University – Kenya

[1] Auerbach, J.N. (2004). Police Accountability in Kenya. East African Journal of Peace and Human Rights 10 (2) 206-245
[2] Awortwi, N. (1999) The Riddle of Community development: Factors Influencing Organization, Participation and Self-Management in 29 African and Latin American Communities, ISS Working Papers no. 287, The Hague; Institute of Social Studies. Book Company.
[3] Bebbington, A. (2004) Social Capital and Development Studies 1: Critique, Debate, Progress?. Progress in Development Studies 4(4): 343-349.
[4] Botes, L. and D. Van Rensburg (2000) Community Participation in Development: Nine Plagues and Twelve Commandments. Community Development Journal 35(1): 41–58.
[5] Brogden, M. (2004) Commentary: Community Policing: A Panacea from the West. African Affairs, 103/413, 635-649,
[6] Brogden, M. (2005). Horses for Courses and Thin Blue Line: Community Policing. In
[7] Bockstette, C. (2008). Jihadist Terrorist Use of Strategic Communication Management Techniques
[8] Brann, Joseph E., and Suzanne Whalley (1992). COPPS: The Transformation of Police Organizations. Community-Oriented Policing and Problem Solving. Sacramento: Attorney General’s Crime Prevention Center. 1992
[9] Brown, Lee P. (1989) Community Policing: A Practical Guide for Police Officials. Perspectives on Policing. Washington, D.C.: National Institute of Justice and John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.
[10] Campbell, J. (2013). Should US fear Boko Haram? October 1, 2013 (CNN). Retrieved 2 October 2013.
[11] Cordner, Gary W., Craig B. Fraser, and Chuck Wexler (1991). Research, Planning, and Implementation. Local Government Police Management, ed. William A. Geller. Washington, D.C.: International City Management Association. 3rd edition. pp.346–347.
[12] Couper, David C., and Sabine H. Lobitz (1991). Quality Policing: The Madison Experience. Washington, D.C.: Police Executive Research Forum..
[13] Dietz and Baker (1987) Murder at Work American Journal of Public Health 77(1987): pp.273–274.
[14] Eck, John E., and William Spelman (1989). A Problem-Oriented Approach to Police Service Delivery Police and Policing: Contemporary Issues, ed. Dennis Jay Kenney. New York: Praeger.
[15] Eck, John E., and William Spelman. Problem Solving (1987): Problem-Oriented Policing in Newport News. Washington, D.C.: Police Executive Research Forum.:pp.104–6.
[16] Frühling, H. (2007). The Impact of International Models of Policing in Latin America: The Case of Community Policing. Police Practice and Research 8 (2): 125.
[17] Gecaga, M. (2007). Religions, Movements and democratization in Kenya: Between the Sacred and the Profane. In G.R. Murunga and S.W. Nasongó (eds.) Kenya: The Struggle for Democracy. Dakar: Codesria Books pp 58-89
[18] Gimode, E.A. (2007). The Role of the Police in Kenya’s Democratisation Process. In
[19] G.R. Murunga and S.W. Nasongó (eds.) Kenya: The Struggle for Democracy, Dakar: Codesria Books pp 227-260
[20] Goldstein, Herman. Problem-Oriented Policing (1997). New York: McGraw Hill. pp.66–67.
[21] Goldsmith, A. (2005). Police reform and the problem of trust. Theoretical Criminology, 9 (4):443-470
[22] Government of Kenya (2005). Office of the President Provincial Administration and Internal Security 2005/06-2009/10 Strategic Plan. Nairobi
[23] Hills, A. (2007). Police Commissioners, Presidents and the Governance of Security. Journal of Modern African Studies 45(3): 403-423.
[24] Hills, A. (2008) ‘The Dialectic of Police Reform In Nigeria,’ Journal of Modern African Studies, 46(2): 215-234
[25] Jensen, S. (2004). Claiming Community. Critique of Anthropology 24 (2): 179-207.Jerome H. Skolnick, The Police and the Urban Ghetto: The Ambivalent Force: In Arthur Niederhoffer and Abraham S. Blumberg, (eds.) Perspectives on Police. Hinsdale, IL: Dryden, 222.
[26] Jones, M. (2008). A Complexity Science View of Modern Police Administration. Public Administration Quarterly 32,no. 3, (October 1): 433-457.
[27] Kelling, George L., Robert Wasserman, Hubert Williams (1988). Police Accountability and Community Policing. Washington, D.C.: National Institute of Justice and John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.
[28] KEPSA Report (2009) Report Of The Community Policing Monitoring And Evaluation Workshop Programme For Nairobi. Unpublished
[29] Kibaki, Mwai (2006) Speech to mark the 1st anniversary of community policing program available online at http://www.statehousekenya.go.ke/ last accessed 11.11.2010
[30] Kothari, C.R. (2004). Research Methodology Methods and Techniques. New Age International (P) Ltd, New Delhi.
[31] Kuecker, G, M. Mulligan and Y. Nadarajah (2010). Turning to Community in times of crisis: Globally derived insights on local Community formation. Community Development Journal 1-20
[32] Kyed, H. M. (2009) Community Policing in Post-War Mozambique. Policing and Society, 19(4):354-371
[33] Moore, Mark H., and Darrel W. Stephens. Beyond Command and Control: The Strategic Management of Police Departments. Washington, D.C.: Police Executive Research Forum. 1991:p.94.
[34] Maykut, P, Morehouse. R. (2003). Beginning Qualitative Research: A philosophical & practical guide. The Falmer Press. Teavhers Library Series, London: Rout ledge.
[35] Marks, M., C. Shearing and J. Wood (2009) Who should the Police be? Finding a New Narrative for Community Policing in South Africa. Police Practice and Research 10 (2): 145.
[36] Meese, Edwin III. (1991) Community Policing and the Police Officer. Perspectives on Policing Washington, D.C.: National Institute of Justice and John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. p.7
[37] Minar, D.W and S.Greer (1969). The concept of community. In David W. Minnar and S. Greer (eds) The Concept of Community: Readings with Interpretations. Chicago: Aldine Publishing Company pp ix-xii
[38] Moody, B (2008) Kenya police face reform after scathing accusations. Reuters 11 December available online at http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSLB110049 access 12/05/09
[39] Moore, Mark H., Robert Trojanowicz, and George L. Kelling (1988). Crime and Policing. Perspectives on Policing. Washington, D.C.: National Institute of Justice and John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.
[40] Mugenda, O. & Mugenda, A. (Revised 2003) Research Methods; Quantitative & Qualitative approaches, African Centre for Technical Studies, Nairobi, Kenya.
[41] Mugenda, O. & Mugenda, P. (2004). Research Methods. Nairobi: Longhorn
[42] Oettmeier, Timothy N., and William H. Bieck (1988). Integrating Investigative Operations Through Neighborhood-Oriented Policing: Executive Session #2. Houston: Houston Police Department.
[43] Oettmeier, Timothy N., and William H. Bieck (1988). Integrating Investigative Operations Through Neighborhood-Oriented Policing: Executive Session #2. Houston: Houston Police Department.
[44] Orodho J.A (2002) Techniques of Writing Research Proposal and Reports Education, KU, Nairobi.
[45] Robson, C. (1993). Real-world research: A resource for social scientists and practitioner researchers. Malden: Blackwell Publishing Sparrow, Malcolm K. Implementing Community Policing. Perspectives on Policing. Washington, D.C.: National Institute of Justice and John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. 1988:p.2
[46] Sherman, Lawrence W. and Anthony V. Bouza in Gary W. Cordner, Craig B. Fraser, and Chuck Wexler (1991). Research, Planning and Implementation. Local Government Police Management, ed. William A. Geller. Washington, D.C.: International City Management Association, 3d edition..
[47] Sparrow, Malcolm (1993) Information Systems and the Development of Policing. Perspectives on Policing. Washington, D.C.: National Institute of Justice and John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.
[48] Rosenbaum, Dennis P., Eusevio Hernandez, and Sylvester Daughtry, Jr (1991). Crime Prevention, Fear Reduction, and the Community Local Government Police Management, ed. William A. Geller. Washington, D.C.: International City Management Association.
[49] Oettmeier, Timothy N., and William H. Bieck (1987). Developing a Policing Style for Neighborhood Policing. Executive Session #1. Houston: Houston Police Department. pp.12–13
[50] Sparrow, Malcolm K., Mark H. Moore, and David M. Kennedy (1990). Beyond 911: A New Era for Policing. New York: Basic Books. pp.182–183
[51] Wadman, Robert C., and Robert K. Olson (1990). Community Wellness: A New Theory of Policing. Washington, D.C.: Police Executive Research Forum.
[52] Walker, A. (2012). What is Boko Haram? (PDF). US Institute of Peace. Retrieved 2 October 2013.
[53] Warwick. (1975). The Sample Survey: Theory and Practice. New York: Mc Graw-Hill Transitional Society’, Police Quarterly 8(1): 64-98
[54] Williams, Hubert (1991). External Resources. Local Government Police Management, ed. William A. Geller. Washington, D.C.: International City Management Association.
[55] Wasserman, Robert, and Mark H. Moore (1988). Values in Policing. Perspectives on Policing. Washington, D.C.: National Institute of Justice and John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. pp.1-3

Muchira Joseph Mwaniki, Dr George C.O. Maroko “Title Community Policing and Crime Prevention in Kirinyaga County –Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.330-341 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/330-341.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Preparation of Bali Hindu Communities and Society Hindu Java in the Implementation of Nyepi Rituals in Hanura Village Teluk Pandan District Pesawaran Regency
Wiwin Sujarwiyanti, Risma M. Sinaga, Pargito – October 2020 – Page No.: 342-346

This study aims to explain the readiness of the Balinese Hindu community and the Javanese Hindu community in the implementation of the Nyepi ritual in Hanura Village, explaining the stages that are carried out before the Nyepi ritual, the implementation of the Nyepi ritual, and after the Nyepi ritual in the Balinese Hindu Community and Javanese Hinduism in Hanura Village and explain factors that cause changes in the Nyepi ritual in the Balinese Hindu community and the Javanese Hindu community in Hanura Village, Teluk Pandan District, Pesawaran Regency. The method used in this research is descriptive qualitative method. This study uses interview data collection techniques, observation, and documentation. The data analysis technique used is qualitative data analysis techniques using a phenomenological approach. The results of this study indicate that in the implementation of the Nyepi ritual, material and non-material readiness for the implementation of the Nyepi ritual. Material readiness, in the form of real human creations. The Balinese Hindu and Javanese Hindus prepare offerings, pancawarna, daksina, tirta, bija and Shiva statues. Meanwhile, non-material readiness, which is not real (abstract), is passed down from generation to generation, which becomes a tradition/habit in society. The readiness to carry out the Nyepi ritual by the Balinese Hindu community and the Javanese Hindu community in Hanura Village, Teluk Pandan District, Pesawaran Regency, the Hindu community carries out various stages such as before the Nyepi ritual, the Nyepi ritual process and after Nyepi. Before the Nyepi ritual, all Hindu communities carry out melasti, mecaru and ogoh-ogoh parades. After that, the Hindu community carries out the Nyepi ritual process, namely tapa brata, inside the house, not traveling, not lighting a fire, not working and fasting for 24 hours straight. Then it ends with the stage after the Nyepi ritual, in which the entire Hindu community performs offerings and goes around the village to forgive each other with the aim of cleansing the sins of fellow humans as God’s creatures. The implementation time factor and economic factors cause changes in the Nyepi ritual, but it does not reduce the religious value of the Balinese Hindu and Javanese Hindu communities.

Page(s): 342-346                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 10 November 2020

 Wiwin Sujarwiyanti
Master of Social Science Education, Faculty of Training and Education, University of Lampung, Indonesia

 Risma M. Sinaga
Master of Social Science Education, Faculty of Training and Education, University of Lampung, Indonesia

 Pargito
Master of Social Science Education, Faculty of Training and Education, University of Lampung, Indonesia

[1] Arikunto, Suharsimi. 2009. Research Procedure A Practical Approach. Bima Aksara Jakarta.
[2] Djamari. 1993. Religion in a Sociological Perspective. Alfabeta. Bandung.
[3] I Gde Rai Oka. 2002. Basic Guidelines for Hinduism. Jakarta.
[4] Koentjaraningrat. 2009. Introduction to Anthropology. Aksara Baru. Jakarta.
[5] Nawawi, Hadari. 2005. Qualitative Research Methods. Gajah Mada.Yogyakarta.
[6] Purwadi. 2005. Javanese Traditional Ceremony. Pustaka Pelajar. Yogyakarta.
[7] Slameto. 2010. Learning and the Factors That Affect It. Rineka Karya. Jakarta.
[8] Victor, Turner. Karnisius. 1990. Society Free of Structure, Liminality and Community. Yogjakarta.
[9] Interview with Mr. Karso, 70 years old, the village secretary of Hanura 1980 on 23 February 2019.
[10] Interview with the Hindu community Mr. Swastika in Hanura Village, Teluk Pandan District, Pesawaran Regency on March 22, 2019.
[11] Interview with the leader of the Hindu religious ceremony, Romo Gede in Hanura Village, Teluk Pandan District, Pesawaran Regency on April 2, 2019.

Wiwin Sujarwiyanti, Risma M. Sinaga, Pargito “Preparation of Bali Hindu Communities and Society Hindu Java in the Implementation of Nyepi Rituals in Hanura Village Teluk Pandan District Pesawaran Regency” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 10, pp.342-346 October 2020 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/342-346.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

A Study on Mobile APP in Students’ English Speaking Learning in Chinese Middle School

Yan Ge, Cao Xiaowei – October 2020 Page No.: 347-351

Oral English learning is an important part of English learning. However, there are still many students who are full of anxiety, tension and other negative emotions in oral English learning in China. In order to study the effect of “Oral 100” app on relieving junior high school students’ oral English anxiety, 150 junior high school students from a Chinese middle school were surveyed. The study found that students in this school have learning anxiety in their oral English class. “Oral 100” app affects and alleviates junior middle school students’ oral learning anxiety in the following three aspects: learning progress anxiety in oral class, speech anxiety in oral class and oral evaluation anxiety.

Page(s): 347-351                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 10 November 2020

  Yan Ge
College of Foreign Studies, Hubei Normal University
Tianmen Hangzhou Huatai Middle School

  Cao Xiaowei
College of Foreign Studies, Hubei Normal University

[1] Su Luannian.( 2017) .A Study on the Correlation between Oral English Anxiety and Language Learning Strategies of Junior Middle School Students?[D].Chongqing Normal University.
[2] Horwitz.(1986).E.K. et al. Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety [J]. The Modern Language Journal, 125-132.
[3] Scovel, T. (1978). The Effect of Anxiety on Foreign Language Learninging: A Review of the Anxiety Research [J]. Language Learning, 32-34.
[4] Zhang Wei.(2011).A Study on the Relationship between Oral English Anxiety and Learner Intrinsic Factors [J]. Journal of Chifeng College, 250.
[5] Young, D.J. (1991).Creating a Low-Anxiety Classroom Environment: What does Language Anxiety Research Suggest? [J]. The Modern Language Journal, 75.
[6] Xiong Huilan.( 2007). An Analysis of Factors Affecting Oral Anxiety among English Learners [J]. Chinese Adult Education, 178-179.
[7] Shi Zhijie.( 2019) Study on Application of Education APP to Improve Students’ Oral English Ability [D]. Guangxi Normal University, 17-52.
[8] Zhao Lianxia et al.(2017).An Empirical Analysis of the Alleviation Effect of APP on Oral English Anxiety [J]. Journal of Xiamen University of Science and Technology, 55-61.
[9] Ju Jianmei.(2008).On Language Anxiety of Learning in Junior Middle Schools-A Case Study of Oral English Teaching in Jiangsu Province [D].Sichuan Normal University,7-40.
[10] Yu Miao.(2016).Achieve a Breakthrough in Junior Middle School English Pronunciation Teaching with the Help of “Oral 100”APP[J].Technology Outlook,229.

Yan Ge, Cao Xiaowei “A Study on Mobile APP in Students’ English Speaking Learning in Chinese Middle School” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.347-351 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/347-351.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Influence of Project Planning on Performance of Compassion Kenya (CKE)-Assisted Holistic Child Development Projects in Nairobi County, Kenya

Ngoya Vuyanzi Claire, Dr. Caleb Kirui – October 2020 Page No.: 352-355

Projects exist to meet a specific need and Compassion Kenya-assisted holistic child development projects are among such projects whose intent is to liberate children and youth from their economic, spiritual, physical and socio-emotional poverty. Success of these projects depends on a number of factors such as planning, communications, employee competence and risk management. How these factors influence project performance is an area that has not been explored before and as such formed a basis for this study. This study sought to investigate the influence of project planning on the performance of Compassion Kenya-assisted Holistic Child Development projects in Nairobi City County. The study used descriptive research design to describe factors and variables in the study. A census of the 21 Compassion Kenya (CKE)-assisted Holistic Child Development (HCD) projects in Nairobi City County was carried out. Primary data was gathered by use of structured questionnaires which was processed by use of the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS).The data was analyzed by descriptive and inferential statistics. Research findings were presented in percentages and tables. Study findings revealed that Planning positively and significantly correlated with performance of Compassion Kenya-assisted HCD projects in Nairobi City County. According to the findings of this study the HCD projects conducted project planning but excluded other stakeholders in decision making. The same had hindered performance of the projects. The study recommended that all stakeholders in the HCD projects be involved in the planning process and their ideas considered valuable by the managers in decision making regardless of their position in the projects. The vision, mission and objectives of the HCD projects should be well explained to all stakeholders so that they all flow in sync.

Page(s): 352-355                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 10 November 2020

 Ngoya Vuyanzi Claire
Department of Management Science, School of Business, Kenyatta University, Kenya

  Dr. Caleb Kirui
Department of Management Science, School of Business, Kenyatta University, Kenya

[1] Al-Hajj, A., & Zraunig, M. (2018). The impact of project planning on the successful completion of projects in construction. International Journal of Innovation, Management and Technology, 9(1), 21-27
[2] Alqahtani, F., Chinyio, E., Mushatat, S., &Oloky, D. (2015) Factors effecting performance of projects: a conceptual framework. International Journal of Scientific and Engineering Research, 6(4), 670–676
[3] Beleiu, I., Crisan, E., & Nistor, R. (2015) Main factors influencing. Interdisciplinary management research, Xi, 59–72
[4] Bonghez, S. & Grigoroiu, A. (2013) If it can’t be expressed in figures—project performance management. Paper presented at PMI® Global Congress 2013—EMEA, Istanbul, Turkey. Newtown Square, PA: Project Management Institute
[5] Compassion International Kenya (2013). Compassion Kenya Field Manual
[6] Compassion International Kenya (2017). Compassion Kenya Annual Report
[7] Fletcher, A., & Fletcher, A. (2014). A Short Guide to Holistic Youth Development. Olympia WA
[8] Khan, B. (2016) Project Performance: How to Measure or Define Success in Project Mangement. Planisware Orchestra,San Francisco
[9] Lemma, T. (2014). The role of project planning on project performance in Ethiopia (A Dissertation of MA Thesis)
[10] Naeem, S., Khanzada, B., Mubashir, T., & Sohail, H. (2018). Impact of Project Planning on Project Performance with Mediating Role of Risk Management and Moderating Role of Organizational Culture. International Journal of Business and Social Science, 9(1), 88- 98.
[11] Naudeau, S., Kataoka, N., Valerio, A., Neuman, M. J., & Elder, L. K. (2011) Investing in Young Children: An Early Childhood Development Guide for Policy Dialogue and Project Preparation. The World Bank
[12] Nzioka, C. (2017). Role of Project Planning on Project Performance in Kenya: A Case of Kenya Power Infrastructure Development Projects. International Journal of Novel Research in Engineering and Science, 4(1), 36 – 43
[13] Ofori-kuragu, J. K., Baiden, B. K., & Badu, E. (2016) Key Performance Indicators for Project Success in Ghanaian Contractors, (January). https://doi.org/10.5923/j.ijcem.20160501.01
[14] Pinto, J. K., & Slevin, D. P. (2015). Critical factors in successful project implementation. IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management, 34(1), 22 – 27
[15] Serrador, P. (2017). The importance of the project planning on project performance. Project Management Institute.
[16] Tesfaye, E., Lemma, T., Berhan, E., & Beshah, B. (2017). Key project planning processes affecting project performance. International Journal for Quality Research, 11(1), 45 – 56
[17] Umulisa, A., Mbabazize, M., & Shukla, J. (2015). Effects of Project Planning Practices on Project Performance of Agaseke Project in Kigali, Rwanda. International Journal of Business and Management Review, 3(5), 29 – 51.
[18] Vleems, M. (2018) Measuring project performance: a method of project comparison. Retrieved from https://dspace.ou.nl/bitstream/1820/9688/1/Vleems M IM9806 AF scriptie.pdf
[19] Watanabe, R. M., & Senoo, D. (2013) Organizational characteristics as prescriptive factors of knowledge management initiatives. Journal of Knowledge Management 12(1), 21 – 36

Ngoya Vuyanzi Claire, Dr. Caleb Kirui “The Influence of Project Planning on Performance of Compassion Kenya (CKE)-Assisted Holistic Child Development Projects in Nairobi County, Kenya ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.352-355 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/352-355.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Strategies to Educate Farmers on Climate Change
Judith Nabwire Oundo, Ibrahim Makina- October 2020 – Page No.: 356-358

The document looks at climate change, effect of climate change and how those effects can be mitigated. Farmers are advised on strategies to be taken for better yields hence food security. The document has looked at intensive literature review on climate change.

Page(s): 356-358                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 11 November 2020

 Judith Nabwire Oundo
Nairobi University, Kenya

  Ibrahim Makina
Nairobi University, Kenya

[1] Kolladi , Y.R. (2017).A Review on Impact on Climate Change on Crop Production on Humid Tropics. Journal of Global Warming.
[2] Ochieng.J, Kirimi.L &Mathenge .M (2016). Effects of Climate Variability and Change on Agricultural Production: The case of Small Scale farmers in Kenya. Journal of Life Sciences. Pages 71-78.
[3] Zwane,M.E. (2019). Impact of climate change on primary agriculture, water sources and food security in Western Cape, South Africa. Journal List Jamba.11(1).
[4] Sazedur. R & Ashfikur .R. (2019).Impacts of Climate Change on Crop Production in Bangladesh: A Review’’ Journal of Agriculture and Crops, Academic Research Publishing Group, vol. 5(1), pages 6-14.
[5] Villegas.J.R. &Thornton.P.K (2015).Climate change Impacts on African Crop Production. Working Paper No. 119 CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS). Copenhagen.
[6] Mulungu .K. & Ng’ombe,N.J (2019). Climate Change Impacts on Sustainable Maize Production in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Review. DOI: 10.5772/intechopen.90033.
[7] Ali .A. & Erenstein .O. (2017) Assessing Farmer use of Climate Change Adaptation Practices and Impacts on Food Security and Poverty in Pakistan. Journal Climate Risk Management Volume 16 2017, Pages 183-194.

Judith Nabwire Oundo, Ibrahim Makina “Strategies to Educate Farmers on Climate Change” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.356-358 October 2020 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/356-358.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Gender Differences in Mathematics Interest and Achievement in Junior Secondary School Students, Niger State, Nigeria

Oluyemo A. A, A. Musbahu (PhD), Prof. I. J. Kukwil, Prof. C. M Anikweze, Shaluko Y. D October 2020 Page No.: 359-366

This study assessed the influence of gender differences in mathematics interest and achievement of Junior Secondary School Students (JSS) in Niger State, Nigeria. Correlation Survey design was adopted for the study. The target population for this study consists of 5,368 (2,705 male and 2,663 female) JSS 1 students in 2012/2013 academic session from 92 public and private Junior Secondary Schools in Zone ’B’ of Niger State. The sample of this study consist 361 (182 male students and 179 female) and multi-stage stratified random sampling technique was employed in the selection. Two instruments were developed for the study which consists of an Inventory on Students’ Interest in Mathematics (ISIM) and a Mathematics Achievement Test (MAT). Descriptive statistic (mean and Standard Deviation), Chi square, t test, biseria correlation and it is associated simple regression of Ordinary Least Square (OLS) method were used to establish relationship between the variables and to test null hypothesis at the 0.05 level of significance. The instruments were validated and the reliability coefficient was established using the test-retest method. The data obtained were analyzed using mean with the criterion mean set at 2.5.The findings of the study revealed that male students excel in Mathematics more than their female counterparts.. Based on the findings of the study, it was recommended amongst others that teachers should make use of alternative teaching methods like the use of games and simulations to motivate students’ interest (both male and female) in the learning of Mathematics.

Page(s): 359-366                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 11 November 2020

 Oluyemo A. A
Dept. of Physics, Niger State College of Education, Minna, Niger State, Nigeria

  A. Musbahu (PhD)
Dept. of Physics, Niger State College of Education, Minna, Niger State, Nigeria

  Prof. I. J. Kukwil
Dept. of Measurement and Evaluation, Nasarawa State University, Keffi, Nasarawa State, Nigeria

  Prof. C. M Anikweze
Dept. of Measurement and Evaluation, Nasarawa State University, Keffi, Nasarawa State, Nigeria

  Shaluko Y. D
Technical Education Dept. Niger State College of Education, Minna, Niger State, Nigeria

[1] Anikweze, C. M. (2010). Measurement and evaluation for teacher education. Enugu: SNAAP Press Ltd.
[2] Colleen M; Ganley M. V (2011). Sex differences in the relation between Mathematics performance, spatial sills and attitudes. Journal of applied developmental psychology, 32(4), 235-242
[3] Darragh L. (2018). Loving and loathing: portrayas of school mathematics inyoung adult fiction. Journal for research in mathematics education, 49(2), 178-209
[4] Ebenezer, D., Adetoun, A. (2014). Harmful cultural practices and gender equality in Nigeria. Gender behaviour, 12(1), 6169-6181
[5] Eccles, J. S & Wang, M. T. (2015). What motivate females and males to pursue careers in mathematics and sciences. International Journal Behaviour Development, 40, 100-106
[6] Federal Ministry of Education (2010). Federal Ministry of Education News on one year strategic plan: No. 5, vol. 23.
[7] Forgasz, H; Leder, G; & Tan, H. (2014). Public views on the gendering of mathematics and related careers: International comparisons educational studies in mathematics, 87(3), 369- 388
[8] Gutierrez, R. (2013). The socio political turn in mathematics education. Journal for research in mathematics education, 44(1), 3768
[9] Hafiz T. J & Hina H.A (2016). Causes of poor performance in mathematics from teachers, parent and student’s perspective. American Scientific Research Journal for engineering, technology and sciences, 15(1), 122-136
[10] Huang, C. (2013). Gender differences academic self- efficacy a meta- analysis. European Journal of Psychology of Education, 28(1), 1-35
[11] Kelly B. E (2013). Gender equality and women empowerment in Nigeria. The desirability and inevitability of a pragmatic approach developing country studies, 3(4), 59-66
[12] Kost- Smith, L. E; Pollock, S. J., Firkelstein,N. D., Cohen, G. L., Ito, T. A., Miyake, A (2012). Replicating a self- affirmation intervention to address gender difference: successes and challenges. In AIPconference proceedings. American institute of physics, 14(1), 1413-1425
[13] Lazarides, R., Dietrich, J., and Taskinen, P. H (2019). Stability and change in students motivational profiles in mathematics classrooms: the role of perceived teaching. Teach. Teach. Education, 79, 164-175
[14] Leder, G; & Forgasz, H. (2018). Measuring who counts: Gender and mathematics assessment. ZDM mathematics education, 50(4), 687-697
[15] Martin, M. O; Mullis, I. V. S; Foy, P; & Hooper, M. (2016). TIMSS 2015 International results inscience. Retrieved from Boston college, TIMSS & PIRLS international study center.
[16] Morgan, C. (2014). Social theory in mathematics education: Guest editorial educational studies in mathematics, 87, 123-128
[17] OECD. (2013). OECD skills outlook 2013: first results from the survey of adult skills
[18] OECD (2014). PISA 2012 results: what students know and can do- students’ performance in mathematics reading and sciences (vol.1, Rev.ed). Paris Pisa OECD publishing
[19] Oluwatayo P., & James, A. (2011). Gender difference and performance of secondary school students in mathematics. European Journal of Educational Studies: Psychologist, 12, 671-684.
[20] Stoet, G. & Geany D. C (2018). The gender equality paradox in science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Psychological science 2018, 29(4), 581-593
[21] TRCN (2011). Professional Diary Teacher Registration Council Nigeria April 2010 – 2011: Pp.58
[22] WAEC, (2009). Analysis of Senior Secondary Certificate Examinations Results. West African Examinations Council Publication, Lagos.

Oluyemo A. A, A. Musbahu (PhD), Prof. I. J. Kukwil, Prof. C. M Anikweze, Shaluko Y. D, “Gender Differences in Mathematics Interest and Achievement in Junior Secondary School Students, Niger State, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.359-366 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/359-366.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Effect of Perceived Organizational Support on Non-Monetary Compensation and Employee Performance at Federal University of Kashere Gombe State

Mohammed Usman, Dr. Ibrahim Garba Muhammad and Dr. Najafi Auwal Ibrahim – October 2020 Page No.: 367-373

Performance of an organization strongly depends on the capability of the human capital of that particular organization. This is because; employees are regarded as the most valuable asset of any organization. The paper aimed at conceptualizing the mediating effect of perceived organizational support on non-monetary compensation and employee performance at Federal University of Kashere Gombe state. The paper consults previous works on human resource management specifically on compensation as well as performance in order to present the conceptual clarification. the paper concludes that the major determinant of performance in any organization is the productivity of the employees. Therefore, employee performance is very important for organizations without which they cannot survive. It is vital for firms to consider it as their main objective. This implies that universities in Nigeria specifically FUK, needs to understand the present and future needs of its staff in order to meet their needs.

Page(s): 367-373                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 11 November 2020

 Mohammed Usman
Department of Accounting and Business Administration, Federal University of Kashere, Gombe State, Nigeria

  Dr. Ibrahim Garba Muhammad
Department of Business Administration & Entrepreneurship, Bayero University Kano, Nigeria.

  Dr. Najafi Auwal Ibrahim
Department of Business Administration & Entrepreneurship, Faculty of Management Sciences, Bayero University Kano, Nigeria

[1] Adams, P.E. (2002). Benefits of employee training program; Employee training plan, Business plan builder. United State.
[2] Ahmed, M. & Ahmed, A. (2014). The impact of indirect compensation on employee performance: An overview, Journal of Public Policy and Administration Research, 4(6), 1-9.
[3] Ajayi, O.S. (2019). Motivational drives and employee performance: Evidence from selected Universities in Nigeria. A Master’s Thesis, Ogun State University, Nigeria.
[4] Akanbi, P.A. (2011). Influence of extrinsic and intrinsic motivation on performance of employee in flour mills limited, Lagos. A PhD Thesis, University of Technology, Ogbomosho, Oyo State.
[5] Ali, M. & Ahmad, Z. N. (2017). Impact of pay promotion and recognition on job satisfaction: A study on banking sector employees Karachi, GMJACS, 7(2), 131-141.
[6] Aliya, I., Farah L., Maiya L., & Hina M. (2015). Factors affecting the employees performance; The case study of banking sector in Pakistan, International Journal of Business and Social Sciences, 4(8), 1-19.
[7] Aslam, A., Ghaffar, A., Talha, T. & Mushaq, A. (2015). Impact of compensation and reward system on the performance of an organization: An empirical study on banking sector of Pakistan. European Journal of Business and Social Sciences, 4(8), 319 – 325.
[8] Armstrong, M. (2010). Essential human resource management practice; A guide to people management, 1st ed. United State of America; Kogan page td. Beadwell & Clyodon.
[9] Armstrong, M., & Murlis, H. (2004). Reward management: A handbook of remuneration strategy and practice (5th Ed.). United Kingdom: Kogan Page.
[10] Azara, S., Mubasher, H. N. & Muhammed, A. (2013). Employees training and organizational performance; Mediating by employee performance in government school in Kotli, A. J. K.; International Journal of Art and Commerce, 5(4), 14-25.
[11] Biswas, S. (2010). Relationship between Psychological Climate and Turnover Intentions and its Impact on Organizational Effectiveness: A Study in Indian organizations. IIMB Management Review, 22 (3), 102-110.
[12] Chadwick, D. (2008). Improving employee engagement within energy resource conservation board”. Master of Arts Thesis, Royal Roads University.
[13] Chen, H.M. & Hsieh, Y.H. (2006). Key trends of the total reward system in the 21st century, Compensation & Benefits Review, 38(6), 64-70.
[14] Dahyana, Y. & Susanty, A.I. (2018). Incentive system impact on individual performance through motivation in a corporate university in Indonesia. The 8th International Conference on Sustainable Collaboration in Business, Technology and Innovation. 1-8.
[15] Eisenberger, R., Armeli, S., Rexwinkel, B., Lynch, P.D. & Rhoades, L. (2001). Reciprocation of perceived organizational support. Journal of Applied Psychology, 86(1), 42-51.
[16] Eluka, F. C. & Okafor, C. (2015). Effects of working condition on employee performance in Nigerian company. An International Journal of Business Management, 2(2), 1-12.
[17] Hall, R.E. (2019). The value of education: Evidence from around the globe. Retrieved online.
[18] Harrison, D., Newman, D., & Roth, P. (2006). How important are job attitudes? Meta-analytic comparisons of integrative behavioural outcomes and time sequences. Academy of Management Journal. 49(2) 305-325.
[19] Harras, H. (2019). The effect of workloads and compensation on work motivation in sasmita jaya foundation. Scientific Journal of Reflection: Economic, Accounting, Management & Business, 2(1), 21-30.
[20] Hoque, A. S. M., Awang, Z., Siddiqui, B. A. & Sabiu, M.S. (2018). Role of employee engagement on compensation system and employee performance relationship among telecommunication service providers in Bangladesh. International Journal of Human Resource Studies, 8(3). 19-37.
[21] Huang, S.M. (2014). A Study of the effect of incentive system on job performance- locus of control as a moderator” The Journal of International Management Studies, 9(1), 89-97.
[22] Hulkko, K., Sarti D., Hakonen, A.& Sweins, C. (2012). Total rewards perceptions and work engagement in elder-care organizations. International Studies of Management & Organization, 42 (1), 24-49.
[23] Hussain, S. D., Khaliq, D. A., Nisar, Q. A., Kamboh, A. Z., & Ali, S. (2019). Impact of employees’ recognition and job stress on job performance: Mediating role of perceived organization support. Strategic Management Journal, 2(2), 69-82.
[24] Jamal, M. (2007). Job stress and job performance controversy revisited: An empirical examination in two countries. International Journal of Stress Management. 14(2), 175-187.
[25] Jaworsk, C., Ravichandran, S., Karpinskic, A.C. & Singh, S. (2018). The effects of training satisfaction, employee benefits, and incentives on part-time employees’ commitment, International Journal of Human Resource Management 7(4), 1-21.
[26] Juliana, I. & Maria, C. (2016).Organizational performance: A concept that self seek to find itself. Annual constantin brancusi, University of Targu Jiu Eco Series, Issue 4.
[27] Kurfi, K.A. (2013). Human resource management. Benchmark publishers limited.
[28] Kurtessis, J. N., Eisenberger, R. Ford, M. T. Buffardi, L. C. Stewart, K. A., & Adis, C. S. (2015). Perceived organizational support: A meta-analytic evaluation of organizational support theory. Journal of Management. 20(10), 1-31.
[29] Lai, H. (2011). The influence of compensation system design on employee satisfaction. African Journal of Business Management, 5(26), 10718-10723.
[30] Landry, A.T. et-al (2018). The carrot or the stick? Investigating the functional meaning of cash rewards and their motivational power according to self determination theory. Journal of Compensation & Benefits Review. 1-17.
[31] Lazear, E. P. (2000). Performance pay and productivity. Journal of American Economic Review, 9(13), 46 – 61.
[32] Madden, L., Mathias, B. D. & Madden, T.M. (2015). In good company: The impact of perceived organizational support and positive relationships at work on turnover intentions. Management Research Review, 38(3), 242-263.
[33] Malik, E.M., Qaiser, R., & Munir, Y. (2012).The impact of pay and promotion on job satisfaction: Evidence from higher education institute of pakistan. American Journal of Economics, 6(9), 133-139.
[34] Mangkunegara, A. P. (2005). Manajemen Sumber Daya Manusia Perusahaan. Bandung. Pakistan, Remaja Rosdakarya.
[35] Markidis, C. & Gettlemen, M. (2018). On the cyclicality of real wages and employment: New evidence and stylized facts from performance pay and fixed wage jobs. Journal of Economics and Engineering, 1-49.
[36] Mengistu, K. (2017). The impact of reward on employee performance: The case of lion international bank. A Master’s Thesis, St. Mary’s University.
[37] Moehric, G.T. (2003). Evolution of compensation in a changing economy: United State bureau of labour statistics.
[38] Mohammed U. & Dugguh, S.I. (2014). Human resource management practice and organizational performance in tertiary institutions in Nigeria. International Journal of Economics, Commerce & Management, 2(12), 1-14.
[39] Mohammed, U. (2015). Impact of human resource management practices on organizational performance: A study of federal university of Kashere, Gombe state. Unpublished Degree Thesis, Federal University of Kashere Gombe.
[40] Muduli, A. (2016). Exploring the facilitators and mediators of workforce agility: An empirical study, Management Research Review, 39(12), 1567-1586.
[41] Nawab, S. (2011). Influence of employee compensation on organizational commitment and job satisfaction: A case study of educational sector of Pakistan. International Journal of Business & Social Science, 2(8). 1-9.
[42] Neves, P., & Eisenberger, R. (2014). Perceived organizational support and risk taking. Journal of Managerial Psychology, 29(2), 187-205.
[43] Njorogeand, K. (2015). Influence of compensation and reward on performance of employees at Nakuru county government. Journal of Business and Management, 1(1),1-9.
[44] Njoroge, S. W. & Josephat K. (2015). Influence of compensation and reward on performance of employees at Nakuru county government. Journal of Business and Management,17(11), 2278-2319.
[45] Nwachukwu, O.J. (2020). NewsIPPIS: Details of Buhari’s sitting with ASUU. The Bulletin, 12-15.
[46] Rai, A., Ghosh, P., Chauhan, R. & Singh, R. (2018). Improving in-role and extra-role performances with rewards and recognition: Does engagement mediate the process? Journal of Management Research and Review. 1-19.
[47] Ren, T. (2017). The impact of pay-for-performance perception and pay level satisfaction on employee work attitudes and extra-role behaviors: An investigation of moderating effects. Journal of Chinese Human Resource Management, 1-39.
[48] Rhoades, L., & Eisenberger, R. (2002). Perceived organizational support: A review of the literature. Journal of Applied Psychology, 87(2), 698-714.
[49] Sajuyigbe, O. B. (2013). Impact of reward on employee performance in selected manufacturing companies in Ibadan, Oyo state, Nigeria. International Journal of Art, 2 (2).
[50] Salton, E. & Nsiah, S., (2015). The mediating and moderating effects of motivation in the relationship between perceived organizational support and employee job performance, 3(7), 1-14.
[51] Serena, A. & Muhammed, K. S. (2014). The impact of rewards on employee performance in commercial banks of Bangladesh; Journal of Business and Management, 9-15.
[52] Stredwick, J. (2005). An Introduction to Human Resource Management; 2nd ed. Great Britain; Elsevier Butterworth Heinemann.
[53] Valaei, N. & Rezaei, S. (2016). Job satisfaction and organizational commitment: An empirical investigation among ICT-SMEs. Management Research Review, 39(12), 1663-1694.
[54] Wangechi, B., Kiragu, D. & Sang, A. (2018). Role of reward systems on job satisfaction of employees in the county government of Nyeri, Kenya. International Journal of Academic Research in Accounting, Finance & Management Sciences, 8(1), 196-204.
[55] Yaseen, A. (2013). Effect of compensation factors on employee satisfaction- A study of doctor’s dissatisfaction in punjab. International Journal of Human Resource Studies, 3 (1).
[56] Yavuz, N. (2004). The use of non-monetary incentives as a motivational tool: A survey study in a public organization in turkey. A Master’s Thesis, Technical University.

Mohammed Usman, Dr. Ibrahim Garba Muhammad and Dr. Najafi Auwal Ibrahim “Effect of Perceived Organizational Support on Non-Monetary Compensation and Employee Performance at Federal University of Kashere Gombe State” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.367-373 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/367-373.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Comparative of Crime Victim Survey Report with the Police Report on Crime Patterns, and Trends in Gboko Town, Benue State, Nigeria
Iorkosu, Tyover Samuel, ThankGod, Okosun, Iyolwuese, Salem I, Yaakugh Vincent – October 2020 – Page No.: 374-379

This study compares crime reports using data obtained from crime victims and Police reports from Gboko town in Benue State, Nigeria between 2017 and 2018. The dark figure inherent in the periodic crime record has severally been pointed out in Sociological literature, but determining the extent of these hidden figures has consistently been obscured due inability to compare Police data with data from crime victims. The significance of this study lies in raising the contribution of crime victims to periodic crime data, and to determine the true extent of crime patterns and trends in Gboko town. To do this a sample size of 400 household heads were systematically drawn from Gboko town based on a sample frame obtained from the National Population Office at Markurdi using Yamane’s formula of determining sample size. The town was segmented into five clusters, with 80 respondents drawn from each using questionnaire and key informant interview method as data collection instrument. Analysis of data revealed that the volume of crime victimization in Gboko town was relatively higher compared to the Police reports. It also showed differences in crime patterns and trends reported. Based on these findings, we recommend among others the involvement of crime victims’ reports in the Police periodic analysis of crime patterns and trends, compensation of crime victims, and encouragement of victims to speak out.

Page(s): 374-379                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 12 November 2020

 Iorkosu, Tyover Samuel
Student, Department of Sociology, Federal University of Lafia, Nasarawa State, Nigeria

 ThankGod, Okosun
Student, Peace and Conflict Studies, Institute of Governance and Development Studies, Nasarawa State University, Keffi, Nigeria

 Iyolwuese, Salem I
Student, Peace and Conflict Studies, Institute of Governance and Development Studies, Nasarawa State University, Keffi, Nigeria

 Yaakugh Vincent
Department of Sociology, Benue State University, Makurdi, Nigeria

[1] Adler, F; Mueller. G.O.W; Laufer, W.S (1998). Criminology (3rd Ed.). McGrew-Hill Company, USA.
[2] Ahmed, A (2008). Intelligence Gathering-Bane of Nigerian security agencies. Duniyass@yahoo.com.retreived on 5th April, 2012
[3] Alemika, E.E. O and Chukwuma I.C (2005) Criminal Victimisaton and fear of Crime in Lagos Metropolis. Nigeria. Series No. 1. CLEEN Foundation. Lagos
[4] Alubo. J. (2006). Ethnic conflict citizen crises in the central Region. Lagos Eddy Avae Nigeria Ltd.
[5] Anosike, B (2003) “Unprecedented. Wide spread. Incidence of Armed Robbery and Kidnapping in Nigeria” one Critical Index of “ Failed State” Status of Nigeria Open letter to president the Nation. 23rd Sept. Vol. 10.p7
[6] Beirne, P. And Massersechmidt J.W. (2003) Criminology. (4th ed). New York: Oxford University press
[7] Brantingham. P.L and Brantingham P.J (1993). environment. Routine and situation; towards a pattern theory of crime. New York crime prevention studies
[8] Chockalingham K (2003). Criminal victimization in four major cities in Southen India. In forum on crime and society Vol. 3. Nos. 1 and 2. pp 118-126. New Delhi.
[9] Durkheim. E. (1949). The Division of Labour in society. Translated simpon G. Free press Glencee.
[10] Ferraro, K. I and Lagrange R.C (1989). “Assessing age and gender differences in perceived risk and fear of crime” Criminology 217:697-710
[11] FRN Official Gazatte (21009). National Population Commission Abuja Nigeria. Federal Government printer Nigeria
[12] Gyong, J.E (1989). Criminological theories and their implications for crime prevention and control. NSPMC Ltd. Lagos.
[13] Gyong, J.E (2010) Criminal victimization and the reporting of Crme in Kaduna State: towards integrating the victim of crime into Criminological discourse” in current research journal of social science. Vol.2 No.5 pp288-295. Maxwell scientific organisation.
[14] Hindelang. M.J,. Gottfredson. M.R and Garofalo. J (1978). Victims of personal Crimes: An Empirical foundation for a theory of personal victimization. Cambridge Mass Ballingers publishing company.
[15] Ijeoma D.O (2010) Kidnapping in Nigeria and its root causes. Retrieved from http://wwwtnep.net/articles/tabid/1800/kidnapping on 24th Sept. 2013.
[16] Kerlinger. P. (1973) foundation of behavioural research New York: Holt Reineheart and Wilsonco.
[17] Moses. U.J (2012). Criminal Victimization in Nigeria Pattern and Trend, Nigerian Police Annual report (2013-2014) Makurdi. Benue state police head Quarter Nigerian Institute of Social and economic research NISER (1998).
[18] Olugun. S. (2010). July 29) Kidnapping Police Launch mass transfer. The Nation. 5 (1461): 1
[19] Yangeve A. (2012). Survey of Crime Victim and Reporting of crime in Makurdi Metropolis. Unpublished Thesis. Benue state University Makurdi.
[20] Yin. P. (1985) Victimization and the aged Springfield. IC Charles C. Thomas
[21] Yishau, O. (2005). Armed Robbery or charm robbery: Violent crime in Nigeria Ibadan Spectrum Books.
[22] Zumve, S.I (2006). “ The precipitation of Victims in Armed Robbery Victimization. In the Social Analyst vol. 5 No. 1 pp 14-20. BSU. NSASA..

Iorkosu, Tyover Samuel, ThankGod, Okosun, Iyolwuese, Salem I, Yaakugh Vincent “Comparative of Crime Victim Survey Report with the Police Report on Crime Patterns, and Trends in Gboko Town, Benue State, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.4 issue 10, pp. 374-379 October 2020 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/374-379.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Laboratory Management in Improving School Quality (Case Study at SMA Negeri 3 Bandar Lampung)

Zahra Mila Putri, Dedy Hermanto, Irawan Suntoro- October 2020 Page No.: 380-383

Good laboratory management depends on several factors which are interrelated with one another. The purpose of this study is to analyze and describe: biological laboratory planning, implementation of biological laboratories, controlling biological laboratories, and follow-up of biology laboratories at SMA Negeri 3 Bandar Lampung. The method used in this research is qualitative with a case study design. This research data collection technique using in-depth interviews, participant observation, and document study. The data source of this study amounted to 8 people with the main informants of the school principal and supporting informants, namely the laboratory coordinator, the head of the laboratory, the biology teacher and students. The results showed that (1) laboratory planning which includes planning, collecting data to get obstacles and determining the time for developing biological laboratories in improving the quality of schools, (2) Implementation of laboratories which includes establishing laboratory activities to create an organizational structure and determining who is responsible in the biology laboratory in improving the quality of schools, (3) Control activities are carried out by preparing a schedule for practicum activities, practicum service activities, learning processes with practicum, and procurement of practicum tools and materials in improving school quality, (4) Laboratory follow-up includes follow-up supervision and follow-up laboratory implementation in improving school quality.

Page(s): 380-383                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 12 November 2020

 Zahra Mila Putri
Faculty of Teacher Training and Education, University of Lampung, Indonesia

 Dedy Hermanto
Faculty of Teacher Training and Education, University of Lampung, Indonesia

 Irawan Suntoro
Faculty of Teacher Training and Education, University of Lampung, Indonesia

[1] Deming, W. Edwards. 1982. Guide to Quality Control. Cambridge: Massachussets Intitute Of Technology.
[2] Depdikbud. 1996. Petunjuk Teknis Pengelolaan Laboratorium IPA. Jakarta: Direktur Jenderal Pendidikan Dasar dan Menengah. Direktorat Pendidikan Menengah Umum.
[3] Elseria, E. 2016. Efektifitas pengelolaan Laboratorium IPA. Junal Manajer Pendidikan.
[4] Engkoswara. 2010. Administrasi Pendidikan. Bandung: Alfabeta.
[5] Fitriani, F. I. T. R. I. A. N. I. (2018). SIKLUS PDCA DAN FILOSOFI KAIZEN. Adaara: Jurnal Manajemen Pendidikan Islam, 7(1), 625-640.
[6] Handoko, H. 2011. Manajemen. Edisi II. Yogyakarta: BPFE.
[7] Ismaya, B.2015. Pengelolaan Pendidikan. Bandung: Refika Aditama.
[8] Isniah, S., Purba, H. H., & Debora, F. (2020). Plan do check action (PDCA) method: literature review and research issues. Jurnal Sistem dan Manajemen Industri, 4(1), 72-81.
[9] Knootz, H.C.O.d.d.H.W. 2002. Essential of Management, Four Edition.
[10] Kurniawan, C., & Azwir, H. H. (2019). Penerapan Metode PDCA untuk Menurunkan Tingkat Kerusakan Mesin pada Proses Produksi Penyalutan. Journal of Industrial Engineering, 3(2), 105-118
[11] Kurniawan, H., Sumarya, E., & Merjani, A. (2018). PENINGKATAN KUALITAS PRODUKSI UNTUK MENGURANGI UNIT CACAT INSUFFICIENT EPOXY DENGAN METODE PDCA DI AREA DIE ATTACH (Studi Kasus Di PT. Unisem). PROFISIENSI, 5(1)
[12] Miles, Matthew B, A. Michael Huberman & Jhony, Saldana. (2014). Analisis Data Kualitatif, Suatu Metode Sourcebook. EdisiKetiga. Penerbitan Sage: Inc.
[13] Mulyadi. 2009. Classroom Management Mewujudkan Suasana Kelas yang Menyenangkan Bagi Siswa.
[14] Rumilah. 2006. Keefektifan Manajemen Laboratorium IPA SMP Negeri di Kabupaten Bantul. Tesis Magister, Tidak diterbitkan. UNY.
[15] Siagian, S.P. 2007. Fungsi-Fungsi Manajerial. Jakarta: PT.Bumi Aksara.
[16] Sugiono. 2010. Metode Penelitian Pendidikan, Pendekatan Kuantitatif dan Kualitatif R&D. Bandung: Alfabeta.
[17] Suharsimi Arikunto. 1979. Buku Ajar: Pengelolaan Materiil. Yogyakarta: AP FIP-IKIP Yogyakarta.
[18] Terry, George R. 2009. Guide to Management, Alih bahasa J. Smith. D.F.M, Bumi Aksara. Jakarta.
[19] Wahyuningrum, MM. 2000. Buku Ajar: Manajemen Fasilitas Pendidikan. Yogyakarta: AP FIP UNY.
[20] Winardi. 2000. Kepemimpinan dalam Manajemen. Jakarta: Rineka Cipta.
[21] Yurnani, H. 2010. Pemanfaatan Laboratorium untuk Meningkatkan Hasil Belajar Biologi. Jurnal Tabularasa PPS Unimed, 7 : 95-104.

Zahra Mila Putri, Dedy Hermanto, Irawan Suntoro “Laboratory Management in Improving School Quality (Case Study at SMA Negeri 3 Bandar Lampung)” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-10, pp.380-383 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/380-383.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Changes in Attitude towards Intimate Partner Violence among Ever Married Women in Nigeria: Evidence from Repeated Cross-Sectional Nationally Representative Surveys

Motunrayo I. FASASI (Ph.D), Matthew A. ALABI October 2020 Page No.: 384-392

Purpose: This study examines changes in attitude towards IPV and associated factors among ever married women in Nigeria.
Methods: This study analysed a secondary data, the Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS) 2008, 2013 and 2018. The weighted sample size comprised of 19,349, 22,880 and 8,969 women for 2008, 2013 and 2018 surveys respectively. Analysis was restricted to ever married women interviewed for the domestic violence module. Binary Logistic regression analysis was performed.
Results: Findings revealed an upward trend (20% increase) in the prevalence of IPV between the year 2008 and 2018, (30% vs. 25% vs. 36%) for the year 2008, 2013 and 2018 respectively. However, there was a downward trend in the proportion of women approving IPV (44% vs. 35% vs. 26%) for the year 2008, 2013 and 2018 respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed demographic and socioeconomic variables namely; younger age, lower educational attainment, residence in rural area, residence in northern region of the country, affiliated to Islam and traditional religion, belonging to the poorest household status and lack of autonomy consistently predicted approval of IPV.
Conclusion: The study showed an upward trend in the prevalence of IPV despite the decline in the proportion of women approving IPV, while demographic and socioeconomic factors accounts for significant variation in approval and experience of IPV in Nigeria. Hence, interventions must address socio-economic differentials.

Page(s): 384-392                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 13 November 2020

  Motunrayo I. FASASI (Ph.D)
Health Centre Services, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria

  Matthew A. ALABI
Academy for Health Development (AHEAD), Ile-Ife, Nigeria

[1] United Nations (2016). Violence against Women Factsheets. Engaging men to prevent violence against women, http://www.un.org. November, 2016.
[2] World Health Organization (2013): Fact Sheet. Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence against Women. No.239. Updated October, 2013.
[3] Oladeji, D. (2013). Personal, Situational and Socio-cultural factor as correlates of intimate partner abuse in Nigeria. Advancement in Sexual Medicine. Journal of Social Science; 3(4): 92-97.
[4] Gbolahan, O. (2013). Socio-cultural factors influencing gender-based violence on agricultural livelihood activities of rural households in Ogun State, Nigeria. International Journal of Biodiversity and Conservation, 5(1), 1-14.
[5] NPC, ICF International. Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey, 2018-Final Report Abuja, Nigeria; Maryland, USA: NPC and ICF International; 2019. Available from: http://dhsprogram.com/publications/publication-FR293-DHS-Final-Reports.
[6] Carter, J. (2015). Patriarchy and violence against women and girls. Lancet.;385(9978):e40–1. pmid:25467580.
[7] Fisher, J., Tran, T. D., Biggs, B., Dang, T. H., Nguyen, T. T., & Tran, T. (2013). Intimate partner violence and perinatal common mental disorders among women in rural Vietnam. International Health, 5(1), 29-37.
[8] Wang L. (2016): Factors Influencing attitude towards Intimate Partner Violence. Aggression and Violent Behaviour. Vol. 29:72-78.
[9] Madukwe, B. (2013): Violence against Women: Urgent Law Reform. Nigerian Vanguard Median Limited, May, 2013.
[10] Gwen, S. (2009): Women’s Attitudes towards Domestic Violence by Country.
[11] Tran, T.D, Nguyen H., Fisher J. (2016) Attitudes towards Intimate Partner Violence against Women among Women and Men in 39 Low- and Middle-Income Countries. PLoS ONE 11(11): e0167438. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0167438.
[12] Iliyasu, Z., Abubakar, I. S., Galadanci, H. S., Hayatu, Z., & Aliyu, M. H. (2013). Prevalence and risk factors for domestic violence among pregnant women in northern Nigeria. Journal of interpersonal violence, 28(4), 868-883.
[13] Rashid, M., Kader, M., Perera, N. K., & Sharma, A. (2014). Wife beating: a population-based study in Bangladesh. Violence and gender, 1(4), 170-175.
[14] Rapp, D., Zoch, B., Khan, M., Pollmann, T, & Krämer, A. (2012). Association between gap in spousal education and domestic violence in India and Bangladesh. BMC Public Health 12(1):467.
[15] Thankian, K., Sidney O.C and Menon A.J. (2015): Factors Associated with Women’s Attitude towards Spousal Abuse: The Case of Zambia. Journal of Health Science 3:217-224.
[16] Marshall, G.A. & Furr L.A. (2010): Factors that affect women’s attitude towards domestic violence in Turkey. Violence Vict. 25(2):265-77.
[17] Thapa, D. K., & Niehof, A. (2013). Women’s autonomy and husbands’ involvement in maternal health care in Nepal. Social Science & Medicine, 93, 1-10.
[18] United Nations (2000): United Nations Millennium Development Goals. Available from:http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/.
[19] Allendorf, K. (2007). Couples’ reports of women’s autonomy and health‐care use in Nepal. Studies in family planning, 38(1), 35-46.
[20] Woldemicael G. (2007): Do women with higher autonomy seek more maternal and child health-care? Evidence from Ethiopia and Eritrea.
[21] Lamichhane, P., Puri, M., Tamang, J., & Dulal, B. (2011). Women’s status and violence against young married women in rural Nepal. BMC women’s health, 11(1), 19.
[22] Menon M. & Johnson, M.P. (2007). Patriarchy and paternalism in intimate partner violence: A study of domestic violence in rural India. Recent Studies on Indian Women: Empirical Work of Social Scientists, Rawat Publications, Jaipur, India, pp. 171&195.
[23] Sabarwal, S., Santhya, K. G., & Jejeebhoy, S. J. (2014). Women’s autonomy and experience of physical violence within marriage in rural India: Evidence from a prospective study. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 29(2), 332-347.
[24] d’Oliveira, A. F. P. L., Schraiber, L. B., França-Junior, I., Ludermir, A. B., Portella, A. P., Diniz, C. S., … & Valença, O. (2009). Factors associated with intimate partner violence against Brazilian women. Revista de saude publica, 43, 299-311.

Motunrayo I. FASASI (Ph.D), Matthew A. ALABI, “Changes in Attitude towards Intimate Partner Violence among Ever Married Women in Nigeria: Evidence from Repeated Cross-Sectional Nationally Representative Surveys” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.384-392 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/384-392.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Relationship between School Connectedness and Secondary School Students’ Academic Outcomes in English Language in Anambra State, Nigeria

Gladys Uzoechina, Pearl Nwabuogo Okoye October 2020 Page No.: 393-397

The study sought to determine relationship between school connectedness and secondary school students’ academic outcomes in English language in Anambra State, Nigeria. The study was guided by three research questions. The research design was correlation survey. Stratified disproportionate sampling technique was used to select a sample size of 420 students from SS2 students in Anambra state public secondary schools. A questionnaire was used to collect data which was administrated through direct delivery approach. Research questions were answered using Pearson Product Moment Correlation Coefficient. Findings from the study revealed among others that the relationship between school connectedness and academic achievement of in-school adolescents in English language is high and positive. Based on the findings, it was recommended that there School authorities should provide a conducive school environment that encourages mutually beneficial relationship between the students and the school staff for effective teaching and learning.

Page(s): 393-397                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 13 November 2020

 Gladys Uzoechina
Department of Educational Foundations, Faculty of Education, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Igbariam, Anambra State, Nigeria

  Pearl Nwabuogo Okoye
Department of Educational Foundations, Faculty of Education, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Igbariam, Anambra State, Nigeria

[1] Adekunle, O.S. (2014). School connectedness, emotional intelligence and locus of control as determinants of academic achievement among school going adolescents in Ikeja, Lagos State.Journal of Educational Policy and Entrepreneurial Research (JEPER), 1(3), 9-17.
[2] Adesemowo, P. O. (2005). Premium on affective education: panacea for scholastic malfunctioning and aberration. 34th Inaugural Lecture, OlabisiOnabanjo University. Ago-Iwoye: OlabisiOnabanjo University Press.
[3] Adeyemo, D. A. (2007).Moderating influence of emotional intelligence on the link between academic self-efficacy and achievement of university students.Psychology Developing Societies, 19(2), 199-213.
[4] Anyamene, A., Nwokolo C. & Ejichukwu, E. (2016). Relationship between study skills and Academic Achievement among secondary school students in Anambra State. International Journal of Education and Social Learning 1(2), 1 – 18.
[5] Blum, R. (2005). School connectedness: Improving the lives of students. Baltimore, Maryland: Studio 39 East, Donna Schaefer.
[6] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2008). Fact sheet: Health risk behaviors and academic achievement; Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
[7] Chapman, E. (2010). Alternative approaches to assessing student engagement rates. Practical Assessment, Research & Evaluation, 8(13). Retrieved from http:// PAREonline.net/getvn.asp?v=8&n=13
[8] Chohan, B.I., & Khan, R.M. (2010). Impact of parental support on the academic performance and self-concept of the student.Journal of Research and Reflections in Education, 4(1), 14 -26.
[9] Clark, L.F., Miller, K.S., & Nagy S.S. (2005). Adult identity mentoring: Reducing sexual risk for African-American seventh grade students. Journal of Adolescent Health 37(4), 337–337.
[10] Davis, H. (2006). Exploring the contexts of relationship quality between middle school students and teachers. The Elementary School Journal, 106, 193–223.
[11] Deci, E., & Ryan, R. (2000). The ‘what’ and ‘why’ of goal pursuits: Human needs and the self-determination of behaviour. Psychological Inquiry, 11, 227–268.
[12] Dike, G. (2007, June 9). Guilty verdict … WAEC nails Government, parents for students’ failure in English, Maths. Daily Sun. p.14.
[13] Education Development Center, (2008). School connectedness and meaningful student participation. Washington DC, U.S.: Department of Education; Retrieved from http://www. ed.gov/admins/lead/safety/training/connect/index.html.
[14] Elias, M. J. (2006). The connection between academic and social–emotional learning.In M. J. Elias & H. Arnold (Eds.).The educator’s guide to emotional intelligence and academic achievement (pp. 4–14). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
[15] Nwogu, B. C. (2015). Educational Research: Basic Issues and Methodology(2nd Ed.). Enugu. University Trust Publishers.
[16] Odeh. R. C., Oguche, O., Angelina. M., &Ivagher, E.D. (2015). Influence of school environment on academic achievement of students in secondary schools in zone “a” senatorial district of Benue State, Nigeria. International Journal of Recent Scientific Research Research, 6(7), 4914-4922.
[17] Patton, G.C., Bond, L., Carlin, J.B., Thomas, L., Butler, H., Glover, S. … Bowes, G. (2006). Promoting social inclusion in schools: A randomized trial of effects on student health risk behaviour and well-being.American Journal of Public Health 96(9), 1582-1587.
[18] Ricarda, S., Anja, M., Anne, F. & Linda, W. (2014).Gender differences in school success: What are the roles of students’ intelligence, personality and motivation? Educational Research, 56(2), 230–243, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00131881.2014.898917
[19] Roeser, R., Midgley, C., & Urdan, T. (1996). Perceptions of the school psychological environment and early adolescents’ psychological and behavioral functioning in school: The mediating role of goals and belonging. Journal of Educational Psychology, 88, 408–422.
[20] Topor, D. R., Keane, S. P., Shelton, T. L. & Calkins, S. B. (2010). Parent involvement and student academic performance: A multiple mediational analysis. JPrevInterv Community, 38(3), 183–197. doi: 10.1080/10852352.2010.486297
[21] Walter, J. (2012) Correlational Research. Retrieved August 14, 2012 from:www.capilanou:ca/programs/psychology/students/research/correlation.html
[22] Wentzel, K. R. (2009). Students’ relationships with teachers as motivational contexts.In K. Wentzel & A. Wigfield (Eds.), Handbook of motivation in school. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Gladys Uzoechina, Pearl Nwabuogo Okoye “Relationship between School Connectedness and Secondary School Students’ Academic Outcomes in English Language in Anambra State, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.393-397 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/393-397.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Implications of Intergovernmental Fiscal Relations on the Financial Autonomy of Local Governments in Admawa State, Nigeria

Dr. Lucky Benson, Usman Isa – October 2020 Page No.: 398-403

The 1999 Constitution of Nigeria as amended provides that every State in Nigeria shall create and maintain a special account where Local Governments funds from Federation account are deposited, including the 10% State’s internally generated revenue. The State is expected to share the revenue among the various Local Governments within her domain for effective service delivery to the grassroots people. This paper sought to evoke information on the effect of State – Local Government Joint Account on the financial autonomy of Local Government Councils in Adamawa State. Data for the study were obtained from both Primary and secondary sources. The study found that the State-Local Government Joint Account operations hinder effective service delivery in Adamawa State. The Fund appropri-ated to Local Government Councils in Adamawa State from the Federation Account was mismanaged by the State Government, through several means which includes illegal deductions, diver-sion and undue engagement of Local Governments into partner-ship projects. The study recommended that, in order to free Lo-cal Governments from such exploitation of the Joint Account system, the constitution has to be reviewed to enable Local Gov-ernments access their allocation directly from the Federation account.

Page(s): 398-403                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 13 November 2020

 Dr. Lucky Benson
Department Of Political Science and Administration ,Adamawa State University, Mubi, Nigeria

  Usman Isa
Department of Public Administration Adamawa State Polytechnic, Yola, Nigeria

[[1] Adamolekun, L {1983). Public Administration: A Nigerian and Comparative Perspective. Lagos Longman ltd
[2] Ayo, S. B. (1985). “Intergovernmental Relations and the management of the Universal Primary Education in Nigeria Since 1976”. In Hashim,l.(eds.), Issues in Public Sector Management in Nigeria. Zaria: University Press ltd
[3] Aghayere, V, O (1997) Dominant issues in the Nigerian Local Government System. A contemporary focus Benin: imprint services. Under Engagement of Local Government into partnership project.
[4] Aluko, O. (2006) corruption in the Local Government system in Nigeria. Ibadan: Oluben printers.
[5] Alao, D.O., Osakede, KO.O and Owolabi, T.Y (2015) challenges of Local Government administration in Nigeria: Lessons from comparative analysis. International Journal of Development and economic sustainability 3 (4), 61-79
[6] Bello-Imam, I.B. & Agba, A.V. (2004) ‘Fiscal Federalism, The National Question and Resource Control. Practice and Prospects’ In Bello-Imam, I.B. & Obadan, M. (ed) Democratic Governance and Development Management in Nigeria Fourth Republic (1999-2003). Ibadan: JODAD Publishers.
[7] Dalhatu, S. (2006) “Essays on Local Government Administration: Fostering better service delivery, record keeping accountability and Empowerment at the Local Government” Kano: Bench-Mark Publishers
[8] Dibie, R. (2004) Public Administration, Politics and Change in the Principles Governance in Nigeria. Lagos, Nigeria: Mbeyi and associate Press.
[9] Gboyega, A. (2001) Local autonomy in Federal policies: The Nigerian Local Government system in historical perspective being a paper presented at an international conference on new directions: Federalism in African Abuja Nig.
[10] Gboyega, A (1987) “Political Values and Local Governments in Nigeria”. Lagos Malthouse Press Ltd.
[11] King, M.C (1998) Localism and Nation Building, Ibadan: spectrum books. Pp.27,30.
[12] Nwakwo,G.O.(2006). “Intergovernmental Relations and Local Government Administration in Nigeria”. In Kamar(eds.)journal of social and management sciences.lbadan: secre-print ltd.
[13] Okelegbe, A.O (2005). The Local Government system and grassroots Development in Nigeria: Issued problems and challenges.
[14] Omorugi, O. (1985) “Beyond the Local Government reforms of 1976” in Ademolekun (ed). Nigeria Public Administration 1960-1980 perspective and prospects Ibadan: Heinemann Educational books (Nig) Ltd.
[15] Onah, R. C. (2004) ‘Trends in State – Local Government Financial Relations and Local Government Administration in Nigeria’. Nigerian Journal of Public Administration & Local Government. Vol. XII, No.1.
[16] Ojo, E,O (2009) Mechanism of National integration in a Multi-Ethnic Federal State. The Nigeria experience. John Archers publishers Ltd.
[17] Ojofeitimi, T. (2002) Managing at the grassroots: Local Government and Rural Development. In the 21st century. Lagos: Centre for Management Development.
[18] Ojugbeli, F.A and Ojoh, J. (2014) The Joint Account system in Nigeria: problems and prospects. Journal of policy and Development Studies 9 (1): 292-300.
[19] Swanborn P. (2010) Case Study Research: what, why and how? London, UK: Sage
[20] Tonwe, D.a (2014 Digesting the Dynamics of Federal – State – Local Government Nexus In Nigeria’s Federal System. An international Journal of Arts and Humanities Bahi Dar, Ethiopia, 3 (1): 85-103.
[21] Uzondu, J. (2011: Sept, 12) Joint Account Crisis: How Governments short change LGS. Nigeria News world. Rationality of Joint State and Local Government Account (2013;9), News ticker.
[22] Yin, R. K. (2009). Case study research: Design and methods: Sage publications.

Dr. Lucky Benson, Usman Isa “The Implications of Intergovernmental Fiscal Relations on the Financial Autonomy of Local Governments in Admawa State, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-10, pp.398-403 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/398-403.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Nigerian Higher Institution Scholars’ Perception amid COVID-19 Pandemic

Ilokanulo Samuel Nchekwubemchukwu, Patrick Ogechukwu Blessing, Mustapha Bala Tsakuwa October 2020 Page No.: 404-408

As the devastating effects of COVID-19 pandemic was being felt by all nations of the world, socio-economic and political undertakings were temporarily suspended, also, academic activities in almost all countries were postponed or adjusted. However, because the gravity of the pandemic effects differs, countries’ higher institutions’ preparations and responses varied to some degrees. Therefore, this paper studied scholar’s perceptions of the Nigerian higher institutions’ preparations and responses amid the COVID-19 pandemic. The quantitative research method was employed and the questionnaire was administered via WhatsApp and WeChat to the research respondents. The data collected were analyzed using wenjuanxing software and results were presented in bar charts. The research findings showed that Nigerian higher institutions face high cost of internet data, inconsistent electricity supply, and poor network services and these can affect scholars’ readiness and participation in the virtual classrooms. There was no significant difference among the research participants based on their gender, academic status and geographical location. Hence, the study recommends a need to train both the staff and the students on the online classes by the institutions, and issues of poor network, high cost of data, and inconsistent electricity should be addressed by the government to help virtual education in the Nigerian high institutions function properly.

Page(s): 404-408                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 13 November 2020

  Ilokanulo Samuel Nchekwubemchukwu
Faculty of Education, Department of Comparative Education, Southwest University, China

 Patrick Ogechukwu Blessing
Faculty of Education Department of Education Leadership and Management, Southwest University, China

 Mustapha Bala Tsakuwa
Faculty of International Studies, Department of Foreign Language and Applied Linguistics, Southwest University, China

[1] Adejumo, K. (2020). Coronavirus: Nigerian tertiary institutions not equipped for distance learning. Retrieved May 1 from https://www.premiumtimesng.com/features-and-interviews/385262-coronavirus-nigerian-tertiary-institutions-not-equipped-for-distance-learning.html
[2] Aduwa-Ogiegbaen, S. E., & Iyamu, E. O. S. (2005). Using information and communication technology in secondary schools in Nigeria: Problems and prospects. Educational Technology & Society, 8 (1), 104-112.
[3] Akudolu, L. I., Ugochukwu, S. E., & Olibie, E. I. (2017). Preparing university students in Nigeria for global citizenship through virtual learning. International Journal of Curriculum and Instruction 9(1) 47–62.
[4] Alvarado, M., & Calderon, I. (2013). Statistical diagnosis and trends in distance higher educationin Colombia. Bogotá, In Distance and Virtual Higher Education in Colombia: New realities, 31-47.
[5] Apuke, O. D. & Iyendo, T. O. (2018).University students’ usage of the internet resources for research and learning: forms of access and perceptions of utility. Heliyon 4 doi: 10.1016/j.heliyon.2018.
[6] Asante G. & Adjei-Frimpong B. (2016). An investigation into the use of ICT tools in the technical vocational education and training (TVET) Delivery – Evidence from Kumasi Metropolis. International Journal of Computer Applications. Retrieved June 26, 2020 from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/290780750
[7] Aworanti, O. A. (2016). Information and communications technology (ICT) in Nigeria educational assessment system – Emerging challenges.Universal Journal of Educational Research 4(6): 1351-1356, DOI: 10.13189/ujer.2016.040612.
[8] Azeezat, A. (2020). Coronavirus: NUC announces closure of Nigerian universities. Retrieved May 1 from https://www.premiumtimesng.com/news/headlines/382880-coronavirus-nuc-announces-closure-of-nigerian-universities.html
[9] Chimpololo A (2013). Transforming the training of technical and vocational education Instructors through Open Distance and Flexible Learning: The Case of Malawi, p6. http://oasis.col.org/handle/11599/1920 retrieved 2020-5-3
[10] Gomes, C. & Chang S. (2020). 3 Ways the coronavirus outbreak will affect international students and how Unis can Help. Retrieved on 2020/4/29, from: https://theconversation.com/3-ways-the-coronavirus-outbreak-will-affect-international-students-and-how-unis-can-help-131195
[11] Ilokanulo, S.N. (2020). ICT as a tool for promoting distance education in Nigerian technical vocational education and training (TVET). International Journal of Research Publication, 53, (1).http://ijrp.org/paper-detail/1156.
[12] Montiel, L. M. C. (2018). A Comparative Study of Online English Language Learning and Face-To-Face English Language Learning (Doctoral dissertation). Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia.
[13] Mukeredzi,T., Kokutse, F. & Dell, S. (2020). Student bodies say e-learning is unaffordable and elitist. University World News: https://www.universityworldnews.com/post.php?story=20200422075107312
[14] Nyariki, L. (2020). Africa supports reading and learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. Retrieved May 1, from https://www.globalpartnership.org/blog/africa-supports-reading-and-learning-during-covid-19-pandemic
[15] Olasunkanmi, I. (2020). Nigerian university students find online learning painful: Here’s why. https://theconversation.com/nigerian-university-students-find-online-learning-painful-heres-why-143919
[16] Swan, K. (2019). Research on online learning. Online learning, 11, 55-59.

Ilokanulo Samuel Nchekwubemchukwu, Patrick Ogechukwu Blessing, Mustapha Bala Tsakuwa “Nigerian Higher Institution Scholars’ Perception amid COVID-19 Pandemic” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 10, pp.404-408 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/404-408.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Academic Ability and Students’ Knowledge of Social Issues and Concepts: A Review in Social Studies
DARAMOLA, Clement Oladayo (Ph.D) – October 2020 – Page No.: 409-414

This paper reviewed the relationship between students’ academic ability and their knowledge of social issues and concepts with a peep on Social Studies curriculum in secondary schools. Buttressing the aim of Social Studies in promotion of knowledge, intellectual processes, and democratic dispositions required of students to be active and become effective citizens that is useful to themselves, people in their environment, the Nation and the world at large, the study explored social concepts and various social issues with a view of eradicating the social problems through adequate knowledge of Social Studies skills and improve students’ academic ability. In order to proffer solutions to the identified social problems that arose due to poor students’ knowledge of social issues and concepts, Social Studies teachers, curriculum planners and government remain to be powerful instruments to resolve these evil effects of poor knowledge of social issues and concepts through full implementation of Social Studies curriculum at both junior and senior secondary classes.

Page(s): 409-414                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 17 November 2020

 DARAMOLA, Clement Oladayo (Ph.D)
Department of Social Studies, College of Education, Ikere Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria

[1] Abubakar, A. (2013). Role of social studies education in national development in Nigeria. Academic Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies, 2(6), 23-26.
[2] Adebisi, H.S. (2013) Moral decadence” from http://www.blogspot.com.
[3] Adesina, A.D.O. & Odejobi, C. O., (2011). Peace Dilemma in Nigeria: A Case for a Peace Education Programme for Elementary School Children. JPE/ e Journal of Education Policy.https://www4.nau.edu/cee/jep/journals.aspx?id=441.
[4] Aluko, S.A (2008) Corruption and National Development: A Lecture delivered at the Centre for Democratic Development Research and Training, Zaria as part of the Activities of Prof. Bala Usman Annual Memorial Lecture, on Saturday 31st May.
[5] Connell, R. W. (1996). Teaching the Boys: New Research on Masculinity, and Gender Strategies for Schools. Teachers College Record (USA), Vol. 98, No. 2,pp. 206–35.
[6] Darling-Hammond, L. (2010). The flat world and education: How America’s commitment to equity will determine our future. New York, NY: Teachers College Press
[7] Eromosele, E., (1993). Nigerian Petroleum Business – A Handbook, Lagos: Advent Communications.
[8] Giles, Stephanie M. (2013). “The Social Studies Classroom: An Optimal Setting for Schools to Support Students At-Risk” (2013).Education and Human Development Master’s Theses. 301.http://digitalcommons.brockport.edu/ehd_theses/301
[9] Gonzalez, L. (2009). Teaching mathematics for social justice: Reflections on a community of practice for urban high school mathematics teachers. Journal of Urban Mathematics Education, 2(1), 22–51. Retrieved from http://ed-osprey.gsu.edu/ojs/index.php/JUME/article/view/32
[10] Gutman, L. M. & Schoon, I. (2013).The impact of non-cognitive skills on outcomes of young people. Education Endowment Fund.
[11] Kayode O. (2013, July 18) Causes and consequences of corruption: The Nigerian experience(2).Punch: Retrieved September 20, 2014, from: http://www.punchng.com, http://www. nigerianecho.com
[12] Kazi NP (2017). Social Studies for Nigerian Schools. Jos: Wais Press Ltd. Coe C (2014). Social Studies in Washington State. Harvard University Press, Cambridge.
[13] Khattak M., Iqbal M.N and Ullah I (2012). Influence of drugs on students’ performance: a qualitative study in Pakistan university students.
[14] Kikuvi, R. N. (2009). Determination of Juvenile Delinquency Development among Pupils in Machakos Rehabilitation Schools. Unpublished Maters Degree Thesis. Kenyatta University.
[15] Kool, A., Mainhard, M.T., Jaarsma, A.D.C. et al. (2018). Do Students with Varying Academic Ability Benefit Equally from Personal Qualities? Applying a Trait and State Perspective. Res High Educ59, 1021–1034.
[16] Leiserowitz, A., Maibach, E., Roser-Renouf, C., & Smith, N. (2011).Climate change in the American mind: Americans’ global warming beliefs and attitudes in May 2011. New Haven, CT: Yale Project on Climate Change Communication.
[17] Lewinsohn, D.A., E. Winata, G.M. Swarbrick, K.E. Tanner, M.S. Cook, M.D. Null, M.E. Cansler, A. Sette, J. Sidney, and D.M. Lewinsohn. (2007). Immune dominant tuberculosis CD8 antigens preferentially restricted by HLA-B.PLoSPathog3:1240-1249.
[18] Magnuson, Katherine (November 2007). “Maternal Education and Children’s Academic Achievement During Middle Childhood”. Developmental Psychology. 43 (6): 1497–1512.
[19] Magstadt, T. M. (2009): Understanding Politics; Ideas, Institutions, and Issues. (8th edt). USA; Cenage Learning March 19, 2018 pp 5 & 8.
[20] Mbaba, J.O. (2008). Critical problems facing the study of social studies in the Primary North education schools in Ebony State, journal of arts and Social Sciences. 1, (1), 12-16.
[21] NACADA, (2012). Report on Rapid Situation Assessment of Drug and Substance abuse in Kenya. Nairobi. Government Printer Word Drug Report, (2014).United Nations Publication, Sales No. E.14. X17, Vienna. Austria
[22] National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS, 1994). National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies: Introduction.
[23] Njore, S.N. (2015). Factors that influence substance use and abuse among offenders under probation in Limuru, Kenya.IOSR Journal of Humanities and Social Science (IOSR-JHSS). 20(2); 72-82.
[24] Nwaiwu, C.O. (2012). Varieties of English as a threat to the future of English in Nigeria. NATECEP Journal of English and Communication Studies 8, 6-7.
[25] Nwanna-Nzewunwa, O. P., Girigiri, R. & Okoh, C. F. (2007). Social Studies Foundations, Methods and Contemporary Social Problems (eds), New Owerri: Springfield Publishers.
[26] Odey, M.O (2019).Socio-cultural practices and upper Basic school students’ academic performance in Social Studies in Cross River State, Nigeria. Unpublished Ph.D Thesis.
[27] Onete, O. U., Edet, P. B., Udey, F. U., & Ogbor, B. P. (2012). Academic performance: A function of achievement motivation among education students of cross river university of technology, Calabar. Review of Higher Education in Africa, 4, 63-83.
[28] Oshodi, O.Y., Aina, O.F. & Onajole, A.T. 2010. Substance use among secondary school students in an urban setting in Nigeria: prevalence and associated factors. African Journal of Psychiatry, 1(3): 52-57
[29] Oyinlola O.S. (2009). Corruption Eradication in Nigeria: An Appraisal. Retrieved, September 15, 2014 from http://www.blogger.com/g-gbenga
[30] Parker, W.C. (Ed.).(2010). Social studies education eC21. In W.C. Parker (Ed.), Social studies today: Research & practice (pp. 53-64). New York, NY: Routledge.Proceedings, CLEEN Foundation, Monograph Series, No. 7, Abuja: CLEEN Foundation.
[31] Robinson, M. B. (2011). Media coverage of crime and criminal justice. Durham, NC: Carolina Academic Press.
[32] Rubington, E., & Weinberg, M. S. (2010). The study of social problems: Seven perspectives (7th ed.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
[33] Samson, K.I. (2012, October 12). Corruption: Bane of Nigeria’s Education. South Africa WAEC, Retrieved, September 20, 2014 from: http://www.nigerianow.org
[34] Sebiomo, B. (2012). Enhancing Sustainable Development in Nigeria: challenges for Social Studies Education: European Scientific Journal: 8 (4) Retrieved 9 November, 2012 www.eurojournal.org.
[35] Tikumah, I.H. (2009). Elements of Social Studies for Nigerian Colleges and Universities. Zaria; A.B.U, Press Limited.
[36] Umanah, O. (2018) Militants overwhelmed Udom, sack schools in Akwa Ibom villages. TNN
[37] United Nations (1998).World Drug Report. New York: Oxford University Press.
[38] United Nations (2005).World Drug Report. New York: Oxford University Press. WHO mortality database. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2006
[39] United Nations (2013).World Drug Report. New York: Oxford University Press.
[40] Von Stumm, S., Hell, B., & Chamorro-Premuzic, T. (2011). The hungry mind: Intellectual ability curiosity is the third pillar of academic performance. Perspectives on Psychological Science. https://doi.org/10.1177/1745691611421204.
[41] Warizi, Farida (2010) “defines corruption in Nigeria: Press release from Economic and financial crimes and commission. Conference Proceedings, CLEEN Foundation, Monograph Series, No. 7, Abuja: CLEEN Foundation.

DARAMOLA, Clement Oladayo (Ph.D) “Academic Ability and Students’ Knowledge of Social Issues and Concepts: A Review in Social Studies” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-10, pp.409-414 October 2020 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/409-414.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Assessing Science Education Undergraduates’ Possession of Emotional Intelligence Skills for Sustenance in the Professional World

Helen Ngozi Ibe (Ph.D), Ezere Chimmuanya – October 2020 Page No.: 415-419

This study examined science education undergraduates’ possession of emotional intelligence skills for sustenance in the professional world. The sample consists of 342 science education undergraduates drawn from a population of 3432 undergraduates in Imo State, Nigeria. The Survey research design was adopted for this study. The study was guided by 2 research questions and 1 hypothesis. The research questions were answered with Mean and Standard Deviation while the hypothesis was tested using independent samples t-test. The Instrument used for data collection is a researcher made rating Scale titled: “Emotional Intelligence Skills Rating Scale” (RTMSP). Coefficient of internal consistency was established at 0.82 using Cronbach alpha reliability. Findings from the study show that science education undergraduates possess some dimensions of emotional intelligence skills while some dimensions are lacking. The study also show there is no significant difference between the emotional intelligence skills of male and female science education undergraduates. The researchers recommended that: emotional intelligence skills should be emphasized in schools by lecturers, psychologists, guidance counsellors, support staff etc of various universities during formal (classroom teachings) and outside classroom settings (social media channels); guidance counsellors of various education faculties in universities, should develop or adopt emotional intelligence tests and subject undergraduates to these tests occasionally in order to trace progress of the undergraduates in development of emotional intelligence skills; Science education undergraduates should constantly adopt strategies of boosting their emotional intelligence using online emotional intelligence scales, occasional sessions with school psychologists and counsellors on emotional intelligence etcetera.

Page(s): 415-419                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 17 November 2020

 Helen Ngozi Ibe (Ph.D)
Department of Life Science Education, Imo State University, Nigeria

  Ezere Chimmuanya
Department of Life Science Education, Imo State University, Nigeria

[1] Adams, N. (2011). Emotional Intelligence amongst Undergraduate Students at a Higher Education Institution. Published Mini- thesis submitted to the department of industrial psychology, University of Western Cape.
[2] Bar-On, R. (2010). Emotional intelligence: An integral part of positive psychology. South African Journal of Psychology, 40(1), 54-62
[3] Chaubey, D.S & Kala, D. (2013). Emotional intelligence among students: A comparative study of engineering and management disciplines. Uttaranchal Business Review. 2(1), 77-90
[4] Fida. A., Ghaffar. A., Zaman. A., & Satti, A.N. (2018). Gender comparison of emotional intelligence of university students. Journal of Education and Educational development, 5(1) 172-189
[5] Fiori, M., & Vesely- Maillefer, A.K. (2018). Emotional intelligence as an ability: Theory, challenges and new directions. In Emotional intelligence in education. 23-47
[6] Mayer, J.D., & Salovey, P. (2007). Mayer-Salovey-Caruso emotional intelligence test. Toronto: Multi-Health systems incorporated.
[7] McCleskey, J. (2014). Emotional intelligence and leadership. International journal of organisational analysis
[8] Moore, C. (2020). Emotional intelligence skills and how to develop them. Retrieved from https://positivepsychology.com/emotional-intelligence-skills/ 10th October, 2020.
[9] Thompson, R. (2018). A qualitative phenomenological study of emotional and cultural intelligence of international students in the United States of America. Journal of international students, 8(2), 1220- 1255
[10] Tripathy, M. (2018). Emotional intelligence: An overview. Mauritius: LAP Lambert academic publishing.

Helen Ngozi Ibe (Ph.D), Ezere Chimmuanya “Assessing Science Education Undergraduates’ Possession of Emotional Intelligence Skills for Sustenance in the Professional World” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-10, pp.415-419 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/415-419.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Educators’ Attributions to the Prevalence of Non-Readers among Learners at Early Childhood Education (ECE) Level in Bulawayo Metropolitan province.

Benny Chitsa PhD, Grace Moyo PhD- October 2020 Page No.: 420-428

This research sought to establish educators’ attributions to the prevalence of non-readers among learners at ECE level in Khami district Bulawayo Metropolitan province. The study was guided by the theoretical framework of Attribution theory by Bernard Weiner. The mixed methods approach and case study with snowball sampling method were used to enable an in-depth exploration of primary schools teaching reading at ECE level. Open-ended questionnaires and structured interview guide were employed for generating data. The study revealed that there was a high prevalence of non-readers among learners at ECE level in Khami district Bulawayo Metropolitan province. The study also revealed that the prevalence of non-readers among learners at ECE level was attributed to educators’ lack of knowledge on the child development theories, lack of psychology of reading, lack of clarity of ECE policy or circular on teaching reading at ECE level in Zimbabwe and to mother tongue interference. The research also attributed the prevalence of non-readers among learners at ECE level to educators’ lack of reading teaching skills, attitude toward teaching reading and to unavailability of reading resources as well as to poor staffing in infant department. The study recommended that there is need for the Ministry of Primary and Secondary Education to revise and review the ECE policy on teaching of reading at ECE level, to ensure that ECE teachers are adequately trained, developed and assisted to obtain the highest qualifications and skills possible in the teaching of reading at ECE level and, to provide quality and relevant ECE reading resources and facilities to ECE teachers.

Page(s): 420-428                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 17 November 2020

 Benny Chitsa PhD
Department of Psychology – Zimbabwe Open University

  Grace Moyo PhD
Candidate with UNISA: Department of Psychology

[1] Ackerman, D. (2006). The costs of being a child care teacher: Revisiting the problem of low Wages’. Educational Policy, Vol. 20, No.1, pp85-112
[2] Akinrotimi, A. A. and Olowe, P. K (2016) Challenges in Implementation of Early Childhood Education in Nigeria: The Way Forward. Journal of Educationa and Practice. Vol 7. (7). 2222-1735.
[3] Amadi, F. N. C. (2013) Challenges of early childhood care education in sustaining girl-child development in Nigeria. Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences, 4(5), 151-156.
[4] Amali, I. O.O., Bello, M., and Okafor I. P. (2012) An Assessment of Pre-Primary School Programme Activities in Kwara State, Nigeria. Journal of Education and Practice, 3(6), 100-105.
[5] Anderman, L. H. and Midgley, C. (1998) Motivation and Middle students’ campaign, IL: ERIC. America
[6] Bryan, B. (2012). How do we characterize the language in Jamaica? Retrieved from http://Jamaica.kdid.org/groups/eduexchange
[7] Brown, H. D. (2000) Principles of Learning and Teaching. New York: Longman.
[8] Butler, L (2016) 60% of SA kids in Grade 4 can’t read. Harare: Herald.
[9] Campbell, S. (2015) Feeling the pressure: Early childhood educators’ reported views about learning and teaching phonics in Australian prior-to-school settings. Australian Journal of Language & Literacy, 38(1): 12-26. Retrieved from http://www.alea.au
[10] Copple, C., and Bredekamp, S. (2009). Developmentally appropriate practice in early childhood programs: Serving Children from Birth through Age 8 (3rd Ed.). Washington, DC: NAEYC.
[11] Creswell, J. W. (2007) Qualitative enquiry and research design: choosing among five approaches. 2nd Ed. London: Sage.
[12] Creswell, J. W. (2013) Qualitative enquiry and research design: choosing among five approaches.4th Ed. London: Sage.
[13] Cummings, K. (2015) Educating English language learners in early childhood classrooms: A survey of teachers’ sense of preparedness and self-efficacy in Washington State. University of Washington
[14] Cunningham, P. (2012) Teaching phonics. California Reader, 45(3), 4-7.
[15] David L. (2007) Attribution Theory (Weiner), in Learning Theories, https://www.learning-theories.com/weiners-attribution-theory.html
[16] Dyanda, C., Makoni, R.D., Muduku, A., and Kuyayama, A. (2006). Evaluation of the national early childhood development programme. Harare: UNICEF.
[17] Eithne, K., Dunphy, E, Dwyer, B, Hayes, G, McPhillips, T, Marsh, J, O’Connor, M and Shiel, G (2012) Literacy in Early Childhood and Primary Education (3-8 years). Research report Number 15 NCCA. https://ncca.ie/media/2137/
[18] Foorman, B.R.; Herrera, S. and Adrea,N. (2015).The structure of oral language and reading and their relationship to comprehension in kindergarten through grade two: Reading and writing: An interdisciplinary journal v28 n5 p655-651
[19] Froma P. R. and Diane R. P. (2006) Early Reading and Writing Development American Speech- Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) America.
[20] Geske, A & Ozola, A (2008) Factors influencing reading literacy at the primary school level University of Latvia, Riga, Latvia –Journal problems of education in the 21st century volume 6
[21] Gottesman, R.L. and Rotkin, L. (2002). Urban second grade children: A profile of good and poor readers.
[22] Graham, S. and Williams, C. (2009). An attributional approach to motivation in school. Handbook of Motivation at School (pp.171-196).
[23] Guthrie, Wigfield, Metsala and Cox (2009) Scientific studies of reading. Vol 3 issue 3
[24] Hamilton, R. J., and Akhter, S. (2002). Psychometric properties of the Multi-dimensional Multi-attributional Causality Scale. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 62(5), 802-817
[25] Hlalethwa, B. D (2013) Reading difficulties experienced by learners in the foundation phase in inclusive schools in Makapanstad. Dissertation. University of South Africa.
[26] Hooper, P. A (2010) Improving reading instruction for students at-risk in Early Education in rural areas: a review of literature. Dissertation. Northern Michigan University. https://www.nmu.edu/sites/DrupalEducation/files/UserFiles/Files/Pre-Drupal/
[27] Hungwe, L (2015) Achievement of automaticity in English reading: An uphill task for grade two learners in Vutika cluster in Mberengwa District Midlands Province. Dissertation submitted to Midland State University
[28] Ise, E.; Leo, B.;Daisy, B. and Luis, F. (2011). Support systems for poor readers: Empirical data from six European Union member states: Journal of learning disabilities, v44 n3 p228-245
[29] Jackson, P. P. (2016) Teachers’ Perceptions of English Language Learners and Reading Instruction Walden University http://scholarworks.waldenu.edu/dissertations
[30] Jettka, D. (2010). The language situation of Jamaica: Language education policy in the tension between standard Jamaican English and Jamaican patwa. Retrieved from www.danieljettka.de/pdf/JETTKA-the-language-situation-of-Jamaica.
[31] Johnson, R. B. and Christensen, L. (2014) Educational research: Quantitative, qualitative and mixed approaches. 5th Ed. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
[32] Kachenga, G. (2008). The Effect of Using Computer Literate Game in the Teaching of Literacy Skills in Zambia. Unpublished M.A Dissertation. Helski : University of Jyvaskyla
[33] Kalindi, S. C. (2005). The Impact of the New Primary Reading Programme on the Poor Readers. Unpublished M.Ed Dissertation. Lusaka: University of Zambia.
[34] Katz, L. G. (1996). ‘Child development knowledge and teacher preparation: Confronting assumptions’. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 11, 135–146.
[35] Lewis, Y. (2010). Literacy in elementary school in Jamaica: The case of the grade four literacy test. Retrieved from University of Iowa Doctoral Dissertation http://ir.u.owa.edu/etd/698
[36] Maree, K. (2007) First steps in research. Pretoria: Van Schaik.
[37] Marima, E. W. (2016) A Survey of Approaches Used in Teaching Reading in Early Childhood Classes in Dagoretti and Westlands Divisions, Nairobi County, Kenya. Journal of Education and Practice. Vol 7 (33) 2222 – 1735
[38] Maruyama, M. (2007). Reading Disability: A Neurological Point of View. Journal of Annals Matafwali, B. (2005). Nature and Prevalence of Reading Difficulties In Grade Three: The Case of Lusaka Province. Unpublished M. Ed Thesis. University of Zambia. Lusaka.
[39] Mataruse, K. (2002) Psychology of Reading. Harare: ZOU.
[40] Mawere, V.H. (2016). Language Arts in ECD. Harare: Zimbabwe Open University.
[41] McMillan, J. H. and Schumacher, S. (2010) Research in education: evidence-based enquiry. 7th Ed. New Jersey: Pearson Education.
[42] Mercer, C. and. (2001). Teaching Students with Learning Problems. 6th ed. Columbus Ohio, Charles Merrill.
[43] Moodie-Reid, L. E (2016) Teachers’ Perceptions of the Impact of the Jolly Phonics Program on Students’ Literacy. Thesis, Walden University
[44] Moyo, J. G. (2005). Beginning to learn. Harare: Longman.
[45] Murnane, R., Sawhill, I and Snow, C (2012) Literacy Challenges for the Twenty-First Century: Introducing the Issue. The Future of children Princeton Booklet. Vol 22. Number 2. https://futureofchildren.princeton.edu/sites/futureofchildren/files/media/literacy_challenges_for_the_twenty-first_century_22_02_fulljournal.pdf
[46] Mwanamukubi, L (2013) Reading Difficulties in Grade six Learners and Challenges faced by Teachers in Teaching Reading: A Case of Chadiza and Chipata districts, Zambia. The University of Zambia. Lusaka
[47] Neuman, M. J., Josephson, K and Chau, P. G (2015) A Review of the litertature: Early Childhood Care and Education (ECCE) Personnel in low and middle – income countries. https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000234988
[48] Noddings, N. (2007). Philosophy of Education (2nd Ed) USA: West View New York, NY: Columbia University Press.
[49] Nyamu, F. E (2015) Assessment of factors influencing achievement of basic reading literacy in public primary schools in Nyeri county, Kenya. A Thesis submitted to the Catholic University of Eastern Africa
[50] Okewole, J. O., Lluezi-Ogbedu, V. A., and Osinowo O. A. (2015) An evaluation of the implementation of early childhood education curriculum in Osun State. Journal of Education and Practice, 6(4), 48-54.
[51] Osho, L. O., Aliyu, N., Okolie, O., and Onifade, O. (2013) Implementation of early childhood education: A case study in Nigeria. Universal Journal of Educational Research 2(2), 119-125.
[52] Pearson, P. D. (2000). Reading in the twentieth century. www.ciera.org
[53] Rakes, G. C,; Dunn, K. E & Rakes, T. A (2013) Attribution as a Predictor of Procrastination in Online Graduate Students. Journal of Interactive Online Learning Vol 12, Number 3, 1541- 4914
[54] Ritchie, J. Lewis, J. (2003) Qualitative research practice: A guide for social science students and researchers. London: Sage.
[55] Roskos, K. A., Christie, J. F. & D.J. Richgels, D. J. (2003) “The Essentials of Early Literacy Instruction,” Young Children 58 (2): 52–60.
[56] Shamir, A. and Korat, O. (2007) Developing an educational e-book for fostering Kindergarten children’s emergent literacy. Computer in schools, 24 (1) 125-143
[57] Strong, S (2010) The Effects of the Label Borderline Personality Disorder on Staff Attributions and Intended Behaviour. Doctorate Thesis submitted to University of East Anglia
[58] Tichapondwa, S. M (2013) Preparing your dissertation at a distance: A research guide. Virtual University for small States of the Collonwealth
[59] Titter, A (2014) Is adolescents’ progress in reading comprehension served by particular attributional views in addition to learning the reading comprehension strategies of reciprocal teaching? A mixed-methods intervention study. Thesis submitted to Victoria University of Wellington.
[60] UN (2013). The millennium development goal report 2013. United Nations, New York. http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/pdf/report-
[61] UNICEF (2012), Teaching Day Care Centres Assist 17 Course manual. Oxford: University Press.
[62] UNICEF (2014) Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) 2014: http://mics.unicef.org/surveys Uwezo. K. (2011). Are Our Children Learning? Annual Assessment Report. http://www.uwezo.net/wpcontent/uploads/2012/08/KE
[63] Verbeek, D. C. (2010) Teaching reading for meaning? A case study of the initial teaching of reading in a mainstream South African school. Dissertation University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa
[64] Weiner, B. (1986). An attributional theory of motivation and emotion. New York, NY: SpringerVerlag.
[65] Weiner, B. (2000). Intrapersonal and interpersonal theories of motivation from an attributional perspective. Educational Psychology Review, 12(1), 1-14.
[66] Weiner, B. (2006). Social motivation, justice, and the moral emotions: An attributional approach. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
[67] Wim, H.J.;Bouwmans, M. and Broeders, I .N. (2006).The prevalence of poor reading in Dutch special elementary education: Journal of learning disabilities.
[68] Zano, Tshabalala, Ncube and Khosi (2015) Challenges faced by rural primary school teachers in teaching English reading in infant classes in Jojo West Cluster in Nkayi District.

Benny Chitsa PhD, Grace Moyo PhD “Educators’ Attributions to the Prevalence of Non-Readers among Learners at Early Childhood Education (ECE) Level in Bulawayo Metropolitan province.” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-10, pp.420-428 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/420-428.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Value of Protecting Endangered Language in Culture: With Special Reference to Examine the Vedda Language in Sri Lanka

Dr. R.A.D. Priyanka Weerasekara – October 2020 Page No.: 429-434

Veddas or Vanniyaletto; an aboriginal group of Sri Lanka have survived for several millennia by adapting and coping with internal and external stress imposed on them. Archaeological and historical evidence prove that they inhabited the island long before the arrival of Aryans and had spread all over it. At present their existence is threatened by modernization where they are forced to embrace the modernity which could also be ended up vanishing them as a cultural group. Language can be considered as the most important aspect of the identity of the culture. During the research it comes to knowledge of the researcher, lack of usage of the Veddas language was the fact behind the modernization, cultural and linguistic assimilation of the Vedda people. Through the empirical findings of this research it is clearly evident that the language of the Vedda is fading away. Finally this research has emphasized that the culture and the language of the Veddas are gradually diminishing and currently the original Vedda language does not exist anymore. The research is based on Qualitative Empirical Research Methodology and the Participant Observation Method based on Case Study has been used for data elicitation.

Page(s): 429-434                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 17 November 2020

 Dr. R.A.D. Priyanka Weerasekara
Department of Languages, Sabaragamuwa University of Sri Lanka, Belihuloya

BOOKS [1] Abbi, Anvita. (2001). A manual of Linguistic Fieldwork and Structures of Indian Languages. Lincom Europa.
[2] Avtans, Abhishek. eds., 2007. Human Face of language Documentation: A Great Andamanese Experience. Peter K. Austin, Oliver Bond, david Nathan, London: SOAS.
[3] Brow, J., 1978. Vedda village of Anuradhapura : The historical Anthropology of Community in Sri Lank. Seattle and London University of Washington Press.
[4] Deraniyagala, S.U. (1992). The Prehistory of Sri Lanka. Colombo: Department of Archeological Survey.
[5] De Silva, Sugathapala, M.W. (1964). DambaneVedi Basa. Sarasavi Publishers.
[6] De Silva, Suathapala, M. W. (1972). Vedda Langauge of Ceylon: Text and Lexicon. Munchen, Kitzinger & Co.
[7] Geiger, Wilhelm (Translation). (1950). The Mahavamsa. Dept. of Information, Colombo.
[8] Parker, H., 1909, Ancient Ceylon, Reprint (1984), Asian Educational Services, New Delhi
[9] Seligmann, C. G., Seligmann, B.S. (1911). The Veddas. Cambridge University Press, London.

JOURNALS, ARTICLES
[10] Dart, Jon., 1990. The Coast Veddas: Dimensions of Marginality. The Vanishing Aborigines: Sri Lanka’s Veddas in Transition, ICES Sri Lanka Studies Series:2, International Center for Ethnic Studies, Vikas Publishing houses Pvt Ltd, New Delhi.
[11] De Silva, Premakumara., 2011. Diminishing or Struggle for Survival: Case of Veddas’ culture in Sri Lanka. SAARC Culture, Diminishing Cultures in South Asia, Volume 2, Vishva Graphics, Pannipitiya.
[12] Deraniyagala, S.U. (1972). Ancient Ceylon. Journal of the archaeological survey Department of Ceylon, The Commissioner of Archaeology, Department of Archaeology, Colombo 7. .
[13] Dharmadasa, K.N.O. (1974). The creolization of an Aboriginal Language: The Case of Vedda in Sri Lanka. Anthropological Linguisics, Vol.xvi, No.2., Uiversity of Sri Lanka.
[14] Dharmadasa, K.N.O. (1999). The Veddas’ Struggle for survival: Problems, Policies and Responses. The Vanishing Aborigines: Sri Lanka’s Veddas in Transition, ICES Sri Lanka Studies Series:2, International Center for Ethnic Studies, Vikas Publishing housesPvt Ltd, New Delhi.
[15] Obyesekara, G., 2002. Where have all the Vedas Gone? Buddhism and aboriginality in Sri Lanka. In the hybrid island: culture crossing and the invention of identity in Sri Lanka , Neluka Silva, Colombo.

WEBSITES
[16] Abbi, Anvita. (2006). VOGA, Vanishing Voice of the Great Andamanese. [online] Available at: <http://www.andamanese.net> [Accessed 03 March 2013].
[17] Disappearing Language. (2011). Living tongues Institute for Endangered Languages [online] Available at: <travel.nationalgeograpic.com/ travel/enduring-voice> [18] International Union of Prehistoric and Protohistoric Sciences [Online] Available at :<http://www.lankalibrary.com/geo/dera1.html> [Accessed 09 August2008]
[19] Obeyesekara, Gananath . Colonial Histories and Vedda Primitivism. [online] Available at: <http://www.vedda.org/vanniyalaeto.html

Dr. R.A.D. Priyanka Weerasekara “The Value of Protecting Endangered Language in Culture: With Special Reference to Examine the Vedda Language in Sri Lanka Examine The Vedda Language In Sri Lanka.
” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-10, pp.429-434 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/429-434.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Sustainability of Reforestation Projects in Kodera and Wire Forests in Rachuonyo South Sub-County, Homa Bay County – Kenya

Mboya, Tobias Ouma, Dr. Moses Otieno (PhD) October 2020 Page No.: 435-452

Despite substantial financial investment on reforestation projects, they fail to realize their fundamental goal of biodiversity conservation, carbon emission reduction, and support to livelihoods, leading to wastage of funds. The research was focused on determining the factors influencing the sustainability of reforestation projects in Kenya, focusing on Kodera and Wire forests in Rachuonyo South Sub-County in Homa Bay County. The objectives were; to assess the influence of public participation on the sustainability of reforestation projects, to assess the influence the economic benefits on the sustainability of reforestation projects, to evaluate the influence of government policy on the sustainability of reforestation projects, and to assess the influence of community awareness on the sustainability of reforestation projects in Kodera and Wire forests. Consequently, the study sought to fill the knowledge gap on the factors influencing the sustainability of reforestation projects in Kodera and Wire Forests. The theories of participation and conservation guided the study. It adopted a descriptive design. Through stratified and simple random sampling, 92 respondents were selected from a target population of 920. The collection of quantitative data was done using closed-ended questionnaires. Validity was enhanced through piloting, while reliability was enhanced through the split-half method. The quantitative data was measured in an interval scale, coded, and fed into the SPSS for analysis. Inferential and descriptive statistics were used to analyze data. Tables were used to present the data. There was a statistically significant relationship between public participation, economic benefits, government policy, and community awareness and the sustainability of reforestation projects (P-value < 0.05 = 0.001843785, 0.009802, 0.040775, and 0.000692 at 95% confidence level respectively). The study concluded that public participation, economic benefits, government policy, and community awareness have a significant influence on the sustainability of reforestation projects. Project implementers should enhance public participation, community awareness, and provide economic benefits to local communities. Government policies on projects should focus on the community and promote equality. Further research should be done to assess the influence of politics, income levels, literacy levels, and tree species on the sustainability of reforestation projects.

Page(s): 435-452                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 19 November 2020

  Mboya, Tobias Ouma
Lecturer, School of Open and Distance Learning, University of Nairobi, Kenya

  Dr. Moses Otieno (PhD)
Lecturer, School of Open and Distance Learning, University of Nairobi, Kenya

[1] Appiah, M., Fagg, M., & Pappinen, A. (2015). A review of reforestation approaches in Ghana: sustainability and genuine local participation lessons for implementing REDD+ Activities. European Journal of Scientific Research, 131(1), 70-99.
[2] Acharya, A. S., Prakash, A., Saxena, P., & Nigam, A. (2013). Sampling: Why and how of it. Indian Journal of Medical Specialties, 4(2), 330-333.
[3] Bullock, A., & King, B. (2011). Evaluating China’s slope land conversion program as sustainable management in Tianquan and Wuqi Counties. Journal of environmental management, 92(8), 1916-1922.
[4] Barr, C. M., & Sayer, J. A. (2012). The political economy of reforestation and forest restoration in Asia–Pacific: Critical issues for REDD+. Biological Conservation, 154, 9-19.
[5] Bryman, A. (2016). Social research methods. Oxford university press.
[6] Bloomfield, G., Meli, P., Brancalion, P. H., Terris, E., Guariguata, M. R., & Garen, E. (2019). Strategic Insights for Capacity Development on Forest Landscape Restoration: Implications for Addressing Global Commitments. Tropical Conservation Science, 12, 1940082919887589.
[7] Cao, S., Tian, T., Chen, L., Dong, X., Yu, X., & Wang, G. (2010). Damage caused to the environment by reforestation policies in arid and semi-arid areas of China. Ambio, 39(4), 279-283.
[8] De Li Z., Jian Chu X. Z., Cong D., Charles H., & RE G. (2013, August 2). World’s largest reforestation scheme fails to protect natural forests. World Agroforestry. Retrieved from https://blog.worldagroforestry.org/index.php/2013/08/02/worlds-largest-reforestation- scheme-fails-to-protect-natural-forests-and-threatens-more/
[9] Edmonds, W. A., & Kennedy, T. D. (2016). An applied guide to research designs: Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods. Sage Publications.
[10] Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations. (2020). The State of the World’s Forests. Retrieved from http://www.fao.org/state-of- forests/2020/en/#:~:text=Forests%20cover%2031%20percent%20of%20the%20global% 20land%20area.
[11] Ghazanfari, H., Namiranian, M., Sobhani, H., & Mohajer, R. M. (2014). Traditional forest management and its application to encourage public participation for sustainable forest management in the northern Zagros mountains of Kurdistan province, Iran. Scandinavian Journal of forest research, 19(S4), 65-71.
[12] International Union for Conservation of Nature. (2020). Issues Brief: Deforestation and Forest Degradation. Retrieved from https://www.iucn.org/resources/issues-briefs/deforestation- and-forest- degradation#:~:text=The%20degradation%20and%20loss%20of,are%20among%20the% 20worl d’s%20poorest.
[13] Ministry of Environment and Forestry. (2018). Taskforce Report on Forest Resources Management and Logging Activities in Kenya. Retrieved from http://www.environment.go.ke/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/Forest-Report.pdf
[14] Kim, S. B., & Alounsavath, O. (2015). Forest policy measures influence on the increase of forest cover in northern Laos. Forest science and technology, 11(3), 166-171.
[15] Le, H. D., Smith, C., & Herbohn, J. (2014). What drives the success of reforestation projects in tropical developing countries? The case of the Philippines. Global Environmental Change, 24, 334-348.
[16] Mugenda, O. M. & Mugenda, A. G. (2003). Research methods: Quantitative and qualitative Approaches. Nairobi: African Centre for Technology Studies.
[17] Park, M. S., & Lee, H. (2014). Forest policy and law for sustainability within the Korean Peninsula. Sustainability, 6(8), 5162-5186.
[18] Persha L, Rodgers W, Nabanyumya R, Mpunda E; (2010) Community Conservation of Closed Forest Biodiversity in East Africa: Can it work?
[19] Park, M. S. (2018). Interest based-participation requiring accountability in greening. Forest science and technology, 14(4), 169-180.
[20] Orbaşli, A. (2017). Conservation theory in the twenty-first century: slow evolution or a paradigm shift. Journal of Architectural Conservation, 23(3), 157-170.
[21] Ofoegbu, C., Chirwa, P. W., Francis, J., & Babalola, F. D. (2017). Socio-economic factors influencing household dependence on forests and its implication for forest-based climate change interventions. Southern Forests: A Journal of Forest Science, 79(2), 109-116.
[22] Owoeye, I., Olayide, O., & Njuguna, P. (2019). Assessment of Afforestation Activities in Embu and Kirinyaga Counties of Kenya. African Journal of Sustainable Development, 9(1), 61- 84.
[23] Peras, J. R., Pulhin, J., Inoue, M., Mohammed, A., Harada, K., & Sasaoka, M. (2016). The Sustainable livelihood challenge of REDD+ implementation in the Philippines. Environment and Natural Resources Research, 6(3), 91-105.
[24] Tabot, A., Owuor, O., & Migosi, J. (2020). Influence of Participatory Project Initiation on Sustainable Forest Management in Saboti, Trans-Nzoia County, Kenya. International Journal of Forestry Research, 2020.
[25] Quick, K. S., & Bryson, J. M. (2016). Public participation. In Handbook on theories of governance. Edward Elgar Publishing.
[26] Reynolds, T. W., Farley, J., & Huber, C. (2010). Investing in human and natural capital: An alternative paradigm for sustainable development in Awassa, Ethiopia. Ecological Economics, 69(11), 2140-2150.
[27] Rauf, T., Khan, N., Shah, S. J., Zada, M., Malik, S. Y., Yukun, C., & Sadique, A. (2019). Poverty and Prosperity: Impact on Livelihood Assets of Billion Trees Afforestation Program in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK), Pakistan. Forests, 10(10), 916.
[28] Taherdoost, H. (2016). Validity and reliability of the research instrument; how to test the validation of a questionnaire/survey in a research. How to Test the Validation of a Questionnaire/Survey in a Research (August 10, 2016).
[29] The World Energy Foundation. (2018). A Brief History of Sustainability. Retrieved from https://theworldenergyfoundation.org/a-brief-history-of-sustainability/
[30] United Nations Environment Program. (2020). Mau Forest Complex. Retrieved from https://na.unep.net/atlas/webatlas.php?id=393
[31] World Wide Fund for Nature. (2020). We Need to Safeguard our Forests. Retrieved from https://wwf.panda.org/our_work/forests/importance_forests/#:~:text=The%20importance%20of%20forests%20cannot,erosion%20and%20mitigate%20climate%20change.
[32] Yamanoshita, M. Y., & Amano, M. (2012). Capability development of local communities for project sustainability in afforestation/reforestation clean development mechanism. Mitigation and adaptation strategies for global change, 17(4), 425-440.

Mboya, Tobias Ouma, Dr. Moses Otieno (PhD) “Sustainability of Reforestation Projects in Kodera and Wire Forests in Rachuonyo South Sub-County, Homa Bay County – Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-10, pp.435-452 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/435-452.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Influence of Monitoring and Evaluation Systems on Performance of Infrastructural Projects in Kenya: A Case of Bomet County, Kenya

Winnie Chepkemoi, Dr Moses M. M Otieno (Ph.D), October 2020 Page No.: 453-471

Monitoring and evaluation (M&E) techniques helps address the issue of measuring performance and achievement of projects. M&E has become imperative in all county programs and projects. No county pursuing development initiatives would proceed at all without M&E framework in place. This study purposed to find out the influence of M&E systems on performance of infrastructural projects in Kenyan county governments: a case of Bomet county. In this study monitoring and evaluation was defined by its activities: budgetary allocation, baseline surveys, performance reviews, and capacity building while project performance of building and construction was taken to be the extent to which goals were achieved. The study objectives included: to establish how budgetary allocation on monitoring and evaluation influence performance of building and construction projects, to determine how baseline surveys influence performance of building and construction projects, to establish the influence of performance reviews on performance of building and construction projects, and to assess the influence of capacity building in M&E on performance of building and construction projects. The study utilized Mugenda and Mugenda assertion to arrive at a sample size of 100 respondents and stratified sampling was used to sample devolved functions from Bomet County. This study used primary data collected via a questionnaire and secondary data collected via published reports and other documents. Correlation and multiple regression analysis were also done to show the relationship between the study variables. The study concludes that there are budgets set to carry out M&E among infrastructural projects in Bomet County government and that various activities included in M&E budget were scope of major M&E events and functions, key stakeholder informational needs and expectations, and M&E requirements. It was also concluded that baseline survey helps in understanding project expectation and that baseline surveys enhances the project performance of infrastructural projects in Bomet County to a large extent. The study concludes that performance reviews enhances the project performance of building and construction in Bomet County to a large extent. The study recommends that the relevant government bodies, the NGOs, World Bank and other donors, the contractors and all the bodies handling these projects must have a specific well defined source of financing the M&E exercise. It also recommends that monitoring personnel should be well trained so as to achieve the target of M&E.

Page(s): 453-471                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 19 November 2020

 Winnie Chepkemoi
Lecturer School Of Open and Distance Learning, University Of Nairobi, Kenya.

  Dr Moses M. M Otieno (Ph.D)
Lecturer School Of Open and Distance Learning, University Of Nairobi, Kenya.

[1] Abeyrama, Tilakasena , Weber, & Karl, E. (2008). Monitoring in Retrospect: Reflections on Practical Experience ad Recommendations. “Studies on Human Settlements Development in Asia”. India: Bangkok: Division of Human Settlements Development, Asian I.
[2] Aden (2012). Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation of Community Projects. Community Based Project Monitoring, Qualitative Impact Assessment and People Friendly Evaluation Methods. Journal, August 2012 edition Vol.8. the utilization of evaluations for evidence-based policy- making. In M. Segone (Ed), Bridging the Gap.
[3] Butteriss, M. (2010). Help wanted: the complete guide to HR for canadian entrepreneurs.
[4] Carroll, T. F. (2009). Intermediary NGOs: The supporting link in grassroots development.
[5] Chandes, J., &Pache, G. (2010). “Investigating Humanitarian Logistics Issues; from operations management to Strategic action” Journal of Manufacturing technology management, Vol. 21 3, PP 320-40.
[6] Cohen, R.J. and M. Swerdlik, (2001). Psychological Testing and Assessment: An Introduction to Tests and Measurement. 5th Edn., McGraw-Hill, Boston, ISBN: 10: 0767421574, pp: 800.
[7] Creswell, J.W. (2012). Educational research: Planning, conducting, and evaluating quantitative and qualitative research. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
[8] Day, J. (2010). The need and practice of monitoring, evaluating and adapting marine planning and management—lessons from the Great Barrier Reef. Marine Policy, 32(5),823-831.
[9] Del Pico, W. J. (2013).Project Control: Integrating Cost and Schedule in Construction. John Wiley & Sons.
[10] Estrella, M., &Gaventa, J. (2010). Who counts reality? Participatory monitoring and evaluation: a literature review. Brighton: Institute of Development Studies.
[11] Frankel, N., & Gage, A. (2007). M&E fundamentals: a self-guided minicourse.
[12] Gorgens, M. and Kusek, J. Z. (2009). Making Monitoring and Evaluation Systems Work. World Bank.
[13] Gosling, Lousia, & Edwards, M. (2009). Toolkits: A Practical Guide to Assessment, Monitoring, Review and Evaluation. London: Save the Children.
[14] Gwadoya, R. A. (2012). Factors influencing effective implementation of monitoring and evaluation practices in donor funded projects in Kenya: a case of Turkana District (Doctoral dissertation).
[15] Gyorkos T. (2003): Monitoring and Evaluation of largescale Helminth control programmes. Acta Tropic, 86(2): 275 – 282.
[16] Gyorkos T. (2013). Monitoring and Evaluation of largescale Helminth control programmes. ActaTropic, 86(2): 275 – 282.
[17] Hatry, H. (2009). Performance Measurement: Getting Results. The Urban Institute, Washington, D.C.
[18] Hill, T. (2005). Operations management, Palgrave MacMillan, New York, NY
[19] Hogger, R., Kuchli, C., Zimmerman, A., Engler, M., &Vokra, E. (2011). Monitoring keeping in touch with reality. Berne: Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation.
[20] Idoro, G. I. (2012). Influence of the monitoring and control strategies of indigenous and expatriate Nigerian contractors on project outcome. Journal of Construction in Developing Countries, 17(1), 2012.
[21] Kahilu, D. (2010). Monitoring and evaluation report of “the impact of information and communication technology service (ICTs) among end users in the ministry of agriculture and cooperatives in Zambia”. Journal of Development and Agricultural Economics, 3(7), 302-311
[22] Simon, R. (2014). A framework for evaluating the government contracting-out decision with an application to information technology. Public administration review, 577- 586.
[23] Simons, R. (2012). The role of management control systems in creating competitive advantage: new perspectives (pp. 622-645). Springer US.
[24] Sinha, K. C., &Labi, S. (2011). Transportation decision making: Principles of project evaluation and programming. John Wiley & Sons.
[25] UNDP, (2012). Handbook on Monitoring and Evaluation for Results, UN: Millennium Development Goals Report 2012.
[26] Wanjiku, S. M. (2015). Monitoring and evaluation factors influencing The performance of road infrastructural projects: A case study of Nyandarua County, Kenya. (Doctoral dissertation, University ofNairobi).
[27] Welsh, F. (2010). Monitoring and evaluating agricultural science and technology projects: theories, practices and problems. IDS Bulletin, 41(6), 75-87.
[28] World Bank (2002). Monitoring & Evaluation: some tools, methods and approaches. The World Bank, Washington, D.C.
[29] Wyngaard, R. (2003). Evaluating the Impact of the Non-Profit Organisations Act, No. 71 of 1997, Legal Resources Centre.
[30] Zaltsman, A. (2014). The effects of performance information on public resource allocations: A study of Chile’s performance-based budgeting

Winnie Chepkemoi, Dr Moses M. M Otieno (Ph.D),”Influence of Monitoring and Evaluation Systems on Performance of Infrastructural Projects in Kenya: A Case of Bomet County, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-10, pp.453-471 October 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-10/453-471.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

A sociological study on the impact of the family’s economic background to arts faculty students. (Based on Colombo, Kelaniya and Sri Jayewardenepura universities)

Wijethunga WTD, Samarakoon AS – October 2020 Page No.: 472-474