Growth and Financial Performance of Islamic Banks in Nigeria: The Monetary Policy Impact

Dr. Olalekan Akinrinola and Aruwa Isah Yusuf- December 2020 Page No.: 01-09

The study investigates the impact of monetary policy on the growth and financial performance of Islamic Banks using data spanning the periods 2014-2019 from 3 Islamic Banks in Nigeria (Jaiz Bank Plc, Sterling Bank Plc and Stanbic IBTC Bank Plc i.e., operating full-fledge Islamic bank or Islamic Banking windows). The study employed the Robust Least Squares (RLS) and Panel Robust Least Squares (PRLS) methods to examine the specific Banks’ effect and the panel analysis. The results showed that on the specific Banks’, monetary policy significantly impacted on their growth and financial performances. However, considering the panel result, monetary policy impacted insignificantly on the Banks, which reflects the disparity in the strategic positions of the Banks. It concluded and recommended from the research findings that the in growth and financial planning of the Islamic banks in Nigeria, plans are put in place to mitigate the unstable monetary policy landscape, while also evaluating the possibility of a dual regulatory model which accommodates Islamic banking guidelines of profit or loss sharing

Page(s): 01-09                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 December 2020

  Dr. Olalekan Akinrinola
Department of Finance, Caleb University, Imota, Lagos Nigeria.

  Aruwa Isah Yusuf
Department of Finance, Caleb University, Imota, Lagos Nigeria.

[1] Ahmad, A., Rehman, K., & Humayoun, A. (2011). Islamic Banking and Prohibition of Riba/ Interest. African Journal of Business Management, 5(5) 1763-1767.
[2] Akintan, I., Dabiri, M., & Sanyaolu, W. (2018). An appraisal of Jaiz Bank on the financial performance of non-interest banking in Nigeria (2012-2016). International Journal of Advanced Research, 6(1), 560-569.
[3] Al-Deehani, T., El-Sadi, H. M., & Al-Deehani, M. T. (2015). Performance of Islamic Banks and Conventional Banks Before and During Economic Downturn. Investment Management and Financial Innovations, 12(2), 238-250.
[4] Ball, L. M. (2010). The Performance of Alternative Monetary Regimes. Handbook of Monetary Economics, 3, 1303-1343. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-444-53454-5.00011-6.
[5] Ball, L., & Sheridan, N. (2003). Does Inflation Targeting Matter. National Bureau of Economic Research. Retrieved from http://www.nber.org/papers/w9577
[6] Beck, T. (2011). Role of Finance in Economic Development: Benefits, Risks and Politics. European Banking Center Discussion Paper. No 2011-038.
[7] Boukhatem, J., & Moussa, F. (2018). The Effect of Islamic Banks on GDP growth: Some Evidence from Selected MENA Countries. Borsa Istanbul Review, 18(3), 231-247. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bir.2017.11.004.
[8] BusinessDay. (2019, November 11). Jaiz Bank is the Most Profitable Islamic Lender in West Africa. Retrieved from BusinessDay Newspapers on the 14th of August 2020. BusinessDay Market Intelligence
[9] Cobham, D., & Song, M. (2020). Transitions between Monetary Policy Frameworks and their Effects on Economic Performance. Economic Modelling, Accepted Manuscript, Available online via: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.econmod.2020.02.049.
[10] Daly, S., & Frikha, M. (2016). Banks and Economic Growth in Developing Countries: What about Islamic Banks? Cogent Economics & Finance. 4(1), 1.26. https://doi.org/10.1080/23322039.2016.1168728.
[11] Djennas, M. (2016). Business Cycle Volatility, Growth and Financial Openness: Does Islamic Finance Make any Difference? Borsa Istanbul Review, 16(3), 121-145.
[12] El-Massah, S., & Al-Sayed, O. (2015). Banking Sector Performance: Islamic and Conventional Banks in the UAE. International Journal of Information Technology and Business Management, 36.
[13] Gheeraert, L., & Weill, L. (2015). Does Islamic Banking Development Favor Macroeconomic Efficiency? Evidence on the Islamic Finance-Growth Nexus. Economic Modelling, 47, 32–39.
[14] IMF. (2016). Monetary policy in the presence of Islamic Banking. IMF Working paper , 16/72.
[15] Kablan, S., & Yousfi, O. (2011, July). Efficiency of Islamic and Conventional Banks in Countries with Islamic Banking. Retrievedon the 13th of August 2020 from https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/32951/1/MPRA_paper_32951.pdf
[16] Nazib, N., & Masih, M. (2017, June 5). The Response of Monetary Policy Shocks on Islamic Bank Deposits: Evidence from Malaysia Based on ARDL Approach. Retrieved from https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/e692/6cfe236d40ae76810c88c4917dfa8a673f67.pdf
[17] Nwaolisa, E., & Kasie, E. (2013, July). Islamic Banking In Nigeria: A Critical Appraisal of Its Effect on the Nigerian Economy. Review of Public Administration and Management. 2(3), 37-48.
[18] Rafay, A., & Fabrid, S. (2019). Islamic Banking System: A Credit Channel of Monetary Policy – Evidence from an Emerging Economy. Economic Research-Ekonomska Istraživanja, 32(1), 742-754. https://doi.org/10.1080/1331677X.2019.1579662.
[19] Samhan, H., & Al-Khatib, A. (2015). Determinants of Financial Performance of Jordan Islamic Bank. Research Journal of Finance and Accounting. 6(8), 37-47
[20] Sutrisno. (2016). Risk, Efficiency and Performance of Islamic Banking: Emirical Study on Islamic Bank in Indonesia. Asian Journal of Economic Modelling, 4(1), 47-56.

Dr. Olalekan Akinrinola and Aruwa Isah Yusuf, “Growth and Financial Performance of Islamic Banks in Nigeria: The Monetary Policy Impact” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 12, pp.01-09 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/01-09.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Influence of Land Disputes on Farming Competitiveness in Chepyuk Ward of Bungoma County, Kenya

John Ayieko Aseta and Ronald Rutto Ngeiyo – December 2020 Page No.: 10-13

The unresolved land issue in Chepyuk ward for decades had adversely affected farming competitiveness in spite of the region being fertile and viable for competitive farm production. Lack of security of tenure on the untitled land had a direct bearing on investment (farm inputs) and therefore to a large extends affected farm output. Despite many researches that had been undertaken on Chepyuk land issue, land and conflict had been widely studied rather than farming competitiveness. The studies on farming competitiveness in Chepyuk ward remains scanty and therefore justify more research on the aspect of farming competitiveness. The main objective of this study was to examine the influence of land disputes on farming competitiveness in Chepyuk Ward of Bungoma County. A descriptive survey research design was used in this study. The study was guided by theory of land ownership in a free society advanced by Ingalls (2012). The target population was 3120, households, 10 land officers and 10 agricultural officers located at the county level. Multistage sampling technique was used in this study where Simple random sampling was employed when selecting 312 respondents among the households. Five Land officers and Five Agricultural officers were respectively and purposefully sampled for this study. The researcher used questionnaires, interviews and document analysis as the main tools for collecting data. The data from the questionnaires, interviews and document analysis was analyzed using descriptive statistics. The researcher used frequencies and percentages in summarizing data. Information obtained through interviews was discussed to support or dispute the findings from the questionnaires. Tables were used to present the data for purposes of interpretation. The study informs Ministry of lands on the existing gaps in the fight against irregular allocation of land. The study also enables land policy experts in the government review existing mechanisms and systems set to support the Chepyuk area residents in dealing with cases that bring about land conflicts in the area and entire nation. Residents were in agreement that the land lacked mapping, surveying and land registration and this triggered frequent conflicts. Cultural norms of the community also denied women land ownership rights. The Land officers and Agricultural officers gave similar opinion. Lack of land documentation denied people opportunity to seriously venture into farming with sole aim of attaining food security and profit negatively affecting livelihood of the residents. The government should reposes illegally acquired plots and re-issue to the rightful owners, it should also process land titles for the scheme. The community should also be sensitized to embrace gender equity on land allocations. This will enable residents to actively engage in farming activities hence enhance farming competitiveness in Chepyuk ward.

Page(s): 10-13                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 15 December 2020

 John Ayieko Aseta
Department of Social Sciences, Kaimosi Friends University College, Kaimosi, Kenya.

  Ronald Rutto Ngeiyo
Department of Geography, Kisii University, Eldoret, Kenya

[1] André C. and Plateau, J.-p., (1998), land relations under unbearable Stress. Rwanda Caught in the Malthusian Trap, Journal of Economic: JICA Research Institute. Pretoria, South Africa.
[2] Bernstein H. (2005), Rural Land and Land Conflicts in Sub-Saharan Africa. In Reclaiming the Land: David Philip. Moyo Sam and Yeros, Paris.
[3] Campbell et al (2000) .Interactions between people and wildlife. South Eastern Kajiado district Kenya, The land use change, Impacts and dynamics projects. Reference: www.jica_ri.jica.go.jp/publication/assessment.
[4] Cousins B. (2000). Tenure and Common Property Resources in Africa. In Evolving Land Rights. Policy and Tenure in Africa.
[5] Creswell J. W. (2003). Research Design, Qualitative Methodology, Quantitative Methodology and Mixed Methods Approaches. 2nded. Thousand Oaks: Sage. Association, (forthcoming).
[6] Deininger K. (2003), Land Policies for Growth and Poverty Reduction: A World Bank Policy Research Report. World Bank and Oxford University Press: Washington, D.C.
[7] Hilson (2002) Small scale mining in Africa. Tackling pressing environmental problems. Research Gades
[8] Kayiso.P.K. (1993).Socio-Economic Baseline Survey.Report no. 11. Mount Elgon Conservation and Development Project: Mbale, Uganda.
[9] Kombo D.L and Tromp D.L. (2006). Proposal and Thesis Writing: An Introduction, Nairobi. Pauline’s Publications.
[10] Kothari, C.R. (2008). Research Methodology: Methods and Techniques. 2nded .New Delhi: New Age International Publishers.
[11] Odgards (2006). Land Related conflicts in Sub-Sahara Africa. African Journals .www.ajol.info/…/51193.
[12] Republic of Kenya (2006).Draft National Land Policy. National Land Policy Secretariat. : Mud Springs Geographers Inc Ministry of lands, Nairobi . www.mudsprings.com
[13] Van Leeuwan (2009). Mediating Land Conflicts in Burundi, Sustainable solutions to Land conflicts .www.genderlinks.org.za/attachement publication.
[14] Wily A. (2003) Governance and land relations. Review of land administration and management in Africa: .IIED London.

John Ayieko Aseta and Ronald Rutto Ngeiyo, “Influence of Land Disputes on Farming Competitiveness in Chepyuk Ward of Bungoma County, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume 4 issue 12, pp.10-13 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/10-13.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Board Composition, Board Size and Market Value of Listed Industrial Goods Companies in Nigeria

Habib Abdulkarim, Abubakar Yusuf, Usman Isah – December 2020 Page No.: 14-19

This study examines the impact of board composition and board size on the market value of listed industrial goods companies in Nigeria. Ex-post factor research design was used and data was collected from annual reports and account of the sampled companies for the period from 2010 to 2019. The ordinary least square, fixed and random effects regression techniques were applied on the panel data collated to estimate the models. The paper documents significant positive effect of board size on the market value of the companies and insignificant but negative effect of board composition on the market value of the companies. In effect, the result suggests that board size plays important role in determining the market value of the firms. These findings are consistent with the agency theory of corporate governance which suggests higher number of members on board. It is recommended that the size of the board of firms in the sector should not be less than 9 members so as to enhance value.

Page(s): 14-19                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 18 December 2020

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41201

 Habib Abdulkarim
Department of Accounting,Gombe State University,Gombe – Nigeria

  Abubakar Yusuf
Department of Accounting,Gombe State University,Gombe – Nigeria

  Usman Isah
Department of Accounting,Gombe State University,Gombe – Nigeria

[1] Adekunle,S.A. & Aghedo,E.M. (2014). Corporate Governance and Financial Performance of Selected Quoted Companies in Nigeria. European Journal of Business and Management, 6(9).
[2] Ahmed,H.S, & Sallau,M.M. (2018). Corporate Government and Market Value of Listed Deposit Money Banks in Nigeria. International Accounting and Taxation Research Group. Faculty of Management Sciences, University of Benin, Benin City, Nigeria, 27-42.
[3] Andreassion,S. (2011). Understanding Corporate Governance Reform in South Africa: Anglo-American.
[4] Andrew, B., & Kelvyn, J. (2014). Explaining Fixed Effects: Random Effects Modeling of Time-Series Cross-Sectional and Panel Data. Political Science Research and Methods. 1(1), 1 – 21.
[5] Bell, A., & Jones, K. (2015). Explaining Fixed Effects: Random Effects modelling of Time-Series Cross-Sectional and Panel Data. Political Science Research and Methods, 3, 133 – 153.
[6] Berle,A. & Means, G. (1932). The Modern Corporation and Private Property. Newyork: Maccmillan.
[7] Chiang,H.T. & Lin,M.C. (2011). Examining Board Composition and Firm Performance. Intenational Journal of Business and Finance Research , 5(3), 15-27.
[8] Eisenhardt,K. (1989). Agency Theory: An Assessment and Review . The Academy of Management Review, 14, 57-74.
[9] El-Maude,J.G., Bawa, A.B & Shanaki, A. R. (2018). ffect of Board Size, Board Composition and Board Meetings on Financial Performance of Listed Consumer Goods Companies in Nigeria. International Business Research, 11(6), 1-10.
[10] Fama,A. & Eugene,F. (1980). Agency Problem and the Theory of the Firm. Journal of Political Economy, 88(2), 288-307.
[11] Fama,E. & Jensen,M. (1983). Separation of ownership and control . Journal of Law and Economics, 26(3), 301-325.
[12] Hamidu,I & Aliyu,M.S. (2015). Corporate Attribute of Board Size and Market Value of Firms in the Nigerian Chemecal and Paints Industry. International Journal of Humanities and Social Science, 5(6), 101-108.
[13] Jensen,M. (1993). The modern industrial revolution, exit and the failure of internal control Mechanism. Journal of Finance, 48(3), 831-880.
[14] Jensen,M. & Meckling,W. (1976). Theory of the firm: Managerial behavioural, agency costs and ownership structure. Journal of Financial Economics , 3(2), 305-360.
[15] Khan,A. & Awan,S.H. (2012). Effect of Board Composition on Firm;s Performance: A case of Pakistan listed Companies. Interdisciplanary Journal of Contemporary Reseacrh in Business, 3 (10).
[16] King, G., & Robert, M. E. (2015). How Robust Standard Errors Expose Methodological Problems They Do Not Fix, and What to Do About It. Political Analysis, 23(2), 159 – 179.
[17] Klein,A. (1998). Firm performance and board committee structure. Journal of Law and Economics, 41, 137-165.
[18] Kyereboah-Coleman,A & Biekpe,N. (2005). Corporate governance and the peroformance of microfinance institution (MFLs) in Ghana. Working paper, UGBS, Legon.
[19] Lipton,M.& Lorsch,J. (1992). A modest proposal for improved corporate governance. Business Lawyer, 159-177.
[20] Mizruchi,M. (1983). Who controls Whom? An examination between management and board of directors inlarge American corporation . Academy of Management Review, 8, 426-43.
[21] MousarF. & Al-Manase. (2012). The Impact of Corporate Governance on the Performance of Jordanian Banks.
[22] Muchemwa, M.R., & Padia, N,. (2016). Board Composition, Board Size and Financial Performance of Johannesburg Stock Exchange Companies. Southfrican Journal of Economics and Management Science (SAJEMS), 19(2), 497-513.
[23] Nishida, K. (2019). Why Multicollinearity is a problem and How to Detect it in your Regression Models. [Online] Retrieved 27/11/2020 from: https://blog.exploratory.io/why-multicollinearity-is-bad-and-how-to-detect-it-in-your-regression-models-e40d782e67e
[24] Nguyen,H. & Fatt,R. (2007). Impact of Board Size and Board Diversity on Firm Value: Australian Evidence. Corporate Ownership and Control, 4(2), 24-32.
[25] O’Brien, M. (2007). A Caution Regarding Rules of Thumb for Variance Inflation Factors, Quality and Quantity 41(5):673-690
[26] Omura,T. (2005). The relationship between market value and book value for five selected Japanese firms. Thesis.
[27] Pantamee,A. & Ya”u. (2018). . Effect of Board Size and Board Composition on firm Performance in Nigerian Petroleum Market Industry. Journal of Advance Reseach in Social and Behavioural Science, 10(2), 131-143.
[28] Pfeffer,J. (1972). Size and Composition of Corporate Board of Directors: The Organisation and its Environment. Administrative Science Quarterly, 17, 218-228.
[29] Ragmond,K.V., Poul, M & Joeyoung, K. (2010). Board of Directors Composition and Financial Performance in a Sarbanes-Oxley World. Academy of Business and Economics Journal, 10(5), 56-74.
[30] Ramdani,D. & Van,W. (2009). Board Independence, CEO duality and firm performance: A quantile regression analysis for indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand.
[31] Rashid,A., De Zoysa,A., Lodh,S & Rulkin,K. (2010). Board Composition and firm performance: Evidence from Bangladesh . Australian Accounting Business and Finance Journal, 4(1), 76-95.
[32] Rosenstrein,S & Wyait,J. (1994). Shareholder weath effects when an officer of one corporation join the board of directors of another. Managerial and Decision Economics, 15, 317-327.
[33] Shah,S.Z.A., Butt,S.A. & Saeed. (2011). Ownership Structure and Performance of Firms: Empirical evidence from an emerging market . African journal of Business Management, 5(2), 515-523.
[34] Topal, Y. & Dogon, M,. (2014). Impact of Size on Financial Performance: The Case of BIST Manufacturing . International Journal of Business Management and Economics Research (IJBMER), 5 (4), 74-79.
[35] Veklenico,K. (2015). The Impact of Board Composition on the Firm’s Performance in Continental Europe . 7th IBA Bachelor Thesis Conference, july 1st, 2016, Enshede. University of Twente, faculty of Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences, Netherland.
[36] Yasser,Q.R.,Entebang,H. & Mansor,S.A. (2011). Corporate governance and firm performance in Pakistant: The case of Karachi stock exchange(KSE)-30. Journal of Economics and International Finance, 3(8), 482-491.
[37] Yermack,D. (1996). Higher market valuation of companies with a ssmall board of directors. Journal of Finance Economics, 40, 183-211.
[38] Zahra,S.E. & Peace,J. (1989). Board of directors and corporate fianacial performance: A review and intergrative model. Journal of Management, 15(2), 291-244.

Habib Abdulkarim, Abubakar Yusuf, Usman Isah, “Board Composition, Board Size and Market Value of Listed Industrial Goods Companies in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.14-19 December 2020  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41201

Download PDF

pdf

Islamic-Based Mathematics Learning Management Model Development (Case Study at the State Islamic Senior High School 1 of Jakarta)

Faizah, Prof. Udin Syaefudin, Oneng Nurul Bariah – December 2020 Page No.: 20-26

Mathematics is a science learned by all people since at an elementary school up to a university. Although mathematics has a very important position, some cases show that mathematics is still deemed as a subject difficult to study at school, and some students consider it as a subject not so exciting. This is why the study performance of mathematics is always very low compared to other subjects. Therefore it is necessary to develop an Islam-based mathematics learning model. A learning model that can form student’s character which is based on a mathematics learning being combined with Islamic values. This research is conducted at the State Islamic Senior High School 1 (MAN 1) of Jakarta. This research uses a Research and Development (R&D) method. The result of this research shows a mathematics management model of the State Islamic Senior High School 1 (MAN 1) of Jakarta being conducted truly as follows: Plan, Teaching Material Development, Learning Practice, Learning Evaluation based on K-13. The Islamic-based Mathematics Learning Model is conducted properly with aspects of: Plan, Teaching Material Development, Learning Practice, K-13 Learning Evaluation plus Islamic values constituting one of types of nationality education. The Islamic-based Mathematics Education Management Model is effective in enhancing the quality as follows: Plan, Teaching Material Development, Learning Practice and Evaluation. The Islamic-based mathematics education management model has a very positive impact for teachers and students of the State Islamic Senior High School 1 (MAN 1) of Jakarta as well as puts forward the very good Islamic values being reflected and realized in daily life.

Page(s): 20-26                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 21 December 2020

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41202

 Faizah
Ministry of Religion Affairs of the Republic of Indonesia Jakarta, Indonesia.

  Prof. Udin Syaefudin
Saud, M.Ed., Ph.D., Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia

  Oneng Nurul Bariah
Oneng Nurul Bariah ,Muhammadiyah University of Jakarta

[1] Abdul Halim Fathani, 2009. Mathematics, Essence and Logic. Yogyakarta: Ar-Ruzz Media.
[2] Abdul Majid, 2011. Learning Planning: Developing Teacher Competence Standard. Remaja Rosdakarya. Bandung.
[3] Anonim, being accessed on the 25th of March 2015 at 20.28 hours. Learning Theory. http://skj6bbb. Edu. ms/additional source/THEORY. HTM.
[4] Anonim, being accessed on the 20th of July 2015 at 20.03 hours. Mathematics Learning Technique, dalam www. Innovative mathematics learning technique html.
[5] Arifin, Zaenal, 2011. Learning Evaluation: Principle, Technique, Procedure. PT Remaja Rosdakarya. Bandung.
[6] Arismunandar, 2006. Education Management: Opportunity and Challenge. Makassar State University, Makassar.
[7] Bafadh, Ibrahim, 2004. Fundamentals of Kindergarten Supervision Management, Bumi Aksara, Jakarta.
[8] Baharuddin and Moh. Makin, 2010. Islamic Education Management. Malang: UIN-Maliki Press. Malang.
[9] Darmaningtyas, 1994. Education In the Era of Crisis and Afterwards (Education Evaluation in the Era of Crisis). Jogjakarta : Pustaka Pelajar.
[10] Department of National Education, 2003. Curriculum of 2004 Competence Standard of Mathematics Subject at Senior Secondary High School and Islamic Senior Secondary High School, (Jakarta: Depdiknas).
[11] Department of Religious Affairs of the Republic of Indonesia, 2009. Al Qur’an and Its Translation, (Bandung: PT Sygma Examedia Arkanluma).
[12] Directorate of Junior Secondary Education, 2003. Contextual Approach (Cotextual Teaching and Learning/CTL). Department of National Education – Directorate General of Primary and Secondary Education – Directorate of Junior Secondary Education. Jakarta.
[13] Eggen, P. and Kauchak, Deed, 1997. Educational Psychology. Prentice-Hall. Colombus.
[14] Eka Prihatin, 2011. Student Management, Alfabeta, Bandung.
[15] E. Mulyasa, Competence-based Curriculum: Concept, Characteristics and Implementation.
[16] Erman Suherman et. al., 2003. Contemporary Mathematics Learning Strategy, (Jica, Revision Edition).
[17] Fatih Arifah, Yustisianisa, 2012. Learning Evaluation (Jakarta: Mentari Pustaka).
[18] Fathurrahman, P dan Sutikno, S, 2009. Learning and Teaching Strategy through General Concept and Islamic Concept. Bandung : Refika Aditama.
[19] H.M. Ali Hamzah, Muhlisrarini, Mathematics Learning Planning and Strategy.
[20] Made Pidarta, 2002. Indonesian Education Management, Jakarta: Rineka Cipta.
[21] M. Arifin, 1993. Islamic Education Philosophy, (Jakarta : Bumi Aksara).
[22] Muhaimin, Abd. Mujib, 1991. Islamic Education Thinking, (Bandung : Bumi Aksara).
[23] Maimun, Agus,. Fitri, Agus Zaenal, 2010. Superior Islamic School of Alternative Education Institution in the Competitive Era, UIN Maliki Press, Malang.
[24] Haidara Putra Daulay, 2009. Islamic Education Dynamics in Southeast Asia, Jakarta: Asdi Mahasatya.
[25] Malayu S.P. Hasibuan, 2011. Management: Basic, Definition, and Problem, BumiAksara, Jakarta.
[26] H.M. Ali Hamzah, Muhlisrarini, 2003. Mathematics Learning Planning and Strategy, Bandung: UPI.
[27] H, Martinis Yamin & Maisah, 2012. Classroom Learning Management: Strategy of Improving Learning Quality, (Jakarta: Gaung Persada Press).
[28] Hamalik, Oemar, 2001. Curriculum and Learning. Jakarta: Bumi Aksara, Jakarta.
[29] Hamalik, Oemar, 2010. Curriculum Development Management. Remanja Rosdakarya, Bandung.
[30] Harjanto, 1997. Teaching Planning. Jakarta : Rineka Cipta. Jakarta.
[31] Hasibuan, S.P. Melayu, 2008. Basic Management, Definition, and Problem. Revision Edition. PT. Bumi Aksara. Jakarta.
[32] Herman Hudojo, 1988. Teaching and Learning Mathematics, (Jakarta).

Faizah, Prof. Udin Syaefudin, Oneng Nurul Bariah, “Islamic-Based Mathematics Learning Management Model Development (Case Study at the State Islamic Senior High School 1 of Jakarta)” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.20-26 December 2020  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41202

Download PDF

pdf

Portraying the Relationship between Cultural Fall and the Hero’s fall in Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

Sandamali K. P. S- December 2020 Page No.: 27-30

This study itself deals with the novel “Things fall apart” which is a creation by a well-known Nigerian writer, Chinua Achebe to see the portraying of the relationship between cultural devastation and the hero’s destruction. The entire novel portrays Igbo society with specificity and sympathy and it examines the effects of European colonialism from an African perspective. The objective of this study is to identify the way that the author has made the link between the major themes and the characters of the text. There it has worked on to see the relationship between the hero’s fall and the cultural fall in the text. Further this study reveals a link which creates a sound bond about the social set up a particular set of people while donating hiding value of a cultural reveal.

Page(s): 27-30                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 21 December 2020

 Sandamali K. P. S
Institute of Human Resource Advancement, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka

[1] Chinua Achebe, “The Novelist as Teacher,” in Hope and Impediments: Selected Essays, Anchor Books, 1988, pp. 40–46.
[2] Edna Aizenberg, “The Third World Novel as Counter history: Things Fall Apart and Asturias’s Men of Maize,” in Approaches to Teaching Achebe’s “Things Fall Apart,” edited by Bemth Lindfors, Modern Language Association of America, 1991, pp. 85–90.
[3] Ernest N. Emenyonu, “Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart: A Classic Study in Colonial Diplomatic Tactlessness,” in Chinua Achebe: A Celebration, edited by Kirsten Holst Petersen and Anna Rutherford, Heinemann, 1990, pp. 83–88.
[4] https://www.ukessays.com/essays/english-literature/things-fall-apart-okonkwos-tragic-flaw-english-literature-essay.php
[5] https://www.ukessays.com/essays/english-literature/okonkwo-as-a-tragic-hero.php
[6] file:///C:/Users/Dell/Downloads/Things%20Fall%20Apart%20-%20Tragic%20Hero.pdf
[7] https://www.sparknotes.com/lit/things/character/okonkwo/
[8] https://www.researchgate.net/publication/311372931_The_Tragic_Hero_of_the_Modern_Period-The_African_Concept
[9] https://www.cram.com/essay/Is-Okonkwo-A-Tragic-Hero-Analysis/P3PKKJQFNM5YQ

Sandamali K. P. S, “Portraying the Relationship between Cultural Fall and the Hero’s fall in Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.27-30 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/27-30.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The applications of appropriate renewable energy technologies by the refugees and displaced persons under humanitarian assistance programmes

Namiz Musafer, Nihal Samaratunga, P. G. Ajith Kumara- December 2020 Page No.: 31-37

Sri Lanka is an island country situated south of India which has experienced with a large number of refugees and internally displaced persons especially since 1983 due to natural and human induced disasters and events from time to time. This study explores and describes how the displaced communities were supplied with appropriate renewable energy technologies to meet their energy demands as against the electricity generated from diesel generators or by providing expensive petroleum gases which contribute towards environmental pollution and greenhouse gas emissions while them being comparatively expensive. This study adopted a ‘single longitudinal case study in retrospect’ research approach. As sustainable energy solutions, providing of fuelwood based energy efficient clay cook stoves, solar photovoltaic lighting and water pumping, solar dryers, biogas systems, small wind turbines, and solar-wind hybrids have been introduced to them on an ad hoc basis depending on the interests and priorities of the supporting agencies. The existing national policies do not place an adequate specific attention to the meeting of energy needs of the displaced communities of Sri Lanka.

Page(s): 31-37                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 22 December 2020

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41203

  Namiz Musafer
Energy Managers, and Integrated Development Associations, Sri Lanka

  Nihal Samaratunga
Energy Managers, and Integrated Development Associations, Sri Lanka

  P. G. Ajith Kumara
Simple Engineering (Pvt) Ltd

[1] Barry, M. L., Steyn, H., and Brent, A., (2009), The use of the focus group technique in management research: the example of renewable energy technology selection in Africa, Journal of Contemporary Management, 6(1), pp. 229 – 240. Available at: https://journals.co.za/docserver/fulltext/jcman/6/1/jcman_v6_a13.pdf?expires=1605459143&id=id&accname=guest&checksum=DBD25B810B7B0C60BF90297F43D09641, Accessed on November 15, 2020.
[2] Baxter, P., and Jack, S., (2008), Qualitative Case Study Methodology: Study Design and Implementation for Novice Researchers, The Qualitative Report, 13(4); pp. 544 – 559.
[3] Berke, P. R., Kartez, J., and Wenger, D., (1993), Recovery after Disasters: Achieving Sustainable Development, Mitigation and Equity, Disasters, 17(2), 93-109. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-7717.1993.tb01137.x.
[4] Central Bank of Sri Lanka (2007, 2011, 2020), Annual Report 2006, 2010, 2019
[5] Centre for Poverty Analysis – CPA (2017), Review of PBF funded project: “Support for Sri Lanka national reconciliation efforts by addressing grievances of the concerned sections of the population through targeted resettlement of the last of the conflict affected internally displaced persons”, Available at https://www.un.org/peacebuilding/sites/www.un.org.peacebuilding/files/documents/sri_lanka_june_2017_-_evaluation_of_resettlement_of_idps_project.pdf, Accessed on June 22, 2020
[6] Drew, D. R., Barlow, J. F., and Cockerill, T. ., (2013), Estimating the potential yield of small wind turbines in urban areas: A case study for Greater London, UK, Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics, 115. C. 104 – 111. ISSN 0167-6105.
[7] European Union and the United Nations – EU & UN (2018), Technical Report on Statistics of Internally Displaced Persons: Current Practice and Recommendations for Improvement, Available at: https://unstats.un.org/unsd/demographic-social/Standards-and-Methods/files/Technical-Report/national-reporting/Technical-report-on-statistics-of-IDPs-E.pdf, Accessed on June 22, 2020.
[8] Grafham, O., and Vianello, M., (2018), Energy for Displacement: Key Issues, Energy For Displacement ‘Understanding the Challenges’, HEED Briefing Paper No.1, Available at: http://heed-refugee.coventry.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/compressed-HEED-Briefing-Paper-September-2018.pdf, Accessed on; November 13, 2020.
[9] Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre and Norwegian Refugee Council – IDMC & NRC (2020), Global Report on Internal Displacement; Available at: https://reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/resources/2020-IDMC-GRID.pdf, Accessed on June 22, 2020.
[10] International Bank for Reconstruction and Development: The World Bank – (IBRC & WB) (2017), State of Electricity Access Report; Available at: http://documentos.bancomundial.org/curated/es/364571494517675149/pdf/114841-REVISED-JUNE12-FINAL-SEAR-web-REV-optimized.pdf, Accessed on June 23, 2020
[11] Lahn, G., and Grafham, O., (2015), Heat, Light and Power for Refugees Saving Lives, Reducing Costs, Available at: https://www.chathamhouse.org/sites/default/files/publications/research/2015-11-17-heat-light-power-refugees-lahn-grafham-final.pdf, Access on November 14, 2020.
[12] Lehne J., Blyth, W., Lahn, G., Bazilian M., and Grafham, O., (2016), Energy services for refugees and displaced people, Energy Strategy Reviews, 13-14; pp. 134-146. Available at: www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211467X16300396, Accessed on November 14, 2020.
[13] Leonard-Barton, D., (1990), A dual methodology for case studies: synergistic use of a longitudinal single site with replicated multiple sites, Organisation Science, 1(1); pp. 248 – 266.
[14] Musafer, N., (2014), Small scale appropriate energy technologies in meeting basic energy needs of Sri Lanka – success and failure factors, National Energy Symposium, Sri Lanka Sustainable Energy Authority, Colombo.
[15] Musafer, N., and Gurmu, D., (2020), Energy Issues and Solutions for Disaster and Conflict Affected Refugees: A Prognosis, International Journal of Innovative Science and Research Technology, 10(5); pp. 1227-1231.
[16] National Council for Disaster Management of Sri Lanka, National Policy on Disaster Management (NPDM); Available at: http://www.disastermin.gov.lk/web/images/pdf/sri%20lanka%20disaster%20management%20policy%20english.pdf; Accessed on November 13, 2020.
[17] Ministry of Power, Energy, and Business Development of the Government of Sri Lanka, National Energy Policy and Strategies of Sri Lanka – NEPS (2019)
[18] Ozcelik, M., (2017), Alternative model for electricity and water supply after disaster, Journal of Taibah University for Science, 11:6, 966-974, DOI: 10.1016/j.jtusci.2017.01.002.
[19] Parliament of Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka, Sri Lanka Disaster Management Act no 13 of 2005; Available at: http://www.unlocked.lk/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Disaster-Management-Act_E.pdf; Accessed on; November 13, 2020.
[20] Practical Action Sri Lanka, Construction and Maintenance of Solar Fish Dryer – Technical Brief
[21] Price, N., (2010), Integrating ‘Return’ with ‘Recovery’: Utilizing the Return Process in the Transition to Positive Peace: A Case Study of Sri Lanka, The Round Table, 99(410); pp. 529 – 545. Available at: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/00358533.2010.509948, Accessed on November 15, 2020.
[22] Ratnasooriya, H. A. R., Samarawickrama, S. P., and Imamura, F (2007), Post Tsunami Recovery Process in Sri Lanka, Journal of Natural Disaster Science, 29(1); pp21 – 28. Available at: https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/jnds/29/1/29_1_21/_pdf, Accessed on November 15, 2020.
[23] Red Cross Red Crescent Movement – RCRCM (2006), Tsunami 2 year Progress Report – Sri Lanka; Available at: https://www.ifrc.org/Docs/Appeals/04/2804srilankapr.pdf, Accessed on June 23, 2020.
[24] Reliefweb (2005), Innovative partnerships in Sri Lanka, Available at: https://reliefweb.int/report/sri-lanka/innovative-partnerships-sri-lanka; Accessed on: November 13, 2020.
[25] Schrijvers, J., (1999), Fighters, Victims and Survivors: Constructions of Ethnicity, Gender and Refugeeness among Tamils in Sri Lanka, Journal of Refugee Studies, 12(3); pp. 307-333.
[26] Schroder, J and Stark, C., (2011), Sri Lanka: Gaps in the Government Response to Post-2007 Internal Displacement, From Responsibility to Response: Assessing National Approaches to Internal Displacement, The Brookings Institution – London School of Economics Project on Internal Displacement, Available at: https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/From-Responsibility-to-Response-Nov-2011doc.pdf, Accessed on; November 15,2020.
[27] Shamini, C., (2012), Challenges of IDP Resettlement in Sri Lanka An Examination of Northern Spring Program in Vavuniya District, Journal of International Development and Cooperation, 18(3); pp. 65 – 83. Available at: https://ir.lib.hiroshima- u.ac.jp/files/public/3/32474/20141016190308405801/ JIDC_18-3_65.pdf, Accessed on November 15, 2020.
[28] Tabrizi, A., Whale, J., Lyons, T. and Urmee, T., (2015), Rooftop wind monitoring campaigns for small wind turbine applications: Effect of sampling rate and averaging period. Renewable Energy, 77. pp. 320-330.
[29] Valatheeswaran, C., and Rajan, S. I., (2011), Sri Lankan Tamil Refugees in India: Rehabilitation mechanisms, livelihood strategies, and lasting solutions, Refugee Survey Quarterly, 30(2); pp. 24 – 44. https://doi.org/10.1093/rsq/hdr005.
[30] Verité Research – VR (2018), Policy Note: Natural Disaster Insurance Coverage Solving the Lethargy on Language Policy Will Help SMEs Island-wide; Available at: https://www.veriteresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Verit%C3%A9-Research-Policy-Note_Natural-Disaster-Insurance-Coverage-1.pdf, Accessed on June 24, 2020.
[31] Voss, C., Tsikriktsis, N. and Frohlich, M. (2002), “Case research in operations management”, International Journal of Operations & Production Management, Vol. 22 No. 2, pp. 195-219. https://doi.org/10.1108/01443570210414329
[32] Wagh, S., and Walke, P. V., (2017), Review on wind-solar hybrid power system, International Journal of Research in Science & Engineering, 3(2): pp. 71 – 76.
[33] World Food Programme (2017), Safe Access to Fuel and Energy (SAFE) Sri Lanka, Available at: https://docs.wfp.org/api/documents/WFP-0000070104/download/, Accessed on November 13, 2020.

Namiz Musafer, Nihal Samaratunga, P. G. Ajith Kumara “The applications of appropriate renewable energy technologies by the refugees and displaced persons under humanitarian assistance programmes” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.31-37 December 2020  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41203

Download PDF

pdf

Investigating the language of wider communication and examining the selected medium of instruction for local primary schools in the Livingstone city of Zambia

Elliot Machinyise, Jackline Pali- December 2020 Page No.: 38-42

Livingstone as a tourist capital of Zambia has developed into a multilingual and multiethnic community because a lot of languages are spoken within its boundaries. In this paper an attempt has been made at taking a sociolinguistic perspective of investigating the local language of wider communication in the Livingstone city of Zambia. To achieve this, particular attention was focussed on the assessment of the popularity of Tonga, Nyanja and Lozi, the three community languages of Livingstone townships. The results of the study were used to establish whether or not Tonga language is indeed the appropriate medium of instruction for Livingstone primary schools and also as a learning subject of choice. A case study survey was carried out in schools and Livingstone townships so as to come up with the desired findings of the study. Instances of language use were observed in selected primary schools in Livingstone. The findings of the study indicate that although Nyanja is not the native language or mother tongue of most Livingstone residents, it has proved to be the language of wider communication. It has also been revealed that although Tonga is the officially prescribed medium of instruction in Livingstone primary schools, many school going children do not use it in many domains. Lozi was found to be the mother tongue of most Livingstone residents but the language is only confined to the home domain and family functions.

Page(s): 38-42                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 22 December 2020

 Elliot Machinyise
David Livingstone College of Education

  Jackline Pali
David Livingstone College of Education

[1] Kashoki, M.E. (1998). Language Policy in Multilingual Countries vis-a-vis Language Maintenance, Language Shift and Language Death. In Journal of Humanities. Vol.2. 1998-1999. Lusaka: University of Zambia.
[2] Kloss, H. (1971) Language Rights of Immigrant Groups: International Migration: Review 5.2: 250-268
[3] Mufwene, S. (2002). Colonisation, Globalisation and the Future of Languages in the Twenty-First Century. International Journal on Multicultural Societies. Vol 4 No. 2
[4] Mytton, G. (1978). Language and the Media. In Ohannessian, S, and M.E, Kashoki (eds) pp. 207-227.
[5] Simwinga J. (2006). Impact of Language Policy on the Use of Minority Languages in Zambia with Special Reference to Tumbuka and Nkoya. PhD. Thesis. Lusaka: University of Zambia.
[6] Stephen, M. (2005) The Politics of Homogeneity: A Critical Exploration of the Anti- bilingual Education Movement. University of Waikato.

Elliot Machinyise, Jackline Pali, “Investigating the language of wider communication and examining the selected medium of instruction for local primary schools in the Livingstone city of Zambia” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.38-42 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/38-42.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Hedonic Shopping Value and Utilitarian Shopping Value on Impulsive Purchases at Tunjungan Plaza Surabaya

Endang Prihatiningsih, Soffia Pudji Estiasih – December 2020 Page No.: 43-47

Currently, consumers do shopping activities not only to fulfill their daily needs but also to become a lifestyle. First consumers shop for products that are useful to fulfill their desires (utilitarian value. But now consumer shopping activities are influenced by emotions such as pleasure and pleasure (hedonic value) which increase one’s prestige or image. Impulsive, which is an unplanned purchase, must be created to provoke emotional or consumer passion in purchasing a certain product or brand when visiting a shopping place such as Tunjungan Plaza. The number of outlets or stores that offer fashion products that are related to hedonic and utilitarian values with impulse buying is common in Tunjungan Plaza. The population in this study were all consumers in Tunjungan Plaza and the number of samples was 70 respondents whose determination was based on the opinion of Hair et al. (2010) with accidental sampling technique. The analysis technique uses multiple linear regression. While the results of the study show the hedonic value (X1) has a significant effect on impulsive purchases (Y) at Tunjungan Plaza Surabaya with a sig. count 0.000 from 0.05. While simultaneously the hedonic value (X1) and utilitarian value (X2) simultaneously have a significant effect on Impulsive Purchases at Tunjungan Plaza Surabaya with sig. count

Page(s): 43-47                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 22 December 2020

 Endang Prihatiningsih
Universitas WR. Supratman Surabaya, Indonesia

  Soffia Pudji Estiasih
Universitas WR. Supratman Surabaya, Indonesia

[1] Ailawadi KL, Lehmann DR, Neslin SA. 2001. Market response to a major policy change in the marketing mix: learning from procter & gamble’s value pricing strategy. Journal Marketing 65(1):44– 61.
[2] Anderson, M., Palmblad, S., dan Prevedan, T. 2012. Atmospheric Effects on Hedonic and Utilitarian Customers. Bachelor Thesis. Linnaeus University.
[3] Bong Soeseno. 2011.Pengaruh In-Store Stimuli Terhadap Impulse Buying Behavior Konsumen Hypermarket Di Jakarta. Articles Ultima Management. Vol.3 No.1
[4] Cahyono Krido Eko. 2019. Pengaruh Hedinic Value dan Utilitarian Valuee terhadap Impulse Buying di mediasi oleh Shopping Life Style pada Industri Kulit Sidoarjo. Jurnal Balance. Vol. XVII No. 2.
[5] Dhar, R & Wertenbroch, K. 2000. “Consumer choice between hedonic and utilitarian goods,” Journal of Marketing Research, 37: 60-71.
[6] Hair Jr., Joseph F., William C. Black, Barry J. Babin, & Rolph E. Anderson, 2010, Multivariate Data Analysis, 7th Edition. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall
[7] Hanzae, K.H., dan Rezaeyeh, S.P. 2013. Investigation of The Effects of Hedonic Value and Utilitarian Value on Customer Satisfaction and Behavioural Intentions. African Journal of Business Management, 7 (11), 818-825, 21 March 2013.
[8] Hamzaee KH, Khonsari Y. 2011. A review of the role of hedonic and utilitarian values on customer’s satisfaction and behavioral intentions. Interdisciplinary Journal of Research in Business 1(5):34–45
[9] Hausman, Angela. 2000. A Multi- method Investigation of Consumers in Impulse Buying Behavior. Journal of Consumer Marketing, Vol. 17 Iss: 5.
[10] Irani, Neda. 2011. “The Effects of Variety-seeking Buying Tendency and Price Sensitivity on Utilitarian and Hedonic Value in Apparel Shopping Satisfaction”. International Journal of Marketing Studies. Vol.3
[11] Kharis, Ismu Fadli. 2011. “Studi Mengenai Impulse Buying dalam Penjualan Online (Studi Kasus di Lingkungan Universitas Diponegoro Semarang)”. Jurnal Universitas Diponegoro Semarang
[12] Kim, H.S. 2006. Using Hedonic and Utilitarian Shopping Motivations to Profile Inner City Consumers. Journal of Shopping Center Research, 13 (1), 2006, 5779
[13] Lisda Rahmasari. 2010. Menciptakan Impulse Buying. Majalah Ilmiah Informatika. Vol. 1 No.3. hlm.56-68.
[14] Ma’ruf, Hendri. 2006. Pemasaran Ritel. Gramedia Pustaka Utama : Jakarta.
[15] Mowen, Jonh C dan Minor, Michael. 2002. Perilaku Konsumen Jilid 1. Alih Bahasa: Lina Salim. Jakarta: Erlangga.
[16] Nejati, M., dan Moghaddam, P. P. 2013. The effect of hedonic and utilitarian values on satisfaction and behavioural intentions for dining in fast-casual restaurants in Iran. British Food Journal, 115(11), 1583–1596. https://doi.org/10.1108/BFJ-10-2011- 0257
[17] Prastia, F.E. 2013. “Pengaruh Shopping Lifestyle, Fashion Involvement dan Hedonic Shopping Value terhadap Impulse Buying Behaviour Pelanggan Toko Elizabeth Surabaya. Jurnal Ilmiah Mahasiswa Manajemen, Vol.2, No.4.
[18] Rachmawati, Veronika. 2009. Hubungan Antara Hedonic Shopping Value, Positive Emotion, Dan Perilaku Impulse Buying Pada Konsumen Ritel. Jurnal Majalah Ekonomi. hal. 192-208
[19] Rahmi Dwi Alfi . N.Rachma. M.Rizal. 2019. Pengaruh Hedonic Shopping Motivation dan Utilitarian Value Terhadap Impulse Buying Dengan Shopping Lifestyle Sebagai Variabel Mediasi Pada Pembeli Di Sardo Swalayan. e – Jurnal Riset Manajemen Prodi Manajemen Fakultas Ekonomi Unisma. website : www.fe.unisma.ac.id (email : e.jrm.feunisma@gmail.com)
[20] Rohman Fatchur. 2009. Peran Nilai Hedonik Konsumsi dan Reaksi Impulsif sebagai Mediasi Pengaruh Faktor Situasional terhadap Keputusan Pembelian Impulsif di Butik Kota Malang. Jurnal Aplikasi Manajemen. Vol. 7 No.2.
[21] Rosita, Nadiyah Hirfiyana. 2009. Skor Nilai utilitarian dan Nilai Hedonik terhadap keputusan Pembelian Ponsel 3G pada Mahasiswa Strata-1 Universitas Brawijaya Malang. Skripsi Fakultas Ekonomi dan Bisnis Universita Brawijaya
[22] Santini, F.D.O., Ladeira, W.J., Vieira, V.A., Araujo, C.F., dan Sampaio, C.H. 2019. Antecedents and consequences of impulse buying: a meta-analytic study. RAUSP Management Journal, 54(2), 178–204. https://doi.org/10.1108/RAUSP-07-2018- 0037
[23] Subagio, H. 2011. Pengaruh Atribut Supermarket terhadap Motif Belanja Hedonik Motif Belanja Utilitarian dan Loyalitas Konsumen. Jurnal Manajemen Pemasaran, 6 (1), April 2011: 8-21.
[24] Sutisna. 2002. Perilaku Konsumen dan Komunikasi Pemasaran. Bandung: PT Remaja Rosdakarya.
[25] Tania Varerina. 2010. Perilaku Pembelian Impulsif Produk Pakaian Masyarakat Urban di Kota Jakarta dan Bandung. Tesis. Jakarta: Universitas Indonesia
[26] Zhang, K.Z.K., Xu, H., Zhao, S., dan Yu, Y. 2018. Online reviews and impulse buying behavior: the role of browsing and impulsiveness. Internet Research Vol. 28. Retrieved from http://10.0.4.84/IntR-12-2016- 0377%0Ahttp:// search.ebscohost. com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=llf&AN=130897 880&site=ehost-live
[27] Zayusman. Fani. Septrizola Whyosi. 2019. Pengaruh Hedonic Shopping Value dan Shopping Lifestyle Terhadap Impulse Buying pada Pelaggan Tokopedia di Kota Padang Jurnal Kajian Manajemen dan Wirausaha. Volume 01 Nomor 01 2019

Endang Prihatiningsih, Soffia Pudji Estiasih, “Hedonic Shopping Value and Utilitarian Shopping Value on Impulsive Purchases at Tunjungan Plaza Surabaya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.43-47 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/43-47.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Influence of Family Background Characteristics on Parent-Child Sexual Health Communication in South-West Nigeria

OLUSANYA Oyewole Omoniyi- December 2020 Page No.: 48-54

Adolescents’ sexual health has become a global public health concern especially in the developing countries. Undoubtedly, parent-child communication remains a vital means by which parents transmit cultural values and monitor the sexual health of their children. Indeed, the extent and the quality of the manner in which parents are involved in their children’s lives are critical factors in the prevention of sexual risk-taking behaviour among adolescents. This paper investigated the influence of parents knowledge, occupation and religion on their communication of sexual health issues with their adolescents among parents in South West Nigeria. The study elicited information from 721 selected respondents, comprising fathers and mothers who had at least, an adolescent in the household; through a multi-stage sampling technique. The study found that most respondents, 78.2% had proper perception of sexual health communication. Parent-child sexual health communication was significantly associated with parents’ occupation (χ2=7.212), and religion (χ2= 6.850). In addition, being self-employed and traditional religion were significant predictors of parent-child sexual health communication in their reference category (OR=0.651, P =0.030<0.05 and OR=0.26, P =0.028<0.05 respectively). Socio-cultural factors still greatly impedes parent-child sexual health communication, despite parents’ proper perception of the need for it. Emerging interventions by all stakeholders need to focus on repositioning parents for early positive parent-child family conversations on sexual health issues coupled with work life and involvement in religious activities that promote parents’ physical and mental preparedness for communication on sexual health

Page(s): 48-54                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 22 December 2020

 OLUSANYA Oyewole Omoniyi

Department of Sociology Adekunle Ajasin University, Akungba-Akoko, Ondo State, Nigeria

[1] Aji, J., Aji, M.O., Ifeadike, C.O., Emelumadu, O.F., Ubajaka, C., Nwabueze, S.A., Ebenebu, U.E., & Azuike, E.C. (2014). Adolescent sexual behaviour and practices in Nigeria: A twelve year review. Afrimedic Journal, 4(1), 80-145
[2] Ajzen, I., & Fishbein, M. (1980). Theory of planned behaviour. Wikipedia, the free Encyclopedia.mht. Retrieved Feb.20, 2017.
[3] Amoran, O.E., Anadeko, M.O. & Adeniyi, J.D. (2005). Parental influence on adolescents’ sexual initiation practices in Ibadan, Nigeria. International Community Health Education, 23, 73–81.
[4] Bastien, S., Kajula, L.J., & Muhwezi, W.W. (2011). A review of studies of parent- child communication about sexuality and HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan. Africa Reproductive Health, 8(25), 121-144.
[5] Bushaija, E., Sunday, F.X., Asingizwe, D., Olayo, R., & Abong’o, B. (2013). Factors that hinder parents from the communicating of sexual matters with
[6] adolescents in Rwanda. Journal of Health Sciences, 2(2). Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/rjhs.v2i2.2.
[7] Federal Ministry of Health. (2012). National strategic framework on the health and development of adolescents and Young people in Nigeria 2007 – 2011. Federal Ministry of Health, Abuja, Nigeria
[8] Gershoff, E.T., Aber, J.L., Raver, C.C., & Lennon, M.C. (2007). Income is not enough: Incorporating maternal hardship into models of income associations with parenting and child development. Child Development, 78(1), 70–95.
[9] Graaf, H., Vanwesenbeek, I., Woertman, L., & Meeus, W.H. (2010). Parenting and adolescents’ sexual development in western societies. Journal of European Psychologist, 16(11), 21-31.
[10] Han, W.J., Miller, P., & Waldfogel, J. (2010). Parental work schedules and adolescents’ risky behaviour. Journal of Developmental Psychology, 46, 1245-1267.
[11] Heinrich, C.J. (2014). Parents’ wellbeing and children’s wellbeing. The Future of Children, Princeton University, 24(1), 121-146.
[12] Henderson,V. (2006). The concept of nursing. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 53(1), 1365-2648.
[13] Mbugua, N. (2010). Factors inhibiting educated mothers in Kenya from giving meaningful sex-education to their daughters. Journal of Social Science and Medicine, 64(5), 1079-1089.
[14] National Bureau of Statistics, Federal Republic of Nigeria. (2012). Nigeria Annual Abstract of Statistics, 30-70.
[15] National Population Commission & ICF International. (2014). Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey 2013. Abuja, Nigeria, and Rockville, Maryland, USA: NPC and ICF International.
[16] Neil, C. & Donald. (2015). Important life issues. European Scientific Journal, 11(20), 1857 – 7881.
[17] Obono, K. (2010). Patterns of mother-daughter communication for reproductive health knowledge transfer in Southern Nigeria. Global Media Journal- Canadian Edition, 5(1), 95-110.
[18] Odu, O.O., Amu, E.O., Samson, A.D., Aduayi, V.A., Owoeye, O., & Eyitayo, E.E. (2017). Perception and attitude of family life education among parents inOsun State, Nigeria. Advances in Research, 9(5), 1-8.
[19] Ojo, O.D., & Fasuba, O.B. (2006). Adolescents sexuality and family life education in South-western Nigeria: Responses from focus group discussion. Journal of Social Sciences, 10(21), 111-118.
[20] Oladepo, O., & Fayemi, M.M. (2011). Perceptions about sexual abstinence and knowledge of HIV/AIDS prevention among in-school adolescents in a western Nigerian City. BMC Public Health. Retrived from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3118238/
[21] Opara, P.I., Eke, G.K., & Akani, N.A. (2010). Mothers perception of sexuality education for children. Nigerian Journal of Medicine, 19(2), 168-72.
[22] Poulsen, M.N., Miller, K.S., Lin, C., Fasula, A., Vandenhoudt, H., Wyckoff, S.C., Ochura, J., Obong’o, C.O., & Forehand, R. (2010). Factors associated with parent-child communication about HIV/AIDS in the United States and Kenya: a cross-cultural comparison. AIDS Behaviour, 14(5), 1083-94.
[23] Santrock, J.W. (2005). Adolescence.4th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill.
[24] Shams, M., Parhikar, S., Mousavizadeh, A. & Majdpour, M. (2017). Mothers view about sexual health education fortheir adolescents daughters: A qualitative study. Journal of Reproductive Health, 14(24), 1-7.
[25] Shonkoff, J.P., Garner, A.S., Siegel, B.S., Dobbins, M.I., Earls, M.F., McGuinn, L., Pascoe, J., & Wood, D.L. (2012). Technical report: The lifelong effects of early childhood adversity and toxic stress, Pediatrics, 129, 232–46.
[26] United Nations Children Fund. (2012). Adolescents, an age of opportunity. New York: UNICEF. https://www.unicef.org.
[27] World Health Organization. (2012). Preventing early pregnancy and reproductive outcomes among adolescents in developing countries. Geneva: WHO

OLUSANYA Oyewole Omoniyi “Influence of Family Background Characteristics on Parent-Child Sexual Health Communication in South-West Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.48-54 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/48-54.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Violence on Traditional Religious Artifacts by Christians during Evangelism/Crusades in Igbo land of Nigeria 2000-2017: A Historical Discourse

Professor Luke E. Ugwueye & Dr. Eusebius S. Adim December 2020 Page No.: 55-60

One of the fundamental obligations of Christians is preaching and spreading of the gospel of Jesus Christ for the purpose of conversion. In Igbo land of Nigeria, this quest for preaching has been on the increase with more Christians becoming extraordinarily zealous to evangelize all kinds of people by ‘fire or by force’. However, one disturbing thing is that some evangelism crusades organized in some areas are characterized by violent attacks on traditional religious artifacts. The main reason put forward for these attacks include the belief that traditional religious artifacts hinder the people’s progress because they (the artifacts) carry with them the heathen evils of traditional idolatry. A historical discourse of such evangelism crusades held in Amansea, Ugbenu, Oraukwu, Igboukwu etc bear marks of violent attack on traditional religious artifacts. Evangelism in itself is not the problem but the deployment of physical violence and verbal attacks on the artifacts of traditional religious adherents. It is discovered that this brand of Christian evangelism is becoming offensive and irritating to some concerned traditionalists who are at the receiving end. A situation as this when unaddressed could trigger off dangerous crises and reprisal attacks capable of destabilizing the peace of the society. In addition to this, the study found out that violence on traditional artifacts obliterates history, culture, arts, religion, piety and impedes robust cross fertilization of ideas between old and the new. As great and rich symbolic repository of knowledge, artifacts provide successive generations with abundant information about how, why, what, when and where they are coming from in a variety of ways; their destruction is a regrettable loss to every society.

Page(s): 55-60                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 23 December 2020

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41204

 Professor Luke E. Ugwueye
Religion and Human Relations, Faculty of Arts, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, PMB 5025 Awka, Anambra State-Nigeria

  Dr. Eusebius S. Adim
Religion and Human Relations, Faculty of Arts, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, PMB 5025 Awka, Anambra State-Nigeria

[1] Arinze, F. C. (2014). Christianity meets Igbo Traditional Religion. In A. K. Njoku & E.
[2] Uzukwu (Eds.). Interface between Igbo Theology and Christianity, 10-19. Britain: Cambridge scholars publishing.
[3] Brown D., (2009). The Lost Symbol. USA: Doubleday Clemens R., Sarscha P. and Sheeza S. (2015). Erasing history: Ancient Artifacts Destroyed Retrieved 16th September, 2019 from https://www.rom.on.ca/en/blog/erasing-history-ancient-artifacts-destroyed
[4] Freitheim, T. (2004). God and violence in the Old Testament. Retrieved 29th July 2017 from
http:// God-and-violence-in-the-old-testament.
[5] Forson, A. (2014). The mandate of evangelism. Retrieved 9th August, 2017 from http://foundationforendtimerepentance.org/index.php/events/8-blog/82-the-mandate-of-evangelism.
[6] Hollinghurst,S.(2015).Isevangelismethical?Retrieved20th August,2017 from http://www.churcharmy.org/Articles/425849/News/Blog/Is_evangelism_ethical.aspx
[7] Inman T. (2014). Ancient pagan and modern Christian symbolism. USA: Loki Publisher
[8] Kalu, O. U. (2003). The Embattled God; Christianization of Igboland, 1841-1991. Eritrea:African world press, Inc.
[9] Metuh I. E. (1987). Comparative Studies of African Traditional Religion. Onitsha: Imico Publishers
[10] Naylor, M. (2004). Cross-cultural impact for the 21st Century:17. Interfaith dialogue in evangelical mission (part 1). Retrieved 22nd October, 2017 from http://impact.nbseminary.com/17-interfaith-dialogue-in-evangelical-missions-part-i/.
[11] Robeck, C. M. (1996). Mission and issue of proselytism. In G. H. Anderson, J. M. Philips &
[12] R. T. Coote (Eds.). International bulletin of missionary research, 2-9. U.S.A: Overseas Ministries Study Center.
[13] Scott, J. M. (1997). Exile and the self-understanding of diaspora Jews in the Greco-Roman
[14] Period. In J. M. Scott (Ed.) Exile: Old Testament, Jewish and Christian conceptions, 173-219. Leiden: Brill.
[15] Sweet, L. (2005) Glory crowns the mercy seat: towards an abductivehomiletic.Retrieved 17thNovember 2017from http://www.webct.georgefox.edu/script/LEC3MOD2/scripts/serve_home:internet.
[16] Young, P. (2013). Principles of Church growth. Cape Town: Publications of Paul Young.
[17] Ugwueye, L. E. (2019). Prophets and Prophecy in the Old Testament. Asaba, Delta: His Bride Publishers

Professor Luke E. Ugwueye & Dr. Eusebius S. Adim, “Violence on Traditional Religious Artifacts by Christians during Evangelism/Crusades in Igbo land of Nigeria 2000-2017: A Historical Discourse” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.55-60 December 2020  DOI : http://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41204

Download PDF

pdf

Militia Counterinsurgency: Implications of Pro-government Militia Participation in Counterinsurgency in Northeast Nigeria

Modu Lawan Gana – December 2020 Page No.: 61-66

This article analyzed the implications of pro-government militias’ participation in the counterinsurgency operation in northeast Nigeria. The militias that that has been engaged in the counterinsurgency operation since 2013 appeared influential in the reduction of the Islamist Boko Haram hostilities in the northeast. Prior to the pro-government militia participation, the counterinsurgency campaign of the State is challenged with lackadaisical performances. However, even as the militias are successful, there is still growing fear that the continued engagement of the militias has adverse consequences on the autonomy of the state and the community. This case study, therefore, investigated the implications of the militias’ involvement in the counterinsurgency operation in Yobe State of northeast Nigeria. The empirical data collected through the techniques of an in-depth interview, focus group discussion, and on the site non-participatory observation. The primary data was triangulated with secondary data from published materials. The study revealed that in the absence of urgent authoritative action to regularize the militias, they will post imminent threats to the stability of the state and their immediate communities. In addition to the instigation of ethnic polarization, the militia will incubate internal feuds, hence destabilizing the peace situation of the communities. The study recommends the government to take urgent measures to verify the participants and weed bad eggs among them. The government should also provide legal procedures for their operations and recruitment process to curtail abuse and excessiveness.

Page(s): 61-66                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 23 December 2020

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41205

 Modu Lawan Gana
Department of Public Administration, Mai Idris Alooma Polytechnic, Geidam, Yobe State, Nigeria

[1] Agbiboa, D. (2015). Resistance to Boko Haram: Civilian Joint Task Forces in North-Eastern Nigeria Conflict Studies Quarterly. Conflict Studies Quarterly, Special Issue 3–22.
[2] Agbiboa, E. D. (2020): Vigilante Youths and Counterinsurgency in Northeastern Nigeria: The Civilian Joint Task Force, Oxford Development Studies, DOI: 10.1080/13600818.2020.1837093
[3] Bamidele, O. (2016). Civilian Joint Task Force’ (CJTF) – A Community Security Option: A Comprehensive and Proactive Strategy to Counter-Terrorism. Journal for Deradicalization, Vol. 7, pp. 124–144.
[4] Falode, J.A. (2016). The Nature of Nigeria’s Boko Haram War, 2010-2015: A Strategic Analysis, Perspectives on Terrorism Vol. 10.1, pp. 41-52.
[5] Gana M.L. (2020). Militia Counterinsurgency. Perspective on the Motivations of Civilian Joint Task Force Militia Participation in Northern Nigeria. RUDN Journal of Public Administration; Vol.7 (2): 124–134. DOI: 10.22363/2312 8313-2020-7-2-124-134
[6] Gana, M.L (2019). Militia Participation in Counterinsurgency: The Impetus of Civilian Joint Task Force Participation in Combating Boko Haram in Nigeria, RUDN Journal of Political Science, Vol.21.3, pp.460-469
[7] Gana, M.L (2020). Strategy of Civilian Joint Task Force Militia in Combating Boko Haram in Northern Nigeria, International Journal of Legal Studies, Vol. 1 (7), 345-360 DOI: 10.5604/01.3001.0014.3126
[8] Gana, M.L., Samsu, K. H & Ismail, M.M (2018a). Counterinsurgency Responses in Nigeria: Unveiling the Constraining Challenges, International Journal of Arts Humanities and Social Sciences Vol. 3.6, pp. 1-8
[9] Gana, M.L., Samsu, K.H & Ismail, M.M. (2018b). Population-Centric Counterinsurgency: The Conduit for Ending Boko Haram Insurgency in Nigeria’s North. European Journal of Behavioral Sciences, 1 (4): 8-13.
[10] Gana, M.L., Samsu, K.H & Ismail, M.M. (2019). Civil Disobedience to Violent Extremism: Understanding Boko Haram in Nigeria, International Journal of Research in Social Sciences, Vol. 8(1), 1-5,
[11] Global Terrorism Database (GTD), 1970–2015. Available at http://www.start.umd.edu/gtd
[12] Global Terrorism Index. (2015). Measuring and Understanding the Impacts of Terrorism, The Institute for Economics and Peace
[13] Hughes, G. (2016). Militias in Internal Warfare: From the Colonial Era to the Contemporary Middle East, Small Wars & Insurgencies, Vol. 27.2, pp. 196-225
[14] International Crises Group (2017). Watchmen of Lake Chad: Vigilante Groups Fighting Boko Haram Africa Report N° 244,
[15] International Crises Group. (2014). Curbing Violence in Nigeria (II): The Boko Haram Insurgency. International Crises Group. Africa Report N° 216
[16] Matfess, H. (2016). Institutionalizing Instability: The Constitutional Roots of Insecurity in Nigeria’s Fourth Republic. Stability: International Journal of Security & Development, Vol. 5.1, 13, pp. 1-19,
[17] Omenma, J.T & Hendricks, C.M (2018). Counterterrorism in Africa: an Analysis of the Civilian Joint Task Force and Military Partnership in Nigeria. Security Journal, 31(3), 764–794.
[18] Onuoha, C.F (2014). A Danger not to Nigeria Alone. Boko Haram’s Transnational Reach and Regional Response. Fredrick Stifung Regional Office, Abuja
[19] Onuoha, F. C. (2012). Reports Boko Haram: Nigeria’s Extremist Islamic Sect. Al-Jazeera Centre for Studies.
[20] Onuoha, F.C & Oyowele, S. (2018). Anatomy of Boko Haram: The Rise and Decline of a Violent Group in Nigeria, Aljezeera Center for Studies, p. 1-10
[21] Raheem, S.O (2015). Boko Haram: The Menace of Small Arms and Light Weapons Proliferation in Nigeria. International Academic Journal of Education, Vol.1.1, pp. 16-33
[22] Reno, W. (2002). The Politics of Insurgency in Collapsing States. Development and Change Vol. 33.5, pp. 837–858
[23] Steinert, C. V., Steinert, J. I., & Carey, S. C. (2018). Spoilers of peace. Journal of Peace Research, pp.1-15 https://doi.org/10.1177/0022343318800524
[24] Weinstein, J. (2006). Inside Rebellion: the politics of insurgent violence, Cambridge: CUP

Modu Lawan Gana “Militia Counterinsurgency: Implications of Pro-government Militia Participation in Counterinsurgency in Northeast Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.61-66 December 2020  DOI : http://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41205

Download PDF

pdf

Adapting to E-Learning Teaching during Covid-19 School Closure: It’s Effect on Physics Students’ Achievement

Dr. Francis Elochukwu Ikeh, Felicia Ugwu Chinyere, Victor Ajah, Olaniyi Owolawi- December 2020 Page No.: 67-70

The sudden outbreak of coronavirus disease also known as COVID-19 in the world has become a major public health issues for many countries leading to total lockdown of most of the human activities in various parts of the world especially in Nigeria educational sector. This lockdown of educational activities in the country necessitated the investigation of effect e-learning teaching on students’ achievement in Physics during covid-19 school closure.The study employed quasi experimental design of pretest posttest non-equivalent control design. The population of the study consist of 3264 Senior Secondary Two (SS1I) Physics students in Awka education zone of Anambra State, Nigeria. Sample size of 332 SS2 Physics students were used for the study. A 40-item Physics Achievement Test developed by the researchers was used for the study. Face and content validation of the instrument was established. Reliability coefficient of .89 was obtained for the instrument using Kuder-Richardson (KR-20) 20. Data obtained were analyzed using means and standard deviations in answering all the research questions while analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to test the formulated hypotheses at 0.05 level of significance. Findings of the study revealed that; students exposed to e-learning teaching had higher mean achievement scores compared to students exposed to conventional method; there was no significant difference in the mean achievement score of male and female students in Physics.

Page(s): 67-70                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 24 December 2020

 Dr. Francis Elochukwu Ikeh
Department of Science Education, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria

  Felicia Ugwu Chinyere
Department of Science Education, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria

  Victor Ajah
Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria

  Olaniyi Owolawi
Department of Science Education, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria

[1] Adeoye, I. A., Adanikin, A. F. &Adanikin, A. (2020). COVID-19 and e-learning: Nigeria tertiary education system experience. International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science, 5 (5) 28-31
[2] Comerchero, M. (2006). E-learning concepts and technique. Retrieved frompberman@bloomu.edu
[3] Kumar, N. &Bajpai, R.P. (2015). Impact of e-learning on achievement motivation and academic performance: A case study of college students in Sikkim. Retrieved from https://ir.inflibnet.ac.in/bitstream/1944/1877/1/38.pdf
[4] Lawal, B.K., Haruna,A., Kurfi, F.S. & David, K. B. (2020). COVID-19 pandemic and pharmacy education in a developing country: A case study from Nigeria. Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/344156984_COVID-19_pandemic_and_pharmacy_education_in_a_developing_country_A_case_study_from_Nigeria
[5] Mohamad, R. (2014). Students’ perspective on the effectiveness of using e-learning. Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/275543572_A_Study_on_the_Student’s_Perspective_on_the_Effectiveness_of_Using_e-learning
[6] Musawi, A.S.A. (2011). Redefining technology role in education. Creative Education, 2 (2) 130-135
[7] Shahzad, A., Hassan, R., Aremu, A.Y., Hussain, A. &Lodhi, R.N. (2020). Effects of COVID‑19 in e‑learning on higher education institution students: the group comparison between male and female. Retrieved from https://covid19.elsevierpure.com/it/publications/effects-of-covid-19-in-e-learning-on-higher-education-institution

Dr. Francis Elochukwu Ikeh, Felicia Ugwu Chinyere, Victor Ajah, Olaniyi Owolawi “Adapting to E-Learning Teaching during Covid-19 School Closure: It’s Effect on Physics Students’ Achievement” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.67-70 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/67-70.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Managerial Economics- Demand and Supply

Kwesi A. Sakyi – December 2020 Page No.: 71-74

In this article, the author explores in a short communication the concepts of demand and supply in relationship to the price mechanism as well as the need for Keynesian market intervention. He further explores the philosophical underpinnings of the idea of the welfare state with regard to merit goods and general wellbeing of citizens.

Page(s): 71-74                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 24 December 2020

  Kwesi A. Sakyi
ZCAS University, P.O. Box 35243, Dedan Kimathi Road, Lusaka, Zambia

Baye, M. (2010) Managerial Economics and Business Strategy, (7th ed.). Boston: McGraw-Hill Irwin
[2] Beardshaw, J., Brewster, D., Cormick, P. & Ross, A (2001) Economics- A Student’s GuideHarlow, England: FT Prentice Hall (p. 37 and pp. 348-350)
[3] Begg, D., Vernasca, G., Fischer, S. & Dornbusch, R. (2013) Economics Maidenhead, Berkshire: McGraw Hill (pp. 166-188)
[4] Begg, D., Vernasca, G., Fischer, S. & Dornbusch, R. (2011) Economics Maidenhead, Berkshire: McGraw Hill (pp.144-169)
[5] Frank, K.H. & Bernanke, B.S. (2007) Principles of Economics New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Company Limited (pp.288-289)
[6] Froeb, L. M. and McCann, B. T. (2009) Managerial Economics: A Problem-Solving Approach, (2nd ed.) Boston: Cengage Learning EMEA.
[7] Gough, J. (2000) Introductory Economics for Business and Management. New York, N.Y: McGraw-Hill
[8] Grant, S.J. (2008) Stanlake’s Introductory Economics Harlow, Essex: Pearson Education
[9] Hayes, A. (n.d.) Economics Basics: Supply and Demand [Online] Retrieved from https://www.investopedia.com/university/economics/economics3.asp
[10] Investopedia (n.d.) Sensitivity Analysis [Online] Retrieved from https://www.investopedia.com/terms/s/sensitivityanalysis.asp
[11] Keat, P.G., Young, P.K.Y. & Erfle, S.E. (2013) Managerial Economics (7th ed.) London: Pearson Education
[12] Lipsey, R. & Chrystal, A. (2010) Economics (12th ed.) Oxford: Oxford University Press (pp. 123-140)
[13] Mankiw, N.G. (2008) Principles of Economics London: Cengage Learning (pp. 258-277)
[14] Peterson H.C and Lewis W.C (1999) Managerial Economics 4th Edition Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 USA
[15] Pindyck, R. S. and Rubinfeld, D. L. (2013) Microeconomics (International Edition, 8th ed.). London: Prentice Hall
[16] Salvatore, D. (2014) Managerial Economics in a Global Economy (8th ed.) Oxford: Oxford University Press
[17] Sloman, T. & Garratt, D. (2010) Essentials of Economics (5th ed.) Harlow, Essex: Pearson
[18] Study.com (n.d.) Relevant & Irrelevant Costs Definitions & Examples [Online] Retrieved from https://study.com/academy/lesson/relevant-irrelevant-costs-definitions-examples.html
[19] Watkins, T. (n.d.) Comparative Statics Analysis [Online] Retrieved fromhttp://www.applet-magic.com/compstat.htm Education (pp.85-96)
[20] Witztum, A. (2005) Economics – An Analytical Introduction Oxford: Oxford University Press (pp. 102-153)

Kwesi A. Sakyi “Managerial Economics- Demand and Supply” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.71-74 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/71-74.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

An Investigation of Management of Football: A Case of Selected Schools in Livingstone District

Caphers Mizinga – December 2020 Page No.: 75-80

This study is an investigation into management of football in Zambian secondary schools; a case of selected Secondary Schools in Livingstone District. The objectives of this study is: to find out how LDSA Executive members get into management positions and to find out how secondary school education managers and administrators can work to improve management practices in the management of football in Livingstone District. The purpose of the study was to investigate factors that affect management of football in selected secondary schools in Livingstone District and to provide educational management and administrators in secondary schools with strategies that lead to finding solutions to mismanagement practices of football in Livingstone District. A mixed methods approach, of both qualitative and quantitative paradigms, was employed, although the qualitative paradigm was dominant. The sample of the study was 128 people, composed of five Livingstone District Sports Association Executive members, 1 Senior Education Standard Officer, 1 Education Standard Officer, 1 District Head Teachers representative, 20 Secondary School Sports Coordinators; 20 Secondary School Sports Teachers(coaches), 40 pupils (football players) and 40 spectators from the community. Purposive sampling was employed in this study. The study revealed that LDSA Executive members got into management positions through elections. The study concluded that the various problems could be overcome by serious involvement and unity of purpose by all stakeholders. The study recommended that LDSA executive be selected based on their qualification in sports management and once selected they must use the fourteen principles and five functions of management.

Page(s): 75-80                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 December 2020

  Caphers Mizinga
PhD. Educational Management and Administration, David Livingstone College of Education.

[1] Byrnes, J and Humble, A (2007) An Introduction to Mixed Method Research: Atlantic Research Centre: Mount Vincent University
[2] Locke, E. A. (1982). The ideas of Frederick W. Taylor: an evaluation. Academy of Management Review, 7(1), 14-24.
[3] Mc Burn D.Il (2010). Research Methods (8th ed) United States of America: Wadsworth Thom
[4] McKinnon, A. (2003). The Impact of Scientific Management on Contemporary New Zealand Business. (Unpublished). Retrieved on 20th July, 2020 from http://homepages.inspire.net.net.nz/-jamckinnon/business.
[5] Mhlanga, E and Ncube, J.E (2003) Research Methods and Statistics: Module DEA60: Harare:ZOU.
[6] Rollinson, D. (2005). Organisational behaviour and analysis: An integrated approach. Essex, UK:Pearson Education
[7] Taylor, F. W. (1911). The principles of scientific management. New York: Harper andBrothers.
[8] Walliman, N (2009) Your Research Project (2nd Ed) London: Sage.

Caphers Mizinga, “An Investigation of Management of Football: A Case of Selected Schools in Livingstone District” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.75-80 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/75-80.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Tragedy of Infertile Women of Hindu Society; Study of Middle Class Family of Kathmandu

Bishnu Prasad Dahal, Ph. D.- December 2020 Page No.: 81-87

Infertility is perceived as only a medical problem in Nepalese society and there are no formal data of infertility. It is also a social problem in our society as cultural customs and perceived religious dictums may equate infertility with failure on a personal, interpersonal, or social level. It is imperative that people have adequate knowledge about infertility so couples can seek timely medical care and misconceptions can be rectified. In this paper the aim of this article is to assess the knowledge, perception and myths regarding infertility prevailing among middle class family of Kathmandu.
Ethnographic study was carried out in Kathmandu by interviewing a sample of 30 women who were accompanying the patients at three fertility centers in Kathmandu. They were interviewed in consultation with infertility specialists. The appropriate knowledge of infertility was found very poor amongst the participants. 40% of respondents identified the infertility is a pathological and only 60% knew about the fertile period in women’s cycle. Uses of emergency pills, late marriage, isolation of couples due to migrations etc are the causes of infertility were found during the study. Despite these, cultural beliefs, traditions, religious faith, myths etc are also found the important causes of infertility was found in study. Beliefs in cultural factors like evil forces and supernatural powers as a cause of infertility are also still prevalent especially amongst respondents though they are educated. Knowledge about infertility is limited in the population and a lot of misconceptions and myths are prevalent in the society. Alternative medicine is a popular option for seeking infertility treatment. The cultural and religious perspective about assisted reproductive technologies is unclear, which has resulted in its reduced acceptability.

Page(s): 81-87                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 December 2020

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41206

 Bishnu Prasad Dahal, Ph. D.
Anthropology, Patan Multiple Campus, Patan Dhoka Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, Nepal

[1] Agadjanian,, V. 2001 Religion, Social Milieu, and the Contraceptive Revolution, Population Studies, 559( 20), 135-148
[2] Alesna-Llanto and Raymundo, 2005 Contraceptive issues of youth and adolescents in developing countries: highlights from the Philippines and other Asian countries, Adolescent Medicine Clinics, 16(3):645-63.
[3] Belliappa, J.L. 2013 Gender, Class and Reflexive Modernity in India, Genders and Sexualities in the Social Sciences,MacMillion
[4] Bergstrom, S. 1992 Reproductive failure as a health priority in the third world: a review. East African Medical Journal, 69(4):174-80.
[5] Bharadwaj, A. 2003 why adoption is not an option in India: the visibility of infertility, the secrecy of donor insemination, and other cultural complexities. Social Science and Medicine 56:1867–80.
[6] Blanchet, T. 1984 Women, Pollution and Marginality: Meaning and Rituals of Birth in Rural Bangladesh, University Press, Dhaka.
[7] Boivin, J., Bunting, L., Collins, J. A., Nygren, K. G. 2007 International estimates of infertility prevalence and treatment-seeking: potential need and demand for infertility medical care,. Human Reproduction, 22(6):1506-12.
[8] Butler, P.A. 2003 Progress in Reproductive Health Research No. 63. Geneva: World Health Organization
[9] Culley, L. Rapport, F., Katbamna, S., Johnson, M., Hudson, N. 2004 A Study of the Provision of Infertility Services to South Asian Communities, De Montfort University, Leicester, Bedford
[10] Dierickx, P., Laake, L.W.V., Geijsen, N. 2018 Circadian clocks: from stem cells to tissue homeostasis and regeneration, EMBO. Rep. 19(1):18-28.
[11] Dyer, S. J., Abraham, N., Hoffman, M., Van der Spy, Z. M. 2002 Infertility in south Africa: women’s reproductive health knowledge and treatment-seeking behaviour for involuntary childlessness. Hum Reprod., 17:1663–1668
[12] Ericksen, K.., Brunette, T. 1996 Patterns and predictors of infertility among African women: A cross-national survey of twenty-seven nations,” Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), 209-220
[13] Feldman-Savelsberg, P. 1999 Plundered Kitchens, Empty Wombs: Threatened Reproduction and Identity in the Cameroon Grass fields. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press.
[14] Fisher, J. A., Bowman, M., and Thomas, T. 2003 Issues for south Asian Indian patients surrounding sexuality, fertility, and childbirth in the US health care system. Journal of the American Board of Family Practice 16:151–5.
[15] Gerrits, T. 1997 Social and cultural aspects of infertility in Mozambique, Patient Education
[16] Guntupalli, A.M., Chenchelgudem, P. 2004 Perceptions, causes and consequences of infertility among the Chenchu tribe of India, Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology, 22,(4), 249-259
[17] Health in Bangladesh, Proceedings: Workshop on Implementation Women’s Health Programs in the Community: The Bangladesh Experience BRAC, Dhaka
[18] Hollos, M.., Larsen, U., Obono, O., Whitehouse, B. 2009 The Problem of Infertility in High Fertility Populations: Meanings, Consequences and Coping Mechanisms in Two Nigerian Communities Social Science & Medicine, 68, 2061–2068
[19] Inhorn, M. C. 1994 Quest for Conception: Gender, Infertility, and Egyptian Medical Tradition University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia
[20] Jindal, U..N., Gupta, A. 1989 Social problems of infertile women in India, International Journal of Fertility. 34:30-33.
[21] Low, B.S. 2001 Why sex matters, Princeton University Press
[22] McQuillan, J., Greil, A., & Shreffler, K. 2011 Pregnancy intentions among women who do not try: focusing on women who are okay either way. Journal of Maternal & Child Health, 15, 178-187.
[23] Naab, F., Brown, ,R., Heidrich, S. 2013 Psychosocial health of infertile Ghanaian women and their infertility beliefs, Journal of Nursing Scholarship,45(2):132-40
[24] Nahar, P., Richters, A. 2011 Suffering of childless women in Bangladesh: the intersection of social identities of gender and class, Anthropology & Medicine, 18:3, 327-338
[25] Neff, D. L. 1994 The social construction of infertility: the case of the matrilineal Nayars in New York.
[26] Nene, U. A., Coyaji, K., Apte, H. 2005 Infertility: a label of choice in the case of sexually dysfunctional couples. Patient Education and Counseling 59:234–9.
[27] Parikh, I., Taskar, V., Dharap, N. 1996 Gynaecological morbidity among women in a Bombay slum. (Unpublished)
[28] Richards, G. 2002. The Psychology of Psychology: A Historically Grounded Sketch, Staffordshire University 12(1), 7-36
[29] Riessman, C. K. 2000 Stigma and everyday resistance practices: childless women in South India. Gender and Society. 14(1):111- 135.
[30] Shahmanesh, M., Gayed, S., Ashcroft, M. (et al) 2000 Geo mapping of Chlamydia and Gonorrhoea in Birmingham. Sexually Transmitted Infections 76:268–72.
[31] Subedi, S., Lamichhane, S., Chhetry, M. 2016 Study of Infertile Couples Attending a Teaching Hospital in Eastern Nepal, Journal of Nepal Medical Association, 55(203):22-25
[32] Unisa, S. 1999 Childlessness in Andhra Pradesh, India: treatment-seeking and consequences. Reproductive Health Matters 7(13):54-64.
[33] Vayena, E., Rowe, P., Griffin, P. D. (eds) 2002 Current Practices and Controversies in Assisted Reproduction report of a WHO meeting. Geneva: World Health Organization
[34] Vayena, E., Rowe, P.., Griffin, P. D. (eds) 2002 Current Practices and Controversies in Assisted Reproduction: report of a WHO meeting. Geneva: World Health Organization
[35] WHO 1991 Infertility: A Tabulation of Available Data on Prevalence of Obstetrics. 46(2):181-87
[36] WHO 2003 En-gendering the Millennium Development Goals on Health, Geneva: World Health Organization.
[37] Wijeyaratne, C. N., Balen, A.H., Barth ,J.H., Belchetz, P.E. 2002 Clinical manifestations and insulin resistance in polycystic ovary syndrome among south Asians and Caucasians: is there a difference? Clinical Endocrinology 57:343–50.

Bishnu Prasad Dahal, Ph. D. “Tragedy of Infertile Women of Hindu Society; Study of Middle Class Family of Kathmandu” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.81-87 December 2020  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41206

Download PDF

pdf

The Use of Didactic Material in Competence Base Approach to Overcome Students

Prof. Agborbechem Peter Tambi, Bafon Richard Mkong – December 2020 Page No.: 88-102

Educationists and curriculum designers are constantly looking for ways to ameliorate his living condition on earth. This explains why in the educational field, pedagogic methods and techniques always undergo modifications. In Cameroon, pedagogic methods of teaching have revolved from teaching using dogmatic method to teaching using objective method‖ and recently to teaching using the competency-based approach (CBA). Competency based education was introduced in French speaking African countries in 1996, during the Conference of Ministers of Education in Yaounde and in Cameroon in July 2012. Teaching Geography otherwise: which approach for which context? This write up focuses on the second axis from passive to active pedagogy. This approach (CBA) was introduced in Cameroon partly because of the failure to meet the educational expectations using teaching by objective. Competency based approach was acclaimed as a more effective approach to teaching and learning due to its envisaged benefits in enhancing the acquisition of knowledge and competences. Overcoming learners ‘attitude on the difficulty in the teaching and learning of Physical Geography (plate tectonics) is a necessity especially with the implementation of the new innovative approach (CBA), which is a learner centered approach. Students sometimes develop misconceptions about a topic because they did not understand the lesson that was taught. Plate tectonics is a technical aspect of physical geography and since most students have little knowledge about this topic, they feel that the topic is a difficult one. This research study is interested in assessing how CBA can be used in overcoming learners ‘attitude on the difficulties faced in the teaching and learning of plate tectonics in Form three. This research work is therefore of significance to students, teachers and to the educational world.
This study will focus on the cognitive and socio constructivist theories of learning. Socio constructivist theory of learning is a product of socio cognitive activities linked to the didactic exchanges between teacher-students and students-students. Cognitive theory stipulates that learning takes place using memory, motivation, and reasoning. The methods which will be used in collecting data are qualitative and quantitative methods, classroom observations, sampling with the use of questionnaires, key informant interviews and focus group discussions. Data shall be analyzed via Microsoft excel and SPSS. At the end of this research work, the researcher will propose strategies and methods which can be used in overcoming learners ‘attitude on the difficulties in the teaching and learning of plate tectonics using CBA in Form three.

Page(s): 88-102                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 December 2020

  Prof. Agborbechem Peter Tambi
Dean Faculty of Education, University of Buea Cameroon

  Bafon Richard Mkong
Faculty of education, Department of Curriculum and Evaluation The University of Yaounde I, Cameroon

[1] Anderson, C. M., & Kwowolth D. (2001). Applying behavior analysis to school violence and discipline problems: School wide positive behavior support. The Behavior Analyst, 28, 49-64
[2] Alain, M, Barbara D, (2002). Didactic approach to interdisciplinarity.
[3] Ajongake, A, (2010), learning theories and the practice of teaching, 9p.
[4] Aimzlam T et al. (2015), Theory and Practice of Competency Based Approach in Education, 191p, M.A. dissertation.
[5] Ambei, M, Kum (2018). The competency-based curriculum implementation appraisal from the perspective teachers of teacher use of resources
[6] Auerbach, E. R. (1986). Competency‐Based ESL: One step forward or two steps back? TESOL Quarterly, 20, (2), 411-430.
[7] Belibi, Enama P.R. (2018) «Competency-based English language teaching in Cameroon
[8] Francophone secondary schools: Peculiarities, challenges and solutions». In L.N. Afutendem,
[9] Berardo, S.A. (2006). The use of authentic materials in teaching of reading. Retrieved from: www.readingmatrix.com
[10] Boudouda S et al. (2012), Algeria, Problems facing teachers in implementing the Competency Based Approach in teaching writing. Master thesis, 93p.
[11] Burrow, S. (1993) ‘National Competency Standards for the Teaching Profession: A Chance to
[12] Define the Future of Schooling or a Re-affirmation of the Past?’, in C. Collins (ed.) Competencies: The Competency Debate in Australian Education and Training, pp.109-116. Deakin: Australian College of Education.
[13] Candeias, A. A.; Rebelo, N.; Oliveira, M. & Mendes, P. (2012). Pupils‟ attitudes and motivation toward learning and school – Study of exploratory modes on the effects of socio demographics, personal attitudes and school characteristics. Portugal: Centre of Research in Education and Psychology, University of Evora.
[14] Candeias, A. A., Rebelo, N. & Oliveira, M. (2013). Students‟ attitudes toward learning and School-study of exploratory models about the effects of socio-demographics and personal attributes.
[15] Crawford, J. (1995). The Role of Materials in the Language Classroom: Finding the balance, in The Erica Garvey‟s reading text for Language Teaching Methodologies, NCELTR, p: 28-31
[16] Dellit, J. (1993) ‘Key Competencies and Schooling in South Australia’, in C. Collins (ed.)
[17] Competencies: The Competency Debate in Australian Education and Training, pp.57-68. Deakin: Australian College of Education
[18] Gafoor, K.A (2013). Introduction to Educational Measurement and evaluation. Types and phases of Evaluation in educational practice.
[19] Garrette, N. (2000), Oxford advanced geography, website www.ou.com
[20] Geography; An integrated approach 3rd edition David Waugh (updated 2005) 656p, website www.nelsonthornes/secondary/geography/gaia
[21] Geography syllabus, (December 2018), inspectorate of pedagogy for the social sciences. Secondary general education for Forms 3.4 and 5classes
[22] Geography syllabus, (2014), inspectorate of pedagogy for the social sciences. Secondary general education.
[23] George, C, (2016), Challenges in implementing competency based approach ; the case of English language teachers of francophone secondary school Yaoundé. 98
[24] Greg, H & Hitchcock, N (2017). Competency-based education has a history and its history illuminates its limitation
[25] Guariento, W. and Morley, J. (2001). Text and text authenticity in the EFL classroom, Oxford University Press.
[26] Harrell, K. (2005). Attitude is everything. New York: Collins Publishers.
[27] Jordi P et al (2016). The introduction of a competence-based curriculum in Spain: From the Primary school to the training of teachers 19p.
[28] Kozma, R. (1994). Will Media influence learning: Reframing the debate, Educational Teachnology and Devolopment. Retrived: anitacrawley. net. Articles.
[29] Lassonde Kendeou, et al. (2016). Refutation texts: Overcoming psychology misconceptions that are resistant to change. Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Psychology Moskowitz,
[30] Larsen, K (2006), Measuring mastery: best practices for assessment in competency-based education. Center on higher education reform. Pearson: Center for College & Career Success-
[31] Lassen, S. R.; Steele, M. M. & Sailor, W. (2006). The relationship of school-wide positivebehavior support to academic achievement in an urban middle school. Psychology in the school. 43(6), 171-183.
[32] Little, D.G. & Singleton, D. M. (1988) authentic materials and the role of fixed support in Language teaching towards a manual for Language Learners. https//files.eric. ed.gov.
[33] Mitchell, T. (2015). Guidance to competency based education experimental site released.
[34] Home Room, the official blog of the U.S. Department of Education.Available from http://www.ed.gov/blog/2015/09/guidance-for-competency-based-education-experimental
[35] Mrowicki, L. (1986). Project work English competency-based curriculum. Portland, OR: Northwest Educational Cooperative. Page 144 – Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching.
[36] Nforbi, E and Martin B. Siewoue (2015) «Perspectives for the competence-based approach with entry through real life situations in the teaching of English in Cameroon francophone secondary schools». Cameroon Journal of Language Education 1: 1 – 18.
[37] Nkwetisama, C.M. (2012). The Competency Based Approach to English Language Education and the Walls between the Classroom and the Society in Cameroon: Pulling Down the Walls. ISSN 1799-2591 Theory and Practice in Language Studies, Vol. 2, No. 3, pp. 516-52 Academy Publisher
[38] Nwana, M et al, (2009). Cameroon, Basic themes in physical and practical geography for secondary schools.249p,
[39] OECD (2005). The Definition and Selection of Key Competences. Executive Summary. OECD
[40] Equity and Quality in Education: Supporting disadvantaged Students and Schools, Paris: OECD Publishing.
[41] OCDE. Organización para la Cooperación y Desarrollo Económicos. La definición y selección de competencias claves: resumen ejecutivo. París: OCDE, 2002.
[42] Richards, J. C., & Rodgers, T. S. (2014). Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
[43] Roegiers, X. (2001). Une Pédagogie de L’intégration : Compétences et intégration des acquis Dans l’enseignement. (2nd ed.). Bruxelles : De Boeck
[44] Scallon,G . (2007), L’évaluation des apprentissages dans une approche par compétences pour concevoir et apprendre. Edition de boeck., Sainte-Foy. PUQ. 2007
[45] Scallon, G. (2007) Evaluation of learning in a competency-based approach. http://www.gnb. ca/000/francophone-f.asp Provincial Policy on the Evaluation of Learning
[46] Schwarz, G. and Cavener, L. A. (1994) ‘Outcome-Based Education and Curriculum Change: Advocacy, Practice and Critique’, Journal of Curriculum and Supervision 9(4): 326-338
[47] Spelleri, M (2002) From lesson to life: Authentic materials bridge the gap. Research gate. http//www.researchgate.net 1346
[48] Tanyi, N, C (2019), Teachers knowledge, understanding, ability and implementation of competency based approach in the teaching of Geography in secondary Grammar schools in the south west region of Cameroon. Published in international journal of trend of scientific research and development. ISSN: 2456 6470 Volume 3.
[49] Tanyi M. E. (2016). Major theories of learning; The process of why, how and When we learn, African publisher, second edition, Yaoundé, Cameroon.
[50] Tectonic Plates and Plate Boundaries – GNS Science: https://www.gns.cri.nz/Home/Learning/Science-Topics/Earthquakes/Earthquakes-at-a-Plate-Boundary/TectonicPlates-and-Plate-Boundaries 8/12/2018

Prof. Agborbechem Peter Tambi, Bafon Richard Mkong, “The Use of Didactic Material in Competence Base Approach to Overcome Students” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.88-102 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/88-102.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

A Critical Analysis of Treasury Single Account Policy in Nigeria

Chief Ajugwe, Chukwu Alphonsus PhD.- December 2020 Page No.: 103-110

One of the major objectives of establishing Treasury Single Account (TSA) scheme is anchored on the fact; it will wipe out corruption that is prevalent at the MDAs and instill accountability and internal control which is necessary for effective conduct of the monetary and fiscal policy surfeit. However, this objective has not been fully realized as corruption has become cancerous worm that has eaten deep into the fabric of the Nigeria society, and cannot be wiping out by a single policy. However, we cannot deny the fact that TSA has to some extent ameliorates corruption in the public establishments.
Despite the above observed rigidities, some key economic metrics have shown that the policy has created positive impacts on the fiscal and monetary policies: TSA makes it easier for tax collections through technology which confers seamless generation and expenditure of the public revenue. While it has aid the CBN in the management of the monetary policy such as reducing liquidity in the inter-bank market, through seamless management of market liquidity, ensuring monetary and price stability and more importantly reduces the use of Open Market Operation(OMO) and the consequent cost.
This paper will take a critical look on the TSA by analyzing the different theories posited by many financial thinkers, the positive impacts on the economy and the challenges that may prevent in realizing such economic advantages will be analyzed, and, positive recommendations will be proffered.

Page(s): 103-110                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 December 2020

 Chief Ajugwe, Chukwu Alphonsus PhD.

Ajugwe Chukwu and Associates

[1] Chijoke N, Ofum, Promise C, Onyibo, Queeneth E, Ahuche. “Impact of Treasury Single Account on Government Revenue and Economic Growth in Nigeria” A Pre-Post design Arabian Journal of Business and Management Review OMAN Chapter Vol 5 No 4 November 2015.
[2] Chukwurah, D.G., Emme, O.I. (2015) “Analysis of Pro and Cons of Treasury Single Account Policy in Nigeria”. Arabian Journal of Business Management review (OMAN Chapter) Vol 5 No 4 page 20.
[3] Charles Soludo (2015) “Is Nigeria Economy Stupid”: a lecture delivered at the 8th Annual Lecture Real News Magazine.
[4] Ekpo E, “A 21-Gun Salute for ‘Uncommon’ Economy “Tell Magazine, August 31, 2015.
[5] Grunberg, E and F. Madiglian (1954) “The Predictability of Social Event” Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press Vol. 62.
[6] https/en./Wikipedia.org/wiki/Treasury Single Account.
[7] https/daily post ng. /2015/11/13. “How Dino Melaye Misled the Senate on TSA Remmita”
[8] Ikya Emmanuel Agbe, Akaa Samuel Igbee. “Treasury single Account: Origin, Challenges, Lessons for Nigeria experience” Imperial Journal of Interdisciplinary Research (IJIR) 3. Issue 5, 2017
[9] Kingstey Imandojemu “Treasury Single Account System and Economic Juche: The Nigeria Experience” Bullion: Publication of Central Bank of Nigeria: Vol 40 No1- January –March2016.
[10] Onyekpere (2015) noted in Eme Okechukwu Innocent, Chukwurah Daniel C, Emmanuel N Ihennacho “An Analysis of Pro and Cons of Treasury Single Account Policy in Nigeria.
[11] Occasional Paper No. 61- (2017) Central Bank of Nigeria “The impact of Operating Treasury Single Account (TSA) On the Risk Profile of Banks in Nigeria”
[12] Pattanayak and Fainbaim (2010) “Treasury Single Account: An Essential Tool for Government Cash Management” Fiscal Affairs Department, Technical Notes International Monetary fund.
[13] Sailendra Patterayak, Israel Fainboin “Treasury single Account Directive: An Essential Tool for Government of Cash https/wen.info.org/external
[14] Udo J E and Esera I.E. (2016) “The New Treasury Single Account (TSA) by State Government of Nigeria: Benefit, Challenges and Proposals’”: Journal of Accounting Volume 4(3).
[15] Wikipedia (https//en.wikipedia.org./wiki/ Treasury –Account- Account.(2020)/

Chief Ajugwe, Chukwu Alphonsus PhD. “A Critical Analysis of Treasury Single Account Policy in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.103-110 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/103-110.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

A Critical Analysis of how Teachers Accommodate Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Zimbabwean Mainstream Primary Schools: An ethnographic study of Reigate District in Bulawayo Metropolitan province

Benny Chitsa PhD -December 2020 Page No.: 111-121

This qualitative study used ethnographic design (participant observation in conjunction with in-depth interviews) with purposive sampling method guided by the theoretical framework of Bronfenbrenner’s social ecological systems theory to closely analyze how teachers accommodate children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) in Zimbabwean mainstream primary schools. In-depth interviews with observations of 20 participants were used in this study. The study revealed that primary school teachers used aversive stimulus such as punishment, harsh or fame rebuke and sharp disapproval or criticism of autistic behaviour as a way of accommodating and controlling autistic children’s repetitive behaviours such as hand-flapping, rocking, jumping, spinning or twirling and complex body movements during the mainstream lesson. This study also revealed that lack of psychological knowledge to deal with autistic children, lack of teaching strategies, Autism learners’ social impairment, ASD learners’ communication or personal expression difficulty, inattentive and hyperactive behaviors, autistic children’s behavioral disorders, large class sizes and lack of appropriate resources were the teachers’ challenges in the teaching of children with ASD in mainstream primary schools. The study recommended that there is need for the Ministry of Primary and Secondary Education to ensure that teachers are adequately trained, developed and equipped with psychological knowledge and skills to deal with autistic children. There is need for the provision of school psychologists as a supportive way of stabilizing teachers’ perceptions in the teaching of children with ASD in regular classes and to emphasize the use of Teaching Assistants in the classroom to promote effective teaching of children with ASD. Finally, the study recommended that ASD pedagogy model, as a teaching device, should be researched and designed to promote effective teaching of children with ASD in mainstream.

Page(s): 111-121                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 December 2020

  Benny Chitsa PhD
Department of Psychology; Department of Education – Zimbabwe Open University

Adom, D., Yeboah, A. & Ankrah, A. K. (2016). Constructivism philosophical paradigm:
[2] Implication for research, teaching and learning. Global Journal of Arts Humanities and Social Sciences Vol 4, No.10, pp.1-9, ISSN: 2052-6350(Print), 2052-6369
[3] Ambady, K. G. & Mathew, S. (2018). Teachers’ perspectives on curriculum
[4] Accommodation for students with intellectual disability in inclusive setup. Conference paper: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/327580522
[5] American Psychiatric Association (2013). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing.
[6] American Psychiatric Association. (2012). Autism spectrum disorders. www.autismsocietycanda.
[7] Atkinson, P., Coffey, A., Delamont, S., Lofland, J. & Lofland, L. (2001). Handbook of Ethnography. London: Sage.
[8] Atkinson P. & Pugsley, L. (2005). Making sense of ethnography and medical education. Med Educ; 39(2)228–234
[9] Ballard, K. (2012). Inclusion and social justice: teachers as agents of change. John Wiley & Sons Australia.
[10] Barnes, K. (2009). The attitudes of regular education teachers regarding inclusion of students with Autism. Dissertation Abstracts International 69 (10a), 3905.
[11] Beech, M. (2010). Accommodations; Assisting Students with Disabilities. Learning Systems Institute Florida State University. https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED565777.pdf
[12] Busby, R., Ingram, R., Bowron, R., Jan, O. and Lyons, B. (2012). Teaching elementary children with autism: Addressing teacher challenges and preparation needs. Rural Educator, 33(2), 27-35.
[13] Carpenter, L. (2013). DSM-5: Autism spectrum disorder. Retrieved from https://depts.washington.edu/dbpeds/
[14] Chataika, T (2007) Inclusion of Disabled students in Higher education in Zimbabwe: From Idealism to Reality – A social Ecosystem perspective. University of Sheffield.
[15] Chinyoka, K. (2013). Psychosocial effects of poverty on the academic performance of the girl child in Zimbabwe. Doctoral thesi http://uir.unisa.ac.za/bitstream/handle/10500/13066/
[16] Chireshe, R. (2013). The state of inclusive education in Zimbabwe: Bachelor of Education (Special Needs Education) students’ perceptions. Journal of Social Science, 34(3):223–228.
[17] Crang, M. & Cook, I. (2007). Doing Ethnographies. SAGE Publications, Ltd. London.
[18] Creswell, J. W. (2009). Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative and Mixed Approaches. 3rd Ed. Los Angeles. Sage Publications, Inc.
[19] Creswell, J. W. (2013). Qualitative enquiry and research design: choosing among five Approaches.4th Ed. London: Sage.
[20] De Clercq, H. (2006). Autism from within: A unique handbook. Kungsangen, Sweden: Intermedia Books.
[21] De Nysschen, S. (2008). Exploring the emotional well-being of educators teaching learners With Autism. Unpublished Master’s Thesis, University of KwaZuluNatal.
[22] Donald, D., Lazarus, S & Lolwana, P. (2010). Educational Psychology in social context: Ecosystem applications in Southern Africa. Cape Town: Oxford University Press.
[23] Edward, G. (2015).Teachers’ knowledge and perceived challenges of teaching children with
[24] Autism in Tanzanian regular primary schools. International Journal of Academic Research and Reflection Vol. 3, No. 5, ISSN 2309-0405
[25] Eldar, E., Talmor, R. & Wolf-Zukerman, T. (2010). Successes and difficulties in the Individual inclusion of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in the eyes of their coordinators. International Journal of Inclusive Education, 14(1), 97-114.
[26] Engelbrecht, P., Oswald, M. & Forlin, C. (2006). Promoting the implementation of Inclusive Education in primary schools in South Africa. British Journal of Special Education 33 (3), 121-129.
[27] Farrell, P., Alborz, A., Howes, A. & Pearson, D. (2010). The impact of teaching assistants On improving pupils’ academic achievement in mainstream schools. A review of the literature. Educational Review, 62, 435-448.
[28] Hart, J. E. & Malian, I. (2013). A statewide survey of special education directors on teacher
[29] Preparation and licentiate in autism spectrum disorders: A model for university and state collaboration. International Journal of Special Education, 28(1), 4-13.
[30] Hayes, D. (2013). The use of prompting as an evidence-based strategy to support children with ASD in school settings in New Zealand. Kairaranga, 14(2), 52-56.
[31] Hayes, J. A., Baylot Casey, L., Williamson, R., Black, T. & Winsor, D. (2013). Educators’
[32] Readiness to teach children with autism spectrum disorder in an inclusive classroom. The Researcher, 25(1), 67-78.
[33] Hess, K., Morrier, M., Heflin, L. & Ivey, M. (2008). Autism treatment survey: Services received by children with autism spectrum disorders in public school classrooms. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 38 (5), 961-971.
[34] Hinton, S., Sofronoff, K. & Sheffield, J. (2008). Training teachers to manage students with
[35] Asperger’s syndrome in an inclusive classroom setting. The Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, 25, 34-48.
[36] Horrocks, J., White, G. & Roberts, L. (2008). Principals’ attitudes regarding inclusion of children with autism in Pennsylvania public schools. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 38, 1462–1473. doi: 10.1007/s10803-007-0522-x
[37] Humphrey, N. & Symes, W. (2013). Inclusive education of pupils with autistic spectrum disorders in secondary mainstream schools: teacher attitudes, experience and knowledge. International Journal of Inclusive Education, 17 (1), 32-46.
[38] Humphrey, N. (2008). Including pupils with autistic spectrum disorders in mainstream schools. Support for Learning, 23(1), 41 – 47.
[39] Humphrey, N. & Lewis, S. (2008). Make me normal: The views and experiences of pupils on the autistic spectrum in mainstream secondary schools. Autism, 12 (1), 23-46.
[40] Humphrey, N. & Parkinson, G. (2006). Research on interventions for children and young people on the autistic spectrum: A critical perspective. Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, 6(2), 76-86
[41] Johnson, R. B & Christensen, L. (2014). Educational research: Quantitative, qualitative and mixed approaches. 5th Ed. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
[42] Jones, A. P. & Frederickson. N. (2010). Multi-informant predictors of social inclusion for students with autism spectrum disorders attending mainstream school. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 40(9), 1094–103. doi: 10.1007/s10803-010-0957-3
[43] Kim, M (2014). Doing social constructivist research means making empathic and aesthetic connections with participants. European Early Childhood Education Research Journal, Volume 22, – Issue 4. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/
[44] Kivunja, C. & Kuyini, A. B (2017) Understanding and Applying Research Paradigms in Educational Contexts. International Journal of Higher Education Vol. 6, No. 5: https://doi.org/10.5430/ijhe.v6n5p26
[45] Leach, D. & Duffy, M., L. (2009). Supporting students with autism spectrum disorders in inclusive settings. Intervention in School and Clinic, 45(1), 31-37.
[46] Leblanc, L., Richardson, W. & Burns, K., A. (2009). Autism spectrum disorder and the inclusive classroom. Teacher Education and Special Education: The Journal of the Teacher Education Division of the Council for Exceptional Children, 32(2), 166-179.
[47] Liamputtong P. & Ezzy, D. (2005). Qualitative research methods. Oxford University Press, Oxford
[48] Lindsay, S., Proulx, M., Scott, H. & Thompson, N. (2013). Exploring elementary school teachers’ strategies for including children with autism spectrum disorder in mainstream classroom classes. International Journal of Inclusive Education, 18(2), 101-122.
[49] Lindsay, S., Proulx, M., Scott, H. & Thomson, N. (2014). Exploring teachers’ strategies for including children with autism spectrum disorder in mainstream classrooms. International Journal of Inclusive Education, 18(2), 101-122, doi: 10.1080/13603116.2012.758320
[50] Majoko, T. (2013). Challenges in School Guidance and Counselling (SGC) services provisions for children with disabilities in Zimbabwean inclusive primary schools. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
[51] Majoko, T. (2016). Inclusion of children with autism spectrum disorders: Listening and hearing to voices from the grassroots. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 46(4), 1429-1140.
[52] Majoko, T (2018). Inclusion of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Mainstream Primary School Classrooms: Zimbabwean Teachers’ Experiences. International journal of special education. Vol.33, No.3.
[53] Mandina, S. (2012). Bachelor of education in-service teacher trainees’ perceptions and attitudes on inclusive education in Zimbabwe. Asian Social Science, 8(13), 227 – 232.
[54] Mann, A. (2013). The experiences of mothers of children with autism in Jamaica: An exploratory study of their journey. Doctoral dissertation. University of South Florida. http://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/4722
[55] McGillicuddy, S. & O’Donnell, G., O. (2013). Teaching students with autism spectrum disorder in mainstream post-primary schools in the Republic of Ireland. International Journal of Inclusive Education, 18(4), 323-344.
[56] Mogashoa, T (2014). Applicability of Constructivist Theory in Qualitative Educational
[57] Research. American International Journal of Contemporary Research Vol. 4, No. 7; https://www.researchgate.net/
[58] Mpofu and Shumba, 2012). Mpofu, J. & Shumba, A. (2012). Challenges faced by students with special educational needs in early childhood development centres in Zimbabwe as perceived by ECD trainers and parents. Anthropologist, 14(4), 327-338.
[59] Muller, E., Schuler, A.L. & Yates, G.B. (2008). Social challenges and supports from the perspective of individuals with Asperger syndrome and other autism spectrum disabilities. Autism, 12, 173–190.
[60] Nerg, L. M. (2016). Getting children out of the street? Ethnographic study on children’s Perspectives and street children centres’ strategies. Master’s thesis; University of Helsinki.
[61] Ntombela, S. (2006). The complexities of educational policy dissemination in the South
[62] African context: A case study of teachers’ experiences of inclusive education policy in selected schools in greater Durban. Unpublished PhD thesis, University of KwaZulu-Natal.
[63] O’Reilly, K. (2009). Key Concepts in Ethnography. SAGE Publications Ltd. London.
[64] Oswald, D.P., Coutinho, M.J., Johnson, J.W., Larson, J. & Mazefsky, C.A. (2008). Student, parent, and teacher perspectives on barriers and facilitators to school success for students with Asperger’s Syndrome. Autism frontiers: Clinical issues and innovations (pp. 137–151)
[65] Obrusnikova, I. & Dillon, S.R. (2011). Challenging Situations When Teaching Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders in General Physical Education. Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly, 28, 113-131
[66] Preece, D. & Trajkovski, V. (2017). Parent Education in Autism Spectrum Disorder — a Review of the Literature. Croatian Review of Rehabilitation Research / Hrvatska
[67] Revija Za Rehabilitacijska Istrazivanja, 53(1), 128-138. https://doi.org/10.31299/hrri.53.1.10
[68] Predescu, M., Ghazi, L. A. L. & Darjan, I (2018). An ecological approach of Autism Spectrum Disorders. Journal of Educational Sciences, XIX • nr. 2(38)
[69] Reeves, S., Peller, J., Goldman, J. & Kitto, S. (2013). Ethnography in qualitative educational research: AMEE Guide No. 80. https://doi.org/10.3109/0142159X.2013.804977
[70] Sally, L., Proulx, M., Thomson, N. & Scott, H. (2013). Educators’ Challenges of Including
[71] Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Mainstream Classrooms, International Journal of Disability, Development and Education, 60:4, 347-362, DOI:
[72] Scott-Croff, C (2017). The Impact of a Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder on
[73] Nonmedical Treatment Options in the Learning Environment from the Perspectives of Parents and Pediatricians; Dissertation. St. John Fisher College. : https://fisherpub.sjfc.edu/education_etd
[74] Simpson, R. L., de Boer-Ott, S. R. & Smith-Myles, B. (2003). Inclusion of learners with autism spectrum disorders in general education settings. Topics in Language Disorders, 23(2), 116–133. https://doi.org/10.1097/00011363-200304000-00005
[75] Soto-Chodiman, R., Pooley, J. A., Cohen, L., & Taylor, M. F. (2012). Students with ASD in Mainstream Primary Education Settings: Teachers’ Experiences in Western Australian Classrooms. Australasian Journal of Special Education, 36, 97-111. doi:10.1017/jse
[76] Stephens, J. (2018). Meeting the needs of children with autism and their parents during out-of-hospital interactions with paramedics. Thesis. Queensland University of Technology
[77] Sukbunpant, S., Arthur-Kelly, M. & Dempsey, I. (2013). Thai preschool teachers’ views about inclusive education for young children with disabilities, International Journal of Inclusive Education, 17:10, 1106-1118. doi: 10.1080/13603116.2012.741146
[78] Symes, W. & Humphrey, N. (2010). Peer-group indicators of social inclusion among pupils with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) in mainstream secondary schools. School Psychology, 31(2), 123-130.b
[79] Strong, S (2010). The Effects of the Label Borderline Personality Disorder on Staff Attributions and Intended Behaviour. Doctorate Thesis submitted to University of East Anglia
[80] Venter, M. (2007). Are we ready yet? The inclusion debate. Naptosa Insight 1 (1), 6-19.
[81] Weber, J. (2013). Teachers’experience of teaching learner with AutismSpectrumDisorder (ASD) in the mainstream classroom. South African journal
[82] Whyte, A., Tedds, J. (2011). Making the Case for Research Data Management. DCC Briefing Papers. Edinburgh: Digital Curation Centre.
[83] Zager, D., Wehmeyer, M. & Simpson, R. (2012). Educating students with Autism: Research based principles and practices. New York: Routledge.

Benny Chitsa PhD “A Critical Analysis of how Teachers Accommodate Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Zimbabwean Mainstream Primary Schools: An ethnographic study of Reigate District in Bulawayo Metropolitan province” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.111-121 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/111-121.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Re-examining the Role of Teacher Trade Unions’ in Promoting Welfare and Sustained Livelihood for their Members: A Case of Teacher Trade Unions in Lusaka, Zambia.

Kakunta M Kabika, Simuyaba Eunifridah, Haambokoma Nicholas and Mwewa Godfrey- December 2020 Page No.: 122-130

We investigated the role of teacher trade unions in promoting teacher welfare and sustained livelihood for their members in Lusaka District of Zambia. The objectives of the study were to; explore how the teacher unions have helped in promoting teacher welfare and sustained livelihood; and determine measures that teacher unions can take to support the teacher welfare and sustained livelihood. A descriptive study design was employed on a target population that comprised four (4) national teacher union officials targeting one (1) official from each of the four national teacher trade union secretariats, 16 teachers, and 16 union leaders at school level of selected schools. Purposive sampling method was used to sample national teacher trade union officials and four school level union leaders from selected primary and secondary schools in Lusaka District. Data was collected through interviews; focus group discussion; and documentary review were thematically analyzed and interpreted, respectively. The study revealed that teacher trade unions were instrumental in providing legal representation of members and in collective bargaining, but their role did not effectively result in motivational conditions of service for promoting enhanced teacher welfare and sustained livelihood. The study recommended that provision of non-traditional incentives such as; education assistance; facilitation of land acquisition; funeral support; financial benefits; health scheme; mortgage; decentralization of functions would have positive impact on teacher welfare and sustained livelihood. The study also recommended that teacher trade unions needed to reposition themselves by re-organizing themselves through employing more innovation as opposed to following traditional approaches to improving member benefits. Teacher trade unions further needed to focus on knowledge empowerment for lower level union leadership structures at school level in order to improve representation of teachers, enhance workers’ education and to diversify into sustainable business ventures that would enhance the union funds, and develop pool fund to be used to empower members.

Page(s): 122-130                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 December 2020

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41207

 Kakunta M Kabika
Department of educational Administration and Policy Studies, The University of Zambia

 Simuyaba Eunifridah
Department of educational Administration and Policy Studies, The University of Zambia

 Haambokoma Nicholas
Department of educational Administration and Policy Studies, The University of Zambia

 Mwewa Godfrey
Department of educational Administration and Policy Studies, The University of Zambia

[1] Adesina, A.M. (2011). Trade Union Leadership Structure and the Challenges of Politics; Ilorin, Nigeria.
[2] Anderson, J.E. (2003). Public policymaking. An introduction. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
[3] Bascia, N. (2005). Triage or tapestry? Teacher union’s‟ work in an era of systemic reform. In
[4] Bendix, S. (1991). Industrial relations in South Africa. Cape Town: Juta.
[5] Gad, L. (1997). The Impact of Structural Adjustment on Trade Unions in Egypt. PhD Thesis,University of Warwick.
[6] Garret, R.M (1999). Teacher job satisfaction in Developing countries. London: DFID.
[7] Georgelles, A. (2010), Teacher union and Educational Reforms. California: Sage Publishing.
[8] Harris, J (2010). ‘Globalizations(s) and Labour in China and India: Introductory Reflection’, Global Labour Journal 1(1): 3-11.
[9] Herman, Jerry, J (1998). “With Collaborative Bargaining, You Work with the Union NotAgainst It.” The American School Board Journal 172, 41-42, 47.
[10] Hugget, R. (1996). Business Studies for GCSE. Second Edition. London: Harper Collins.
[11] ILO (2004). Trade Unions and Poverty Reduction Strategies. Geneva: ILO
[12] Kakuba, C.C. (2001). Trade Unions and Labour Policies. Lusaka: Zambia PublishingCompany.
[13] Kelly, J. (1998). Rethinking Industrial Relations: Mobilization, collectivism and Long Waves,London, Routledge.
[14] Kuhn, G. (1998). Collective Bargaining and Labour Relations: Prentice Hall, Indiana.
[15] Laine, D. (2011). Are Unions Members Happy? Evidence from Eastern and Western Europe.
[16] Maravi, E. (2002). The Rebirth of Unionism in Zambia. Lusaka: Multimedia Publications.
[17] MoGE (2016). Annual Report for 2015, Ministry of General Education: Lusaka.
[18] Mwilima, N. (2008).The Role of Trade Unions in Job Creation: A case study of the JobCreation
[19] Trust; A research report submitted to the Faculty of Humanities,University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
[20] Patillo, K.M. (2012). Quiet Corruption: Teacher Unions and Leadership in South African Schools. Honours thesis. Middletown, Connecticut: Wesleyan University.
[21] Ratteree, B. (2004). Teachers, their Unions and the Education for All campaign, Background paper prepared for the Education for All Global Monitoring Report 2005, The Quality Imperative. USA
[22] Seekings, J. (2004).Trade unions, social policy and class compromise in post-apartheid South Africa. Review of African Political Economy, 100:299-312.
[23] Veerle, D. and Enslin, P. (2002). Democracy in education or education for democracy: The limits of participation in South African School governance. Journal of Education, 28, School of Education, University of Natal: 5-25
[24] Von Holdt, K (1994). The rise of strategic unionism. Retrieved on 9 / 24/2010 from: http://www.africafiles.org/article.asp?ID =4702.
[25] SIDA (2000). Teacher education, Teachers’ conditions and motivation. Stockholm: Author.
[26] SimuyabaL E and Chibwe, P. Teacher Professionalism in Zambia: Practices, Challenges and Prospects in the Post 2015 Era. Proceedings of the 67th International Conference on Education, art and Social Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden, April 2016, Available on http://worldresearchlibrary.org.proceedings.php. Pp 17-21. (ISNB 978-93-8597389-5)
[27] Simuyaba, E. Banda D, Mweemba L and Muleya G, Theory againist Practice, Training of Teachers in a Vacuum, Journal of Education and Social Policy, Vol.2, No 4); December, 2015.
[28] Wood, G (1998). Trade Union recognition: cornerstone of the new South AfricanEmployment Relations. Johannesburg: Thomson International Publishing.
[29] Wood, D (1996). The Politicization of Teachers’ associations in the Cote d’ Ivoire. African Studies Association, Vol.39, No.3:113-129.
[30] Zengele, T. (2010), Teacher Unions, Redeployment, Employment of Educators Act No. 76 of199 Collective Agreements. Page 17, 32.
[31] ZNUT. (2012). the Teachers’ Voice. Volume 19 December 2012.

Kakunta M Kabika, Simuyaba Eunifridah, Haambokoma Nicholas and Mwewa Godfrey, “Re-examining the Role of Teacher Trade Unions’ in Promoting Welfare and Sustained Livelihood for their Members: A Case of Teacher Trade Unions in Lusaka, Zambia.” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.122-130 December 2020  DOI : https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41207

Download PDF

pdf

Challenges Facing Women in Formalization of Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises: A Case of Kinondoni Municipal, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

Jimson Joseph Chumbula- December 2020 Page No.: 131-136

It is estimated that two billion (61 per cent) of the global employed population earn their living in the informal economy. Women’s enterprises are largely informal enterprises; it is common knowledge that women are dominant members of the informal economy and are less present as owners of formal enterprises. Women play a key role in the private sector and micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) in Tanzania. Most WOEs in Tanzania are concentrated in informal, micro, low growth, and low profit activities, where entry barriers are low but price competition is intense. This happens while the government of Tanzania has expressed commitment to support women’s entrepreneurship through a number of policy pronouncement as well as specific support programs to empower their businesses. Therefore this study intended to investigate challenges making women to continue doing informal business in Tanzania regardless of the commitment of the government and a number of negative effects associated with this choice. Data collection was carried out through individual survey and focus groups discussions. Likert scale type questions were used to measure women attitude on business registration. Results indicate that low awareness among business women on registration matters, high registration fee, high tax for the registered enterprises, long time spent in registration process hinders women to go for it. The study concludes that the number of women who registered their enterprises at Kinondoni district is low. The paper recommends that government and other stakeholders in business should ensure that they raise awareness to all women in business on the importance of registering enterprises. The registration fee and business tax should be affordable to enable all willing business women to register their enterprises.

Page(s): 131-136                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 December 2020

 Jimson Joseph Chumbula

Department of Economics and Social Studies, Ardhi University, P.O. Box 35176, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.

[1] Bruhn, M., and D. McKenzie (2013b), “Entry regulation and formalization of micro enterprises in developing countries”, Policy Research Working Paper 6507, Washington: World Bank
[2] Carrol, E. (2011). Taxing Ghana’s informal sector: The experience of women, Christian Aid Occasional Working paper, Number 7.
[3] Chidoko, C., & Makuyana, G. (2012). The contribution of the informal sector to poverty alleviation in Zimbabwe. Developing Countries Studies, 2(9), 41–44.
[4] Darbi, W. P. K., & Knott, P. (2016). Strategising practices in an informal economy setting: A case of strategic networking. European Management Journal, 34(4), 400–413. doi:10.1016/j.emj.2015.12.009
[5] [5]. De Kok, J. M. P., C. Deijl and Ch. Veldhuis-Van Essen (2013), “Is small still beautiful? literature review of recent empirical evidence on the contribution of SMEs to employment creation”, Geneva: ILO.
[6] Djankov, S., Lieberman, I., Mukherjee, J., and Nenova, T. (2002), Going Informal: Benefits and Costs, Draft: The World Bank.
[7] Elk, K., and Kok, J., (2014). Enterprise formalization: Fact or fiction? A quest for case studies, International Labour Organization (ILO), Geneva: International Labour Office.
[8] Fajnzylber, P., W. F. Maloney and G.V. Montes-Rojas (2011), “Does formality improve micro-firm performance? Evidence from the Brazilian SIMPLES program”, Journal of Development Economics 94(2).
[9] Forkuor, D., Peprah, V., & Alhassan, A. M. (2017). Assessment of the processing and sale of marine fish and its effects on the livelihood of women in Mfantseman Municipality, Ghana. Environment, Development and Sustainability, 20(3), 1329–1346. doi:10.1007/ s10668-017-9943-7
[10] ILO (2011), “Statistical update on employment in the informal economy”, Geneva: International Labour Office, Department of Statistics.
[11] ILO (2012), “Measuring informality: A statistical manual on the informal sector and informal employment”, Geneva: International Labour Office.
[12] Ishengoma, E.,and Kappel, R. (2005). Formalisation of Informal Enterprises: Economic Growth and Poverty, Economic Reform and Private Sector Development Section. Gtz [http://www.gtz.de].
[13] Loayza, N.V. (1997), The Economics of the Informal Sector: A Simple Model and Some Empirical Evidence from Latin America, Washington, D.C.: The World Bank, 20433
[14] Mori, N. (2014). Women’s entrepreneurship development in Tanzania: insights and recommendations / International Labour Office – Geneva.
[15] Ramani, S. V., Ajay, T., Tamas, M., Sutapa, C., & Veena, R., (2013). Women entrepreneurs in the informal economy: Is formalization the only solution for business sustainability?. UNU-MERIT Working Paper 2013-018
[16] Richardson, P., Howarth, R., and Finnegan., G. (2004). The Challenges of Growing Small Businesses: Insights from Women Entrepreneurs in Africa. International Labour Office • Geneva
[17] Shigela, K. M. (2018). Women traders get chance to join formal economy. Dar es salaam.
[18] Sutter, C., Bruton, G. D., & Chen, J. (2019). Entrepreneurship as a solution to extreme poverty: A review and future research directions. Journal of Business Venturing, 34(1), 197–214.
[19] Veronica Peprah , Daniel Buor & David Forkuor | (2019) Characteristics ofinformal sector activities and challenges faced by women in Kumasi Metropolis, Ghana, CogentSocial Sciences, 5:1, 1656383, DOI: 10.1080/23311886.2019.1656383

Jimson Joseph Chumbula, “Challenges Facing Women in Formalization of Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises: A Case of Kinondoni Municipal, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.131-136 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/131-136.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Subversion of Hegemonic Gender Perspectives as a Means to Postcolonial Authenticity in Ngugi’s Petals of Blood and Ogbu’s The Moon Also Sets

Elizabeth Nasipwoni, Dr. Felix Orina, Dr. Joseph Musungu -December 2020 Page No.: 137-149

The purpose of this paper is to interrogate Ngugi wa Thiong’o’s and Osi Ogbu’s subversion of sexism, classism and racism which are elements of patriarchy. Patriarchy is among pervasive hegemonic legacies that characterize postcolonial societies and adversely affects gender relations. Attempts at dismantling patriarchal structures has sparked contestations and controversies among literary artists and scholars in both Western and postcolonial societies. Mainstream feminist approaches have not been embraced in postcolonial contexts since patriarchy to a great extent is associated with colonialism in postcolonial setups. Therefore Western feminists are viewed as accomplices in the colonial project who fail to take into account experiences of women in postcolonies. This paper is pursuant of patriarchy dismantling project but deviates from mainstream perpectives. It focuses on the fiction of two African male postcolonial feminist artists whose humanist and Afroeuropean approaches seem appropriate in subverting gender disparities. These approaches accord dignity to all human beings regardless of sex. Additionally, they encourage co-operation and complementarity between men and women. Appropriate strands of African Feminism addressed patriarchy while Marxist feminism postulations addressed class and exploitation. The literature review focused on critical works of authors and literary critics who have analyzed the two texts and other works on gender and capitalism. One of the findings of this paper is that Afroeuropean approaches to gender are viable in subverting sexism, racism and classism. Secondly, equitable opportunities can be accorded to males and females depending on ability and endowment and not on sex.

Page(s): 137-149                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 December 2020

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41208

 Elizabeth Nasipwoni
Wekesa- Kibabii University

  Dr. Felix Orina
Department of English, Literature, Journalism and Mass Communication, Kibabii University

  Dr. Joseph Musungu
Department of English, Literature, Journalism and Mass Communication, Kibabii University

[1] Adichie, C., (2009). Danger of a Single-2009 TED Talk. https: //lanetwork.facinghistory.org>
[2] Alazzawi, A. J.M., (2018).A Feminist Perspective in Ngugi wa Thiong’o’s Petals of Blood. International Journal of English Literature & Social Sciences, Vol. 3 Issue5, Sept- Oct,2018.https://dx.doi.org/10.22161/ijels.3.5.27.
[3] Arndt, S., (2000). Africa dender Trouble and African Womanism: An Interview with Chikwenye Ogunyemi and Wanjira muthoni, Signs, Vol,25 (3):706-709.
[4] Arndt, S., (2018). Perspectives on African Feminism: Defining and Classifying African Feminist Literatures. Taylor and Francis Ltd. Sweden.No.54 (2002),pp31http://about.jstor.org/terms.
[5] Ashcroft, B. et al, (1995). The Postcolonial Studies Reader. London: Routledge.
[6] Becker, J. C., et al (2014). Confronting and Reducing Sexism: A Call for Research on Intervention, Journal of Socials, 70 (4) ISSN 0022-4537.https://scholarship.org.org/uc/item/7fv3k
[7] Cliff, T., (1984). Class Struggle and Women’s Liberation, London.
[8] Edeh, P., (2015). African Humanism in Achebe in Relation to the West. Open Journal of Philosophy, 2015; 5(3) 205-210.https://dx.doi.org/10.4236/0jpp.2015.53025
[9] Giminez, M., (2005). Capitalism and the Oppression of Women: Science and Society, Vol.69. No.1, January 2005, 11-32.
[10] Hossain, D., (2016). Marxist Feminist Perspective of Corporate Gender Disclosures. Asian Journal of Accounting and Government, 7:11-24(2014) http://dx.doi.org/10.17576/AJAG-2016-07-02.https://.www.palgrave.com/gp/why- publish/author-perspectives/motherhood-in–literature
[11] Lorde, A., (1984). Sister Outsider, Crossing Press, Berkeley, CA.
[12] Lugones, M. (2007). Heterosexualism and the Colonial/ Modern Gender System, Vol. 22. No.1.Retrieved from http://about.jstor.org/terms.
[13] Memmi, A., (1965). The Colonizer and the Colonized. Boston: Beacon Press.
[14] Millett, K., (1970). Sexual Politics, New York: Ballantine Books.
[15] Mishra, R. (2013). Postcolonial feminism: Looking into within-beyond-to difference. International Journal of English and Literature, Vol.4 [4], pp129-134, Doi 10.5897//IJEL12165.http://www.academicjournals.org/IJEL.
[16] Mohanty, C. T. et al (1991). Third World Women: The Politics of Feminism. Bloomington: Indiana University.
[17] Morton, S., (2003). Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Routledge Critical Thinkers Essential Guides for Literary Studies, Routledge.
[18] Nayar, P. K., (2008).Postcolonial Literature: An Introduction. Delhi: Pearson Longman.
[19] Ngugi, T., (1986). Decolonizing the Mind. Twayne Publishers, New York.
[20] Ngugi, T., (1992). Writers in Politics. Nairobi: Heimann.
[21] Ngugi, T., (1993). Moving the Centre: The Struggle for cultural Freedoms, Nairobi, East African Educational Publishers.
[22] Ogunyemi, O. C., (2019). Womanism: The Dynamics of Contemporary Black Female Novel in English 041,089.175.102 on December 17, 2019 20 http://www. Journals.Uchicago. edn/t-andc
[23] Osi, O. (2002). The Moon Also Sets. Nairobi, Kenya: E.A.E.P.
[24] Oyekun, O. A., (2014). African Feminism: Some Critical Considerations, Lagos University, Nigeria, Volume 15, 1: 2014.
[25] Oyewumi, O., (1995) “.Colonizing Body and Mind”. The Postcolonial Studies Reader, London: Routledge.
[26] Oyewumi, O., (1997). The Invention of Women: Making an African Sense of Western gender Discourses, Minnesota University Press.
[27] Petersen, K. H. (Ed.) (1986). Criticism and Ideology, Sweden, Scandinavian Institute of African Studies. No. 20.
[28] Schwerdt, O. D., (1994). Reconstructing Identity in Postcolonial African Fiction: Individualism and Community in the Novels of Ngugi wa Thiong’o.
[29] Shigali, L. R., (2017). In Defense of African Male Writers Feminist Philosophy: Alternative Reading of Sembene Ousmane-The Feminist Macho”, Vol.15, doi: 10.17265/1539- 8080/2017.0006.S
[30] Shigali, H. R., (2009). Alternative Portraits of Power and Empowerment in Selected Female Writers’ Works, Kenyatta University Library.
[31] Stefano, C.D., (2014). “Marxist Feminism: The Encyclopedia of Political Thought”. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118474396.wbept065
[32] Tiffin, H. (1987). ‘Postcolonialism Literatures and Counter-Discourse’, Kunapipi 9(3) 17-34.
[33] Tutu, D., (1999). No Future Without Forgiveness, Cape Town: Image Books.
[34] Tyagi, R., (2014). Understanding Postcolonial Feminism in Relation with Postcolonial and Feminist Theories, International Journal of Language and Linguistics ISSN2374-8850(print), 2374-8869(online) Vol.1No2 December, 2014.
[35] Wane, N., (2002). African Indigenous Feminist Thought: The Politics of Cultural Knowledge, Sense Publishers.7-21.www.enotes.com/homework-help/whats-definition-economic-empowerment 454154.
[36] Weber, M., (1967). Law in Economy and Society, Simon and Schuster, New York.
[37] Yohannes, L., (2012). A Postcolonial Look at African Literature: Case Study of Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche’s Works, Addis Ababa University.

Elizabeth Nasipwoni, Dr. Felix Orina, Dr. Joseph Musungu, “Subversion of Hegemonic Gender Perspectives as a Means to Postcolonial Authenticity in Ngugi’s Petals of Blood and Ogbu’s The Moon Also Sets” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.137-149 December 2020  DOI : https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41208

Download PDF

pdf

Leadership, Followership and Accountability in Contemporary Nigeria: Challenges and the Way Forward

MOFOLUWAWO Esther Omoniyi – December 2020 Page No.: 150-155

No nation the world over, has achieved meaningful development politically and economically without the input of effective and visionary leadership. It is apposite to say that Nigeria seems to have failed to produce quality leadership capable of addressing numerous challenges confronting the nation. Leadership, followership and accountability is a universal challenge to all nation states; while some developed countries have overcome the primitive stage to propel their economy and social welfare of citizens to a comfortable level, other developing economy are still grappling to grow above such challenges. The main objective of this paper is to examine the challenges of leadership, followership and accountability in contemporary Nigerian society, and propose a way forward. The paper look into the concept of leadership, types of leadership, qualities of good leadership and followership. This paper adopts descriptive approach and content analysis as its methodological orientation. The paper concludes that Nigerian must be ready to ask and demand for accountability if they want to make the society a better place. The paper recommend among others that: followers should be allowed to speak out their mind and show support when appropriate, there should be a good public opinion pool that will serve as a check and balance to leadership since docility of followers can plunder them into dictatorship and underdevelopment. Nigerian government should embrace practical approach to the promotion of accountability in governance and democracy, there must be roles and strategies to promote a set of values of responsibilities from the followers and leadership traits, integrity, transparency, responsiveness, rule of law, and efficiency should serve as the basis for consideration of leadership.

Page(s): 150-155                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 January 2021

 MOFOLUWAWO Esther Omoniyi
Department of Social Studies, Emmanuel Alayande College of Education, Oyo Oyo State, Nigeria

[1] Achebe, C. (1983). The trouble with Nigeria, Enugu. Fourth Dimension Publishers Ltd.
[2] Ajadi, T.O. and Adedeji, S.O. (2009). Principle of institutional administration. National Open University of Nigeria, Lagos Gold Print Ltd, Lagos. ISBN: 978-058-282-7.
[3] Allen, T. (2018). Want to be a good leader, learn to follow. Retrived fromhttps://www.fast company.com./902273002 want-tobe-agood-leader-learn-to-follow. On May 25, 2020.
[4] Dagaci, A.M. (2009). Democracy and leadership questions: A redefinition in the Nigerian context. Lapai International Journal of Management and Social Sciences, 2(2), 16-28.
[5] Ejimabo, N.O. (2013). Understanding the impact of leadership in Nigeria: Its reality, challenges and perspectives. Retrieved on 17/5/2020 from https://journals. sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/2158244013490704.
[6] Essoh, P.A. and Udoh, H.D. (2014). Leadership and the development paradox in Nigeria. International Journal of Liberial Arts and Social Science. Vol. 2 No. 3. Retrieved on 17th May, 2020 from www.ijbass.org.
[7] Gberevbie, D.E., Joshua, S., Nchekwube, E.O. and Oyeyemi, A. (2017). Accountability for sustainable development and the challenges of leadership in Nigeria, 1999-2015. Retrieved from https://us.sagepub.com.en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage on 17th May, 2020.
[8] Gill, R. (2004). “Leadership in public sector, issues challenges and a strategy for action”. A paper presented at the 2004 EFMD Conferences in public management development. Brussel 3 – 5 June.
[9] Hollander, E.P. (1995), “Ethical challenges in the leader-follower relationship”, Business Ethics Quarterly, Vol. 5 No. 1, pp. 55-65.
[10] Chaleff, I (1997). The Courageous Follower: Standing Up to and for Our Leaders. NASSP Bulletin, Volume: 81 (586), 109-119.
[11] Jason, W. (2018). Followership and its models. Retrieved fromhttp://www.attack-gecko.net/2018/9/04/followership/ on 17 May 2020.
[12] Jehn, K.A. and Bezrukova, K. (2003). A field study group of diversity, workgroup context, and performance. Journal of Organizational Behaviour, 25, 703-720.
[13] Kelly, R. (2008). Rethinking followership, the art of followership: How great followers create great leaders in an organizations (1st ed, pp5 – 15) San Francisco, CA: Jossey – Bass.
[14] Kolade, C. (2012). The possibility of good governance in Nigeria. https://www.businessdayonline.com/NG/index.php/news/111. Retrieved on the 17th May, 2020.
[15] Koppell, J.G.S. (2005). Pathologies of accountability: ICAN and the Challenge of multiple accountabilities disorders. Public Administration Review, 65(1), 94-108.
[16] Kuforiji, A.V. (2020). The future of Africa is true leadership: Post Covid-19 Realities. Retrieved from http://ytimes.tv/2020/04/18/the-future-of-africa-is-true-leadership-post-covid-19-realities/?utm-campaign=sharecholic&utm_medium=whatsapp&utm_source=im on 8th June, 2020.
[17] Mamora, O. (2012). The possibility of good governance in Nigeria. https://www.businessdayonline.com/NG/index.php/news/111. Retrieved on 17th May, 2020.
[18] Mofoluwawo, E. O. (2015). Leadership and national integration efforts in Nigeria centenary: Challenges and way forward. In M.B.A. Ogunsola and Chris Omotosho (Ed) Multidisciplinary Journal of Arts Social Sciences. Vol.8. 1 -12.
[19] Mofoluwawo, E.O. (2019). Good leadership and accountability: A parthway to national development in Nigeria. Being a paper submitted for publication in the 11th Annual National Conference, School of Arts and Social Sciences, Adeyemi College of Education, Ondo.
[20] Ngwube, I.K. (2010). Leadership for change. Management in Nigeria, Nigeria Institute of Management, July-September, vol. 46; No. 3 pp. 7-14.
[21] Ninalowo, A. (2003). Democratic governance, regional integration and development in Africa. Development Policy Management Forum, Addis-Ababa. DPMF Occasional Paper. 11(2003), 1-32.
[22] Northouse, P. (2001). Leadership: Theory and practice, 2nd Edition. London: Sage.
[23] Ogbonna, E.C., Ogundiwin, A.O. and Uzuegbu-Wilson, E. 92012). Followership imperative of good governance: Reflections on Nigeria’s ‘Second Chance’ at democratization. Retrieved from www.llste.org on 10th June 2020.
[24] Okebukola, P.A. (2014). Human capital development and innovation in T. Abioye, C. Awonuga and A. Amumu (Eds.) Leadership and Innovation in Africa’s Development Paradigm. Ota, Nigeria: Covenant University Press. 29-48.
[25] Oseghale, R. (2016). Leadership, accountability and strategic role of followership. https://leadership and advancement.com/2016/01/07/leadership-accountability-and-the-strategic-role-of-followership. Retrieved on June 1st 2020.
[26] Richardson, P. (2008). Good governance: The vital ingredient of economic development. Management in Nigeria, 44(4), 15-20.
[27] Suda, L. (2013). In praise of followers. Paper presented at PMI (R) Global Congress 2013 – North America, New Orleans, L.A. Newtown Squire, P.A: Project Management Institute.
[28] Thom-Otuya, B.E.N. (2012). Leadership and followership: Essential factors for national development and achievement of organization goals. Retrieve from www.richmann.org on May 25 2020.
[29] Uveges, J.A. (2003).The dimension of public administration: Introductory readings. Boston: Holbrook press.

MOFOLUWAWO Esther Omoniyi, “Leadership, Followership and Accountability in Contemporary Nigeria: Challenges and the Way Forward” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.150-155 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/150-155.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Effect of Leadership Style, Organizational Culture, Job Design, and Self Efficacy on Workplace Learning, Growth Mindset, and Employee Achievement Motivation in Bank Jatim

Setyo Budhi W., Ujianto, Slamet Riyadi – December 2020 Page No.: 156-162

The purpose of the study was to analyze the effect of leadership style, organizational culture, job design, and self-efficacy on workplace learning, growth mindset, and achievement motivation in Bank Jatim. The study design uses explanatory research. The research samples are employees of Bank Jatim class I branch office in East Java, and a sample of 165 employees was obtained. Data analysis techniques using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM).
The results show leadership style has a significant effect on workplace learning and growth mindset, while the effect on achievement motivation is not significant. Organizational culture has a significant effect on workplace learning and growth mindset, while the effect on achievement motivation is not significant. Job design has a significant effect on workplace learning and achievement motivation, while its effect on growth mindset is not significant. Self-efficacy has a significant effect on growth mindset and achievement motivation, while the effect on workplace learning is not significant. Workplace learning and growth mindset both have a significant effect on achievement motivation.

Page(s): 156-162                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 January 2021

 Setyo Budhi W. Faculty of Economics and Business, University of 17 Agustus 1945 Surabaya, Indonesia

  Ujianto Faculty of Economics and Business, University of 17 Agustus 1945 Surabaya, Indonesia

  Slamet Riyadi Faculty of Economics and Business, University of 17 Agustus 1945 Surabaya, Indonesia

[1] Bandura, A. (2005). Self-Efficacy The Exercise of Control. New York: W.H. Freemanand Company.
[2] Bangun, Wilson. (2012). Manajemen Sumber Daya Manusia. Jakarta: Erlangga.
[3] Caniels, Marjolein C.J., Semeijn, Judith H., dan Renders, Irma H.M. (2018). Mind the mindset! The interaction of proactive personality, transformational leadership and growth mindset for engagement at work. Career Development International, Vol. 23 Issue: 1, pp.48-66. https://doi.org/10.1108/CDI-11-2016-0194.
[4] Fulmer, Kenneth L. (2000). Business Continuity Planning: A Step-By-Step Guide With Plannings Forms, Third Edition: Rothstein Associates.
[5] Gibson, James. L., Jhon M. (2009). Organizational: Behavior, Structure, Processes. New York: The McGraw Hill Companies, Inc.
[6] Greenberg, J. dan Robert A. Baron. (2007). Behavior in Organization, International Edition. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.
[7] McClelland, David C. (2009). Entrepreneur Behavior and Characteristics of Entrepreneurs. The Achieving Society.
[8] Nasution, S.I. (2017). Analysis of the factors that influence achievement motivation. Journal of Islamic Education. Vol. VII No.II: 38-54.
[9] Ormrod, Jeanne Ellis. (2008). Educational Psychology Helps Students Grow And Develop. Sixth Edition Volume 2. Jakarta: Erlangga.
[10] Utomo, J., Nanere M., and Sutono. (2017). The Effect Achievement Motivation, Leadership Character and Internal Culture Towards Employee’s Performance a Case Corporate from Indonesia. Journal of Applied Management (JAM).
Vol. 15 No.1: 1-9.
[11] Vaughan, Karen. (2008). Workplace Learning: a literature review. New Zealand: The New Zealand Engineering Food & Manufacturing Industry Training Organisation Incorporated.

Setyo Budhi W., Ujianto, Slamet Riyadi “The Effect of Leadership Style, Organizational Culture, Job Design, and Self Efficacy on Workplace Learning, Growth Mindset, and Employee Achievement Motivation in Bank Jatim” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.156-162 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/156-162.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Patients’ Relative Satisfaction with Nursing Care: A Case Study of Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar.

Umoh, Edet O. (PhD); Endra, Michael; Otosi, Okosienen; Anake, Monday; Nkanga, Dominic; Unwana, Udomoh; Usani, Patrick; Ejoh, Vincent & Amu, Denis.- December 2020 Page No.: 163-172

Psychiatric nurses like any other caregiver are more answerable to themselves and others for service rendered to their patients. The patients though with abnormal behaviour, have right of quality care and safety and nurses are held liable on failure to provide such. The study adopted a cross sectional, descriptive research design to assess patient relatives’ satisfaction with nursing services in Federal Neuro-psychiatric Hospital, Calabar, and Cross River State. Four (4) research questions were raised to direct the course of this study. A total of 58 patients’ relatives who responded to the questionnaire were sampled using convenient sampling procedure. A well validated and reliable questionnaire was used as instrument for data collection. Data collected was analyzed using frequency counts, simple percentages and mean scores. Finding revealed that there was marked improvement of Patients’ health status prior to grant of trial leave as compared to their health status when they were admitted into the hospital. Nearly all the relatives were very satisfied with the nursing care received by their patients; hence, the relatives indicated that the level of wellness of their patients was very good. Nevertheless, the relatives pointed out some areas that needed to be improved. These include; giving adequate and timely information to relatives regarding their patients, improving on patients’ feeding and cleanliness of Wards through frequent sanitation. Based on these observations, the researcher therefore recommended increase in supervision of activities by the Ward Managers and Supervisors, and encouragement of collaborative service between Nurses and Social Workers to promptly inform relatives over patients’ current information and wellbeing.

Page(s): 163-172                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 January 2021

 Jimson Joseph Chumbula

 Umoh, Edet O. (PhD)
Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar,Nigeria

  Endra, Michael
Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar,Nigeria

  Otosi, Okosienen
Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar,Nigeria

 Anake, Monday
Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar,Nigeria

  Nkanga, Dominic
Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar,Nigeria

  Unwana, Udomoh
Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar,Nigeria

 Usani, Patrick
Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar,Nigeria

  Ejoh, Vincent
Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar,Nigeria

  Amu, Denis
Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar,Nigeria

[1] Beltran-Aroca, C. M., Girela-Lopez, E., Collazo-Chao, E., Perez-Barquero, M. M., Munoz Villanueva, M. C. (2016). Confidentiality breaches in clinical practice: what happens in hospital? BMC Medical Ethic. 617:52.
[2] BMC Health Serv Res. 2008; 8: 92.
[3] Bowers, L., Banda, T., & Nijman, H. (2010a). Suicide inside: A systematic review of inpatient studies. The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 198(5), 315-328
[4] Braunack-Mayer, A.C., Mulligan, E. (2003). Sharing Patient information between professionals: confidentiality and Ethics, MJA, 178: 277-279.
[5] Burke JP. (2016). Infection control-a problem for patient safety. New England Journal of Medicine. 2016; 348(7):651–656.
[6] Clegg, A. (2013). Patient property and valuables, Doncaster and Bassetlaw Hospitals NHS, NHS Foundation Trust, PAT/PA12 V. 3
[7] Code of ethics for Nurses in Australia: Australian College of Nursing. 2002. Reprinted in 2005. Eurostat. (2010). Eurostat regional yearbook 2010. http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/cache/ITY…/KS…/KS-HA-10-001-12-EN.PDF.
[8] Coutu DFL. Sense and reliability: A conversation with celebrated psychologist Karl E. Weick. Harvard Business Review. 2018; 81(4):84–90.
[9] Davis, C. (2017). The Importance of Professional Accountability. Nursing Made Incredibly Easy!: November/December 2017 – Volume 15 – Issue 6 – p 4 doi: 10.1097/01.NME.0000525557.44656.04
[10] Epstein, RM. (2017). Mindful practice in action (1): Technical competence, evidence-based medicine, and relationship-centered care. Families, Systems & Health. 2017; 21 (1):1–9.
[11] Exworthy, T & Wilson, S. (2010) Escape and Absconding from secure psychiatric unit. European Journal of psychiatry. 10 (6), 74-82.
[12] Farahani, M. F., Shamsikhani, S. & Hezaveh, M. (2014). Patient satisfaction with Nursing and Medical care in Hospitals affiliated to Arak University of Medical Science in 2009. Nurs Midwifery Stud. 2014 Sep; 3(3): e14022, PMCID: PMC4332990, PMID: 25699278
[13] Gilburt, H; Rose, D. & Slade, M (2008), The importance of relationship in mental health care: A qualitative study of service users’ experiences of psychiatric hospital admission in the United Kingdom. Doi: 10.1186/1472-6963-8-92, PMCID: PMC2386459, PMID: 18439254
[14] Gowda, F, Guru, S., Kumar, G., Nourthoorn, C. & Lepping, M. (2017). Retrospective analysis of absconding behaviour by acute care consumers in one psychiatric hospital campus in Austrialia. Int. Journal of Mental Health Nursing 10 (4), 177-85.
[15] Henneman, E. A. (2017). Recognizing the ordinary as Extraordinary: Insight into the “Way We Work” to improve patient safety Outcomes. Am. J. Crit. Care, 26, 272-277.
[16] Institute of Medicine (2000). To err is human: Building a safer health system. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.
[17] Institute of Medicine (2001). Crossing the quality chasm: A new health system for the 21st century –Summary. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 2-4.
[18] Kalisch BJ. (2006). Missed Nursing Care: A qualitative study. Journal of Nursing Care Quality. 2006;21:306–313.
[19] Kalisch, BJ; Doumit, M, Lee KH, Zein JE (2013). Missed nursing care, level of staffing, and job satisfaction: Lebanon versus the United States. Journal of Nursing Administration. 2013;43:274–279.
[20] Kalisch, BJ; Landstrom, GL & Hinshaw, AS (2009). Missed nursing care: A concept analysis. Journal of Advanced Nursing. 2009; 65:1509–1517.
[21] Kalisch, BJ; McLaughlin, M & Dabney, BW (2012). Patient perceptions of missed nursing care. Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety. 2012; 38:161–167.
[22] Kalisch BJ, Tschannen D, Lee KH. (2011). Do staffing levels predict missed nursing care? International Journal for Quality in Health Care. 2011; 23:302–308.
[23] Kalisch BJ, Tschannen D, Lee KH, Friese CR. Hospital variation in missed nursing care. American Journal of Medical Quality. 2011; 26:291–299.
[24] Kalisch BJ, Xie B, Dabney BW. Patient-reported missed nursing care correlated with adverse events. American Journal of Medical Quality. 2013; 29:415–422.
[25] Karen, A. B. (2003). “Patient Safety: A shared Responsibility” . Online journal of issues in Nursing: vol. 8 No. 3
[26] Larsen, I. B., & Terkelsen, T. B., (2014). Coercion in a locked psychiatric ward: Perspectives of patients and staff. Nursing Ethics, 21(4), 426-436.
[27] Lin, F., Gillespie, B. M., Chaboyer, W., Li, Y., Whitelock, K., Marshall, A. p. (2019). Preventing Surgical site infections: Facilitators and barriers to nurses’ adherence to clinical practice guidelines – A qualitative study. j. Clin. Nurs. 28, 1643-1653.
[28] Loukidou, E., Ioannidi, V., & Kalokerinuo-anagnostopoulou, A. (2010). Institutionalized nursing staff: planning and developing a specialized educational framework that enhances psychiatric nurses’ roles and promotes de-institutionalization. Journal of psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 17, 829-837.
[29] Muralidharan, S., & Fenton, M. (2012). Containment strategies for people with serious mental illness. The Cochrane Library, 2, 1-15.
[30] Needleman, J. (2011). Nurse staffing and inpatient hospital mortality. New Engl J Med. 364(11): 1037-1045
[31] Nilufer, D., & Nurdan, K. (2016). Protection of privacy and confidentiality as a patient right; physicians and nurses viewpoints. Allied academics biomedical research. www.alliedacademies.org/articles/protection-of-privacy-and-confidential-as-a-patient-right-physicians-and-nurses-viewpoints.html
[32] Nursing and Midwifery Council of Nigeria: Code of Professional Conduct—2013
[33] Ocaktan, E., Yildiz, A., Ozdemir, O. (2004). Knowledge and attitudes of healthcare personnel working at Abidinpasa Health Group Directorate. Ankara University FakultesiMecmuasi. 57: 129-137
[34] Ochonma, O. G., Nwodoh, C. O, & Ingwu, J. A., Igwe, S. E., Ani, G. J., Dyages, E. O., (2017). Nurses’ Confidentiality of Medical Information and trusting relationship with Patients: A survey of Patients’ perceptions of Nurses in a South-South Hospital, Nigeria. International Journal of Health and Pharmaceutical Research. 2045-4673 vol. (3)
[35] Onyemelukwe, C., (2018). Patient Safety in Nigeria: An Emergent Concept (in Global patient Safety: law, policy and practice). www.researchgate.net/publication/327830963_Patient_Safety_in_NIgeria_An_Emergent_Concept_in_Global_Patient-Safety_Law_Policy.
[36] Piercey, W. D., Fralick, P. C. & Scarborough, H. (2020). HOSPITAL, Last Updated: Apr 16, 2020 See Article History
[37] Price, B. (2015). Respecting patient Confidentiality. Nursing Standard, 2015, 29(22): 50-57
[38] Raji, S. O (2017) prospective study of patients absconding from a psychiatric hospital in Iran. Med. Glas Journal. 105 (24), 1016-1019.
[39] Sermeus, W. (2016). Understanding the role of Nursesn in patient safety: from evidence to policy with RN4 Cast. BMC Nurs. 15, 1.
[40] Sert, G., (2008). Medical ethics and the right of privacy. Istanbul; Publication
[41] Sharac, J.; McCrone, P.; Sabes-Figuera, R.; Csipke, E.; Wood, A.; & Wykes, T. (2010). Nurse and Patient Activities and Interaction on Psychatric Inpatients Wards: A Literature Review. Int J Nurs Stud. Int J Nurs Stud. 2010 Jul; 47(7): 909–917. Published online 2010 Apr 24. doi: 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2010.03.012, PMCID: PMC4018996, EMSID: EMS58306, PMID: 20417514
[42] Sherwood, G. (2015). Perspectives: Nurses’ expanding role in developing safety culture: Quality and safety Education for Nurses-Competencies in action. Journal of research in Nursing, 20(8), 734-740.
[43] Sochalski J. Is more better? The relationship between nurse staffing and the quality of nursing care in hospitals. Medical Care. 2014;42(2 Suppl):II67–II73.
[44] Stewart, D & Dowers, L. (2011): Absconding and locking ward doors’. Evidence from the literature. Journal of psychiatric mental health nursing. 18 (8), 89-93.
[45] Stewart, D., Davis, B., Bowers, L., Jarret, M., Clark, N & Kiyimba, F. 2010. Absconding: why patients leave. Journal of psychiatric mental health nursing 12 (8) 199-205.
[46] Taylor, L., Hain, S., Karsh, B.F. & Emmanuel, L (2013) Module 13b mental health care: preventing and responding to absconding and missing patients. The patient safety education programme. Canadian health journal. 6 (2), 72-79.
[47] The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, & the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. A new era in nursing: Transforming care at the bedside. 2017 Retrieved from http://www.rwjf.org/content/dam/files/legacy-files/article-files/2/TCABBrochure041007.pdf.
[48] US. Department of health and Human Services (2019). Nursing and patient safety. www.psnet.ahrq.gov/primer/nursing-and-patient-safety.
[49] Vaismoradi, M., Jordan, S., Kangasniemi, M. (2015). Patient participation in patient safety and Nursing input – a systematic review. J. Clin. Nurs. 24, 627-639.
[50] Vieta, E., Garriga, M., Cardete, L., Bernardo, M., Blanch, J., Catalan, R., Vazquez, M., Soler, V., Ortuno, N. & Martinez-Aran, A. (2017). Protocol for the management of psychiatric patients with psychomotor agitation. BCM Psychiatry volume 17, art.:328 (2017).
[51] Woogara, J. (2005). Patieints’ privacy of the person and human rights. Nurs Ethics, 12: 273-287.
[52] World Health Organization (WHO) (2019). Patient Safety. http://www.who.in/patientsafety/en/

Umoh, Edet O. (PhD); Endra, Michael; Otosi, Okosienen; Anake, Monday; Nkanga, Dominic; Unwana, Udomoh; Usani, Patrick; Ejoh, Vincent & Amu, Denis, “Patients’ Relative Satisfaction with Nursing Care: A Case Study of Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar.” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.163-172 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/163-172.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Incidence of Successful Escape among Patients Who Attempted to Abscond from Federal Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar

Umoh, Edet O. PhD & Endra, Michael E. -December 2020 Page No.: 173-178

The striking difference between general and psychiatric patients is acceptance of symptoms and diagnosis. In a psychiatric setting, escape is a recurrent incident which directly reflects the sign of patient’s refusal or rejection of offered treatment. It can pose serious challenges to staff especially nurses who are the custodian of the patients, as well as the hospital management responsible to provision of security apparatus in the hospital. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of successful escape among patients who attempted to abscond from Federal Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar within the period covering January, 2016 to July, 2020. The study adopted an expost facto design as data were collected from Nurses’ Reports, Incidence Report and folders of all patients with history of attempted escape. Data collected were presented in frequency table and charts, and descriptive statistics of frequency counts and simple percentage were employed in describing the secondary data collected for this study. Findings revealed that within the period under study, a total of 136 incidence of attempted escape occurred in the Facility with the highest occurrence of 52 (38.2%) witnessed in 2016. Among these patients, 86 (63.2%) successfully escaped from the facility. The highest proportion of 29 (21.3%) patients successfully absconded from hospital in 2016, while the Ward that witnessed the highest incidence of 27 (19.9%) successful escaped within the period was Ward 3. However, the incidence of successful escape within the period was highest among male with diagnosis of substance abuse, bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia; and among those patients who were forcefully admitted with denial of symptoms. Considering the outcome of this study, the researchers recommended among other things that there should be adequate number of nursing staff on duty with quick attention to patients’ overt and covert complaints.

Page(s): 173-178                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 January 2021

 

  Umoh, Edet O. (PhD)
Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar,Nigeria

  Endra, Michael E.
Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar,Nigeria

Emanuel LL, Taylor L, Hain A, Combes JR, Hatlie MJ, Karsh B, Lau DT, Shalowitz J, Shaw T, & Walton M, (2017). Module 13b: Mental Health Care: Preventing and Responding to Absconding and Missing Patients. The Patient Safety Education Program– Canada (PSEP – Canada) Curriculum. www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca ,@ PSEPCanada@cpsi-icsp.ca
[2] Exworthy, T. & Wilson, S. (2010). Escapes and absconds from secure psychiatric units. European Journal of psychiatry. 10 (6), 74-82, Psychiatrist 34(3):81-82, DOI: 10.1192/pb.bp.108.024372
[3] Gowda, GS, Thamby, A., Basavaraju, V., Nataraja, R., Kumar, CN & Math, SB (2019). Prevalence and Clinical and Coercion characteristics of patients who abscond during inpatient care from psychiatric hospital. Indian J Psychol Med. 2019 Mar-Apr; 41(2): 144–149.doi: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_188_18, PMCID: PMC6436412, PMID: 30983662
[4] Guru, S., Gowda, GS., Abel, T., Vinay, BR., Nataraja, CN., Kuma, VM., & Bada, M (2019). Prevalence, clinic and coercion characteristics of patients who abscond during in-patients care from psychiatric hospital interm j psycho med.41 (2): 144-149
[5] John, C J., Gangadhar, Bn. & Channabasavanna, SM (1980). Phenomenology of ‘Escape’ from a mental hospital in India. Indian Journal of Psychiatry 22(3):247-50, PubMed
[6] kumar, CN; Gowda, GS; Kondapuram, N and Math, SB (2016). Patients escape from mental health hospital: A comparison of escaped patients during 2015 and 2016. Nimhens J. (7(2): 23-26
[7] Raji, S. O (2017) prospective study of patients absconding from a psychiatric hospital in Iran. Med. Glas Journal. 105 (24), 1016-1019.
[8] Stewart, D and Dowers, L. (2011): Absconding and locking ward doors’. Evidence from the literature. Journal of psychiatric mental health nursing. 18 (8), 89-93.
[9] Stewart, D., Davis, B., Bowers, L., Jarret, M., Clark, N and Kiyimba, F. 2010. Absconding: why patients leave. Journal of psychiatric mental health nursing 12 (8) 199-205.
[10] Taylor, L., Hain, S., Karsh, B.F. and Emmanuel, L (2013) Module 13b mental health care: preventing and responding to absconding and missing patients. The patient safety education programme. Canadian health journal. 6 (2), 72-79.
[11] Townsend, MC (2011). Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing. 10th ed. Davis, FA 1915 Arch Street, Philadelphia PA 19103. Pp83-85 ISBN 10:0-8036-1451-9

Umoh, Edet O. PhD & Endra, Michael E.,”Incidence of Successful Escape among Patients Who Attempted to Abscond from Federal Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.173-178 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/173-178.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Role of the Non-Governmental Organizations in Early Childhood Development in Egypt: A Case Study of Educate Me Foundation in Giza Governorate

Mostafa Hamdy El Said Ahmed – December 2020 Page No.: 179-188

Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) have played a key role in Egypt by providing a number of public services (Ibrahim, 2017). Also they have projects that support formal and non-formal education (Lewis, 2016). This study was aimed to provide a foundation for the role of Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) in Early Childhood Development (ECD) through identifying and examining the role of Educate Me Foundation in Giza Governorate as NGO working the field of ECD in Egypt as a case study. Additionally, it will try to investigate the relationship between NGOs and the Ministry of Education (MOE) and explore the challenges that face the NGOs during their implementing their work in the area of early childhood development. The researcher adopted the exploratory research design. Where he presented the literature review related to the same filed to identify the role of the NGOs in the ECD in different regions, also the researcher used the government reports. The paper is divided into three main parts. The first part presents the introduction of the role of NGOs in ECD, and the importance of the paper, and examines the literature on the role of NGOs in ECD, while the second part contains the challenges and the relationship with governmental bodies from a global perspective, and contains an analysis with a reflection on the Educate Me foundation. Finally, the third part contains the findings and conclusion alongside policy recommendations for the solution of the problem. The findings of the study show that Educate Me foundation had a significant role in the ECD, they achieved their progress with the limited financial resources and unstable relationship with MoE due to the regulations and bureaucracy. The study recommended that NGOs should develop open income-generating projects and self-financing instead of an external one. Besides seeking to change the culture of the MoE and its vision towards the existence of these organizations through seminars and conferences organized by NGOs in cooperation with government sector institutions.

Page(s): 179-188                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 January 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41209

  Mostafa Hamdy El Said Ahmed
KDI School of Public Policy and Management, Egypt

[1] Abdul Majid, Mohammed. (2009), philanthropy and development (7), the International Center for Research and Studies.
[2] Adly, Hwaida (2009), Role of NGOs in Supporting the Education of the Poor, Case Study.
[3] Alaraji, F. (2016).Primary education reforms targeting marginalized groups: the role of local non-governmental organizations in slum areas in Cairo, American University in Cairo, School of Global Affairs and public policy.
[4] Amen, M. (2008). NGOs and Educational Reform in Egypt: Shared and Contested Views. Case Western.
[5] Anzar, U. (2002). The NGO sector in Pakistan: Past, present, and future. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society (46th Orlando, FL March 6-9, 2002). The Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC).
[6] Avolio-Toly, R. (2010). Successful Models of Non-Governmental Organizations in Consultative Status: Best Practices in Education. Retrieved from: http://csonet.org/content/documents/Education.pdf.
[7] Bronfenbrenner, U. (October 1976). The Experimental Ecology of Education. Educational Researcher, 5(9), 5-15.
[8] Central Agency for Public Mobilization and Statistics (CAPMAS). (2018), Egypt in Figures. Retrieved From: https://www.capmas.gov.eg/Pages/StaticPages.aspx?page_id=5035.
[9] Chunlan, H. (2006). Non-Governmental Organizations and the development of China’s Education. Chinese Education & Society, 39(1), 21-40.
[10] El Baradei, L. & Amin, K. (2010). Community Participation in Education: A Case Study of the Boards of Trustees’ experience in the Fayoum governorate in Egypt. Africa Education Review, 7:1, 107-138.
[11] El Baradei, M. & El Baradei, L. (2004). Needs Assessment of the Education Sector in Egypt. Retrieved from: http://www.zef.de/fileadmin/webfiles/downloads/projects/el-mikawy/egypt_final_en.pdf.
[12] El-Agati, M. (2013). Foreign Funding in Egypt after the revolution. Arab Forum for Alternatives, FRIDE, and HIVOS publication. Retrieved from: http://fride.org/download/WP_EGYPT.pdf.
[13] El-Kogali, S., Karafft, C. (2015). Expanding Opportunities for the Next Generations Early Childhood Development in the Next Generations: Early Childhood Development in the Middle East and North Africa.
[14] Fielmua, N., Bandie, R. D. (2012). The Role of Local Non-Governmental Organizations in Basic Education in the Nadowli District of Ghana, British Journal of Arts and Social Sciences, Vol.4, No.1.
[15] Ghoneim, N., El Baradei, L. (2013). The Impact of Strategic Planning on Egyptian Non-Profits’ Performance: An Assessment Using the Balanced Scorecard. Journal of US-China Public Administration, Vol.10, No.1, 57-76.
[16] Heckman, James J. (2000).Policies to foster human capital. Research in economics 54, no.1, 3-56.
[17] Ibrahim A. Habiba. (2017), NGOs and Development Work in Developing Countries: A Critical Review American Journal of Innovative Research and Applied Sciences, 5(1), 1-6.
[18] Jagannaathan, Sh. (1999). The Role of non-Governmental Organizations in Primary Education: A Study of Six NGOs in India. Retrieved
From:http://elibrary.worldbank.org/doi/abs/10.1596/1813-9450-2530.
[19] Kalemba, B. (2013). Community Participation in Education Delivery: A Study of How Community School Target OVCs in Chipulukusu, Zambia, Master’s Thesis. Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).
[20] Krafft, C. (2015). Increasing educational attainment in Egypt: The impact of early childhood care and education. Economics of Education Review, 46, 127–143.
[21] Lewis, D. (2009). Nongovernmental Organizations, Definition, and History. London School of Economics and Political Science.
[22] Lewis, G. O. (2016). NGOs, development, and dependency : A case study of save the children in Malawi. Senior Projects, (150), 64.
[23] Maclure, R. (2000). NGOs and Education in Sub-Saharan Africa. Instruments of all Hegemony or Surreptitious Resistance. The University of Ottawa. Education & Society, 8 (2), 25-44.
[24] Manli Li. (2007). The Role and Activities of NGOs on Young Faculty Development in Teachers.
[25] Ministry of Education (2010), the Situation of Education in Egypt: A Report Based on National.
[26] Ministry of Education (2013a), Situation Analyses of the Pre-primary Level of Education in Egypt.
[27] Ministry of Education, (2003). The National Plan for Education for All (2002/2003-2015/2016), Cairo. Retrieved from: http://planipolis.iiep.unesco.org/upload/Egypt/Egypt%20EFA%20Plan.pdf.
[28] Ministry of Education, (2007). National Strategic Plan for Pre-University Education Reform in Egypt (2007/08-2011/12).
The Development of Education in Egypt (2004-2008): A National Report. Cairo. Retrieved from:http://www.ibe.unesco.org/National_Reports/ICE_2008/egypt_NR08.pdf.
[29] Mundy, K., & L. Murphy. (2001). Transnational advocacy, global civil society. Emerging evidence from National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, (2007). The Science of Early Childhood Development. Center on the Developing Child, Harvard University, 1-13.
[30] Nkuna, D. N. (1999). The Role of Non-Governmental Organizations in Early Childhood. Development programs in Giyani. Rand Afrikaans University, Faculty of Education and Nursing, South Africa.
[31] Pollock, J. (2013). State Manipulation of NGOs: Government –Civil Society Relations in Egypt. Master Degree Thesis. The Fletcher School.
[32] Sakya, Th.M. (2000). Role of NGOs in the Development of Non-Formal Education in Nepal, CICE Hiroshima University, Journal of International Cooperation in Education Vol. 3, No. 2, pp11-24.
[33] Sayed, F.H. (2006). Transforming Education in Egypt: Western influence and Domestic Policy Reform. The American University in Cairo Press.
[34] Stromquist, N. (1998). NGOs in a new paradigm of civil society. Current Issues in Comparative the field of education. Comparative Education Review, 45(1), 85-126.
[35] Ulleberg, I. (2009). The Role and Impact of NGOs in capacity Development: From replacing the state to reinvigorating education. UNESCO and the International Institute for Educational Planning. Retrieved from: http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0018/001869/186980e.pdf.
[36] UNESCO (2009). Educational Marginalization in National Education Plans. Retrieved from: http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0018/001866/186608e.pdf.
[37] USAID (2007). Reaching the Underserved: Complementary Models of Effective Schooling. Retrieved From: http://www.equip123.net/docs/e2-CompModelsEffectiveSchooling- Book.pdf.
[38] Willetts, P. (2002). What is a Non-Governmental Organization? City University, London. Retrieved from: http://www.staff.city.ac.uk/p.willetts/CS-NTWKS/NGO-ART.HTM.
[39] World Bank. (2002). Arab Republic of Egypt Strategic Options for Early Childhood Education, (24772).
[40] World Bank. (2011). learning for all: Investing in People’s Knowledge and Skills to Promote Development.
[41] World Bank Group Education Strategy 2020, 1–112. Retrieved from:http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/169531468331015171/pdf/649590WP0 REPLA00W B0EdStrategy0final.pdf.
[42] Zaalouk, Malak (2004), the Pedagogy of Empowerment: Community Schools as a Social Movement Egypt. American University in Cairo Press. Cairo, Egypt.

Mostafa Hamdy El Said Ahmed, “The Role of the Non-Governmental Organizations in Early Childhood Development in Egypt: A Case Study of Educate Me Foundation in Giza Governorate” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.179-188 December 2020  DOI : http://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41209

Download PDF

pdf

Influence of Art Teachers’ Operational Competence on Students’ Art Learning Achievemen

GANDONU, Sewanu Peter, AJAYI, Noah Oluwasanjo, ORIDOLA, Adeola Ibrahim – December 2020 Page No.: 189-195

This study examines the influence of art teachers’ operational competence on students’ art learning achievement, using Clustered Students Teaching (CST) approach. Through the exploration of existing relevant literature, the study categorizes the key aptitudes that form an art teacher’s competence and with that, a Model of Aptitudes in Art Teachers’ Operational Competence (MATCo) was developed. Test One of the study tested art teachers’ operational competence through an assessment of practical art-teaching class; to assess art teaching skills of the teachers, while Test Two involved data gathering through a Study-Specific Questionnaire on Art Teachers’ Competence (SSQATOCo), consisting of thirty items generated from the objectives. The sample for the study consists of five (5) visual art teachers with Masters’ degree in Visual arts and one hundred (100) Senior Secondary School Visual art students, selected from five (5) schools within Badagry Township who were systematically grouped into 5 clusters. Data gathered was statistically tested using the Chi-square at 0.05 level of significance. Findings from the study reveal that competence in art theory, art practice and instructional methodology are key aptitudes of an art teacher, that not all art teachers have required competence, and that incompetence in these key aptitudes account for the reason why students’ art learning achievement is low. Recommendations are made based on the findings.

Page(s): 189-195                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 January 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41210

 GANDONU, Sewanu Peter
Department of Fine and Applied Arts, Adeniran Ogunsanya College of Education, Lagos, Nigeria

 AJAYI, Noah Oluwasanjo
Department of Fine and Applied Arts, Adeniran Ogunsanya College of Education, Lagos, Nigeria

 ORIDOLA, Adeola Ibrahim
Department of Fine and Applied Arts, Adeniran Ogunsanya College of Education, Lagos, Nigeria

REFERENCES
[1] Amsami, B., Mohammed,Y. & Mazila, E., (2015). Visual art Teachers and Performance Assessment Methods in Nigerian Senior Secondary Schools. Mgbakoigba: Journal of African Studies, Volume 4,1-18.
[2] Anon., n.d. Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary.6th ed. s.l.:s.n.
[3] Federal Republic of Nigeria, (2012). Nigeria Certificate in Education Minimum Standards. (2012ed.) Abuja: National Commission forColleges of Education.
[4] Flipovic, S., (2018). The role of basic and specific competences in the teaching of fine art in Serbia. http://www.cyberleninka.ru
[5] Gandonu, S. P., (2019). The CEFR-VL and its suitability to Art Education in Nigeria – a review. International Journal of Education throughArt, 15(1),27-33.
[6] Gandonu, S. P., Azeez, O., Aderinto, O. Oridola, A., (2019).Employing Corporal Punishment in Management of Visual Art Classin Lagos State Senior Secondary Schools: Challenging the Oppressive Pedagogy. Nigerian Education Review, 12(1),209-220.
[7] Haanstra, F., (2013). Research into Competency Models in Art Education. Amsterdam : School of the Arts/ Utrecht University.
[8] Harris, A. & Muijs, D., (2005). Improving Schools Through Teacher Leadership. Berkshire: OpenUniversity Press..
[9] Katz, J. & Slomka, G., (2000). Achievement Testing.In: G. Gerald & H. Michel, eds. Handbook of Psychological Assessment. 3rd ed.Oxford: Pergamon Press,149-182.
[10] Koeppen, K., Klieme, E. & Leutner, D., (2008). Current Issues inCompetence Modelling and Assessment. Journal of Psychology, 216(2), 61-73.
[11] Little, O., Goe, L. & Bell, C., (2009). A Practical Guideto Evaluating Teacher Effectiveness. Washington, DC:National Comprehensive Centre for Teacher Quality.
[12] Naz, K., (2016). Effects of teachers’ professional competence on students’ academic achievements at Secondary School level in Muzaffarabad District.Muzaffarabad District, Munich, GRIN Verlag,:
[13] Nbina, J., (2012). Teachers’ competence and students’ academic performance in senior secondary schools chemistry: is there arelationship?. Global Journal of Educational Research, 11(1),15-
[14] Ode, E. J., (2016). Strategies for Improving Quality of Teachers inVisual Arts Programmes in Nigerian Colleges of Education for Optimum Productivity. JONTTE,27-34.
[15] Okonkwo, I. E., (2014). Towards Quality Art Education: Challenges and Opportunities. Unizik Journal of Arts and Humanities,110 – 130.
[16] Olasehinde-Williams, F., Lasiele, Y. & Owolabi, H., (2018). Teachers’Knowledge Indices as Predictors of Secondary School Students’Academic Achievement in Kwara State, Nigeria. IAFOR Journal of Education, 6(1), 73-90.
[17] Onwuasoanya, F., (2009). Competencies Needed for Teaching Fine and Applied Arts in Secondary Schools in Nsukka Zone. Nsukka: Unpublished M.A Thesis.
[18] Opoko, P. & Nwade, J., (2014). Catching them Young: The experiences of Children Art Instructors in Nigeria. Global Journal of Arts Education, 4(2), 56-60.
[19] Sarwat, S. & Shafi, M., (2014). Impact of Perceived Teachers’ Competence on Students’ Performance: Evidence for Mediating/ Moderating Role of Class Environment. i-manager’s Journal of Psychology, May – July, 8(1),10 – 17.
[20] Shyllon, Y., (2013). Problems of Art Development In Nigeria. [Online]http://www.pmnewsnigeria.com
[21] UNESCO, (2018). Guidebook on Education for Sustainable Development for educators – Effective teaching and learning in teachereducation institutions in Africa. Paris: UNESCO.
[22] UNICEF, (2019). Every Child Learns: UNICEF Education Strategy 2019-2030. New York: United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF).
[23] Walling, D. & Davis, J., 2020. School, Preparation of Teachers. http://www.education.stateuniversity.com
[24] Westera, W., (2001). Competences in Education: A Confusion of Tongues. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 33(1),75-88.

GANDONU, Sewanu Peter, AJAYI, Noah Oluwasanjo, ORIDOLA, Adeola Ibrahim, “Influence of Art Teachers’ Operational Competence on Students’ Art Learning Achievemen” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.189-195 December 2020  DOI : https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41210

Download PDF

pdf

The difference between Educate Me preschoolers and their counterparts of traditional schools in the socio-emotional development domain

Mostafa Hamdy El Said Ahmed – December 2020 Page No.: 196-203

The Socioemotional development is considered as an important factor in child development. This study aims to compare the scores of (KG1, and KG2) betweenEducate Me preschoolers(treatment) and their counterparts of traditional schools(control) in socio-emotional development domainin the International Development & Early Learning Assessment (IDELA).in the Talbyiadistrict, Which is one of the marginalized areas in GizaGovernorate in Egypt. The results show that in the Baseline results, there is no significant difference between Educate me and non-Educate me. However, after implementing the multiple student assessment strategies that educate me adopted in Sep. 2017, the Endline result shows that there is a statistically significant difference between Educate me and non-Educate me in the domain of social-emotional development. The paper also suggests to complete the assessment and to search for alternatives to ensure the sustainability of the fund.

Page(s): 196-203                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 January 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41211

 Mostafa Hamdy El Said Ahmed
KDI School of Public Policy and Management, Egypt

[1] Bredekamp, S., Knuth, R. A., Kunesh, L. G., & Shulman, D. D. (1992). What does research say about early childhood education. Retrieved from: http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/ttsystem/teaching/eecd/Curriculum/Planning/edudev_art_00421_081806. html.
[2] Denham, S. A. (2006). Social-emotional competence as support for school readiness: What is it and how do we assess it? Early Education & Development, 17(1), 57–89.
[3] Denham, S. A., & Brown, C. (2010). “Plays nice with others”: Social-emotional learning and academic success. Early Education & Development, 21, 652–680.
[4] Gokiert, R.J., Georgis, R., Tremblay, M., Krishnan, V., Vandenberghe, C. & Lee, C. (2014). Evaluating the Adequacy of Socio-Emotional Measures in Early Childhood. Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 32(5), 441-454.
[5] Melhuish, E.C., Phan, M.B., Sylva, K., Sammons, P., Siraj-Blatchford, I. & Taggart, B. (2008). Effects of the Home Learning Environment and Preschool Center Experience upon Literacy and Numeracy Development in Early Primary School. Journal of Social Issues, 64(1), 95-114.
[6] Molfese, V.J., Molfese, P.J., Molfese, D.L., Rudasill, K.M., Armstrong, N. & Starkey, G. (2010). Executive Function Skills of 6 to 8-Year-Olds: Brain and Behavioral Evidence and Implications for School Achievement. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 35(2), 116-125.
[7] National Scientific Council on the Developing Child (2007). The science of early childhood development: Closing the gap between what we know and what we do.
[8] National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. (November 2007). The Science of Early Childhood Development. Center on the Developing Child, Harvard University, 1-13.
[9] Nores, M. & Barnett, W. S. (2010). Benefits of early childhood interventions across the world 🙁 Under) investing in the very young. Economics of Education Review, 29 (2), 271–282.
[10] Nores, M. & Barnett, W. S. (2012). Investing in Early Childhood Education: A Global Perspective. National Institute for Early Education Research. Rutgers the State University of New Jersey.
[11] Save The Children. (2016). Lessons in Literacy: 8 principles to ensure every last child can read.
[12] Yates, T., Ostrosky, M.M., Cheatham, G. A., Fettig, A., Shaffer, L., & Santos, R. M. (2008). Research synthesis on screening and assessing social-emotional competence. Retrieved from Center on the Social Emotional Foundations for Early learning http://csefel. vanderbilt.edu/documents/rs_screening_assessment.pdf.
[13] Yoder, N. (2014). Teaching the whole child: Instructional practices that support social-emotional learning in three teacher evaluation frameworks. (Retrieved from American Institutes for Research Center on Great Teachers and Leaders. Retrieved from http://www.gtlcenter.org/sites/default/files/TeachingtheWholeChild.pdf

Mostafa Hamdy El Said Ahmed “The difference between Educate Me preschoolers and their counterparts of traditional schools in the socio-emotional development domain” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.196-203 December 2020  DOI : https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41211

Download PDF

pdf

COVID-19, Cyclone Amphan and Flood 2020: How the Government of Bangladesh Managed Multiple Disasters

Musabber Ali Chisty, Nawshin Aforse, Mourupa Mohima- December 2020 Page No.: 204-212

Considering the population density of Bangladesh, existing poverty, vulnerable healthcare system and social structure, the recent COVID-19 outbreak control became a huge challenge for the government of the country. Apart from this rapidly transmitted virus, the addition of cyclone Amphan and monsoon flood almost all over the country accelerated the challenge to another level. Immediate after the declaration of the rapid surge of coronavirus pandemic, the Government of Bangladesh has initiated some strict measures to fight against the situation. The aim of this study is to critically analyze the necessary measures taken by the government to deal with this global pandemic, compounded by the super cyclone Amphan and early monsoon flood. The study is based on the secondary data sources which referred in depth views. Along with the 4,634 confirmed losses of lives till now, COVID-19 pandemic has created major impact in the economy that arises many problems. Also, the government had to undertake evacuate operation during the cyclone which eventually resulted 2.6 million affected people. From addressing the widespread of the pandemic to taking necessary steps such as creating awareness, suspension of international flights, imposing restrictions in movement, declaring lockdowns, announcing funds worth $8.56 billion, assigning designated hospitals by the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, the government has been trying to minimize the risk. Almost 70,000 CPP volunteers worked, nearly 2 million people were evacuated at risk during the cyclone. More than 1546 flood shelters, 387 medical teams and allocation of nearly BDT 9,200,000 cash including relief items were confirmed by the government to deal with the early wave of monsoon flood. In this short commentary, there is review of initiatives taken by the Bangladesh Government towards the current challenges. The study concluded with some recommendations to suggest the possible strategies to resist the growing trend of economy crushing pandemic of COVID-19, and contain with difficulties occurred due to cyclone Amphan and monsoon flood.

Page(s): 204-212                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 January 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41212

 Musabber Ali Chisty
Institute of Disaster Management and Vulnerability Studies, University of Dhaka, Dhaka-1000, Bangladesh

 Nawshin Aforse
Institute of Disaster Management and Vulnerability Studies, University of Dhaka, Dhaka-1000, Bangladesh

 Mourupa Mohima
Institute of Disaster Management and Vulnerability Studies, University of Dhaka, Dhaka-1000, Bangladesh

[1] M. Adnan, S. Khan, A. Kazmi, N. Bashir, and R. Siddique, “COVID-19 infection : Origin , transmission , and characteristics of human coronaviruses,” J. Adv. Res., vol. 24, pp. 91–98, 2020, doi: 10.1016/j.jare.2020.03.005.
[2] L. C. O’Keefe, “Middle east respiratory syndrome coronavirus,” Workplace Health and Safety, vol. 64, no. 5. pp. 184–186, 2016, doi: 10.1177/2165079915607497.
[3] Y. Guo et al., “The origin , transmission and clinical therapies on coronavirus disease 2019 ( COVID-19 ) outbreak – an update on the status,” Mil. Med. Res., vol. 7, no. 11, pp. 1–10, 2020.
[4] R. Sheervalilou et al., “COVID ‐ 19 under spotlight : A close look at the origin , transmission , diagnosis , and treatment of the 2019 ‐ nCoV disease,” J. Cell. Physiol., no. April, pp. 1–52, 2020, doi: 10.1002/jcp.29735.
[5] World Health Organization, “Coronavirus Situation Report – 184,” 2020. doi: 10.1213/xaa.0000000000001218.
[6] W. J. McKibbin and R. Fernando, “The Global Macroeconomic Impacts of COVID-19: Seven Scenarios,” 2206–0332, 2020.
[7] International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, “Operation Update Report Bangladesh : Cyclone Amphan,” 2020.
[8] G. Das, “Amphan – Maiden Super Cyclone of the Century,” May 2020.
[9] Aljazeera, “Cyclone Amphan kills dozens, destroys homes in India, Bangladesh,” 2020. https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/05/cyclone-amphan-leaves-trail-destruction-bangladesh-india-200521035745307.html (accessed Jul. 29, 2020).
[10] NAWG CARE Bangladesh, “Cyclone Amphan Joint Needs Assessment (JNA),” no. May, 2020, [Online]. Available: https://www.humanitarianresponse.info/sites/www.humanitarianresponse.info/files/documents/files/cyclone_amphan_joint_needs_assessment_nawg_31052020.pdf.
[11] FLOODLIST NEWS, “India and Bangladesh – Torrential Rain from Cyclone Amphan Triggers Flooding – FloodList,” 2020. http://floodlist.com/asia/india-bangladesh-cyclone-amphan-floods-may-2020 (accessed Aug. 26, 2020).
[12] Need Assessment Working Group, “Monsoon Floods 2020 Coordinated Preliminary Impact and Needs Assessment Bangladesh Needs Assessment Working Group,” no. July, 2020, [Online]. Available: file:///C:/Users/user/Downloads/nawg_monsoon_flood_preliminary_impact_and_kin_20200802_final.pdf.
[13] FLOODLIST NEWS, “Bangladesh – Monsoon Floods Affect 3.3 Million – FloodList,” 2020. http://floodlist.com/asia/bangladesh-monsoon-floods-update-july-2020 (accessed Aug. 26, 2020).
[14] FLOODLIST NEWS, “Bangladesh – Floods in 15 Districts Affect Almost 1.4 Million – FloodList,” 2020. http://floodlist.com/asia/bangladesh-floods-update-july-2020-2 (accessed Aug. 25, 2020).
[15] NASA, “Intense Flooding in Bangladesh,” Jul. 2020.
[16] Dhaka Tribune, “Flood situation improves across the country | DhakaTribune,”2020. https://www.dhakatribune.com/bangladesh/nation/2020/08/26/water-level-in-ganges-basin-continues-to-remain-steady (accessed Aug. 26, 2020).
[17] OCHA, “National Preparedness and Response Plan for COVID-19, Bangladesh – Bangladesh | ReliefWeb,” Jul. 2020. https://reliefweb.int/report/bangladesh/national-preparedness-and-response-plan-covid-19-bangladesh.
[18] S. Anwar, M. Nasrullah, and M. J. Hosen, “COVID-19 and Bangladesh: Challenges and How to Address Them,” Front. Public Heal., vol. 8, no. April, pp. 1–8, 2020, doi: 10.3389/fpubh.2020.00154.
[19] IDARE, “Bangladesh COVID-19 Scenario & Trend,” 2020. https://covid19bd.idare.io/.
[20] R. K. Biswas, S. Huq, A. Afiaz, and H. T. A. Khan, “A systematic assessment on COVID ‐19 preparedness and transition strategy in Bangladesh,” J. Eval. Clin. Pract., p. jep.13467-jep.13467, Aug. 2020, doi: 10.1111/jep.13467.
[21] Directorate General of Health Services and Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, “National Guidelines on Clinical Management of Coronavirus Disease 2019 ( Covid-19 ),” vol. 2019, no. March, pp. 0–28, 2020, [Online]. Available: file:///C:/Users/Lenovo/Downloads/COVID_Guideline_V4.30.3.2020 (1).pdf.
[22] UNB, “Bangladesh suspends flights to all countries except China, UK,” 2020.
[23] D. Tribune, “Covid-19: Educational institutions engaging in online, virtual classes | Dhaka Tribune,” May 2020. https://www.dhakatribune.com/bangladesh/education/2020/05/02/covid-19-educational-institutions-engaging-in-online-virtual-classes.
[24] T. F. Express, “Effects of the pandemic on the education sector in Bangladesh,” Jul. 2020. https://thefinancialexpress.com.bd/views/effects-of-the-pandemic-on-the-education-sector-in-bangladesh-1592061447.
[25] UNB, “Coronavirus: Govt not extending general holidays,” May 2020. https://unb.com.bd/category/bangladesh/coronavirus-govt-not-extending-general-holidays/52152.
[26] E. K. and R. Ahamad, “Red zone declaration process in a mess,” Jun. 2020.
[27] T. B. Standard, “Armed forces deployed in all districts to control the coronavirus | The Business Standard,” Mar. 2020.
[28] D. Tribune, “Government to increase Covid-19 test facilities at hospitals for overseas passengers | Dhaka Tribune,” Jul. 2020.
[29] UNB, “Coronavirus sample testing to be increased to 15,000 a day soon: Health Minister,” May .
[30] S. and R. Mamun Mizanur, “Govt to bear costs of private hospitals treating Covid-19 patients | Dhaka Tribune,” May 2020.
[31] United Hospitals Ltd., “United Hospital signs MoU with DGHS (Directorate General of Health Services) for joint collaboration to operate Munshiganj Isolation Centre for Corona Virus (COVID19) suspect/positive patients – United Hospital,” 2020. https://www.uhlbd.com/news/united-hospital-signs-mou-with-dghs20.
[32] N. Kamruzzaman and Sakib, “Bangladesh imposes total lockdown over COVID-19,” Mar. 2020. https://www.aa.com.tr/en/asia-pacific/bangladesh-imposes-total-lockdown-over-covid-19/1778272.
[33] T. Statesman, “Bangladesh extends restrictions on public transport, travels until May 30 – The Statesman,” May 2020.
[34] E. and A. Kamol Rashad, “General holiday for red zones in Bangladesh announced,” Jun. 2020.
[35] T. B. Standard, “DGHS issues comprehensive technical guidelines to contain Covid-19 | The Business Standard,” May 2020. https://tbsnews.net/coronavirus-chronicle/covid-19-bangladesh/dghs-issues-comprehensive-technical-guidelines-contain.
[36] IFC, “COVID-19 Management Guidance for factories in Bangladesh – Better Work,” 2020. https://betterwork.org/portfolio/covid-19-management-guidance-for-factories-in-bangladesh/.
[37] New Age, “1 jailed, 29 fined for hoarding, hiking mask price,” 2020. https://www.newagebd.net/article/101876/1-jailed-29-fined-for-hoarding-hiking-mask-price (accessed Sep. 09, 2020).
[38] UNB, “PRAN-RFL donates protective equipment to police, health workers in Ctg,” Jun. 2020. https://unb.com.bd/category/business/pran-rfl-donates-protective-equipment-to-police-health-workers-in-ctg/53452.
[39] T. B. Standard, “State Minister Shahriar gives safety equipment to healthcare providers in Rajshahi | The Business Standard,” Apr. 2020.
[40] BetterWork, “Bangladesh Updates – Better Work,” 2020. https://betterwork.org/2020/04/15/bangladesh-updates/.
[41] M. Rahman, “COVID-19 boosts digitization of higher education in Bangladesh,” Aug. 2020. https://blogs.worldbank.org/endpovertyinsouthasia/covid-19-boosts-digitization-higher-education-bangladesh.
[42] Bdnews24.com, “Warning Signal No. 2 as depression turns into cyclone‘Amphan,’”2020. https://bdnews24.com/bangladesh/2020/05/16/warning-signal-no.-2-as-depression-turns-into-cyclone-amphan (accessed Sep. 07, 2020).
[43] Dhaka Tribune, “Super cyclone Amphan barrels toward Bangladesh,” 2020. https://www.dhakatribune.com/bangladesh/2020/05/18/super-cyclone-amphan-barrels-towards-bangladesh (accessed Sep. 07, 2020).
[44] International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, “Emergency Plan of Action ( EPoA ) Bangladesh : Cyclone Amphan A Situation Analysis,” 2020.
[45] Department of Disaster Management, “Relief Item and Allocation Notice,” 2020.
[46] The Business Standard, “Armed forces step in post-cyclone recovery,” 2020. https://tbsnews.net/environment/cyclone-amphan/armed-forces-step-post-cyclone-recovery-84286 (accessed Sep. 08, 2020).
[47] Department of Disaster Management, “Housing Item Allocation,” 2020.
[48] The Daily Star, “Repair embankments damaged in Cyclone Amphan on urgent basis,” 2020. https://www.thedailystar.net/country/news/repair-embankments-damaged-cyclone-amphan-urgent-basis-1905421 (accessed Sep. 08, 2020).
[49] Dhaka Tribune, “Govt taking Tk100cr project to repair embankments,”2020. https://www.dhakatribune.com/bangladesh/2020/05/28/zahid-faruk-govt-taking-tk100cr-project-to-repair-embankments (accessed Sep. 08, 2020).
[50] International Committee of the Red Cross, “Information bulletin Bangladesh : Floods The situation,” 2020. [Online]. Available: file:///C:/Users/user/Downloads/daily flood reports/IBBDfl130720.pdf.
[51] Department of Disaster Management, “Daily Disaster Report 30.07.2020,” 2020.
[52] International Committee of the Red Cross, “Information bulletin Bangladesh: Monsoon Floods,” 2020. [Online]. Available: file:///C:/Users/user/AppData/Local/Mendeley Ltd./Mendeley Desktop/Downloaded/Unknown – Unknown – Glide n° FL-2020-000161-BGD.pdf.
[53] Department of Disaster Management, “Daily Disaster Report 31.08.2020,”2020.[Online].Available: file:///C:/Users/user/Downloads/daily flood reports/2020-09-02-16-32-c6ecf59e20d4b47b670f8e3951b1e3bc destroction details.pdf.
[54] World Health Organization, “WHO Bangladesh COVID-19 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Update,” vol. 21, no. 182–183, pp. 60–66, 2020, [Online]. Available: file:///C:/Users/user/Downloads/daily flood reports/who-covid-19-update-21-20200720.pdf.
[55] UNHCR, “United Nations Nations Unies Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs,” 2020. [Online]. Available: file:///C:/Users/user/AppData/Local/Mendeley Ltd./Mendeley Desktop/Downloaded/Unknown – Unknown – United Nations Nations Unies Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs.pdf.
[56] Need Assessment Working Group, “Needs Assessment Working Group Bangladesh BANGLADESH Response Modality and Type of Organization Access to the Fund by Type of Organization,” 2020.[Online].Available: https://public.tableau.com/views/Flood4W1stRound/Sheet24?:language=en&:display_count=y&:origin=viz_share_link.
[57] Need Assessment Working Group, “Needs Assessment Working Group (NAWG) Bangladesh Monsoon Floods 2020 Coordinated Preliminary Impact and Needs Assessment,” 2020.
[58] The Financial Express, “BD economy grew 5.24pc in FY20 amid pandemic,” The Financial Express, 2020. https://thefinancialexpress.com.bd/economy/bd-economy-grew-524pc-in-fy20-amid-pandemic-1597136362.
[59] New Age, “GOVERNMENT MEASURES TO FIGHT COVID-19 : Is it enough?,” New Age Youth desk, 2020. .

Musabber Ali Chisty, Nawshin Aforse, Mourupa Mohima, “COVID-19, Cyclone Amphan and Flood 2020: How the Government of Bangladesh Managed Multiple Disasters” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.204-212 December 2020  DOI : https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41212

Download PDF

pdf

Evaluation of Profit Impact of Marketing Strategies on Firm’s Sales Performance: A Study of Branded Soft Beverage Drinks in Lagos

Adebola O. Lukmon & Iheanacho O. Albert- December 2020 Page No.: 213-220

This paper is an evaluation of profit impact of marketing strategies on firm’s sales performance using branded soft beverage drinks in Lagos. Specific emphasis is laid on products of Nigeria Bottling Company (NBC, Plc). The objectives were to determine the profit impact of product strategy on organisations sale volume, to assess the profit impact of pricing strategy on organisations sales market share, to determine the profit impact of distribution strategy on consumers purchase decision. Survey research design was adopted for this study. A primary source of data was used. Product moment correlations coefficient analysis was used to test the hypotheses with the aid of statistical package for social sciences (SPSS v. 20). The study found a significant relationship between marketing strategies adoption and sales profit in Nigeria Bottling Company Plc; there is a strong, positive correlation between product strategy of NBC Plc and profit impact on the organisations sales which was statistically significant. The finding of this study led to the conclusion that marketing strategies adopted by Nigeria Bottling Company has profit impact on the organiation’s sales performance; product strategy of Nigeria Bottling Company has significant profit impact of on organisations sale volume. The study recommend that Nigerian Bottling Company need not to restrict their strategy areas to Marketing mix variables but must ascertain what kinds of strategies (e.g. quality, pricing, vertical integration, innovation, advertising) amongst other that best impact on the sales performance and profit of the organisation.

Page(s): 213-220                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 January 2021

 Soro Mike Hakin
Department of Marketing, DS Adegbenro ICT Polytechnic, Itori, Ogun State, Nigeria

 Iheanacho O. Albert
Department of Marketing, Faculty of Business Administration University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus, Nigeria

[1] Achumba, I. C. (2000). Strategic Marketing Management, Mac-Williams and Capital Publisher Inc, Charlotte. U.S.A
[2] Achumba, I.C. and Osuagwu, L. (1994).Marketing Fundamentals and Practice, Rock Hill: USA: AI-Marks Educational Research, Inc.1-40.
[3] Adebisi, S. and Babatunde, B. (2011) Strategic influence of Promotional Mix on Organisational Sales Turnover in the face of Strong Competitor Business Intelligent Journal. July.Vol.4 No 2pg342-360
[4] Akinyele, S.T (2010) Strategic Management Practice on the Performance of Firms in Nigeria Oil and Gas Industry International Journal Research Consumer Management 1 (4) pg 6-33.
[5] Boone, Louis E., and David L. Kurtz.(2005). Contemporary Marketing 2005.Thomson South-Western, 2005.
[6] Chiliya.N., Herbst, G. and Roberts-Lombard, M. (2009). The impact of marketing strategies on profitability of small grocery shops in South African townships, African Journal of Business Management, 3(3), 070-079.
[7] Denny, G. (2016).Profit Impact of Marketing Strategy. Fundamental Company Report, company’s affairs marketpublishers.com/companies
[8] Farris, Paul W., and Michael J. Moore (2004). The Profit Impact of Marketing Strategy Project: Retrospect and Prospects. Cambridge University Press.
[9] Ibojo, B. O and Ogunsiji, A (2011) Effect of Sales Promotion as a tool on Organisational Performance.Journal of Emergency Trends in Economic and Management Science (JETEMS) 2(1): pg 9-13
[10] Koce, H. D. (2010), Marketing. Journal of Marketing, Volume 2, Number 1, p31-37.
[11] Kotler, P. and Armstrong, G. (2006), Principles of Marketing, 11th Edition. New Jersey: Peearson Pearson Education Plc Ltd
[12] Ofoegbu, O.E and Ibojo, B.O (2015).Effect of Strategic Product on Customer Satisfaction.A case study of a reputable organization in the Food and Beverage Industry. ACU Journal of Social and Management Sciences, AjayiCrowther University, Oyo.Vol 1 No 1 September, 2015 pp141-158
[13] Osuagwu, L.(2001). An evaluation of the marketing strategies of Nigerian insurance companies, Academy of Marketing Studies Journal,Vol. 5(2), pgI7-30.
[14] Schwenk, C. R. and Shrader, C.B. (1993). Effects of formal strategic mission statement on financial performance in small firms: A meta- analysis. Journal of Strategic Marketing Management, Vol. 23, No.4, Sage Publishers, California

Adebola O. Lukmon & Iheanacho O. Albert “Evaluation of Profit Impact of Marketing Strategies on Firm’s Sales Performance: A Study of Branded Soft Beverage Drinks in Lagos” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.213-220 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/213-220.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Quality Improvement of Nursing Services In Federal Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar—Nigeria

Umoh, Edet O. (PhD); Endra, Michael; Otosi, Okosienen; Anake, Monday; Nkanga, Dominic; Unwana, Udomoh; Usani, Patrick; Ejoh, Vincent & Amu, Denis- December 2020 Page No.: 221-235

In Nursing, quality improvement is a systemic and continuous action that leads to measurable improvement of nursing care on special group of patients. It specifically aims at attaining a different performance level to improve quality by working towards achieving improved and better outcomes. This study was undertaken to assess quality improvement of nursing services in Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria. The researchers carried out an observational assessment using a quality appraisal checklist to vet and rate of nurses’ performance in-line with the required standard of nursing practices in a psychiatric setting. The assessment covered six (6) aspects of nursing services including; nurses’ routines, nurses’ activities, maintenance of patients’ right, nurses’ general appearance, and maintenance of working tools. Data generated for the study were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Percentage scores were computed to assess and describe the level of performance of the nurses in each of the respective aspects of assessment. Findings of the study revealed that the nurses had very good performance in the maintenance of patients’ right (93%) and other activities related to nursing care (82%). The nurses had good performance in the other three (3) aspects of assessment including nurses’ general appearance (79%), maintenance of working tools (79%), and nurses’ routine (72%). Comparing the overall performance of the nurses based the respective wards, the study revealed that Ward III had the best performance with a score of 93%, followed by Ward II (91%), Ward IV (89%), Ward V (87%), OPE (86%), Ward VI (85%), Ward VII (82%), OPE (79%) and Ward I (75%) respectively. However, the general rating of the assessed items revealed that nurses had poor performance in conducting nurses’ review and maintenance of working tools and equipment; and fair performance in items including; handing/taking over of duty, patients and instrument; punctuality at work; cleanliness of working environment; documentation of events; and supervision of activities. On this note, the researchers recommended among other things that there should be continuous re-education of nursing staff by personnel in Continuous Education Unit and sponsorship of workshop, seminars and online education to update knowledge and efficiency.

Page(s): 221-235                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 January 2020

 Umoh, Edet O. (PhD)
Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar,Nigeria

  Endra, Michael
Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar,Nigeria

  Otosi, Okosienen
Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar,Nigeria

 Anake, Monday
Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar,Nigeria

  Nkanga, Dominic
Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar,Nigeria

  Unwana, Udomoh
Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar,Nigeria

 Usani, Patrick
Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar,Nigeria

  Ejoh, Vincent
Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar,Nigeria

  Amu, Denis
Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar,Nigeria

[1] The Institute of Medicine of the National Academics; http://www.iom.edu/AboutIOM.aspx
[2] Advances in Quality Improvement: Principles and Framework, Spring 2001 issue of the Quality Assurance Project’s QA Brief
[3] Bettencourt, E. (2014). 14 items that new nurses should have in their bag. DiversityNursing Blog
[4] https://www.webmd.com/mental-health/rights-mental-illness
[5] https://www.cchr.org/about-us/mental-health-declaration-of-human-rights.html
[6] Jamshidi, N., Molazem, Z., Sherif, F., Torabizadeh, C. & Kalyani, M. (2016). The challenges of nursing students in the clinical learning environment: A Qualitative Study. The Scientific World Journal, Volume 2016, Article ID 1846178 | 7 pages | https://doi.org/10.1155/2016/1846178
[7] Ledesma-delgado, E. & Mendes, M. (2009). The nursing process presented as routine care actions: Building its meaning in clinical nurses’ perspective. Revista Latino-Americana de Enfermagem, vol.17 no.3, On-line version ISSN 1518-8345, https://doi.org/10.1590/S0104-11692009000300008
[8] NMCN (2015), Code of Professional Conduct, Standard/Code of Professional Conduct, https://www.nmcn.gov.ng/codec.html
[9] Nursing Service Directorate (NSD) (2016). Ethical conduct, uniform attire and personal appearance policy for nurses and midwives. Health care service directorate, office of the deputy Prime Minister, Ministry of Health.
[10] Nursing100.com (2018). What do nurses do on Daily Basis? http://nursing100.com/what-do-nurses-do-on-a-daily-basis/
[11] Sharac, J., McCrone, P., Sabes-Figuera, R., Csipke, E., Wood, A. & Wykes, T. (2010). Nurse and patient activities and interaction on psychiatric inpatients wards: A Litereture Review. Int J Nurs Stud. 2010 Jul; 47(7): 909-917. doi: 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2010.03.012, PMCID: PMC4018996

Umoh, Edet O. (PhD); Endra, Michael; Otosi, Okosienen; Anake, Monday; Nkanga, Dominic; Unwana, Udomoh; Usani, Patrick; Ejoh, Vincent & Amu, Denis “Quality Improvement of Nursing Services In Federal Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar—Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.221-235 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/221-235.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Occupational Risk and Hazards among Nurses and Health Workers in Federal Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar

Umoh, Edet O. PhDN – December 2020 Page No.: 236-261

Though every workplace possess its peculiar risk, psychiatric setting is composed of patients with unpredictable mental state and whose behavior can change to adversity on his/her attendance at any time. Consequently, healthcare workers in this healthcare setting are faced with diverse problems resulting from threat, physical confrontation, verbal and physical assault, poisoning and other potential dangers. This study however was embarked upon to ascertain the major hazards and risks faced by nurses and other health care providers in Federal Psychiatric Hospital, and proffer useful recommendations on the possible ways of cushioning their effects. Six (6) research questions were raised and three (3) hypotheses developed to give direction to the study. Related literatures were adequately reviewed. Health Belief Model and the Theory of Reasoned Action were the theoretical framework used as these theories were found related to the study. The study adopted a descriptive survey research design; the respondents were conveniently selected from all the clinical departments of the hospital for the study. A well validated and reliable questionnaire was used as an instrument for data collection. Data collected were presented using frequency table and charts, and were analyzed using simple percentages and weighted mean scores. The research hypotheses were tested using Pearson Chi-square statistical analysis significant at 0.05. Findings revealed the regular hazards encountered by health care providers in Federal Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar to include noise, verbal and physical aggression, darkness (lack of light), poor lighting system, and attack from patients. The level of exposure of Health care workers in the hospital to hazards and/or risks was moderate. Health assistants were the ones with the highest level of exposure (75.0%), followed by nurses (64.7%) while the least exposed among the cadres of health care workers were pharmacists (16.7%). However, exposure to workplace hazard has significant impact and/or effect on the health status and clinical output of health care workers in the hospital (p<0.05) respectively. To cope with these hazards, HCWs employed the following strategies: compliance with all safety instructions, adherence to infection control precautions regarding blood, body fluids and infectious tissues, wearing safety equipments during working hours, and reporting of unsafe situations that are highly hazardous to staff for quick interventions. The Chi-square test of hypothesis three revealed that only “attending lectures/seminars organized on occupational safety in the hospital and beyond” though not a significant measure adopted by the respondents, has statistical significant impact on the exposure of the respondents to workplace hazard. Finally, results of the study revealed that the significant efforts put by the hospital’s management in minimizing workplace hazard were: carrying out strict supervision to ensure wards and environmental sanitation, and maintaining emergency team to assist and provide care to un-complying patients. Nonetheless, effort put by the hospital’s management in minimizing hazards in the hospital was perceived to be fairly poor according to the respondents’ rating. Based on these findings, the researcher recommend a call to traditional leaders, governments and management officials to provide the hospital with steady power supply, ensure 3 monthly fumigation of the hospital premises, employ more nursing and health assistants, and schedule regular continuous education to healthcare providers for update of potential risk and hazard management.

Page(s): 236-261                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 january 2020

 Umoh, Edet O. PhDN
Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar,Nigeria

[1] Adegoke BO, Akodu AK & Oyeyemi AL (2008), Work-related musculoskeletal disorders among Nigerian physiotherapists. BMC MusculoskeletDisord 9:112
[2] Ahasan MR & Partanen T (2001), Occupational health and safety in the least developed countries—a simple case of neglect J Epidemiol 11:74-80.
[3] Akangbe Ifeoluwa (2015), occupational stress and effective coping strategies in nursing, Lahti University of Applied Sciences,
[4] Aluko, OO; Adeboyo, EA; Adebisi, FT; Ewegbemi, MK; Abidoye,
[5] AT & Popoola, BF, (2016), Knowledge, Attitude and Perceptions of Occupational Hazards and Safety Practices in Nigerian Healthcare Workers, Journal List, BMC Res Notes v.9; 2016, PMC4744628, BMC Res Notes. 2016; 9: 71, Published online 2016 Feb 6, doi: 10.1186/s13104-016-1880-2, PMCID: PMC4744628
[6] Amosun AM, Degun AM, Atulomah NOS, Olanrewaju MF & Aderibigbe KA (2011), Level of knowledge regarding occupational hazards among nurses in Abeokuta, Ogun state, Nigeria, Curr Res J Biol Sci. 2011;3(6):586–590.
[7] Aon Risk Solutions, (2012), 2012 Health Care Workers Compensation Barometer.
[8] Arasi, S., Balasubramanian, A., Palsamy, J., Gurusamy, T., Diana, J.,
[9] Ravindran, Y. & Balakrishnan, K. (2015), Perception and Prevalence of Work-related health Hazards Among Healthcare Workers in Public health Facilities in Southern India, Journal List, Int J Occup Environ Health, v.21(1); Jan-Mar 2015, PMC4273523, doi: 10.1179/2049396714Y.0000000096
[10] Barbara, K., Glenora, E., Audrey B. & Shirlee, S. (2004), The Nature of Nursing, Fundamentals of Nursing: Concepts, Process and Practice, Second Edition, p.38
[11] Bureau of Labor Statistics, (2012), Economic news release: Nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses requiring days away from work, 2011, www.bls.gov/news.release/osh2.nr0.htm.
[12] Cimiotti, J.P., Aiken, L.H., Sloane, D.M. & Wu, E. (2012), Nurse staffing, burnout, and health care–associated infection, American Journal of Infection Control, 40(6): 486-490
[13] Davidson, L. et al, (2009), Recovery in practice, Oxford University Press.
[14] Department of Health and Children, (2008), Building a Culture of Patient Safety, Report of the Commission on Patient Safety and Quality Assurance, Stationery Office, Dublin.
[15] Department of Health, (2007), Best Practice in Managing Risk, Principles and evidence for best practice in the assessment and management of risk to self and others in mental health services, HMSO UK.
[16] Ergun, FS & karadakovan, A (2005), Violence towards nursing staff in emergency departments in one Turkish city. International Journal of Nursing review 52:154-160.
[17] Fernandes & Marziale, (2014), Occupational risks and illness among mental health workers.
[18] Freund, A. & Dropkin, J. (2014), Controlling Health Hazards to Hospital Workers, DOI: 10.2190/NS.23.Suppl., Source: PubMed, https://www.researchgate.net/publication/258765886
[19] Friedman RA, (2006), Violence and mental illness: how strong is the link? N Engl J Med, 2006; 355:2064–2066.
[20] Hale LJ in R (B) v Ashworth Hospital Authority, (2005) 2 AC 278, par 31
http://www.ilo.org/public/portugue/region/eurpro/lisbon/pdf/safeday2013_relatorio.pdf.
[21] Ifeoluwa, A (2015), occupational stress and effective coping strategies in nursing, Lahti University of Applied Sciences.
[22] Janz, NK. & Becker, MH (1984), “The Health Belief Model: A Decade Later”, Health Education & Behavior, 11 (1): 1–47. doi:10.1177/109019818401100101.
[23] Janz, Nancy K.; Marshall H. Becker (1984). “The Health Belief Model: A Decade Later”. Health Education & Behavior. 11 (1): 1–47. doi:10.1177/109019818401100101.
[24] Karahan A, Kav S, Abbasoglu A & Dogan N (2009), Low back pain: Prevalence and associated risk factors among hospital staff. J AdvNurs 65: 516-524
[25] Katsuro, P. & Gadzirayi, C. (2010), Impact of Occupational health and Safety on workers’ productivity: A Case of Zimbabwe food industry, African Journal of Business Management Vol. 4(13), pp. 2644-2651, 4 October, 2010, Available online at http://www.academicjournals.org/AJBM, ISSN 1993-8233 ©2010 Academic Journals
[26] Kriner, P (2016), Hospital Workers, “I really enjoy the patients–it’s the work that’s hurting me”, Health Day
[27] Lim JF. (2004), A report on needle stick injury for the year 2000, Journal of Occupational Safety and Health, 2004; 1(2):86-93.
[28] Magtubo, C. (2016), The Workplace: Hazards and Risks Psychiatric nurses face, MIMS Today
[29] Marziale MH, Galon T, Cassiolato FL & Girão FB (2012), Implementation of Regulatory Standard 32 and the control of occupational accidents, Acta Paul Enferm, 2012; 25(6):859-66.
[30] Molinari, JA (2003), Infection control: it’s evolution to the current standard precautions, J Am Dent Assoc. 2003; 134(5):569–574. doi: 10.14219/jada.archive.2003.0222.
[31] National Council on Compensation Insurance, (2013), Hospital Workers’ Compensation Claims for Policy Years 2005–2009.
[32] O’Brien‐Pallas, L., Shamian, J., Thomson, D., Alksnis, C., Koehoorn, M., Kerr, M. & Bruce,
[33] S., (2004), Work‐related disability in Canadian nurses, Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 36(4): 352-357.
[34] Ribeiro AE, Christinne RM & Espíndula BM (2010), Identification of the institutional risks in nursing professionals, Rev Eletrôn Enferm, (Centro de Estudos de Enfermagem e Nutrição), 2010; 1(1):1-16, Portuguese.
[35] Rogers, A.E., Hwang, W.T. & Scot, L.D. (2004), The effects of work breaks on staff nurse performance, Journal of Nursing Administration, 34(11): 512-519.
[36] Rogers, M; Archibald, M; Morrison, D; Wilsdon, A; Wells, E; Hoppe, M; Nahom, D & Murowchick, E (2002), “Teen Sexual Behavior: Applicability of the Theory of Reasoned Action”, Journal of Marriage and Family (Volume 64).
[37] Rosenstock, I (1974), “Historical Origins of the Health Belief Model”, Health Education & Behavior, 2 (4): 328–335, doi:10.1177/109019817400200403.
[38] Shogni, M., Mahnaz, S., Fateme, S., Shiva, H. & Sedighe, S. et al. (2008), Workplace violence and abuse against nurses in Iran. Elsevier 2:184-193
[39] Tavares JP, Beck CL, Magnago TS, Zanini RV & Lautert L (2012), Minor psychiatric disorders among nurses university faculties, Rev Latinoam Enferm, 2012; 20(1):175-82, Portuguese.
[40] Zaeem H, Zafar I & Atif R (2016), Job stress among community health workers: A multi-method study from Pakistan. International Mental Health System. www.hse.ie/eng/services/…/Mentalhealth/RiskManagementinMentalHealth.pdf

Umoh, Edet O. PhDN “Occupational Risk and Hazards among Nurses and Health Workers in Federal Psychiatric Hospital, Calabar” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.236-261 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/236-261.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Stakeholders’ role in ensuring effective financial management in Ghana’s Public Universities: A qualitative analysis of University for Development Studies.

Paul Tongkomah Saayir, William Antoorokuu Sande- December 2020 Page No.: 262-271

Financial management is an important aspect of public administration of every nation and one of the elements that make government effective. Public universities had some disregard for financial regulations, internal control mechanisms and widespread financial irregularities which led to financial losses per various audit reports. This study assessed stakeholder’s role in ensuring effective financial management. Key informant interviews and in-depth document analyses (reports analyses) were used to gather data. The findings were that; the University financial policies were adequately developed by top management but not well communicated to financial administrators; the university had weak budget supervision and monitoring as well as weak accounting and internal controls systems. The study recommended that the University should constitute a budgetary monitoring team to enhance its budgetary system, acquire up-to-date accounting software to facilitate its financial reporting and engage proactive professional internal auditors to raise the standard of the University internal control systems.

Page(s): 262-271                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 January 2020

 Paul Tongkomah Saayir
Department of Social and Business Education, SDD University of Business and Integrated Development Studies. Ghana, West Africa

 William Antoorokuu Sande
Directorate of Finance, SDD University of Business and Integrated Development Studies, Ghana, West Africa

[1] Abbey, C. P. (2010). A study on the impact of the internal audit functions as a tool for instilling financial discipline in the public sector of Ghana. MBA dissertation. London: University of Wales Institute, Cardiff.
[2] Addo, A. (2012). Audit Practice and Assurance. Accra: GPC Ltd. Arizona, C. P. (2010). Principle of Sound Financial Management Revised Edition. Retrieved from http//www.preonaaz.gov
[3] Asare, T. (2008). Internal auditing in the public sector: Promoting good governance and performance Improvement. International Journal of Government Financial Management.
[4] Baltaci, M. & Yilmaz, S. (2006). Keeping an eye on sub national governments: Internal control and audit at local levels. World Bank Publications, pp. 7-15.
[5] Bradstreet Report (2004), Better Budgeting: A Report on Better Budgeting Forum. London: CIMA.
[6] Ghana Audit Service (2014). Report of the auditor-general on the accounts of public universities in Ghana for the year ended 31st December 2014: Retrieved from http// www.ghaudit.org
[7] Ghana Audit Service (2015). Report of the auditor-general on the accounts of public universities in Ghana for the year ended 31st December 2015: Retrieved from http// www.ghaudit.org
[8] Ghana Audit Service (2016). Report of the auditor-general on the accounts of public universities in Ghana for the year ended 31st December 2016: Retrieved from http// www.ghaudit.org
[9] Ghana Audit Service (2017). Report of the auditor-general on the accounts of public universities in Ghana for the year ended 31st December 2017: Retrieved from http// www.ghaudit.org
[10] Ghana Audit Service (2018). Report of the auditor-general on the accounts of public universities in Ghana for the year ended 31st December 2018: Retrieved from http// www.ghaudit.org
[11] Government of United States (2019). Principles of sound financial management. City of Peoria, Arizona: US
[12] International Records Management Trust (1999). From accounting to accountability: managing accounting records as a strategic resource: A study program. U K: available at www.irmt.org/documents/educ training/public sector rec/IRMT financial recs.doc
[13] Institute of Certified Public Accountants of Kenya (2017). ICPAK Public Financial Management (PFM) Conference. Nairobi: ICPAK.
[14] Lee, R.D., Johnson, W.J. & Joyce, P.G. (2004). Public budgeting systems. Canada: Jones and Barlett Publishers, Inc.
[15] Ministry of Finance (2016). Public financial management Act (PFM) Act 921). Accra: Ghana Publishing Corp
[16] MoFEP (2005). Financial administration manual for government departments. Accra: MoFEP
[17] Nii-Tackie, G., Marfo-Yiadom, E, & Achina, S. (2016). Determinants of internal audit effectiveness in decentralised local government administrative systems. International Journal of Business and Management 11(11). http://dx.doi.org/10.5539/jibm.v11n11p184
[18] Oduro, R. (2015). Public sector accounting and finance: IPSAS Ed. Cape Coast: University of Cape Coast.
[19] Parliament of Ghana (2016). Report of public accounts committee. Accra: Parliament Press
[20] Public Interest Accountability Committee Report (2015), Better Budgeting: A report on better financial accountability forum. Accra: PIAC.
[21] Szymanski, S. (2007). How to implement economic reforms: How to fight corruption effectively in public procurement in SEE Countries. NJ: OECD Publications
[22] Simson, R., Sharma, N. and Aziz, I. (2011). A Guide to public financial management literature. London: Overseas Development Institute.
[23] University for Development Studies (2017). Brief history of the university. Tamale: UDS. available at http://www.uds.edu.gh/about-us -history-and -facts. Retrieved on 10th December 2020
[24] University for Development Studies (2017). University for Development Studies Strategic Plan 2017-2023. Tamale: UDS
[25] University for Development Studies (2017). University for Development Studies Statutes. Tamale: UDS
[26] University for Development Studies (2011). Financial Accounting Manual. Tamale: UDS.
[27] World Bank (1998). Public expenditure framework handbook. Washington DC: World Bank

Paul Tongkomah Saayir, William Antoorokuu Sande “Stakeholders’ role in ensuring effective financial management in Ghana’s Public Universities: A qualitative analysis of University for Development Studies” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.262-271 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/262-271.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Examining Female Students’ Artistic Production towards the Teaching of Visual Culture: Exploratory Study in Selected Female Colleges of Education in Ashanti Region, Ghana

Augusta Adu-Sakyi, Abraham Aibie – December 2020 Page No.: 272-275

The paper delved on how tutors of Arts education can meticulously assist learners comprehend imagery and text as regards how the virtual world is manipulated. The synopsis being emphasized that tutors of Arts education ought to appreciate that consumption remains the indispensable basis of the social order of teaching and learning in the current curriculum and visual culture in Colleges of Education in Ghana.
Through the tutelage offered to learners to better appreciate the processes and products associated with visual culture, we imbibe in these learners, clarity of how imagined and constructed the world represents, leading to a better articulation of the learners’ ambitions through evolving technologies.
Qualitative research technique was adopted for the study in the form of battery of test (questionnaire) administered observation and interview guide. Simple random sampling technique was used to select two Colleges of Education in Ashanti region, thus Agogo Presbyterian Women’s College of Education and St. Louis College of Education.
The article found significant association between female students’ artistic production and the teaching of visual culture in the selected Colleges of Education and recommended that Arts Tutors in Colleges of Education should prioritize students’ artistic production even though there are associated challenges such as low patronage of the programme, inadequate studios as well as low esteem towards Visual Arts education.
Accordingly, the authors’ remarks on artistic production and visual culture was that “As long as academicians remain astute, there is the need to restrict our precious time debating on the structural deficit of curriculum and instead focus more on its meanings; we would concentrate less on state limited guidelines and more on the interconnectedness of the local and global communities ; we would be less motivated as regards the technical attributes of art and focus more on the fundamental tenets of art ;and more importantly, we would harness educational scarce resources from teaching students what we were taught and more on what they should rather know.

Page(s): 272-275                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 11 January 2021

 Augusta Adu-Sakyi
Tutor, Creative Arts Department, Agogo Presbyterian Women’s College of Education.

  Abraham Aibie
Tutor, Creative Arts Department, Methodist College of Education

[1] Asare-Danso, S. (2014).Effects of Educational Policies on Teacher Education in Ghana: A Historical Study of the Presbyterian College of Education. International Journal of Humanities and Social Science.Vol. 4, No. 6;
[2] Annoh, C. (1989). Education. Kumasi: Cita Printing Press.Boulder Valley School District, 2014. Philosophy and Rationale for Visual Arts Education.
[3] Aweso D.M, Armstrong E.A, Nicholas Aning Boadu A.N, Francis Kwesi Nsakwa K.F and Nyarko-N.,E (2020),”E-learning in Tertiary Education in Ghana: Exploring Its Nuggets and Nuances for Stakeholder Engagement’’, International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) |Volume IV, Issue X, December 2020|ISSN 2454-6186.
[4] Ben Walmsley (2020),”The death of arts marketing: a paradigm shift from consumption to enrichment’’, Arts and the MarketVol. 9 No. 1, 2019pp. 32-49.
[5] Curriculum Research and Development Division (CRDD), (2014). Teaching syllabus for Fundamentals in Visual Arts. Accra Ghana: Ministry of Education.
[6] Johnson K. K., and Agbeyewornu K. K.,(2016). The Challenges of Visual Arts Education in Ghana’s Colleges of Education. International Journal of Scientific Engineering and Applied Science (IJSEAS) – Volume-2, Issue-3, March 2016.
[7] Kerry Freedman (2000), “Social Perspectives on Art Education in the U. S.: Teaching Visual Culture in a Democracy,” Studies in Art Education 41, no. 4 : pp. 314-329, https://doi.org/10.2307/1320676
[8] Mariana-D., G., Zamar and Emilio A.Segura, (2020),’’ Implications of Virtual Reality in Arts Education: Research Analysis in the Context of Higher Education’’, Journal of Educational Science.
[9] Nicholas Mirzoeff (2015), “Class lecture, Visual Culture Methods from New York University, New York, NY Fall”.
[10] Paul Duncum, “Visual Culture: Developments, Definitions, and Directions for Art Education,” Studies in Art Education 42, no.2 (2001): pp. 101-112, https://doi.org/10.2307/1321027

Augusta Adu-Sakyi, Abraham Aibie, “Examining Female Students’ Artistic Production towards the Teaching of Visual Culture: Exploratory Study in Selected Female Colleges of Education in Ashanti Region, Ghana.” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.272-275 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/272-275.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Dilemma of Violent Extremism and Conflict Escalation among Youths in Myanmar

Ephraim Bassey Emah- December 2020 Page No.: 276-292

Radicalisation and violent extremism remain a global concern that hinders peacebuilding in many ways. As youths become radicalised and participate in ethnic armies in Myanmar, their engagements are motivated by ethnonationalism agendas. Ethnonationalism encompasses the demand for political recognition, resource and territorial control, and liberation from structural injustices and repressive systems that marginalise ethnic minorities. These demands emerge from feelings of relative deprivation and frustration, which force ethnic armed organisations (EAOs) to seek recognition for their local constituencies. While several contemporary conversations conceptualise radicalisation and extremism in Myanmar from religious perspectives, they ignore the proliferation of political violence through ethnic ideologies as a form of extremism. Therefore, a clear understanding of extremism emerges when research questions why and how people radicalise, particularly when the phenomenon is viewed as an ‘ecology’ – a system with interconnected elements. Thus, the absence of systemic assessment of the structural factors that perpetuate vertical and horizontal forms of violence in Myanmar impedes a clear understanding of the complexity of the conflicts, and the motivations for youth indulgence in extremism. This research contributes to the understanding of politically-motivated grievances as a significant driver of violent extremism in Myanmar. Using research findings, it argues that violent extremism among youths in Myanmar is politically-motivated, emerging due to structural injustices perpetrated against ethnic minorities. These feelings result from relative deprivation, frustration and aggression, and the quest for significance, spurring a resolve to liberate one’s ethnic group from repressive and hegemonic political systems that impede participatory opportunities to decision-making and leadership.

Page(s): 276-292                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 11 January 2020

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41213

 Ephraim Bassey Emah
University of Notre Dame, IN 46556, United States

[1] Ackermann, A. (2003). The Idea and Practice of Conflict Prevention. Journal of Peace Research, 40(3), 339-347.
[2] Al-Lamim, M. (2009). Studies in Radicalisation: State of the Field Report. Politics and International Relations Working Paper. Retrieved from: https://static1.squarespace.com/static/566d81c8d82d5ed309b2e935/t/567ab488b204d58613bf92aa/1450882184032/Studies_of_Radicalisation_State_of_the_F.pdf
[3] Andrienne, J. (2018). Understanding China’s Response to the Rakhine Crisis. United States Institute of Peace. Retrieved from: https://www.usip.org/sites/default/files/2018-02/sr419-understanding-chinas-response-to-the-rakhine-crisis.pdf
[4] Ban, K. (2015). Plan of Action to Prevent Violent Extremism: United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy. Retrieved from: https://www.un.org/en/ga/search/view_doc.asp?symbol=A/70/675
[5] Borum, R. (2012). Radicalisation into Violent Extremism II: A Review of Conceptual Models and Empirical Research. Journal of Strategic Security, 4(4), 37-62. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5038/1944-0472.4.4.2.
[6] Bowen, J. (2017). Why Preventing Violent Extremism Needs Sustaining Peace. International Peace Institute. Retrieved from: https://www.ipinst.org/2017/10/why-preventing-violent-extremism-needs-sustaining-peace
[7] Boyd-MacMillan, E. (2019). A Mental Health Approach to Understanding Violent Extremism. Ex Post Paper RAN Policy & Practice. Retrieved from: https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/sites/homeaffairs/files/what-we-do/networks/radicalisation_awareness_network/about-ran/ran-h-and-sc/docs/ran_hsc_prac_mental_health_03062019_en.pdf
[8] Breuer, J. & Elson, M (2017). Frustration – Aggression Theory. In Sturmey, P (Ed.). The Wiley Handbook of Violence and Aggression, p. 1-12. United Kingdom: John Wiley & Sons Ltd. DOI: 10.1002/9781119057574.whbva040.
[9] Buchanan, J. (2016). Militias in Myanmar. Yangon: The Asia Foundation. Retrieved from: https://asiafoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Militias-in-Myanmar.pdf
[10] Burke, A., Williams, N., Barron, P., Jolliffe, K. & Carr. T. (2017). The Contested Areas of Myanmar: Subnational Conflict, Aid, and Development. Yangon: The Asia Foundation. Retrieved from: https://asiafoundation.org/publication/contested-areas-myanmar-subnational-conflict-aid-development/
[11] Bynum, E. (2018). Understanding Inter-Ethnic Conflict in Myanmar. Retrieved from: https://www.alnap.org/system/files/content/resource/files/main/acleddata.com-Understanding%20Inter-Ethnic%20Conflict%20in%20Myanmar.pdf
[12] Callahan, M.P. (2007). Political Authority in Burma’s Ethnic Minority States: Devolution, Occupation and Coexistence. Washington DC: East-West Center Policy Studies, No. 31.
[13] Chalk, P. (2013). On the Path of Change: Political, Economic and Social Challenges for Myanmar. Australian Strategic Policy Institute (ASPI). Retrieved from: https://www.files.ethz.ch/isn/175091/On%20the%20path%20of%20change_%20political,%20economic%20and%20social%20challenges%20for%20Myanmar.pdf
[14] Clarke, S.L., Myint, S.A.S., & Siwa, Z.Y. (2019). Re-examining Ethnic Identity in Myanmar. Retrieved from: https://reliefweb.int/report/myanmar/re-examining-ethnic-identity-myanmar
[15] Cortright, D., Seyle, C., & Wall, K. (2017). Governance for Peace: How Inclusive, Participatory and Accountable Institutions Promote Peace and Prosperity. USA: Cambridge University Press.
[16] Cuesta, B.L. (2016). Myanmar: The Roadmap 7 Steps to a Disciplines Democracy. Spanish Institute for Strategic Studies. Retrieved from: http://www.ieee.es/en/publicaciones-new/documentos-de-opinion/2016/DIEEEO91-2016.html
[17] Davis, Q. (2016). Building Infrastructure for Peace: The Role of Liaison Offices in Myanmar’s Peace Process. Centre for Peace and Security Studies. Retrieved from: http://www.centrepeaceconflictstudies.org/wp-content/uploads/Role-of-Liaison-Offices-Update-jan.15.pdf
[18] Davis, Q., Hyma, R., Kirkham, A., Kry, S., Martin, M., Ngarm, S.P., Simbulan, K., Shahpur, T., Visser, L. (2016). We Want Genuine Peace: Voices of Communities from Myanmar’s Ceasefire Area 2015. The Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies (CPCS). Also available on: http://www.centrepeaceconflictstudies.org/wp-content/uploads/We-Want-Genuine-Peace-FINAL-ENG-WEB.pdf
[19] Egreteau, R. & Mangan, C. (2018). State Fragility in Myanmar: Fostering Development in the Face of Protracted Conflict. LSE-Oxford Commission on State Fragility, Growth and Development. Retrieved from: https://www.theigc.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/Myanmar-Report-final.pdf
[20] Emah, E.B. (2020). The Politics of Inclusion in Myanmar’s Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement. E-International Relations. July 28, 2020. Retrieved on: https://www.e-ir.info/2020/07/28/opinion-the-politics-of-inclusion-in-myanmars-nationwide-ceasefire-agreement/
[21] Galtung, J. (1969). Violence, Peace, and Peace Research. Journal of Peace Research, 6(3), 167-191.
[22] Gravers, M (1999). Nationalism as Political Paranoia in Burma: An Essay on the Historical Practice of Power. London: Routledge.
[23] Glazzard, A. (2017). Losing the Plot: Narrative, Counter-Narrative and Violent Extremism. International Centre for Counter-Terrorism. DOI: 10.19165/2017.1.08.
[24] Hardy, K. (2018). Comparing Theories of Radicalisation with Countering Violent Extremism Policy. Journal for Deradicalisation, 15, 76-110.
[25] Hendrickson, D. & Karkoszka, A. (2002). The Challenges of Security Sector Reform. SIPRI Yearbook. Retrieved from: https://www.sipri.org/yearbook/2002/04
[26] International Crisis Group (2014). Myanmar: The Politics of Rakhine State. Crisis Group Asia Report. Retrieved from: https://www.crisisgroup.org/asia/south-east-asia/myanmar/myanmar-politics-rakhine-state
[27] International for Security and Development Policy (2018). A Return to War: Militarized Violence in Northern Shan. Asia Paper. Retrieved from: http://isdp.eu/content/uploads/2018/05/A-Return-to-War-Print-V-w-cover-21.05.18.pdf
[28] Jaquet, C. (2014). The Kachin Conflict: The Search for Common Narratives. International Management Group.
[29] Jasko, K., Webber, D., Kruglanski, A.W., Gelfand, M., Taufiqurrohman, M., Hettiarachchi, M., & Gunaratna, R. (2019). Social Context Moderates the Effects of Quest for Significance on Violent Extremism. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1-23. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/pspi0000198
[30] Jolliffe, K (2014). Ethnic Conflict and Social Services in Myanmar’s Contested Regions. Yangon: The Asia Foundation. Retrieved from: https://asiafoundation.org/resources/pdfs/MMEthnicConflictandSocialServices.pdf
[31] Jolliffe, K. (2015). Ethnic Armed Conflict and Territorial Administration in Myanmar. Yangon: The Asia Foundation. Retrieved from: https://asiafoundation.org/resources/pdfs/ConflictTerritorialAdministrationfullreportENG.pdf
[32] Kruglanski, A., Jasko, K., Webber, D., Chernikova, M., & Molinario, E. (2018). The Making of Extremists. Review of General Psychology, 22(1), 107-120.
[33] Kyaw, N.N. (2016). Islamophobia in Buddhist Myanmar: The 969 Movement and Anti-Muslim Violence. In Crouch, M (ed.). Islam and the State in Myanmar: Muslim-Buddhist Relations and the Politics of Belonging, 183-210. India: Oxford University Press.
[34] Lakhani, S. (2012). Preventing Violent Extremism: Perceptions of Policy from Grassroots and Communities. Howard Journal, 51(2), 190-206.
[35] Lake, D. A. (2002). Rational Extremism: Understanding Terrorism in the Twenty-first Century. Dialogue-IO, 15-29.
[36] Luengo-Cabrera, J. & Pauwels, A. (2016). Countering violent extremism: The Horn of Africa. Brief Issue. Retrieved from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/315689481_Countering_violent_extremism_the_Horn_of_Africa
[37] Liden, K. (2018). A War on Values? On the Politics of Countering the Values of Violent Extremism. Society, Security, and Technology, 1(1), 18-37.
[38] Mandaville, P. & Nozell, M. (2017). Engaging Religion and Religious Actors in Countering Violent Extremism. United States Institute of Peace Special Report. Retrieved from: https://www.usip.org/sites/default/files/SR413-Engaging-Religion-and-Religious-Actors-in-Countering-Violent-Extremism.pdf
[39] Maskaliunaite, A. (2015). Exploring the Theories of Radicalisation. International Studies, 17(1), 9-26.
[40] Mroz, J. (2009). Lone Wolf Attacks and the Difference Between Violent Extremism and Terrorism. Retrieved from: http://www.ewi.info/lone-wolf-attacks-anddifference-between-violent-extremism-and-terrorism
[41] Mušić, S. (2016). The Role of Education in Preventing Violent Extremism and Radicalism. Retrieved: from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/324942495_The_Role_of_Education_in_Preventing_Violent_Extremism_and_Radicalism
[42] Mušić, S. (2018). Religious Aspects of the Phenomenon of Violent Extremism. Retrieved from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/324992185_Religious_aspects_of_the_phenomenon_of_violent_extremism
[43] Nasser-Eddine, M., Garnham, B., Agostino, K. & Caluya, G. (2011). Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) Literature Review. Australia: Counter-Terrorism and Security Technology Centre, DSTO Defence Science and Technology Organisation.
[44] Paung Sie Facility (2017). Youth & Everyday Peace in Myanmar: Fostering the Untapped Potential of Myanmar’s Youth. Retrieved from: https://www.jointpeacefund.org/sites/jointpeacefund.org/files/documents/youth_paper_english.pdf
[45] Renshaw, C.S. (2013), Democratic Transformation and Regional Institutions: The Case of Myanmar and ASEAN. Journal of Current Southeast Asian Affairs, 32 (1), 29–54.
[46] Ricigliano, R. (2012). Making Peace Last. A Tool Box for Sustainable Peacebuilding. Boulder, London: Paradigm Publishers.
[47] Sageman, M. 2017. Turning to Political Violence: The Emergence of Terrorism. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.
[48] Schirch, L. (2018). The Landscape of Terror. In Schirch, L. (ed.). The Ecology of Violent Extremism, p. 5-20. Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group, Inc.
[49] Smith, A. (2018). Myanmar-Watching: Problems and Perspectives. Griffith Asia Institute. Retrieved from: https://www.griffith.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0034/272959/Regional-Outlook-Paper-58-Selth-web.pdf
[50] Shauri. H.S & Wanjala, S.W. (2017). Radicalization and Violent Extremism at the Coast of Kenya: “Powerful Voices of Coexistence, Are They Being Heard?” In Njogu, K. & Cage, I. (eds.). Meeting of Cultures at the Kenyan Coast, p. 145-154. Kenya: Twaweza Communications Ltd.
[51] Simbulan, K. (2018). When Perceptions Define Reality: Implications and Challenges after the August 2017 Crisis in Rakhine State. Myanmar: RAFT.
[52] South, A. (2009). Ethnic Politics in Burma: States of Conflict. New York, USA: Routledge.
[53] Staniland, P. (2012b). States, Insurgents, and Wartime Political Orders. Perspectives on Politics, 10 (2), 43-64.
[54] Stephens, W., Sieckelinck, S. & Boutellier, H. (2019a). Preventing Violent Extremism: A Review of the Literature. Studies in Conflict & Terrorism, 1-16. https://doi.org/10.1080/1057610X.2018.1543144.
[55] Stephens, W. & Sieckelinck, S. (2019b): Being Resilient to Radicalisation in PVE Policy: A Critical Examination. Critical Studies on Terrorism, 1-24. DOI: 10.1080/17539153.2019.1658415.
[56] Stokke, K., Vakulchuk, R., Øverland, I. (2018). Myanmar: A Political Economy Analysis. Norwegian Institute of International Affairs. Retrieved from: https://reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/resources/Myanmar_-_A_Political_Economy_Analysis_-_Norwegian_Institute_of_International_Affairs_2018.pdf
[57] Taylor, R. H. (2005). Do States Make Nations? The Politics of Identity in Myanmar Revisited. South-East Asia Research, 13(3), 261-286.
[58] The Belmont Report (1979). Retrieved from: http://www.hhs.gov/ohrp/humansubjects/guidance/belmont.html
[59] Tun, T.Z & Soe, H.M. (2020). Thousands of Myanmar Workers Rally for Higher Minimum Wage. Myanmar Times. Retrieved from: https://www.mmtimes.com/news/thousands-myanmar-workers-rally-higher-minimum-wage.html
[60] United Nations Development Programme (2016). UNDP Global Meeting on Preventing Violent Extremism and Promoting Inclusive Development, Tolerance, and Diversity. Retrieved from: https://www.undp.org/content/dam/norway/img/Concept%20note_PVE-no%20agenda.pdf
[61] United Nations Security Council Resolution 2250. Retrieved from: https://www.un.org/press/en/2015/sc12149.doc.htm
[62] Weinberg, L. & Pedahzur, A. (2004). Religious Fundamentalism and Political Extremism. Nova Religio 8(2), 106–109.
[63] Wells, T. (2016). Making Sense of Reactions to Communal Violence in Myanmar. In Cheesman, N & Farrelly, N. (eds.). Conflict in Myanmar: War, Politics, Religion, p.245-260. Singapore: Yusof Ishak Institute.
[64] Williams, M.C. (2015). Myanmar’s Troubled Path to Reform Political Prospects in a Landmark Election Year. Chatham House: The Royal Institute of Political Affairs. Retrieved from: https://www.chathamhouse.org/sites/default/files/field/field_document/20150226Myanmar.pdf
[65] Zillmann, D., & Cantor, J. R. (1976). Effect of Timing of Information about Mitigating Circumstances on Emotional Responses to Provocation and Retaliatory Behavior. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 12(1), 38–55. DOI:10.1016/0022-1031(76)90085-8.
[66] _________________. Myanmar at a Glance. Retrieved from: https://asiafoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Myanmar-TStateofConflictandViolence.pdf

Ephraim Bassey Emah, “The Dilemma of Violent Extremism and Conflict Escalation among Youths in Myanmar” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.276-292 December 2020  URL: DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41213

Download PDF

pdf

The Teaching of Civic Education in Zambian Secondary Schools as a Strategy for Effective Political Participation

Davy Mainde, Daniel Katongo Chola -December 2020 Page No.: 293-301

The core focus of this study was to investigate the teaching of Civic Education in Zambian secondary schools and how it serves as a strategy for effective political participation in the community. This study was used a qualitative case study. Twenty (20) professional teachers in Civic Education and Thirty-Five (35) learners in Civic Education classes from Five (05) selected secondary schools in Lusaka district of Lusaka province were purposively nominated through homogenous sampling. One – to – one interview was used to collect information from teachers while focus group discussion was used to collected data from learners in Civic Education classes. The study established that the teaching of Civic Education in schools is positively serving a role of training learners for effective political participation as it provide them with knowledge on governance issues. It was also established that Civic Education prepare learners for effective leadership and critical thinking which are key to political participation. Further, the study established that learners are prepared for the way of life and political tolerance as they effectively participate in political affairs of their community. It was recommended that Schools should strengthen local Continuous Professional Development (CPD); the government of the republic of Zambia to come up with a clear policy that will arouse the interest of the young people through the teaching of Civic Education to effectively participate in political activities of their community while still in school; and the Ministry of General Education to constantly call for educational conferences to sensitise Civic Education teachers on the need to prepare learners for effective political participation as outline in the 2013 Zambia education curriculum framework.

Page(s): 293-301                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 11 January 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41214

  Davy Mainde
The University of Zambia

  Daniel Katongo Chola
Mulungushi University

Akaranga, S. I. and Makau, B. K. (2016). Ethical Considerations and their Applications to Research: a Case of the University of Nairobi. Journal of Educational Policy and Entrepreneurial Research. 3(12), pp 1-9.
[2] Boakye-Agyei K. (2006). Fostering Civic Engagement: Stakeholder Participation in Rural Projects in Ghana. A dissertation submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at George Mason University.
[3] Branson, M. S. and Quigley, C. N. (1998). The Role of Civic Education. New York.
[4] Eurydice Report (2017). Citizenship Education at School in Europe. Brussels.
[5] Finkel, S. E. (2003). “Can Democracy Be Taught”, Journal of Democracy. 14 (4), pp. 34-38.
[6] Fouka G. & Mantzorou M. (2011). What are the Major Ethical Issues in Conducting Research? Is there a Conflict between the Research Ethics and the Nature of Nursing? Health Science Journal. 5 (1), pp. 3-14.
[7] Garson, G. D. (2002). Guide to Writing Empirical Papers, Theses and Dissertations. New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc.
[8] Grindle, M (2010). Good Governance: The Inflation of an Idea, Faculty Research Working Paper Series. Harvard University.
[9] Halstead J. M and Pike, M. A. (2006). Citizenship and Moral Education Values in Action. London: Routledge.
[10] Haniza, M. (2014). Civics and Citizenship Education in Malaysia: The Voice of Micro Policy Enactors. A Thesis Submitted in Fulfilment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy of Cardiff University.
[11] Hinde, R. E. (2008). Civic Education in the NCLB Era: the contested mission of elementary and middle schools. Journal of curriculum and instruction (JoCI). 2(1), pp. 74-86.
[12] Jindal, N. (2014). Good Governance: Needs and Challenges. International Journal of Scientific & Engineering Research. 5(5), pp. 113-116.
[13] Khalid, M. A., Alam, Md. M., and Said, J. (2016). Empirical Assessment of Good Governance in the Public Sector of Malaysia. Economics and Sociology. 9(4), pp. 289-304. DOI: 10.14254/2071-789X.2016/9-4/18.
[14] Mainde, D (2018). The Teaching of Civic Education in Zambian Schools: A Tool for Conflict Resolution in the Community. A Study of Selected Schools of Lusaka Province. A dissertation submitted to the University of Zambia in collaboration with Zimbabwe Open University in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the award of the degree in Masters Science in Peace, Leadership and Conflict Resolution. Lusaka.
[15] McCowan, T. (2009). Rethinking Citizenship Education: A Curriculum for Participatory Democracy. London: Continuum.
[16] MOESVTEE (2013). Zambia Education Curriculum Framework 2013. Lusaka: CDC.
[17] Muleya, G. (2015). The teaching of Civic Education in Zambia: An Examination of trends in the teaching of Civic Education in Schools. PhD dissertation: University of South Africa.
[18] Muleya, G. (2019). Curriculum Policy and Practice of Civic Education in Zambia: A Reflective Perspective, In A. Petersen et al. (eds.). The Palgrave Handbook of Citizenship and Education. https://doi/10.007/978-3-319-67905-153-1
[19] Muleya, G. (2019). Re-examining the Concept of Civic Education. Journal of Lexicography and Terminology. 2(2), pp. 25-42.
[20] Muleya,G.(2018b). Civic Education Versus Citizenship Education? Where is the point of Convergence? Journal of Lexicography and Terminology. 2(1), pp 109- 130.
[21] Muntengwa,W., Namadula, B., Hamainza, V., Simwatachela, R., Kakana, F., Simui, F. and Muleya, G. (2020). Unearthing Disablers in the Cultivation of Civic Skills among Learners in Selected Secondary Schools in Lusaka District, Zambia. International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS). IV (IX), pp. 228-238.
[22] Neuman, W. L. (2004). Basics of Social Research: Qualitative and Quantitative Approach, (2nd ed.) Boston: Pearson Education, Inc.
[23] Niemi, R. G., Richard, G. & Junn, J. (1998). Civic Education- What Makes Students Learn. London: Yale University Press.
[24] Owen, D. (2015). High School Students’ Acquisition of Civic Knowledge: The Impact of We the People. Georgetown University.
[25] Piñgul, F. S. (2015). Measuring the Impact of a Supplemental Civic Education Program on Students’ Civic Attitude and Efficacy Beliefs. Journal of Education and Training Studies. 3(2), pp. 61-69.
[26] Ranjit, K. (2005). Research Methodology-A Step-by-Step Guide for Beginners, (2nd ed.). Singapore: Pearson Education.
[27] Şanlı, Ö. and Mehmet, A. (2015). The Significance of Establishing Democratic Education Environment at Schools. International Journal on New Trends in Education and Their Implications. 5(2). www.ijonte.org
[28] Satu, R. (2007). Empowering the Poor? Civic Education and Local Level Participation in Rural Tanzania and Zambia. A Dissertation Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the College of Arts and Sciences. Georgia State University.
[29] Scott, W. V. and Deirdre, D. J. (2009). Research Methods for Everyday Life: Blending Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
[30] Tovmasyan, T. and Thoma, T. M. (2008). The Impacts of Civic Education on Schools, Students and Community. New York: Caucasus Research Resource Centre.
[31] Vasiljevic, B. (2009). Civic Education as a Potential for Developing Civil Society and Democracy. Tromsø: University of Tromsø.
[32] Woleola, J. E. (2017). Good Governance Theory and the Quest for Good Governance in Nigeria. International Journal of Humanities and Social Science. 7(5), pp. 293-301.
[33] Yin, R. K. (2003). Case Study Research Design and Methods, 3rd ed. London: Saga Publication, Inc.

Davy Mainde, Daniel Katongo Chola, “The Teaching of Civic Education in Zambian Secondary Schools as a Strategy for Effective Political Participation” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.293-301 December 2020  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41214

Download PDF

pdf

Regulatory Framework and the Nigeria Tourism Economy

Yekinni Ojo BELLO, PhD, and Mercy Busayo BELLO – December 2020 Page No.: 302-306

Purpose- This paper examines the extent feasible tourism regulatory framework can contribute to unlocking Nigeria tourism economy.
Research Methodology- The study been an exploratory study, reviewed various reports and previous literature in this domain of study upon which insightful inferences were made.
Findings- The study finds that Nigeria can only maximise her tourism economy potentials if tourism regulatory framework gear towards environmental sustainability, a secure and safe Nigeria, prioritisation of the tourism sector, and promotion of health and sanitary practices are galvanized.
Research Implications– By establishing five major areas of tourism regulatory framework, the study offers an insight on the need for the government of Nigeria to vigorously purse effort to sustaining her environment for accelerated tourism business development, taking decisive action to overhauling her security architecture, urgently restore tourism to a full ministry status as against the current merger of the sector including, a bold step to appoint experts as minister of tourism. Others include, announcement in clear terms the plan by the country to become open defecation free country by year 2025.
Originality: This study is the first to establish the connection between regulatory framework and the Nigeria tourism economy. The study argues that feasible tourism regulatory framework has the capacity to remodeling the Nigeria choking tourism economy.

Page(s): 302-306                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 11 January 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41215

 Yekinni Ojo BELLO
University of Port Harcourt, Faculty of Management Sciences, Department of Hospitality Management and Tourism Choba, Rivers State, Nigeria.

 Mercy Busayo BELLO
Federal Polytechnic Auchi, School of Applied Sciences, Department of Hospitality Management Auchi, Edo State, Nigeria

[1] Adedigba, A. (2019). Nigeria worst African country in open defecation, second globally . Retrieved from Premium Times, Sunday, October 6, 2019: https://www.premiumtimesng.com/news/top-news/337023-nigeria-worst-african-country-in-open-defecation-second-globally-report.html.
[2] Anthony, B., Marcelo, F., Andrew, H., Sarah, J., Neil, K., David, P., Kelvin, V. C.;. (2004). Vission 2020; Forcasting International Student Mpbility; A UK Perspective. England: British Council Department.
[3] Atilola, O. (2012). Climate Change and the Environment: Issues and Geo-information Challenges. Working Week 2012: Knowing to Manage the Territory, Protect the Human Environment and Evaluate the Cultural Heritage. Rome, Italy, 6-10 May.
[4] Aworinde, T. (2019). Nigeria Ranks 148 on Global peace Index. Retrieved from Punch Newspaper June 16th: https://punchng.com/nigeria-ranks-148th-on-global-peace-index.
[5] Bankole, A. S. (2002). Services Trade Policy and the Nigerian Tourism Sector:A Note of Tourism Contribution, Constraints and Opportunities. A Paper Submitted to the African Journal of Economic Policy. Ibadan: Department of Economics; University of Ibadan.
[6] Bello, Y. O and Majebi, E. C. (2018). Religion Tourism and Social Development. Journal of Faculty of Management Sciences, 192-210.
[7] Bello, Y. O. (2018). Hospitlaity and Tourism Economics. Ondo: Grace Excellent Publishers.
[8] Bello, Y. O., and Bello, M. B. (2015). Lodging Service Management and Administration, Theory and Practice. Benin: Diamond Publishing House.
[9] Bello, Y. O., and Majebi, E. C. (2018). Lodging Quality Index Approach: Exploring the Relationship Between Service Quality and Customers Satisfaction in Hotel Industry. Journal of Tourism and Heritage Studies, 7, (1), 58-78.
[10] Bello, Y. O., Bello, M. B., & Raja, N. R.Y. (2014). Travel and Tourism Business Confidence Index in Nigeria: Issues and Challenges . African Journal of Hospitality, Tourism and Leisure , 3, (2), 1-15.
[11] Bello, Y. O., Bello, M. B., and Obiora, N. J. (2017). Sport Tourism: Perceived Economic Impact of Okpekpe Marathon Race on the Host Community . Journal of Tourism and Heritage Studies , 6, (1), 113-132.
[12] Bello, Y. O., Udi, I. O., Bello, M. B., and Raja, N. R. Y. (2016). Introduction to Hospitality management. Ondo: Grace Excellent Publishers.
[13] Bello, Y.O., and Bello, M. B. (2017). Hotel Front Office Management; The Contemporary Approach . Ondo: Grace Excellent Publishers.
[14] Bello, Y.O., and Bello, M.B . (2012). Infrastructure Development: A Strategic Approach for Sustainable Hospitality Business in Edo State . Continental Journal of Sustainable Development, 3, (1), 47-54.
[15] Bello, Y.O., and Bello, M.B. (2017). Exploring the Relationship between Religion Tourism and Economic Development of a Host Community . International Journal of Business and Management Invention, 6, (9), 41-51.
[16] BGL Group. (2014). Economic Note: Nigeria Tourism Industry: A Revolutionized Tourism Sector as a Panacea for a Thriving Hospitality Business. Retrieved January 26, 2014, from www.research.bg/group.com.
[17] Ekwujuru, P. (2016). Tourism contributes N1.7bn to GDP in Q3 2016. Lagos: Vangard Newspaper, Sunday 19 November.
[18] Jennifer, B., & Thea, C. (2013). Travel and Tourism Competitiveness Report: Reducing Barriers to Economic Growth and Job Creation. Geneva: World Economic Forum.
[19] Jumia Travel. (2017). The Hospitality and Tourism Outlook in Nigeria. Lagos: Jumia Travel Nigeria.
[20] Naido, V. (2007). Research on the Flow of International students to UK Universities: Determinants and Implications. Journal of Research in International Education, 6, (3) 287-307.
[21] Nigeria Country Profile. (1992). Implementation of Agenda 21: Review of Progress made since the United Nation Conference on Environment and Development. Retrieved from www.un.org/esa/earthsummit/nigeriac.
[22] Nigerian Tourism Development Corporation. (1997). Official Gazette No. 21 vol. 84 of 9th April 1997 of NTDC. Abuja: Nigerian Tourism Development Corporation.
[23] Okoli, C. I. (2001). Tourism Development and Management in Nigeria. Enugu: Jee Communication.
[24] Roberts, A., Chou, P., and Ching, A. (2010). Contemporary Trend in East Asia Higher Education: Disposition of International Students in Taiwan Universities. Higher Education, 59, 149-166.
[25] TDI. (2014). Nigeria Tourism Development Master Plan . Retrieved from www.tourismdev.com/nigeria_tourism_devel opement_master_plan. Retrieved on, 26.01.14.
[26] UNICEF. (2019). Nigeria worst African country in open defecation, second globally. Retrieved from Premium Times, Sunday, October 6, 2019: https://www.premiumtimesng.com/news/top-news/337023-nigeria-worst-african-country-in-open-defecation-second-globally-report.html.
[27] UNICEF. (2019a). Nigeria needs additional two million toilets annually over 7 years. Retrieved from https://www.premiumtimesng.com/news/more-news/331249-sanitation-nigeria-needs-additional-two-million-toilets-annually-over-7-years-unicef.html.
[28] United World Tourism Organisation. (2018). World Tourism barometers. Madrid Spain: UNWTO.
[29] Wall, G., and Mathiesom, A. (2006). Tourism: Change, Impacts and Opportunities. New York: Pearson Prentice Hall.
[30] World Tourism Organization. (2016). UNWTO World Tourism Barometer. Retrieved from Madrid: UNWTO:http://www.unwto.org/facts/eng/barometer.htm.

Yekinni Ojo BELLO, PhD, and Mercy Busayo BELLO “Regulatory Framework and the Nigeria Tourism Economy” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.302-306 December 2020  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41215

Download PDF

pdf

Substance use and academic performance among university youth students. A case study of Bulawayo Metropolitan Province

Moyo Grace- December 2020 Page No.: 307-311

The purpose of this study was to explore the perceived effects of drugs and substance use on academic performance among university youth students in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. This qualitative study employed the phenomenology research design. The research philosophy or set of beliefs that informed the conduct and writing of this research was constructivism/ interpretive. Convenience and purposive sampling techniques were used. Interview guide was used as an instrument for data collection. Due to data saturation, 10 (Ten) participants were interviewed. Data was analyzed thematically. Findings of the study revealed that, the university students’ abuse drugs like marijuana, mandrax mixture and substances like, alcohol, bronco cough syrup. The findings from this present study discovered that the major causes of substance use among university youth students include: home stressors, child headed families, lack of food, school fees, family background parental influence, frustrations at home, peer pressure, availability of money to buy the drugs and availability of drugs. The findings also revealed that the effects of drugs abuse are: poor academic performance in class, school dropout, bullying other students, lack of interest in studying, low concentration and stealing. The study recommends that there is a need for all universities to have Psychology and Counselling hubs manned by registered Psychologists and Counsellors to guide and give therapy to all university youths and the affected students. There is need for the government through Ministry of higher and tertiary education to introduce Psychology and Counselling programs in university curriculum to empower students with preventive strategies to reduce substance use. The study recommends organisation of awareness campaigns on substance use to the students and parents.

Page(s): 307-311                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 11 January 2021

  Moyo Grace
PhD candidate with UNISA; Department of Psychology

[1] Adeyemo Florence O. Beatrice,O , Okpala,P.U. , Ogodo,O.(2016). Prevalence of drug abuse amongst university students in Benin City, Nigeria, Public Health Research, Vol. 6 No.2, 2016, pp. 31-37. doi: 10.5923/j.phr.20160602.01
[2] Akanbi,M.,I., Augustina,G., Theophilus,A.,B.,Muritala, M., Ajiboye,A.,S.(2015). Impact of substance abuse on academic performance among adolescents of colleges of education in Kwara State,Nigeria. Journal of education and practice.Vol 6. No.28.pp:108-112.
[3] Ajala,J.A.(2012). A profile of drugs use in some selected universities in Nigeria. West African Journal on physical and health education, 1(1): 50-52
[4] Balsa, A.I.; Homer, J.F.; French, M.T.; and Weisner, C.M. (2009). Substance use, education, employment, and criminal activity outcomes of adolescents in outpatient chemical dependency programs. Journal of Behavioral Health Services and Research Jan;36(1):75– 95,
[5] Bandura, A. (1977). Aggression: A social learning analysis. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.
[6] Bryman,A.(1988). Quantity and quality in social research. London, Boston:Unwin Hyman Publications.
[7] Chingarande, S., & Guduza, M. (2011). The Youth and Unemployment in Zimbabwe. National Association of NGOs(NANGO),Institute of Development Studies (IDS), (2), 1–3. Retrieved from www.mydec.gov.zw
[8] Dlamini, P., G., & Makondo, D. (2017). The Prevalence of Drug and Substance Abuse among School Going Teenagers in the Shiselweni Region of Swaziland. International Journal of Innovation and Applied Studies.Vol20(2). pp: 652-660
[9] Emmanuel, C., Valentine,T.P., Terna,F.,Haruna,H., Terkuma,C., & Chinyere,A. (2017). Effects of Substance/Drug Abuse on the Academic Achievement of Secondary School Students in Mkar Metropolis, Gboko, Benue State. International Journal of Psychological and Brain Sciences. 2. 40-45. 10.11648/j.ijpbs.20170202.12.
[10] Hennessy, E. A., Tanner-smith, E. E., Finch, A. J., Sathe, N., & Kugley, S. (2018). Recovery schools for improving behavioral and academic outcomes among students in recovery from substance use disorders: a systematic review. (October). https://doi.org/10.4073/csr.2018.9
[11] Kabo,D & Keatlaretse,R. (2018). Substance Abuse and Mental Health Effects among the Youth in Botswana: Implications for Social Research. Journal of Education, Society and Behavioural Science. 24. 10.9734/JESBS/2018/38304.
[12] Kavutha, M.J.(2015). Influence of drug use on academic performance among secondary school students in Matinyani District , Kenya. International Journal of Scientific and Research Publications, Vol5, Issue 11,pp:2250-3153.
[13] Matutu, V & Mususa, D.(2019). Drug and Alcohol Abuse Among Young People in Zimbabwe: A Crisis of Morality or Public Health Problem (November 19, 2019). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3489954 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3489954
[14] Muoti,S.,K.(2014). Effects of drug and substance abuse on academic performance among secondary school students, Kenya; Kathonzweni District, Makueni County.
[15] National Institute on Drug Abuse (2013). Principles of Adolescent Substance Use Disorder Treatment: A Research-Based Guide. NIH Pub. No. 14-7953, 2013. Available at: https://www.drugabuse.gov/sites/default/files/podata_1_17_14.pdf
[16] National Institute on Drug Abuse (2014). Principles of Adolescent Substance Use Disorder Treatment: A Research-Based Guide. NIH Pub. No. 14-7953, 2014. Available at:
https://www.drugabuse.gov/sites/default/files/podata_1_17_14.pdf
[17] National Institute on Drug Abuse (Nida) (2018). Principles of drug addiction treatment: A research-based guide 3rd edition. Retrieved from https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/principles-drug-addiction-treatment-research- based-guide-third-edition/principles-effective-treatment on 6/11/20
[18] Nida (2020). Monitoring the Future Study: Trends in Prevalence of Various Drugs https://www.drugabuse.gov/drug-topics/trends-statistics/monitoring-future/monitoring-future-study-trends-in-prevalence-various-drugs
[19] Ngesu, L., & Njeru, A. (2014). Causes and Effects of Drug and Substance Abuse Among Secondary School Students in Dagoretti Division , Nairobi West. Global Journal of Interdisciplinary Social Sciences, 3(3), 1–4.
[20] Olawole-Isaac, A., Ogundipe, O., Amoo, E. O., & Adeloye, D. O. (2018). Substance use among adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review and meta-analysis. South African Journal of Child Health, 12(2b), 79–84. https://doi.org/10.7196/sajch.2018.v12i2b.1524
[21] Padilla-Diaz, M. (2015). Phenomenology in educational qualitative research: philosophy as science or philosophical science. International Journal of educational excellence. Vol1, No.2,pp:101-110
[22] Parry, C.D.H. (1998). Global Initiative on Primary Prevention of Substance Abuse Among Young People, Harare, Zimbabwe, 24-26 February 1998. http://www.favor.org.za/pdf/countryreport.pdf
[23] Peltzer, K., Ramlahan, S.& Gliksman, L. (2006). Responsible Alchoholic Beverages sales and services training intervention in Cape Town: A pilot study. Journal of Psychology in Africa, 16, 45-52.
[24] Plotnik,R.(2002). Introduction to psychology. 6th edition.New York:Wadsworth Group
[25] Ritchie, J., & Lewis, J. (2003). Qualitative research practice- a guide for social science students and researchers. London, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications Ltd.
[26] Riva, K., Allen-Taylor, L., Schupmann, W. D., Mphele, S., Moshashane, N., & Lowenthal, E. D. (2018). Prevalence and predictors of alcohol and drug use among secondary school students in Botswana: A cross-sectional study. BMC Public Health, 18(1), 1–14. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-018-6263-2
[27] Ryan,S., Hope, B., Scott, A., & Gregory,S. (2013). Mindfulness deficits in a sample of substance abuse treatment seeking adults: A descriptive investigation. Journal of substance use. 19. 194-198. 10.3109/14659891.2013.770570.
[28] Sahu, K. K., & Sahu, S. (2016). Substance Abuse Causes and Consequences. Bangabasi Academic Journal, 9(May), 52–59. Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/246544796
[29] Smith, D. (2009). Phenomenology. In E. Zalta (ed.). The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Retrieved from http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/sum2009/entries/phenomenology/ on December , 16, 2019
[30] Sue,D., & Jim,O. (2009). Hospital inpatient admissions of past heavy drinking. Journal of Substance Use. 9. 296-303. 10.1080/1465989042000271183.
[31] Tsvetkova,L.A & Antonova,N.A.(2013). The prevalence of drug use among university students in st. Petersburg, Russia. Psychology in Russia: State of the Art Volume 6, Issue 1, pp:86-94
[32] World Health Organisation (2004) https://www.who.int/substance_abuse/publications/en/zimbabwe.pdf
[33] World Health Organization (2014). Substance Abuse Department: Global status of report on alcohol. Geneva: WHO.

Moyo Grace, “Substance use and academic performance among university youth students. A case study of Bulawayo Metropolitan Province” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.307-311 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/307-311.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Towards a Framework for Integrating and Evaluating Corporate Social Investments in Extractive Sector Business Operations in Sub-Saharan Africa

Theophilus Jong Yungong – December 2020 Page No.: 312-322

This paper sets out to suggest a framework for integrating and evaluating extractive sector Corporate Social Investments (CSI) in the business operations of extractive firms in Sub-Saharan Africa. It designates CSI as voluntary programs that aim to enhance development opportunities for host countries and communities to extractive firms in the region. The underlying premise of this paper is that CSI interventions are often claimed to be developmental but there is neither a straight link between CSI and development nor guarantees that this can be achieved in ways considered just, balanced and sustainable. It, therefore, suggests that the extent to which CSI can deliver on development opportunities will depend on the way it is structured, effectively integrated into the business operations of firms and monitored for intended results. The bone of contention therefore is on how to determine development-oriented CSI. To address this concern, this paper develops the front and backend activities approach to integrating CSI in the business operation of firms and evaluating its developmental impact on the target communities. This framework builds on existing literature and the novel concepts of CSI applicability and CSI effectiveness. It also introduces the notion of results-based CSI. This is not only in terms of inputs and activities, but most importantly, in terms of outcomes and impact of CSI interventions.

Page(s): 312-322                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 13 January 2020

 Theophilus Jong Yungong
Department of Political Science and Comparative Politics, University of Buea – Cameroon

[1] Abegunde, O., 2014. Causal Factors and the Dynamics of Resources Conflicts In Africa: A Comparative Analysis Of Niger Delta And Marikana. International Journal of Humanities and Social Science Invention. Volume, 3(2), pp. 27-36.
[2] Baron, D. P., 2001. Private Politics, Corporate Social Responsibility, and Integrated Strategy. Journal of Economics & Management Strategy. Volume 10 (2001), pp.7-45. Bhattacharyya and Hodler, 2010
[3] Bowen, H. R., 1953. Social Responsibilities of the Businessman. New York: Harper. Cai et al, 2012).
[4] Cai, Y., Jo,H., and Pan,C., (2012). Doing Well While Doing Bad? CSR in Controversial Industry Sectors. Journal of Business Ethics 108 (4), 467-480.
[5] Campbell, B., 2009. Regulation of the Extractive Sector: Issues Raised by the Revision of Mining Regimes in Africa. In: “Rethinking Extractive Industry: Regulation, Dispossession, and Emerging Claims”. The Centre for Research on Latin America and the Caribbean and Extractive Industries Research Group, 5th – 7th March 2009, Toronto: York University.
[6] Campbell, B., 2012. Corporate Social Responsibility and Development in Africa: Redefining the Roles and Responsibilities of Public and Private Actors in the Mining Sector. Resources Policy 37 (2), pp. 138-143.
[7] Collier, P., 2007. The bottom billion: Why the Poorest Countries are Failing and What Can be Done About It. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Community Planning.net (2009)
[8] Community Planning.net, 2009. Glossary A–Z. [Online] Available at: http://www.communityplanning.net/glossary/glossary.php [Accessed: 26th March 2015].
[9] Cramton, P., 2007. How Best to Auction Oil Rights? In: Humphreys, M., Sachs,J.D., and Stiglitz, J.E. Eds. 2007. Escaping the Resource Curse. Columbia University Press: New York. Chapter 5, pp. 114 – 152.
[10] Freeman, R.D.; Harrison, J.S.; Wicks, A.C.; Parmar, B., De Colle, S., 2010. Stakeholder Theory: the state of the art. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
[11] Friedman, M., 1970. The social responsibility of business is to increase its profits. New York Times Magazine, September 13, 1970.
[12] Frynas, J.G., 2008. CSR and International development: Critical Assessment. Corporate Governance, An International Review • October 2008, Volume 16 Number 4 July 2008
[13] Galbreath, J. 2006. Corporate social responsibility strategy: strategic options, global considerations. Corporate Governance; 2006; Volume 6 (2).
[14] Gertler, P.J., Martinez, S., Premand, P., Rawlings, L.B., Vermeersc, M.J., 2011. Impact Evaluation in Practice. Washington, D.C.: World Bank.
[15] Gond, J. and Moon, J., 2011. Corporate Social Responsibility in Retrospect and Prospect: Exploring the Life-Cycle of an Essentially Contested Concept. No. 59-2011 ICCSR Research Paper Series. International Centre for Corporate Social Responsibility, Nottingham University Business School
[16] Gradl , C, and Knobloch, C., 2010. Inclusive Business Guide: How to Develop Business and Fight Poverty. Berlin: Endeva.
[17] Halme,M., Lindeman, S., and Linna, P., 2012. Innovation for Inclusive Business: Intrapreneurial Bricolage in Multinational Corporations. Journal of Management Studies [pdf], Available at: DOI 10.1111/j.1467-6486.2012.01045.x [Accessed: 16th June 2015]
[18] Hillman, A.J., and Keim, G.D., 2001. Shareholder value, Stakeholder Management, And Social issues: What’s The Bottomline? Strategic Management Journal, Volume 22 (2), pp. 125-139.
[19] Humphreys, M., and Sandbu M.E., 2007. The Political Economy of Natural Resource Fund. In: Humphreys, M., Sachs, J.D., and Stiglitz, J.E. Eds. 2007. Escaping the Resource Curse. Columbia University Press: New York. Chapter 8, pp. 194 – 236.ICMM 2012
[20] ICMM – The International Council on Mining and Metals, 2012. Community Development Toolkit. London: ICMM.
[21] IFC – International Finance Corporation, 2010. Strategic community investment: a good practice handbook for companies doing business in emerging markets. Washington, D.C: IFC.Imas and Rist, 2009.
[22] Imas, L.G.,and Rist, R.C., 2009. Designing and Conducting Effective Development Evaluations. Washington D.C: World Bank.
[23] Ismail, M. 2009. Corporate Social Responsibility and Its Role in Community Development: An International Perspective. Journal of International Social Research, Volume 2 (9) pp. 1999 – 2009.
[24] Jamali, D., and Mirshak,R., 2006. Corporate social responsibility: theory and practise in a developing world context. Journal of Business Ethics Volume 72, pp. 243 – 262.
[25] Johnston, D., 2007. How to Evaluate the Fiscal Terms of Oil Contracts. In: Humphreys, M., Sachs,J.D., and Stiglitz, J.E. Eds. 2007. Escaping the Resource Curse. Columbia University Press: New York. Chapters 3, pp. 53 – 88.
[26] KPMG Africa Limited, 2013. Oil and Gas in Africa: Africa’s Reserves, Potential and Prospects. Amstelveen, Netherlands: KPMG.
[27] Kusek, Z.L., and Rist, R.C., 2004. Ten Steps to a Results-Based Monitoring and Evaluation System. Washington DC: World Bank.
[28] Loehr, D., 2014.The hidden rent-seeking capacity of corporations”, International Journal of Social Economics, Volume 41 (9) pp. 820 – 836.
[29] Moran, D.D., Wackernagel,M., Kitzes, J.A., Goldfinger, S.H., Boutaud, A., 2007. Measuring Sustainable development — Nation by nation. Ecological Economic Volume 64 (2008), pp. 470 – 474.
[30] Moyo, D., 2009. Dead aid: why aid is not working and how there is a better way for Africa. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.
[31] Parast, M.M and Adams, S.G., 2012. Corporate Social Responsibility, Benchmarking, and Organisational Performance in the Petroleum Industry: A Quality Management Perspective. International Journal of Production Economics. Volume 139 (2012) pp. 447 – 458.
[32] Porter, M.E., and Kramer, M.R., 2011. The Big Idea: Creating Shared Value: Rethinking Capitalism. [pdf] Available at: http://hbr.org/2011/01/the‐big‐idea‐creating‐shared‐value/ar/pr [Accessed: 22nd February 2015].
[33] Columbia University Press: New York. Chapter 4. pp. 89 – 113.
[34] Rajan, S.C., 2011. Poor little rich countries: another look at the ‘resource curse’, Environmental Politics, Volume 20 (5), pp. 617-632.
[35] Sachs, J., 2007. How to Handle The Macroeconomics Of Oil Wealth In: Humphreys, M., Sachs,J.D., and Stiglitz, J.E. Eds. 2007. Escaping the Resource Curse. Columbia University Press: New York. Chapter 7, pp. 173 – 193.Saiia, 2015).
[36] Saiia, D.H., 2015. Sustainability. In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Related Terms. [Online] Available at: https://accounts.google.com/ServiceLogin?service=blogger&hl=fr&passive=1209600&continue=https://www.blogger.com/home#identifier [Accessed: 28th December 2015].
[37] Schwab, K., Ed., 2014. The Global Competitiveness Report 2014–2015. Geneva: World Economic Forum.
[38] Smith, G.A., 2008. An Introduction To Corporate Social Responsibility In The Extractive Industries,” Yale Human Rights and Development Journal, Vol. 11(1), pp. 1-7.
[39] Smith, A., 1776. An Inquiry Into The Nature And Causes Of The Wealth Of Nations. Edited by Soares S.M., MetaLibri Digital Library, 29th May 2009. [pdf] Available at: https://www.ibiblio.org/ml/libri/s/SmithA_WealthNations_p.pdf [Accessed: 25th February 2015].
[40] Stiglitz, J.E., 2007. What is the Role of the State? In: Humphreys, M., Sachs,J.D., and Stiglitz, J.E. Eds. 2007. Escaping the Resource Curse. Columbia University Press: New York. Chapter 2. pp. 23 – 52.
[41] Tordo, S., Warner, M., Manzano, O., Anouti, Y., 2013. Local Content Policies in the Oil and Gas Sector: IBRD: Washington DC.
[42] UNDP – United Nations Development Programme, 2010a. Inclusive Markets Development Handbook. New York: UNDP.
[43] UNDP – United Nations Development Programme, 2010b. Assessing Markets, New York: UNDP.
[44] UNDP – United Nations Development Programme, 2010c. Brokering Inclusive Business Models. New York: UNDP.
[45] UNDP – United Nations Development Programme, 2010d. Guide to Partnership Building. New York: UNDP.
[46] UNECA – United Nations Economic Commission for Africa and AU- African Union, 2011. Minerals and Africa’s Development: The International Study Group Report on Africa’s Mineral Regimes. Addis Ababa: ECA Publishing Unit.
[47] UNGA – United Nations General Assembly, 66th Session, 2012. Resolution Adopted by the General Assembly on 27 July 2012: 66/288. The future We Want (A/RES/66/288). New York: United Nations Organisation.
[48] Vogel, D.J., 2005. Is there a market for virtue? The Business Case for Corporate Social Responsibility. California Management Review, Volume 47, pp. 19–45.
[49] Watkins, R., Meiers, W.M., Visser, Y.L., 2012. A Guide to Assessing Needs: Essential Tools for Collecting Information, Making Decisions, and Achieving Development Results. Washington D.C.: World Bank.
[50] WBG – World Bank Group, 2015. World Development Indicators 2015. Washington DC: IBRD.
[51] World Bank, 2013. World Bank Development Indicators, 2012/2013. Washington, D.C.: World Bank.
[52] Yungong, T.J., 2017. Evaluating the development potential of extractive sector corporate social investments in Cameroon: Case of the oil & gas and mining sub-sectors. Port Elizabeth: NMU Publications. Available at [Online] https://vital.seals.ac.za/vital/access/manager/Repository/vital:27179?site_name=GlobalView [Accessed:12th July 2020]

Theophilus Jong Yungong, “Towards a Framework for Integrating and Evaluating Corporate Social Investments in Extractive Sector Business Operations in Sub-Saharan Africa ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.312-322 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/312-322.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Effects of Career Placement by KUCCPS among the Undergraduate Students in Public Universities in Kiambu County, Kenya

Karanja Joseph Ndung’u, Rose Obae- December 2020 Page No.: 323-329

The study assessed the effects of career placement by KUCCPS to students’ career choice and the career guidance information by KUCCPS on students’ degree programme selection process in the public universities in Kiambu County, Kenya. The target population was 3000 first year students from Kenyatta University, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology (JKUAT) and University of Nairobi. A sample size of 900 students was obtained. Data collection was done using questionnaires, while data analysis was done using descriptive statistics. Findings showed that 82.8% of the students had applied for most famous degree programmes (Health/Biological sciences, Law, Engineering/architecture/ building and construction, Computer related courses, Business related courses and Statistics/Accounting/commerce) showing a high preference of these courses. But after placement majority of the students (72.9%) were placed in Art related courses different from what they had not applied for. From the Pearson product correlation coefficient which was -0.75 and the scatter diagram, it clear that there was strong negative correlation between what the students had applied for and what they were placed for. KUCCPS did not place most of the students on degree programmes of their choice and interest, but they were placed in different programmes. Moreover, 67.7% of the students agreed that they were not able to access KUCCPS website for career guidance and information. To minimize placement challenges, KUCCPS should be working closely with the labour market each and every year to establish the skill gap, so that it place students to fill the gap in future but not totally relying on its laid down policy which should be dynamic and not statics or fixed. With this kind of strategy most students will benefit and will be satisfied with the placement process. The career and guidance teachers should be empowered and trained with career guided skills, knowledge and provided with enough resources by KUCCPS to carry out effective career guidance services at secondary schools level before placement in the University.

Page(s): 323-329                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 13 January 2020

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41216

 Karanja Joseph Ndung’u
PhD Student, Department of Education Administration and planning, University of Nairobi, Kikuyu Campus, Thika, Kenya

  Rose Obae
Senior Lecturer, Department of Education Administration and planning, University of Nairobi, Kikuyu Campus, Thika, Kenya

[1] Agrey, L., & Lampadan, N. (2014). Determinant Factors Contributing to Students‟ Choice in Selecting University. Journal of Education and Human Development. Vol 3(2), 391-404.
[2] Alfred-Davidson, T. 2009.High school counselor and career specialists’ perceptions of school practices that involve parents in students’ career planning. PhD Diss., Dept. of Secondary Univ of Florida. United States, Florida.
[3] Banks-Santilli,L. (2014). First Generation College Students and their Pursuit of the American Dream. Journal of case studies in Higher Education, 5,1-32. American Press.
[4] Brown, D., and Brooks,.L. (1991). Career Couselling Techniques. Needham Heights, MA:Allyn & Bacon.
[5] Gaffner, D.C., & Hazler, R.J.(2002). Factors Related to Indecisiveness and Career Indecision in Undecided College Students. Journal of College Students Development, 43, 317-326.
[6] Gibson, R. L., & Mitchell, M. H. (2003). Introduction to Guidance and Counselling. (6th ed). New York: Pearson Educational Inc.
[7] Jomo Kenyatta University, (2018). Admission Office: Career Selection and Placement, Handbook of the College Admissions Profession, University Press. Kenyan Association of College Registrars and Admission.
[8] Kenyatta University, (2018). Admission Office: Career Selection and Placement, Handbook of the College Admissions Profession, University Press. Kenyan Association of College Registrars and Admission.
[9] Kidd, H. (2007) and Savickas, M. (2005). Career Construction Principals and Practice, Handbook of Vocational Psychology (4th edn)…..33-52 page 33.
[10] Mugenda, O. & Mugenda, A. (2003). Research methods Quatitative and Qualitative Approach. Nairobi Acts Press.
[11] Muindi, B. (2011, February 22nd). Scrap Parallel Degree Courses, Says Mwiria. The Daily Nation. Retrieved on 1st March, 2011 from: Daily Nation On The Web.
[12] Mutero, D. (2001, May 14). Not all is Lost in Public Universities. The Daily Nation, (20). Nairobi: Nation Media Group Ltd.
[13] Mutie & Ndambuki, P. (2002). Guidance and Counselling for School and Coleges. Nairobi: Oxford University press.
[14] Ng’ang’a. A, (2014). Effect of Talent Management on Organisation Performance Case of Conservation Agency in Kenya. International Journal of social sciences Management and Entrepreneurship 2(1):241-261, April 2018. Sage Publishers.
[15] Onsongo. J. (2011). Affirmative Action, Gender Equity and University Admission-Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania. London Review of Education. Vol 7, No1, March 2009, 71-81.
[16] Onsongo, J. (2009) . Four forms of Disconnection:Negociating Gender, Education and Poverty Reduction in Schools in Kenya and South Africa. Assets Publishing Service.gov.uk.
[17] University of Nairobi (2018). Admission Office: Career Selection and Placement, Handbook of the College Admissions Profession, University Press. Kenyan Association of College Registrars and Admission.
[18] Plank, S. B., & Jordan, W. J. (2001). Effects of information, guidance, and actions on postsecondary destinations: A study of talent loss. American educational research Journal, 38(4), 947-979.
[19] Porter, S.R. and P.D. Umbach. 2006. College major choice: An analysis of person-enviroment. Research in Higher Education. 47(4):429-449.
[20] Swan, C. C. (1998). Admissions officer: A profession and a career. In C. Swan & S. Henderson (Eds.), Handbook for the college admissions profession (pp. 29–36). Westport, CT:Greenwood Press, American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admission Officers.
[21] Trusty, J, S.G. Niles, and J.V. Carney. 2005. Education-career planning and middle school counselors. Professional School Counseling. 9(2):136-143

Karanja Joseph Ndung’u, Rose Obae “Effects of Career Placement by KUCCPS among the Undergraduate Students in Public Universities in Kiambu County, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.323-329 December 2020  DOI : https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41216

Download PDF

pdf

Nigeria-South Africa Relations from Apartheid to Post-Apartheid

Dr. Tamunopubo Big-Alabo & Dr. Emmanuel C. MacAlex-Achinulo – December 2020 Page No.: 330-335

This study examined the relations between Nigeria and South Africa from the period of Apartheid to Post-Apartheid. The study was guided by realist conflict theory by Donald Campbell. The study adopted ex-post research design while data was collected through secondary source such as textbooks, journal articles, newspapers, magazines and internet materials, the data generated was analyzed through content analysis. The findings of the study showed that there were some relations that existed between Nigeria and South Africa during the period of Apartheid which includes; bilateral political relations and bilateral economic relations. In a likely manner there have been breaches in relations between Nigeria and South Africa during the post-apartheid era which now has negative impacts in the areas of political and diplomatic, socio-cultural and economic. Based on the findings the study recommended among others; that there should be high level diplomatic engagement between Nigeria and South Africa as a way out of mending their unbecoming relation that had existed between the two countries and the government of South Africa should assist individuals from Nigeria that have incurred losses to rebuild their businesses that had resulted from the attacks.

Page(s): 330-335                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 January 2020

 Dr. Tamunopubo Big-Alabo
Department of Political and Administrative Studies, University of Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria.

  Dr. Emmanuel C. MacAlex-Achinulo
Department of Political and Administrative Studies, University of Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria.

[1] Campbell, D. (1965). Ethnocentric and other altruistic motive. Lincoln: University of Nebraska.
[2] Charman, A. Petersen, L. & Piper, L. (2012). From South African survivalism to foreign entrepreneurship: The transformation of the spaza sector in delft, Cape Town.Transformation. 47-73.
[3] Claassen, C. (2015). What explains South African xenophobia? A test of eight theories. School of Social and Political Sciences University of Glasgow.
[4] Frankel, J. (1968) The making of foreign policy. London Oxford University Press.
[5] Gross, F. (1945) Foreign policy analysis. New York, Philosophical Library.
[6] Held D., McGrew A., Goldblatt D. & Perraton, J. (1999). Global transformations, politics, economics and culture. Cambridge: Polity
[7] Kayode, F. (2014). The cash, the jet and pastor Ayo Oritsejafor. This-day, The SundayNewspaper.
[8] Laura, N. (2008). The new foreign policy: Power seeking in a globalized era. Lanham, Md: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
[9] Mahendra, K. (1967). Theoretical aspects of international politics. Shiva lalagarwala of Politics.
[10] Mistry, D. (2004). Falling crime, rising fear: 2003 national victims of crime survey. Crime Quarterly.
[11] Modelski, G. (1962) Theory of foreign policy. In T. Big-Alabo, Migration and Nigeria-South Africa relations. International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Sciences
[12] Oksana, Y. (2008). Xenophobia: Understanding the roots and consequences of negative attitude towards immigrants. The Counselling Psychologist Journal.
[13] Omojola, B. (2006). The sky is the limit. Africa Today.
[14] Oyelana, A. A. (2015). Crime phobia’s effects on immigrant entrepreneurs in South Africa.Journal of Social Sciences.
[15] Padelford, N. J. & Lincoln, G. A. (1977). The dynamics of international politics. Macmillan Company, New York. Press
[16] Pahad, A. (2002). Briefing on the incoming state visit. Union Building.
[17] Sifingo, B. (2003). South African high commissioner to Nigeria comments on business relations. African Business Journal.
[18] Shrief, M., Harvey, O., White, J., Hood, W. & Shrief, W. (1961). Intergroup conflict and cooperation: The robbers cave experiment. Norman, OK: University Book Exchange.

Dr. Tamunopubo Big-Alabo & Dr. Emmanuel C. MacAlex-Achinulo, “Nigeria-South Africa Relations from Apartheid to Post-Apartheid ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.330-335 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/330-335.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Availability of Intellectual Development Programmes in Primary School Libraries and Their Impact on Pupils’ Academic Performance

Faustina Chioma Haco-obasi- December 2020 Page No.: 336-345

Intellectual development of children is initiated by education and library is one of the core aspects of education. Intellectual development is concerned with how various mental processes like attention span, reasoning, learning, remembering and problem-solving develop from birth until adulthood. Given this, there is a direct connection between the library resources and programmes and the ultimate development of the intellect of the child. This work understudied ten (10) selected private primary schools from South-East and South-South geopolitical zones of Nigeria to determine the available intellectual development programmes and resources of their libraries. The test scores of 300 pupils in six subjects were taken before and after intensive exposure to the intellectual development programmes to establish their effect on academic performance. The findings indicated the availability of such programmes as well as print resources for developing the pupils’ intellect but very few electronic resources. The one-sample T-test was employed to test the positive significant effect of available intellectual development programmes in improving pupils’ academic performance. The calculated value (24.28177) of the student t-test statistic is greater than the tabulated value (1.6715) at 0.05 level of significance and therefore rejected the null hypothesis that there’s no positive significant effect of available programmes in improving pupils’ academic performance cross all selected primary schools in the states. The findings of the study led to the conclusion that there is a significant positive impact of intellectual development programmes on pupils’ academic performance.

Page(s): 336-345                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 January 2020

 Faustina Chioma Haco-obasi
Federal University of Technology, Owerri,Nigeria.

[1] F.O. Ajegbomogun, M.O. Salaam, The state of school libraries in Nigeria, PNLA Quarterly: the official Publication of Pacific Northwest Library Association 75(3) (2011).
[2] J.R.J.C.d.i.p.s. Saffran, Statistical language learning: Mechanisms and constraints, 12(4) (2003) 110-114.
[3] M. Tomasello, M. Carpenter, J. Call, T. Behne, H.J.B. Moll, b. sciences, Understanding and sharing intentions: The origins of cultural cognition, 28(5) (2005) 675-691.
[4] J. Piaget, B.J.N.Y.B. Inhelder, Thepsychology of the child, (1969).
[5] A. Frick, N.S.J.S.C. Newcombe, Computation, Young children’s perception of diagrammatic representations, 15(4) (2015) 227-245.
[6] M.A. Koenig, S.J.N.t.s.w.W.i. Doebel, children,, o.s.c.t. us, Children’s understanding of unreliability, (2013) 235-240.
[7] P.L. Harris, Trusting what you’re told: How children learn from others, Harvard University Press2012.
[8] D.J.K.Q. Oberg, New International School Library Guidelines, 46(5) (2018) 24-31.
[9] N.J.G.J.o.E.R. Anero, Relevance and challenges of primary education to the overall development of the child and the Nigerian society, 13(2) (2014) 55-62.
[10] S.Z. Ullah, M. Farooq, Quality Libraries Produce Quality Learners, Online Submission 4(2) (2008) 1-9.
[11] B.O. Gbadamosi, A survey of primary school libraries to determine the availability and adequacy of services for universal basic education (UBE) in Oyo State, Nigeria, Evidence Based Library and Information Practice 6(2) (2011) 19-33.
[12] E. Rosenfeld, good news for school libraries in Canada, Teacher Librarian 32(5) (2005) 55.
[13] F.A. Fabunmi, O.O.J.A.R.R. Awoyemi, A Cursory Look at Primary School Libraries and Utilization in Ado-Ekiti Local Government Area of Ekiti-State, Nigeria, 4(4) (2010).
[14] E. Adomi, Collection development and management in context, Warri: Etodick Publishers (2006).
[15] R.J. Todd, C.C. Kuhlthau, Student learning through Ohio school libraries, OELMA2004.
[16] L.J.S. Hay, Student learning through Australian school libraries Part 1: A statistical analysis of student perceptions, 3(2) (2005) 17-30.
[17] R.J. Todd, School libraries and the development of intellectual agency: Evidence from New Jersey, School Library Research 15 (2012).
[18] H. Funk, G.D.J.R.i. Funk, Children’s literature: An integral facet of the elementary school curriculum, 29(1) (1992) 40.
[19] P.C. Akanwa, Department of Library and Information Science Imo State University, Owerri, Journal of Nigerian Languages and Culture Vol 17(1) (2017) 166-184.
[20] K.B. Collins, C.A. Doll, Resource Provisions of a High School Library Collection, School Library Research 15 (2012).
[21] D.J.L.i.r. Strickland, I.N.C.o.T.o.E. young childre n. Urbana, Prompting language and concept development, (1977).
[22] M. Ayaz, N. Ali, A.B. Khan, R. Ullah, M. Ullah, Impact of school library on students’ academic achievement at secondary school level in southern districts of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences 7(5) (2017) 95-103.
[23] K.C. Lance, M.J. Rodney, C. Hamilton-Pennell, Measuring Up to Standards: The Impact of School Library Programs & Information Literacy in Pennsylvania Schools, (2000).
[24] V.J. Earp, A Study of the Role of the Elementary School Librarian in Reading Instruction in the Region II, Education Service Center Area of Texas, Online Submission (2006).
[25] S. Baxter, A. Smalley, Check it out! the results of the school library media census: Final report. St. Paul: Metronet. Retrieved March 28, 2013, 2003.
[26] D. Kachel, Graduate Students (2011). School library research summarized: A graduate class project. Mansfield University. Retrieved March 3, 2013.

Faustina Chioma Haco-obasi, “Availability of Intellectual Development Programmes in Primary School Libraries and Their Impact on Pupils’ Academic Performance” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.336-345 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/336-345.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Social Trust of Foreign Teachers amidst Covid-19 Anxiety in XI’AN, China

Karen Joy B. Talidong & Edison B. Estigoy- December 2020 Page No.: 346-350

The predicament brought by the COVID-19 pandemic caused many people around the world to deal with anxiety and look for preventive measures at the same time. In this study, social trust is one factor to consider. An online survey was designed to collect the perceptions of the foreign teachers in Xi’an China about social trust, experiences, and attitudes in dealing with anxiety. Results showed that foreign teachers trust the implementation of the preventive measures of COVID-19 by the government which leads to social security and social stability. Further results revealed that foreign teachers are having social trust in the state and community but are undecided in terms of public places. Moreover, regardless of gender, foreign teachers’ social trust doesn’t differ.

Page(s): 346-350                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 15 January 2020

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41217

 Karen Joy B. Talidong
Shaanxi Normal University

 Edison B. Estigoy
Xi’an International Studies University

[1] Balkhi F, Nasir A, Zehra A, and Riaz R. (May 02, 2020) Psychological and Behavioral Response to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic. Cureus 12(5): e7923. doi:10.7759/cureus.7923
[2] Ben-Ner, A., and Putterman, L. (2001). Trusting and trustworthiness. BUL Rev., 81, 523.
[3] Bongoh Kye, Sun-Jae Hwang (2020), Social Trust in the midst of pandemic crisis: Implications from COVID-19 of South Korea. Research in Social Stratification and Mobility https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rssm.2020.100523
[4] Calhoon, G.G., Tye, K.M., 2015. Resolving the neural circuits of anxiety. Nat. Neurosci. 18, 1394–1404. https://doi.org/10.1038/nn.4101.
[5] Chen, X., and Liu, G. (2017). Gender moderates the effect of homo economicus belief on trust. Social Behavior and Personality: an international journal, 45(5), 873-880.
[6] Cherti, M. (2008). Paradoxes of Social Capital: A Multi-Generational Study of Moroccans in London. Amsterdam University Press
[7] Coleman, J. S. (1990). Foundations of social theory. Harvard University Press
[8] Croson, R., and Gneezy, U. (2009). Gender differences in preferences. Journal of Economic literature, 448-474.
[9] Dalton, R. J. (2007). The social transformation of trust in government. International Review of Sociology, 15(1), 133–154. https://doi.org/10.1080/03906700500038819.
[10] Fukuyama, F. (1995). Trust: the social virtues and the creation of prosperity. Hamish Hamilton
[11] Gambetta, D. (1988). Trust: Making and Breaking Cooperative Relations (Vol. 52, Issue 4).
[12] Glaeser, E. L., Laibson, D. I., Scheinkman, J. A., & Soutter, C. L. (2000). Measuring trust. The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 115(3), 811–846
[13] Haselhuhn, M. P., Kennedy, J. A., Kray, L. J., Van Zant, A. B., and Schweitzer, M. E. (2015). Gender differences in trust dynamics: Women trust more than men following a trust violation. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 56, 104-109.
[14] [14] Karen Joy B. Talidong & Cathy Mae D. Toquero (2020) Philippine Teachers’ Practices to Deal with Anxiety amid COVID-19, Journal of Loss and Trauma, 25:6-7, 573 579, DOI: 10.1080/15325024.2020.1759225
[15] Mansbridge, J. (1999). Altruistic trust. In M. E. Warren (Ed.), Democracy and Trust (pp. 290 309). Cambridge University Press cited in Patulny, R. V., & Lind Haase Svendsen, G. (2007). Exploring the social capital grid: bonding, bridging, qualitative, quantitative. International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, 27(1/2), 32–51.
[16] McKnight, D. H., & Chervany, N. L. (2000). What is trust? A conceptual analysis and an interdisciplinary model. AMCIS 2000 Proceedings 382.
[17] Mechanic, D., and S. Meyer. (2000). “Concepts of Trust among Patients with Serious Illness.” Social Science and Medicines 51 (5):pp. 657-668
[18] Moy, P., & Scheufele, D. A. (2000). Media effects on political and social trust. Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, 77(4), 744–759. https://doi.org/10.1177/107769900007700403.
[19] Newton, K. (2001). Trust, social capital, civil society, and democracy. International Political Science Review, 22(2), 201–214
[20] Newton, K. (2005). Predicting cross-national levels of social trust: global pattern or Nordic exceptionalism? European Sociological Review, 21(4), 311–327.https://doi.org/10.1093/esr/jci022.
[21] Nooteboom, B. (2006). Social Capital, Institutions and Trust. CentER Discussion Paper, 2006 35
[22] Paxton, P. (2002). Social Capital and Democracy: An Interdependent Relationship. American Sociological Review, 67(2), 254–277
[23] Portes, A. (1998). Social capital: its origins and applications in modern sociology. Annual Review of Sociology, 24(1), 1–25
[24] Purdue, D. (2001). Neighbourhood Governance: Leadership, Trust and Social Capital. Urban Studies, 38(12), 2211–2224
[25] Putnam, R. (2000). Bowling alone: The collapse and revival of American community. New York: Simon & Schuster.
[26] Robbins, B. G. (2016). From the general to the specific: How social trust motivates relational trust. Social Science Research, 55, 16–30
[27] Roy, D., Tripathy, S., Kar, S. K., Sharma, N., Verma, S. K., & Kaushal, V.(2020). Study of knowledge, attitude, anxiety, & perceived mental healthcare need in Indian population during COVID-19 pandemic. Asian Journal of Psychiatry, 51, 102083–102087. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajp.2020.102083
[28] Sarason, I. G. (1988). Anxiety, self-preoccupation, and attention. Anxiety Research, 1, 3-7.
[29] Taormina RJ. (2013) Measuring trust in China: Resolving Eastern and Western differences in concepts of trust, Third Asian Conference of Psychology and the Behavioral Sciences. 2013. http://hdl.handle.net/10692/310.
[30] Thielmann, I., and Hilbig, B. E. (2015). Trust: An integrative review from a person–situation perspective. Review of General Psychology, 19(3), 249-277.
[31] Torpe L, Lolle H. (2011) Identifying social trust in cross-country analysis: Do we really measure the same? Social Indicators Res. 2011;103:481–500. doi: 10.1007/s11205-010-9713-5.
[32] Van de Walle, S., & Bouckaert, G. (2003). Public service performance and trust in government: The problem of causality. International Journal of Public Administration, 29 (8 &9), 891913.https://doi.org/10.1081/PAD120019352.
[33] Ward P, Meyer (2009) S. Trust, social quality and wellbeing: a sociological exegesis. Dev Soc. 2009; 38:339–63.
[34] Wilder-Smith, A., & Freedman, D. O. (2020). Isolation, quarantine, social distancing and community containment: Pivotal role for old-style public health measures in the novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) outbreak. Journal of Travel Medicine, 27(2), 1–4. https://doi.org/10.1093/jtm/taaa020
[35] Xiang YT, Yang Y, Li W, Zhang L, Zhang Q, Cheung T, et al. (2020) Timely mental health care for the 2019 novel Coronavirus outbreak is urgently needed. Lancet Psychiatry 2020; 7:228–9.

Karen Joy B. Talidong & Edison B. Estigoy, “Social Trust of Foreign Teachers amidst Covid-19 Anxiety in XI’AN, China” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.346-350 December 2020  https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41217

Download PDF

pdf

The Effect of Career Commitment on Productivity in The Construction Sector of Libya: A pilot study

Juma Aseed Mohamed Buajela, Sadun Naser Yassin Alheety – December 2020 Page No.: 351-358

Construction affects nearly all aspects of life, including home, leisure, school and work. Building is an integral factor in building an acceptable living standard in Libya, but it faces exceptional health and safety challenges. Building workers’ pay very highly for the chance to earn a living. These challenges and the ways to address them need to be addressed. Libya is one of the developing countries and its various construction sectors constitute important economic components. Although the Libyan construction sector is fast growing and developing, it is still confronted by competitive challenges. The purpose of the current study is to evaluate Career Commitment on Productivity in The Construction Sector of Libya as A pilot study. The context of this study was the construction industries in Libya. A total of 40 responses from employees were drawn from construction firms in Libya. This was achieved using a probability type sampling in which stratified random sampling was applied. The quantitative method has been selected using the empirical study with a designed questionnaire comprised of 26 questions and involved 40 respondents comprising of the Administrative, Construction worker, and Supervisors. The data analysis is divided into three phases: initial data analysis – the pilot study, statistical analysis to develop a model and to test the study hypothesis. All stages of data analysis use the method of Structural equation modelling. The results showed that Career Commitment is not significantly at the level of 0.05, the p-value is .258 which is greater than .05. Therefore, a hypothesis which assumes Career Commitment has a positive impact on Organizational Productivity was rejected. The most implication for this study, Theoretically, the main drive of this investigation was to evaluate Career Commitment on Productivity in The Construction Sector of Libya. Human resource management literature shows a link between Career Commitment and organizational productivity. One of the most important recommendations of the study since Career Commitment was an international notion besides requires to be considered for further investigations throughout a great amount of broader environmental well as researched within the scope of a greater and more comprehensive populace, it is recommended to future researchers to gather data from other research contexts, and to some other industries so that hidden variables can be identified as well as a comparative analysis can be carried out.

Page(s): 351-358                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 15 January 2020

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41218

 Juma Aseed Mohamed Buajela
Department of Management, Al-Madina International University, Kualalumpur-Malaysia

  Sadun Naser Yassin Alheety
Department of Management, Al-Madina International University, Kualalumpur-Malaysia

[1] Asghari, M. (2019). Impact of jasmines on safety, productivity and physiology of food crops. Trends in Food Science & Technology, 91, 169-183.‏
[2] Azoulay, P., Joshua, Z. & Wang, J. (2010). Superstar Extinction, Quarterly Journal of Economics125(2), 549-589.
[3] Babbie, E., & Rubin, A. (2010). Essential research methods for social work. Belmont, Ca.‏
[4] Balakrishnan, N. (2007). Progressive censoring methodology: an appraisal. Test, 16(2), 211.‏
[5] Bandiera, O., Iwan, B, & Imran, R. (2007). Incentives for Managers and Inequality among Workers: Evidence from a Firm Level Experiment. Quarterly Journal of Economics 122(2), 729-773.
[6] Bonn W. (2005). Unemployment duration and individual heterogeneity: a regional study, Applied Economics, 37, 133-153
[7] Brondino, M., Silva, S.A., & Pasini, M., (2012). Multilevel approach to organizational and group safety climate and safety performance: Co-workers as the missing link. Safety Science 50: 1847–1856.
[8] Brown, C., George-Curran, R., & Smith, M. L. (2003). The role of emotional intelligence in the career commitment and decision-making process. Journal of Career Assessment, 11(4), 379-392.
[9] Bryman, A., & Bell, E. (2015), Business research methods. Oxford University Press, USA
[10] Carson, K. D. and Bedeian, A. G. (1994). Career commitment: Construction of a measure and examination of its psychometric properties. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 44, 237-262.
[11] Cavana, R. Y., Delahaye, B. L., & Sekaran, U. (2001), Applied business research: Qualitative and quantitative methods. John Wiley & Sons Australia
[12] Crossan, F. (2003). Research philosophy: towards an understanding. Nurse Researcher (through 2013), 11(1), 46.‏
[13] Felt, O., Buri, P., & Gurny, R. (1998). Chitosan: a unique polysaccharide for drug delivery. Drug development and industrial pharmacy, 24(11), 979-993.‏
[14] Fornell, C., & Larcker, D. F. (1981). Structural equation models with unobservable variables and measurement error: Algebra and statistics.‏
[15] Galliers, R. (1992). Information systems research: Issues, methods and practical guidelines. Blackwell Scientific.‏
[16] Guba, E. G., & Lincoln, Y. S. (1994). Competing paradigms in qualitative research. Handbook of qualitative research, 2(163-194), 105.‏
[17] Hair, J. F. (2010). Multivariate data analysis. Pearson College Division.
[18] Hair, J. F., Black, W. C., Babin, B. J., & Anderson, R. E. (2014). Multivariate data analysis: Pearson new international edition. Essex: Pearson Education Limited.‏
[19] Hao, R., Zhonglin, W., & Qishan, C. (2013). The impact of psychological capital on employees’ career success: the mediating role of career commitment. Journal of Psychological Science, 4, 35
[20] Hart, S. D. (2001). Assessing and managing violence risk. HCR-20 violence risk management companion guide, 13-25.‏
[21] Hesse-Biber, S. J., Hesse-Biber, S. N., & Leavy, P. (Eds.). (2006). Emergent methods in social research. Sage.‏
[22] Judge TA, Kammeyer-Mueller JD, Weiss HM et al. (2017). Job attitudes, job satisfaction, and job affect: A century of continuity and of change. Journal of Applied Psychology, 102(3): 356-374
[23] Karatepe, O.M. and Avci, T. (2017), “The effects of psychological capital and work engagement on nurses’ lateness attitude and turnover intentions”.
[24] Kim, M. R. (2007). Influential factors on turnover intention of nurses; the effect of nurse’s organizational commitment and career commitment to turnover intention. Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing Administration, 13(3), 335-3
[25] Krejcie, R.V and Morgan, D.W (1970). Determining Sample Size for Research Activities. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 30, 607-610.
[26] Lauriola, M., & Levin, I. P. (2001). Personality traits and risky decision-making in a controlled experimental task: An exploratory study. Personality and Individual Differences, 31(2), 215-226.
[27] Lawrence, T. B., & Suddaby, R. (2006). 1.6 institutions and institutional work. The Sage handbook of organization studies, 215-254.‏
[28] Leedy, P. D., & Ormrod, J. E. (2005). Practical research. Pearson Custom.‏
[29] Mearns, K., Flin, R., Gordon, R., & Fleming, M. (2001). Human and organizational factors in offshore safety. Work & Stress, 15, 144 –160.
[30] Myers-Scotton, C. (1997). Dueling languages: Grammatical structure in codeswitching. Oxford University Press.‏
[31] Nduro, M. (2012). The effect of motivation on the performance of employees at GT bank Ghana (Doctoral dissertation).‏
[32] Okoye, P. V. C., & Ezejiofor, R. A. (2013). The effect of human resources development on organizational productivity. International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, 3(10), 250.
[33] Olu & Majekodunmi (2020). Climate change impact on workers’ health, safety and productivity. Climate Change, 2020, 6(21), 156-167
[34] Pinsonneault, A., & Kraemer, K. (1993). Survey research methodology in management information systems: an assessment. Journal of management information systems, 10(2), 75-105.‏
[35] Romero, D., Mattsson, S., Fast-Berglund, Å., Wuest, T., Gorecky, D., & Stahre, J. (2018). Digitalizing occupational health, safety and productivity for the operator 4.0. In IFIP International Conference on Advances in Production Management Systems (pp. 473-481). Springer, Cham.‏
[36] Saunders, M., Philip, L., & Adrian, T., (2009). Research Methods for Business Students. 5th ed. Edinburgh: Ess: Pearson Education Ltd. 61.
[37] Sekaran, U. (2003). Research Methods for Business – A Skill Building Approach. Carbondale, IL: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., p. 63.
[38] Sekaran, U., & Bougie, R. (2003). Research method of business: A skill Building Approach. New York: John Willey & Sons.
[39] Tatar, Ali. (2020). Impact of Job Satisfaction on Organizational Commitment.
[40] Tatar, Ali. (2020). Impact of Job Satisfaction on Organizational Commitment.
[41] Tchapchet, E. T. (2013). The impact of employee participation on organisational productivity at a university of technology in the Western Cape, South Africa (Doctoral dissertation, Cape Peninsula University of Technology).
[42] Tchapchet, E. T. (2013). The impact of employee participation on organisational productivity at a university of technology in the Western Cape, South Africa (Doctoral dissertation, Cape Peninsula University of Technology).
[43] Wearing, S., & Neil, J. (2009). Ecotourism: Impacts, potentials and possibilities? Routledge.‏
[44] Wearing, S., & Neil, J. (2009). Ecotourism: Impacts, potentials and possibilities? Routledge.‏
[45] Zeng, D., & Lin, D. Y. (2007). Maximum likelihood estimation in semiparametric regression models with censored data. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society: Series B (Statistical Methodology), 69(4), 507-564.‏

Juma Aseed Mohamed Buajela, Sadun Naser Yassin Alheety, “The Effect of Career Commitment on Productivity in The Construction Sector of Libya: A pilot study ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.351-358 December 2020  DOI : https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41218

Download PDF

pdf

Access to Quality Information as a Tool for Rebuilding Trust in Service Delivery of Teachers with Visual Impairment in Nigeria

Victor Chuks Nwokedi (Ph. D) & Samuel Olajide Ogundele- December 2020 Page No.: 359-362

Teaching is the process of inculcation knowledge, values, morals and skills needed to solve both theory and practical problems. Knowledge is gain as a result of access to quality information about a topic or subject. However, quality information can be used as an asset to enhance effective service delivery of teachers with visual impairment in Nigeria and toward rebuilding trust in the educational services provided. To this end the paper examine the need to access quality information as tool for rebuilding trust in service delivery of teachers with visual impairment, role of information in teaching and learning process, and advantage of access to quality information on service delivery of teachers with visual impairment. It was concluded that the role of information in teaching and learning process cannot be over emphasized, teachers including teachers with visual impairment need to access quality information in other to transfer quality knowledge to their learner. It is observed that information access is low among teachers with visual impairment. Suggestions is that the institutions need to provide adequate information resources in a format that can be easily access by teachers with visual impairment, and the institutional based information system should be effectively manage so that the service delivery of teachers with visual impairment can be trusted in Nigeria.

Page(s): 359-362                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 15 January 2020

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41219

 Victor Chuks Nwokedi (Ph. D)
Department of Social Science Education, University of JOS, Jos Plateaustate, Nigeria

 Samuel Olajide Ogundele
Department of Social Science Education, University of JOS, Jos Plateaustate, Nigeria

[1] Achebe,N.E & Lucky, A.T (2013). Information Service Delivery to the Visual Impaired: A Case Study of Hope for the Blind Foundation Wusasa, Zaria, Nigeria. Research Journal of Information Technology. 5(1): 15-23. ISSN:2041-3106
[2] Adam,M (1993). Students Perception of Teachers Effectiveness and their Class Work Examination Performance in Secondary Schools in Borno State, Nigeria. M.ed. Dessertation, University of Maiduguru,128p.(Unpublished)
[3] Adeoye, M.O & Popoola, S.O (2011). Teaching Effectiveness, Availability, Accessibility and Use of Library and Information Resources Among Teaching Staff of Schools Nursing in Osun and Oyo State Nigeria. Library Philosophy and Practice. ISSN:1522-0222.Retrieved from https://digitalcommon.unl.edu/Libphil-prac/525
[4] Apiah, D.K. (2017) Information SeekingBehaviour of Visually Challenge Students in Public Universities: A Study of University of Ghana, Legon and University of Education Winneba. Library Philosophy and Practice. Retrieved from https://digital Commons.unl.edu/libphi/prac/1507.
[5] Azemi, N.A, Zaidi, H & Hussin, N (2017) Information Quality in Organization for Better Decision Making. International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Science. 7(12).ISSN:2222-6990.Retrieved fromhttp://dx.doi.org/10.6007/IJARBSS/v7-i1213624.
[6] Chinnasamy, K. (2016). Information need and seeking behaviour of engineering college students in Madurai. A case study. Qualitative and quantitative methods in library. 5, 131-140
[7] Chimah, N.J & Nwokocha, U. ( 2013). Information Resources, Retrieval and Utilization for Effective Research in Tertiary and Research Institutions. Asian Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences (AJHSS) 1( 3): 11-19. ISSN: 2320-9720
[8] Tank, R., Kwong, B., Strzlkowski, T. & Kantor (2003)
[9] Embury, S.M, Missier, P., Sampoio, S., Greewood, R.M. & Greece, A.D. (2009). Incorporating Domain-specific information qualitative constraints into database queries. Journal of Data & Information Quality (JDIQ). 1(2), retrieved from http://delivery.acm.org/10.1145.1580000/1577846/911_embury.pdf?key1-1577846&keyz-5318887521&1011-portal&di-ACM&CFID-60913111&CFTOKEN-59567280
[10] Global Advisory committee. Information quality: the foundation for justice decision making. Retrieved from www.IT.OJP.GOV/IQ-RESOURCES
[11] Howard, G, Lubbe, S & Klopper, E. (2011). Impact of Information qualitative on information research. Alternation Special Edition 4, 288-305.
[12] Harden, R.M & Crosby, J. (2000). The twelve role of the teacher: AMME Medical Education Guide. Scotland:LynnBell
[13] Ismaila, B.A (1999). The relationship between teachers characteristics and Student Academic Achievement in Secondary Schools in Adamawa State, Nigeria. Unpublished M.Ed Dissertation, University of Maiduguri. 152p.
[14] Mbuga, E.N, Odini, C. & Chege, A. (2018). Provision of Information Service to the Visually Impaired Studentd at Thika School for the Blind. International Journal of Humanities and Social Science. 8(8), 46-56.
[15] Ntui A.I. & Udah A.E (2015). Accessibility and Utilization of Library Resources by Teachers in Secondary Schools in Calabar Education Zone of Cross River State, Nigeria. Global Journal of Human- Social Science XV(VIII).
[16] Odunlade, R.O (2017) Availability and accessibility of information resources as predictor of lecturer teaching effectiveness. Library Philosophy and Practice. Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphi/prac/1509
[17] Ortlieb, E. (2013). Attraction Theory, Practice and Evaluation. Literacy Research. 4(3), 21-30.
[18] Popoola, S.O & Holiso, Y. (2009). Use of Library Information Resources and services as Predictor of Teaching Effectiveness of Social Scientist. AJLAIS. 19(1), 65-77.

Victor Chuks Nwokedi (Ph. D) & Samuel Olajide Ogundele, “Access to Quality Information as a Tool for Rebuilding Trust in Service Delivery of Teachers with Visual Impairment in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.359-362 December 2020  DOI : https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41219

Download PDF

pdf

Review of Distributors, Retailers and Customers’ Assessment of Lion Brand Portland cement Over Other Competing Portland Cement Brands

Richard Jimin Agema, Ochanya Blessing Adegbe, Philip Dewua – Decembber 2020 Page No.: 363-369

The main objective of this paper is to present a review of distributors, retailers’ and customers assessment of lion brand Portland cement product over other competing Portland cement brands in Nigeria. The researchers adapt mix research methodology. Therefore, the research methods adapted for the study is survey, historical, descriptive, analytical and empirical methods. The sample population designed for the study was 44 distributors, retailers, and 44 customers of the company’s product. A cluster sampling method is adapted for the study. Distributors, retailers, and customers were asked to assess the product over other competing cement brands like Dangote cement, Ashakacem, and Rock imported cement. Results of the survey conducted revealed that: distributors, retailers, and customers rated Lion Brand Portland Cement product over other competing brands as rather poor. Similarly, Consumers and Customers also rated Lion Brand Portland Cement over other competing brands as rather poor. The poor rating was in terms of low-capacity utilization that couldn’t meet Consumers and Customers demand for the product. The poor rating was also associated with poor packaging, poor customer services and scarcity of the product at depots and retail outlets due to constant plant shutdown and low capacity utilisation. The study recommends that, the company should improve on low-capacity utilization to meet consumers demand for the product. In addition, company should improve on product packaging i. e. the underweight of the package product and encourage good Customer Service delivery at plants and depots to improve product positioning and sales.

Page(s): 363-369                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 19 January 2020

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41220

 Richard Jimin Agema
Department of Business Management, Faculty of Management Science Benue State University Makurdi,. Nigeria.

  Ochanya Blessing Adegbe
Department of Business Management, Faculty of Management Science Benue State University Makurdi,. Nigeria.

  Philip Dewua
Department of Business Management, Faculty of Management Science Benue State University Makurdi,. Nigeria.

[1] Aaker, D. A. (1992) Strategic Marketing Management; Third Edition. New York: John Wiley & Sons Inc.
[2] Aaker, D.A. (1991), Managing Brand Equity. The Free Press: New York. pp. 7, 39, 61, 110.
[3] Agema, R. J. (1997) Effective Marketing of Cement in Nigeria: A Case Study of Benue Cement Company Plc.1980-1995. Zaria: (An Unpublished B.Sc. Project), Department of Business Administration, Ahmadu Bello University Zaria.
[4] Annual Reports and Accounts of BCC Plc. (2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995). Jos: Trinity Graphic Limited.
[5] Holt, D. B. (n d) Brands and Branding. Cultural Strategy Group.
[6] Chernatony L. and McDonald, M. (1998), Creating Powerful Brands, 2nd ed., Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann.
[7] Christopher, M. and Towill, D. (2001). An integrated model for the design of agile supply chains. International Journal of Physical distribution & Logistics Management.
[8] Clifton, R. and Simmons, J. (2003) Brands and Branding. London: The Economist Newspaper Ltd
[9] Cravens, D. W & Lamb, W. C. (1993) Strategic marketing management cases. Homewood: Irwin Inc
[10] Doyle, P. (1999) “Building successful brands” in excellence in advertising: The IPA guide to best practice. Second edition. Edited by butter field lisle. Oxford: Butter.
[11] Fifield, P. (1998) Marketing strategy Second Edition. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann.
[12] Ghodeswar, B. M. (2008) Building brand identity in competitive markets: a conceptual model. Journal of Product & Brand Management. Vol.17(1) pp. 4–12. Emerald Group Publishing Limited. [DOI 10.1108/10610420810856468.
[13] Kahia, G. and Iravo. M. (2014) Factors affecting the performance of distribution logistics Among production Firms in Kenya: A case study of Bata shoe company (K) Limited.International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences. Vol.4 (10) P.281
[14] Kapferer, J.N. (2004), “Brand NEW world, brand equity”, The Economic Times, June 30, Mumbai.
[15] Knapp, D.E. (2000), The Brand Mindset. New York: McGraw-Hill. pp. 33, 36, 103.
[16] La-Londe, Martha, Cooper, and Noordewier, (1998). A Management Perspective: Customer Service. Pp. 51-56.
[17] Okigbo, N. (2013) International Journal of Innovative Research in Engineering & Science. vol.8 (2), p.1
[18] Ramsden, P. & Zacharias, J. (1993) action profiling: generating competitive edge through realizing management potentials. USA: Gower press.
[19] Schewe, C. D. (1987) Marketing Principles and Strategies First Edition. New York: Random House.
[20] Thompson & Strickland (1996) Strategic Management Concepts and Cases; Ninth Edition. Boston: Irwan McGraw-Hill.
[21] Thompson, J.I. (1993) Strategic Management Awareness & Change, Second Edition. London: Chapman & Hall. Worth Heinemann.
[22] Weilbacher, W.M. (1995), Brand. NTC Business Books. Chicago, IL, p. 4.

Richard Jimin Agema , Ochanya Blessing Adegbe, Philip Dewua “Review of Distributors, Retailers and Customers’ Assessment of Lion Brand Portland cement Over Other Competing Portland Cement Brands. ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.363-369 Decembber 2020  DOI : https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41220

Download PDF

pdf

Gender and the Media: Assessing the Visibility of Women in the Nigerian Press from Five Widely Circulated National Dailies.

Izunwanne, Gloria Nnedimma, Akor, George Bassey & Elesia, Christian Chukwudubem- Decembber 2020 Page No.: 370-377

The mass media have been accused of inequality in gender representations from the continuous decline of female reporters to the stereotyping of women in news reportage and the exclusion of women in news source selection. The visibility of women in the Nigerian press was assessed by analysing the manifest content of an edition each of five widely circulated national dailies namely: Vanguard, The Guardian, Daily Sun, New Telegraph and The Nation, published in August, 2020. The purpose was to find out if the various accusations are justified. The study was hinged on the muted group theory which stated that women belong to the minority group in environments where men control power. The visibility of women in the Nigerian press was examined by checking the representations of women against their male counterparts through the by-lines, newsmakers, contributors, photographs, portrayal, beats, prominence and senior staff positions which made up the content categories where the units of analysis were drawn. Data collected were statistically presented in tables and graphs. The findings show that the male gender dominated with over 80% in every content category examined in each of the newspapers. The study concluded that there still remains an overwhelming gender gap in favour of the men in the Nigerian press. The women are the muted group and are almost invisible the print media. Therefore, the study recommended that the media should consider gender reforms and avoid the exclusion of women.

Page(s): 370-377                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 19 January 2020

 Izunwanne, Gloria Nnedimma
Department of Mass Communication, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka.

  Akor, George Bassey
Department of Mass Communication, University of Calabar, Calabar.

  Elesia, Christian Chukwudubem
Department of Political Science, Tansian University, Umunya.

[1] Amobi, I. (2013). Portrayal and participation of women in Nigerian media. Retrieved from https://profteri.wordpress. com/2013/07/27/portrayal-and-participation-of-women-in-nigerian-media/
[2] Anyanwu, C. (2001, July 15). Nigeria women demand more representation in governance. This Day Newspapers, Lagos.
[3] Ardener, E. (1975). Belief and the problem of women. In S. Ardener (eds.). Perceiving women. London: Malaby Press. Pp 1-17.
[4] Barkman, L. L. (2018). Muted group theory: A tool for hearing marginalized voices. Retrieved from https://www .cbeinternational.org/resource/article/priscilla-papers-academic-journal/muted-group-theory-tool-hearing-marginalized.
[5] Chukwurah, D. C., Nduba, J. O. & Izunwanne, G. N. (2020). Gender equality and women political participation and representation in Nigeria. International Journal of Academic Accounting, Finance & Management Research (IJAAFMR), 4(7) 52-59.
[6] Colfer, C. J. P. (1982). On communication among unequals. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 7(3), 263-283.
[7] Global Media Monitoring Project (2015). Who makes the news? UK and Canada: World Association for Christian Communication (WACC).
[8] Ikuomola, A. D. & Okunola, R. A. (2011). Womanhood and the media: Nigeria and the Arab word. Journal of the Social Sciences, 6(3), 227-234.
[9] Izunwanne, G. N. (2013). Attitude of female mass communication students towards journalism as a career: A study of Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka. (Unpublished project). Department of Mass Communication, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka.
[10] Kiprotich, A. J. & Chang’orok, J. R. (2015). Gender communication stereotypes: A depiction of the mass media. IOSR Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences, 20(11), 69-77.
[11] Kramarae, C. (1981). Women and men speaking. Rowley, MA: Newbury House
[12] Kramarae, C. (2005). Muted group theory and communication: Asking dangerous questions. Journal of Women and language, 28(2), 55-61.
[13] Liena, C. Y. (2011). Challenges faced by female journalists in African societies. Paper presented at the West African Conference for Journalists. Accra Ghana. June 12, 2011. Retrieved from https://www.worldpulse.com/community/users/liena/posts/16000.
[14] Lorber, J. (1998). Gender inequality: Feminist theories and politics. New York: Roxbury Publishing Company.
[15] Nangabo, D. (2015). The muted group theory: An overview. Retrieved from https://m.grin.com/document/309915#
[16] Nwankwo, N. (2012). Gender equality in Nigerian politics. Lagos: Deutchetz Publishers
[17] Nyondo, R. (2005). Career choices for female journalism students: A case in Zambia University in Zambia, Lusaka
[18] Okunna, S. C. (2002). Gender and communication in Nigeria: Is this the 21st Century? Paper delivered at International Association for Media and Communication Research (IAMCR) Biennial Conference, Barcelona, Spain, July 2002
[19] Okunna, S. C. (2005). Women as invisible as ever in the Nigeria’s news media. International Journal of Media and Cultural Politics. 1(1), 127-130.
[20] Omenugha, K. A. (2005). Poverty, media and gender in Nigeria: Women reclaim issue of media development. Journal of the World Association for Christian Communication. 3, 41-44.
[21] Oyinade, R. B. & Daramola, I. (2013). Media, gender and conflict: The problem of eradicating stereotyping of women in Nigeria. Singaporean Journal of Business Economics and Management Studies. 2(1), 27-41.
[22] Premium Times (2019, August 21). Full list: Portfolios of Buhari’s 44 ministers – 2019-2023. Premium Times. Retrieved from https://www.premiumtimesng.com/news/headlines/347816-full-list-portfolios-of-buharis-44-ministers-2019.html
[23] Ronderos, K. (2012). Women journalists in the eye of the storm. Retrieved from https://www.awid.org/news-and-analysis/women-journalists-eye-storm
[24] Wall, J. C. & Gannon-Leary, P. (1999). A sentence made by men: Muted group theory revisited. The European Journal of Women’s Studies, 6(1), 21-29.
[25] World Economic Forum (2020). Global gender gap report 2020. Geneva, Switzerland: World Economic Forum.

Izunwanne, Gloria Nnedimma, Akor, George Bassey & Elesia, Christian Chukwudubem, “Gender and the Media: Assessing the Visibility of Women in the Nigerian Press from Five Widely Circulated National Dailies.” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.370-377 Decembber 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/370-377.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Review of Cost Effectiveness of Organisation Structure of Benue Cement Company Plc Gboko towards Achieving Its Marketing Objective: An Empirical Analysis

Richard Jimin Agema, Hembadoon Diaka, Bukola Rebecca Oyeleye- Decembber 2020 Page No.: 378-386

The main objective of this study is to present an empirical review of whether Benue Cement Company PLC Gboko adopted a cost-effective organization structure towards achieving its marketing objective. The study adopts mix research methods of Survey, historical, descriptive, analytical and empirical. The Company’s Population consisted of 326 top and middle level Managers and 910 for lower-level Managers. The Sample population of 44 employees were drawn for the study covering the Four levels of management. This consisted of 3 Top managers, 20 middle level managers, 9 First level Supervisors, 12 Clerical staff. The data collection method adopted for the study is through questionnaire, literature reviews, company documents, and personal observations. Data analysis technique adopted for the study is simple percentages, frequency tables, and pie chart. Results of findings from the study revealed that, the Company did not adopt a cost-effective organization structure to achieve the Company’s marketing objective. The company adopted a long chain of command and communication as depicted by the company’s organizational structure as presented in appendixes I and II in variance with empirical recommendations evidence. This kind of structure is contrary to what Schewe (1987) recommended that: “for organization to survive, it should have a shorter chain of communication and command”. The Company’s restructuring effort of 1994 and 2001 did not make significant changes in the cost reduction efforts to achieve the company’s strategic business objectives, as stated in the company’s mission statement as…, “to achieve effective and efficient resources utilization” with the aim to make profit. The study recommends that to be cost effective to achieve its marketing objective, the company should have an organisation structure with a shorter Chain of command and communication and work towards reducing wastes in production activities.

Page(s): 378-386                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 19 January 2020

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41221

 Richard Jimin Agema
Department of Business Management, Faculty of Management Science Benue State University, Makurdi, Nigeria

  Hembadoon Diaka
Department of Business Management, Faculty of Management Science Benue State University, Makurdi, Nigeria

  Bukola Rebecca Oyeleye
Department of Business Management, Faculty of Management Science Benue State University, Makurdi, Nigeria

[1] Agbim, K.C; Oriarewo, G. O. and Zever, T. A. (2014) Contribution of Organisation structure, Leadership and Relationship styles and Innovation Process towards Organisational Innovativeness. International Journal of Economics, Commerce and Management.Vol.11(12). p8.
[2] Annual Reports and Accounts of BCC Plc. (2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995). Jos: Trinity Graphic limited.
[3] Companies and Allied Matters Decree 1990.
[4] Benue Cement Company Plc. (2001) Corporate Planning and Data Processing Department.
[5] Ottih, L.O. (2008). Organization theory: Structure, Design and Process. Port Harcourt: Amex Publications.
[6] Schewe, C. D. (1987). Marketing Principles and Strategies, First Edition. New York: Random House.
[7] Thompson & Strickland (1996) Strategic Management Concepts and Cases; Ninth Edition. Boston: Irwin McGraw-Hill
[8] Thompson, J.L. (1993). Strategic Management Awareness & Change Second Edition. London: Chapman & Hall.
[9] Toledo, L. A. (2009) Organizational Structures within the Scope of Strategic Marketing Planning: A Discursive Study. Rev. Adm. UFSM, Santa Maria, vol. 2, (2). Pp. 180-196.
[10] Pearce, J. A. and Robinson, R. B. (2002). Strategic management Formulation, Implementation and Control, Eight Edition. Boston: McGraw-Hill Irwin. Pp.277-278.
Porter, M. E. (2011). On Strategy: What is Strategy. USA: Harvard Business School Publishing Corporation. Pp.2-3.

Richard Jimin Agema, Hembadoon Diaka, Bukola Rebecca Oyeleye, “Review of Cost Effectiveness of Organisation Structure of Benue Cement Company Plc Gboko towards Achieving Its Marketing Objective: An Empirical Analysis” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.378-386 Decembber 2020  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41221

Download PDF

pdf

Relationship between the Organizational Culture and the Performance of Mumias Sugar Company in Kakamega County, Kenya

Francis Namuswa Mutibo, Dr. John Mutinda – December 2020 Page No.: 387-391

Organizations are open systems operating in an environment with a multitude of challenges. In this case change has become an everyday component of organizational dynamics and these organizations need to recognize these changes for them to perform effectively. Despite many change strategies and policies in place, Mumias Sugar Company has continually encountered performance below the expected level. Therefore, the organization needs to create the infrastructure needed to plan, execute and sustain their corresponding changes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between organizational culture and the performance of Mumias Sugar Company Limited, Kakamega County, Kenya. A descriptive research design was adopted in the study. The study targeted Mumias Sugar Company in Kakamega County, Kenya. A total of 122 participants comprising of 10 organization’s senior management staff and 112 middle level and junior staff formed the respondents’ target population. A census of 122 respondents was carried out. The study used primary data that was gathered using questionnaires. Validity of the research instrument was ensured through content validity and Cronbach alpha coefficient test was used to test reliability of the questionnaires. Descriptive statistics such as mean and standard deviation was used to analyze quantitative data and presented in terms of tables, figures, charts and graphs. Regression analysis was used to show the relationship between variables. The study found that organizational culture had a positive and significant influence on organizational performance. The study concluded that the culture of the organization sets expectations for how people behave and work together, and how well they function as a team. In this way, culture can guide decision-making and improve workflow overall. The study recommended that the organization must first understand the current culture or the way things are now, then decide where it wants to go, define its strategic direction and decide what the organizational culture should look like to support the strategic change process

Page(s): 387-391                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 20 January 2020

 Francis Namuswa Mutibo
Department of Business Administration, School of Business, Kenyatta University, Kenya

  Dr. John Mutinda
Department of Business Administration, School of Business, Kenyatta University, Kenya

[1] Boeker, W. (2016). Strategic change: The influence of managerial characteristics and organizational growth. Academy of management journal, 40(1), 152-170
[2] Brown, S. W. (2015). When Executives Speak, We Should Listen and Act Differently, in Marketing Renaissance: Opportunities and Imperatives for Improving Marketing Thought, Practice, and Infrastructure. Journal of Marketing, 6(9), 1- 25
[3] Damanpour, F., & Evan, W. M. (2014). Organizational innovation and performance: the problem of” organizational lag. Administrative science quarterly, 3(2), 392 – 409
[4] Day, G. S. (2014). The Capabilities of Market-Driven Organizations. Journal of Marketing, 5(8), 37 – 52
[5] Dolan, S. L., & Garcia, S. (2015). Managing by values: Cultural redesign for strategic organizational change at the dawn of the twenty-first century. Journal of management development, 21(2), 101-117
[6] Fiss, P. C., & Zajac, E. J. (2016). The symbolic management of strategic change: Sensegiving via framing and decoupling. Academy of Management Journal, 49(6), 1173 – 1193
[7] Kamaamia, A. T. (2016). The Effect of Organizational Culture on Organizational Performance: A Case of Kenya School of Monetary Studies (Ksms) (Doctoral dissertation, United States International University-Africa)
[8] Kenny, J. (2017). Effective project management for strategic innovation and change in an organizational context. Project Management Journal, 34(1), 43 – 53
[9] Lines, R. (2014). Influence of participation in strategic change: resistance, organizational commitment and change goal achievement. Journal of change management, 4(3), 193 – 215
[10] Miller, D. (2015). Relating Porter’s business strategies to environment and structure: Analysis and performance implications. Academy of management Journal, 31(2), 280-308
[11] Pearce, J. A. & Robinson, R. B. (2012). Strategic Management: Strategy Formulation and Implementation. Third Edition, Richard D. Irwin Inc
[12] Ravasi, D., & Phillips, N. (2015). Strategies of alignment: Organizational identity management and strategic change at Bang & Olufsen. Strategic Organization, 9(2), 103-135
[13] Saffold, G. S. (2016). Culture traits, strength, and organizational performance: Moving beyond “strong” culture. Academy of management review, 13(4), 546-558
[14] Schein, E. H. (1984). Coming to a New Awareness of Organizational Culture. Sloan Management Review
[15] Sengottuvel, A., & Aktharsha, S. U. (2016). The Influence of Organizational Culture on Organizational Performance in Information Technology Sector. IOSR Journal of Business and Management (IOSR-JBM), 1(10), 56 – 64
[16] Shahzad, F., Luqman, R. A., Khan, A. R., & Shabbir, L. (2012). Impact of organizational culture on organizational performance: An overview. Interdisciplinary journal of contemporary research in business, 3(9), 975-985
[17] Wanyande, P. (2017). Management politics in Kenya’s sugar industry: Towards an effective framework. African Journal of Political Science, 2(3), 123 – 140

Francis Namuswa Mutibo, Dr. John Mutinda, “Relationship between the Organizational Culture and the Performance of Mumias Sugar Company in Kakamega County, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.387-391 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/387-391.pdf

Download PDF

pdf


Righting the wrongs: Justice Clever Mule Musumali’s legacy of judicial activism revisited

Mumba Malila – December 2020 Page No.: 392-408

:: Many judiciaries in Africa have been carped for their allegedly complicit role in the violation of constitutions and the undermining of the rule of law in the post-independence state. In this connection, an African human rights lawyer once lamented that:
[t]he judiciaries in common law African countries must take substantial responsibility for the collapse of constitutional government …. The judiciary in many of these countries deliberately and knowingly abdicated its constitutional role to protect human rights and, in many cases, actively connived in the subversion of constitutional rule and constitutional rights by the executive arm of government.
Whether one agrees with this sentiment or not, it is, to many judges, a sobering indictment. It is undeniable that, perhaps with the general exception of the Kenyan, Malawian and South African judiciaries, which have consistently acquitted themselves fairly well and with remarkable decency too, especially in recent times, many judiciaries in the African region are still reeling from the devastating effects of political intimidation that has undermined their confidence to check on executive excesses and the blatant disregard of the rule of law.

Page(s): 392-408                                                                                                                  Date of Publication: 20 January 2021

 Mumba Malila
Judge, Supreme Court of Zambia

References are not available.

Mumba Malila, “Righting the wrongs: Justice Clever Mule Musumali’s legacy of judicial activism revisited” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.392-408 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/392-408.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Influence of Resource Scheduling On the Performance of Residential Construction Projects in Nairobi City County, Kenya

Duncan Kimutai Ronoh, Dr. Caleb Cheruiyot Kirui – December 2020 Page No.: 409-414

Project performance is a primary consideration in any project, and different strategies are usually employed to ensure better project performance. Despite the dedicated efforts to improve project performance, gated community residential construction projects still register poor performance. A literature review reveals that many public construction projects, residential construction projects, and road construction projects still register poor performance related to project management practices. This study aimed to investigate the influence of resource scheduling on the performance of residential construction projects in Nairobi City County, Kenya. Simple random sampling and purposive sampling was used with a descriptive survey research design. Seventy-nine gated community residential construction projects were selected, with the target population being the project managers, project supervisors, and contractors from each selected project. Data was collected using questionnaires. Descriptive and inferential statistics were adopted to analyse the data presented in tables. The study found a significant relationship between resource scheduling and project performance. The study concluded that the proper allocation of project equipment facilitates smooth operations and successful project completion. The study recommended that project managers, contractors, and supervisors should ensure they clearly set roles for the individuals, teams, tasks, or departments to improve the performance of the project.

Page(s): 409-414                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 20 January 2021

 Duncan Kimutai Ronoh
Department of Business Administration, School of Business, Kenyatta University, Kenya

  Dr. Caleb Cheruiyot Kirui
Department of Business Administration, School of Business, Kenyatta University, Kenya

[1] Aibinu, A. O., &Odeyinka, K. A. (2016). Construction delay in Nigeria: a perception of indigenous and multinational construction firms. Journal of Emerging Trends in Economics and Management Sciences (JETEMS), 5(3), 371-378
[2] Alaghbari, W., Kadir, M.R.A., Salim, A., &Ernawati (2017). The significant factors causing delay of building construction projects in Malaysia. Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, 14(2), 192- 206
[3] Al-Hazim, N., Salem, Z., & Ahmad, H. (2017). Delay and Cost Overrun in Infrastructure Projects in Jordan. Procedia Engineering, 183, 18-24
[4] Alinaitwe, H., Apolot, R., & Tindiwensi, D. (2013): Investigation into the causes of delaysandcost overruns in Uganda’s public sector construction projects, Journal of Construction inDeveloping Countries, 18(2), 33-47 23
[5] Aziz, R., & Abdel-Hakam, A. (2016). Exploring delay causes of road construction projects in Egypt. Alexandria Engineering Journal, 55(2), 1515-1539
[6] Barney, J. (1991). Firm resources and sustained competitive advantage. Journal of management, 17(1), 99-120
[7] Crivelli, E., & Gupta, S. (2013). Resource blessing, revenue curse? Domestic revenue effort in resource-rich countries. European Journal of Political Economy, 35, 88-101
[8] Durdyev, S., Omarov, M., & Ismail, S. (2017). Causes of delay in residential construction projects in Cambodia. Cogent Engineering, 4(1).
[9] Fayek, A. R. (2013). Process improvement for power plant turnaround planning and management. Architecture, Engineering and Construction, 168
[10] Flyvbjerg, B., Skamris Holm, M., & Buhl, S. (2014). What Causes Cost Overrun in Transport Infrastructure Projects? Transport Reviews, 24(1), 3-18
[11] Gituro, W., &Mwawasi, S. (2016). Time and Cost Overruns in Road Construction Projects in Kenya Under Kenya National Highways Authority. ORSEA, 6(1), 117-156
[12] Kihoro, M. W., &Waiganjo, E. (2015). Factors affecting performance of projects in the construction industry in Kenya: A survey of gated communities in Nairobi County. Strategic Journal of Business & Change Management, 2(2), 37-66
[13] Kwatsima, S. A. (2015). An Investigation into the Causes of Delay in Large Civil Engineering Projects in Kenya (Doctoral dissertation).
[14] Love, P., Sing, C., Wang, X., Irani, Z., &Thwala, D. (2012). Overruns in transportation infrastructure projects. Structure and Infrastructure Engineering, 10(2), 141-159. doi: 10.1080/15732479.2012.715173
[15] Mukuka, M., Aigbavboa, C., &Thwala, W. (2015). Effects of construction projects schedule overruns: A case of the Gauteng Province, South Africa. Procedia Manufacturing, 3, 1690-1695
[16] Musyoka, M. C. (2017).Project Environment, Macro Planning Process and Performance of Housing Construction Industry: A Case of Gated Community Projects in Nairobi County, Kenya(Doctoral Dissertation)
[17] Musyoka, M., Gakuu, C., &Kyalo, D. (2017). Influence of Technological Environment on Performance of Gated Community Housing Projects in Nairobi County, Kenya. European Scientific Journal, ESJ, 13(11), 43. doi: 10.19044/esj.2017.v13n11p43
[18] Nagaraju, S. K., & Reddy, B. S. (2012). Resource Management in Construction Projects– a case study. Resource, 2(4)
[19] Niazi, G., & Painting, N. (2017). Significant Factors Causing Cost Overruns in the Construction Industry in Afghanistan. Procedia Engineering, 183, 510-517. doi: 10.1016/j.proeng.2017.03.145
[20] Nzingu, J., & Karanja, P. (2018). Influence of Monitoring and Evaluation Practices on Success of Gated Residential Housing Projects in Nairobi County, Kenya. The Strategic Journal of Business & Change Management, 5(4), 1350 – 1365
[21] Obegi, D. O. & Kimutai, G. J. (2017). Resource scheduling and project performance of international not-for-profit organizations in Nairobi City County, Kenya. International Academic Journal of Information Sciences and Project Management, 2(2), 199-217
[22] Ochenge, M. D. (2018). Project Management Practices and Performance of Road Infrastructure Projects Done By Local Firms in the Lake Basin Region, Kenya (Doctoral dissertation, Kenyatta University).
[23] Odeck, J. (2014). Cost overruns in road construction—what are their sizes and determinants?. Transport Policy, 11(1), 43-53. doi: 10.1016/s0967-070x(03)00017-9
[24] Pinha, D. C., & Ahluwalia, R. S. (2019). Flexible resource management and its effect on project cost and duration. Journal of Industrial Engineering International, 15(1), 119-133
[25] PMI (2016). Construction extension to the PMBOK® guide (3rd ed.). Newtown Square, Pa.: Project Management Institute
[26] Saleh, R., Moarefi, A., Amiri, M. H., Moarefi, S., &Sweis, R. (2018). Causes of delay in Iranian oil and gas projects: a root cause analysis. International Journal of Energy Sector Management
[27] Salunkhe, A. A., & Patil, R. S. (2014). Effect of construction delays on project time overrun: Indian scenario. Int. J. Res. Eng. Technol, 3(1), 543-547
[28] Seboru, M. (2015). An Investigation into Factors Causing Delays in Road Construction Projects in Kenya. American Journal of Civil Engineering, 3(3), 51. doi: 10.11648/j.ajce.20150303.11
[29] Senouci, A., Ismail, A., &Eldin, N. (2016). Time delay and cost overrun in Qatari public construction projects. Procedia engineering, 164, 368-375
[30] Shah, R. (2016). An Exploration of Causes for Delay and Cost Overruns in Construction Projects: Case Study of Australia, Malaysia & Ghana. Journal of Advanced College Of Engineering and Management, 2, 41. doi: 10.3126/jacem.v2i0.16097
[31] Singh, R. (2017). Delays and cost overruns in infrastructure projects: extent, causes and remedies. Economic and Political Weekly, 43-54
[32] Yaghootkar, K., & Gil, N. (2012). The effects of schedule-driven project management in multi-project environments. International Journal of Project Management, 30(1), 127-140.

Duncan Kimutai Ronoh, Dr. Caleb Cheruiyot Kirui, “Influence of Resource Scheduling On the Performance of Residential Construction Projects in Nairobi City County, Kenya ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.409-414 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/409-414.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Impact of Monetary and Non-Monetary Incentives on Employee’s Motivation: A Case of Non-Teaching Staff of Kumasi Polytechnic

Eunice Nkansah, Joseph Owusu Amoah- December 2020 Page No.: 415-425

Successful corporate strategies are those executed well by management, however, the execution of the strategies itself rest on the employees involvement in the processes of the business. It is therefore important for management to have a good understanding of factors that influence employees to be motivated in carrying out the necessary task and achieve or exceed management expectation. The study was conducted in Kumasi Kumasi technical university among the non-teaching staff. The sampling method used was the purposive or judgmental sampling. Questionnaires were distributed to 144 non-teaching staff. The data collected was analyzed using both descriptive and inferential statistics. The results of the study show that the monetary incentives used in Kumasi Polytechnic consist of Merit Pay, Bonuses, Salaries and wages, Gain sharing, Accommodation Loan and Scholarship. Whiles the non-monetary incentives consist of Job Promotion, Career Development, Recognition and Fringe Benefit. The study also revealed that generally, the non-teaching staff of Kumasi Polytechnic are motivated. Furthermore, the study revealed that both monetary and non-monetary incentives have impact on motivation, however those that have significant impact were salaries and wages and Merit pay for monetary incentives and crèche for non-monetary. In addition, the study revealed that challenges faced in employee motivation include management not knowing what motivate employee at each time therefore failing to provide what motivates them most. The study recommended that those monetary and non-monetary incentives that have significant impact on employee motivation should be reinforced to enable employees give out their best.

Page(s): 415-425                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 20 January 2021

  Eunice Nkansah
Finance Directorate, Kumasi Technical University, Post Office Box 854, Kumasi, Ashanti Region, Ghana

  Joseph Owusu Amoah
School of Business and Law, Department of Banking and Finance, University for Development Studies, Post Office Box UPW 36, Wa, Upper West region, Ghana

[1] Aktar, S., Sachu, M. M., and Ali, M. E. (2012). The impact of rewards on employee performance in commercial banks in Bangladesh: An empirical study. IOSR Journal of Business and Management, 6 (2), 9-15.
[2] Armstrong, M. (2007). Employee Reward Management and Practice. London and Philadelphia: Kogan Page.
[3] Arnolds, C.A., and Venter, D. J. (2007). The Strategic Importance of Motivational Rewards. Port Elizabeth: Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University.
[4] Atkinson, J.W. (1964). An Introduction to Motivation. Princeton, New Jersey: Van Nostrand.
[5] Bagraim, J.,Cunnington, P., Portgieter, T., and Viedge, C. (2007). Organizational Behavior a Contemporary SouthAfrican Perspective. Pretoria: Vanschaik Publishers.
[6] Baron, R. A. (1983). Behavior in Organizations: Understanding and Managing the Human Side of Work. Boston: Allyn and Bacon, Inc.
[7] Bateman, T. S., and Snell, F. (2007). Management, Leading and collaborating in a competitive world. McGraw-Hill: Boston.
[8] Berg, E. (1991). Benefit Plans Focus on Flexibility. Healthcare, (21), 22 – 30.
[9] Bowen, P., Cattell, K., Michell. K., Edwards, P. (2008). Job Satisfaction of South Africa Quantity Surveyors: Are Employers Happier than Employees? Journal of Engineering, Design & Technology, 6(2), 124-144.
[10] Campbell, D. J. (1982). Determinants of Choice of Goal Difficulty Level: A Review of Situational and Personality Influences. Journal of Occupational Psychology.
[11] Cascio, W. F. (1992). Managing Human Resources: Productivity, Quality of Life and Profits. McGraw Hill, New York.
[12] Delany, K., and Turvey, S. (2007). Competing in the Race for Talent. People Dynamics, 22(1).
[13] Demos, N. (1988). The Role of Money in Motivating Employees.
[14] Doyle, R. J. (1983). Gainsharing and Productivity. Amacom, New York.
[15] Evans, C., Graff, M., Cools, E., and Van Den Broeck, H. (2008). Cognitive styles and managerial behaviour: a qualitative study. Education+ Training.
[16] Ewing, J. C. (1989). Gainsharing Plans: Two Key Factors. Compensation and Benefits Review (21), 49 – 53.
[17] Gibbs, M., and Hendricks, W. (2004). Do Formal Salary Systems Really Matter? Industrial and Labor Relations Review, 58(1), 71-93.
[18] Graham-Moore, B. E. (1990). Review of the Literature in Graham-Moore, B. E. & Ross, T. L (Eds.). Gainsharing: Plans for Improving Performance. Bureau of National Affairs Books, Washington, DC.
[19] Herzberg, F., Mausner, B., and Snyderman, B. B. (1989). The Motivation to Work. John Wiley and Sons, Inc.
[20] Hesterly, S., and Sebilia A. J. (1986). Recognizing Clinical Excellence. Journal of Nursing, 16 (2), 34 – 38.
[21] Higgins, J. M. (1994). The Management Challenge. (2nd Ed.). New York: Macmillan.
[22] Jones, E. (1955). The Life and Work of Sigmund Freud, Vol.2. New York: Basic Books.
[23] Kempner, T. (1983). Motivation and Behavior – A Personal View. Journal of General Management, 9 (1).
[24] Kepner, K. (2001). Class Lecture Notes from AEB 4424: Human Resource Management in Agribusiness. Taught at the University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.
[25] Kowitz, G. T. (1967). The Management of Motivation. The Phi Delta Kappan, 49(2), 77-80.
[26] Lawler, E. E. (1973). Expectancy Theory and Job Behavior. Organizational Behavior and Human Performance, 9, 482 – 503.
[27] Liao, S. H., Fei, W. C., and Chen, C. C. (2007). Knowledge Sharing, Absorptive Capacity, and Innovation Capability: An Empirical Study of Taiwan’s Knowledge Intensive Industries. Journal of Information Science, 33(3), 340–359.
[28] Lumumba, P. (2012). An Assessment of The Effectiveness Of Non-Monetary Incentives In Motivating Sacco Society Staff: A Case Study Of Front Office Savings Accounts Workers In Nairobi County. A Research Project Submitted to the Graduate School in Partial Fulfillment for the Requirements of the Master of Business Administration Degree of Kabarak University.
[29] Maslow, A. H. (1993). A Theory of Human Motivation. Psychological Review, 50, 370 -396.McCann, D. (2000). Carrot.
[30] Meacham, M., and Wiesen, A. (1999). Changing Classroom Behavior: A Manual for Precision.
[31] Mitchell, J. (2002). Looking After Ourselves: An Individual Responsibility? Journal of the Royal Society for Health, Vol.4, 169-173.
[32] Moody, R. C. (2003). Associations Among Neural Dopamine Effects, Motivation, Affect, and Cognitive Functioning: Empowerment Revisited, Indiana University, Purdue University, Indianapolis.
[33] Mugenda, O. M., and Mugenda, A. G. (1999). Research methods: Quantitative and qualitative approaches. Acts press.
[34] Of Social Sciences Of Middle East Technical University.
[35] Pappas, J. M., and Flaherty, K. E. (2006). The Moderating Role of Individual-Difference Variables in Compensation Research. Journal of Managerial Psychology, 21(1), 1935.
[36] Ramlall, S. (2003). Managing Employee Retention as a Strategy for Increasing Organizational Competitiveness;Applied HRM Research, 8 (2), 63-72.
[37] Robbins, S. P. (2005). Organizational Behavior, 11th Ed, Prentice-Hall, India.
[38] Roethlisberger, F. J., and Dickson, W. J. (1999). Management and the Worker. Cambridge: University Press.
[39] Sigler, K. (1999). Challenges of Employee Retention Management; Research News, Patrington, 22 (10).
[40] Strempel, P. (2003). Towards Strategies for Managing Knowledge Workers, (accessed 25th February, 2016).
[41] Theisen, B. A., and Pelfrey, S. (1990). Using Employee Benefit to Fight Nursing Shortage. Journal of NursingAdministration, 20 (9), 24 – 28.
[42] Thompson, A., Strickland, A. J., and Gamble, J. E. (2000). The Quest for Competitive Advantage. New York: McGraw-Hill Irwin. Value Based Management.
[43] Vroom, V. H. (1964). Work and Motivation, Wiley, New York, NY.
[44] Warren, M. (2007). Stuff is Not Enough. Marketing Magazine, 112 (11). Retrieved February 2, 2016, from EBSCOHOST database
[45] Welbourne, T. M., and Gomez-Mejia, L. R. (1988). Gainsharing Revised. Academy of Management Journal, (20), 19 – 28.
[46] Whetten, D.A. and Cameron, K. S. (2007). Developing Management Skills. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall.
[47] Wiscombe, J. (2002). Rewards get results. Workforce, 81(4), 42-42.
[48] Yavuz, N. (2004). The Use of Non-Monetary Incentives as a Motivational Tool: A Survey Study in a Public Organization in Turkey. A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate School

Eunice Nkansah, Joseph Owusu Amoah, “The Impact of Monetary and Non-Monetary Incentives on Employee’s Motivation: A Case of Non-Teaching Staff of Kumasi Polytechnic” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.415-425 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/415-425.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Constructing From Reminiscences: Indigenous Conflict Resolution Mechanisms among the Bakossi (Cameroon), C.1750-2000

Ngome Elvis Nkome, Joseph B. Ebune- December 2020 Page No.: 426-432

The current social and political conflicts that characterize many post independent African states is indicative of the fact that existing western modeled national and international conflict prevention mechanisms have failed to provide lasting solutions to the different conflicts that the continent is renowned for. Drawing from the Bakossi ethnic group of Cameroon, this article argues that traditional African societies could offer more effective conflict prevention and resolution mechanisms based on the African’s strict respect for traditional symbols and institutions. We demonstrate that traditional Africa was not a conflict free society but that, the societies had evolved highly respected systems which did not permit the intensification of conflicts. We recount how some of these symbols/systems were effectively used in conflict situations among the Bakossi and at the same time calling for their re-appropriation in contemporary times. We argue that German and later British colonialism used and later discarded these mechanisms in abating conflicts. We have relied on oral tradition and some selected literature in gathering and presenting the data.

Page(s): 426-432                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 20 January 2021

 Ngome Elvis Nkome
University of Younde 1, Cameroon

 Joseph B. Ebune
University of Younde 1, Cameroon

Archival Data
National Archives in Buea (NAB) and Oral Interviews
[1] Conversation with chief Nhon Nzume-Ngeh Jacob, Nyasoso III village, Chief of Nyasoso III, aged 60 years old, 12 June, 2016.
[2] File A6, No.2652 “Nfam Juju”.
[3] File No Aa, (1923) 37, Report on the Ancient Tribal Machinery in the Cameroons (1923) by H. Cadman.
[4] File No. 1291, Juju Societies Relation to Native Administration, 1926
[5] File No. 1291/Aa(1926)54, “Juju Societies Relation to Native Administration, 1926.
[6] File No. 1641, Native Authorities Kumba Division: Appointment of District and village headmen under Chapter 14, Section 9(1).
[7] File No. 1641, Native Authorities Kumba Division: Appointment of District and village headmen under Chapter 14, Section 9(1),
[8] File No. 174 (1931), Annual Report for Kumba Division, Cameroon’s Province 1931.
[9] File No. 174 (1931), Annual Report for Kumba Division, Cameroon’s Province 1931
[10] File No. 279,H. Vaux, “Intelligence Report on Bakossi Clan, 1932.
[11] File No. 39(1924), Native Administration or Questions of Primitive Communities Evolving their own Administration and Sub-court as a step in the Process
[12] File No.291 (1932), Intelligence Report on Bakossi Clan, Kumba Division
[13] Interview with Rev. Ndelle Ebwake, Mpako village, Retired Rev.Pastor of the Presbyterian Church in Cameroon, aged 80 years old, June 23, 2016.
[14] Interview with the chiefs of Mbulle, Mekede-mbeng and Bekume villages, 2016.
Secondary Sources
[15] Atabe, Thomas.S. “Religion in Bakossi traditional society: A literary Enquiry” .Postgraduate Diploma in African Literature thesis University of Yaoundé. 1979.
[16] Boege, Volker. Traditional Approaches to Conflict Transformation Potential and Limits. Berlin: Berghof Research Centre, 2006.
[17] Deng,F. M. and Zartman, J.W. Conflict Resolution in Africa. Washington D.C: The Brookings Institution, 1999.
[18] Ebune, Joseph B. “Tradition and Modernity Among the Bakundu: A Study in Socio-cultural change under colonialism and Beyond.”PhD Thesis in History, University of Buea, 2009.
[19] Ejedepang, S.N. Reminiscences on the Dynastic History of Ndom-Mwasundem.USA: Xebrlis Publishers, 2010.
[20] _______________. The Tradition of a People: Bakossi. Yaoundé: SOPECAM, 1971.
[21] Ekane, Ignatius Halle. The Rationality of African Cultural Dynamism: A Case Study in Bakossiland, South West Province of Cameroon .Weikersheim: Margraf Publishers, 2005.
[22] Eta, Thomas E. “Conflicts and Conflicts Resolutions in the Lower Banyang Polities, Circa 1886-1958” .MA Thesis in History, University of Buea, 2013.
[23] Funteh, Mark B. “Inter-Cameroon Baptist Convention Conflicts 1954-2002: A Historical Investigation”.PhD Thesis in History, University of Yaounde 1, 2008.
[24] Ndille, Roland N and Ngome, Elvis Nkome. “Killing Our Spirituality: The Basel Missionaries and the Bakossi of Mwetug-Cameroon Since 1896”, in Journal of Religion and Spirituality Vol. 6, No.3, (2015):1-10.
[25] Ngoh, Victor Julius. Cameroon 1884 – 1985: A Hundred Years of History. Yaounde: Navi-Group Publication, 1987.
[26] Ngome, Elvis Nkome. “Colonialism, the Basel Mission and Traditional Authority in Mwetugland, Bakossi, (Cameroon), 1891-1961” .MA Thesis in History, University of Buea, 2013/4.
[27] Ojo , J.C.B., D.K. Orwa, Olatunde, and. Utete, C.M.B. African International Relations . London: Longman, 1985.

Ngome Elvis Nkome, Joseph B. Ebune, “Constructing From Reminiscences: Indigenous Conflict Resolution Mechanisms among the Bakossi (Cameroon), C.1750-2000” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.426-432 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/426-432.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Role of Pastors to Care for Their Congregations Both During Covid-19 Outbreak and After

Yanto Paulus Hermanto – December 2020 Page No.: 433-435

The role of pastors is very important to meet the needs of the congregation in the Covid-19 period and after. The formulation of the research problem is what pastors should do during a pandemic and afterwards for the congregation. The method to answer this problem formulation uses a qualitative approach by collecting several journals, books and Bible verses related to the formulation of the problem, then looking for similarities that allow it to answer this research problem. Thus, the correct answer is obtained and can be used as a guide for pastors during the Covid-19 period and after. There are five things that pastors can do from the results of this research that can meet the needs of the congregation both spiritually, the soul and physically

Page(s): 433-435                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 23 January 2020

 Yanto Paulus Hermanto
Sekolah Tinggi Teologi Kharisma Bandung, Jl. Mekar Laksana No.8 Bandung, Jawa Barat Indonesia

[1] Ajith Fernando. Christian Lifestyle, the Bible Is the Word of God. Kalam Hidup, 2002.
[2] Buinei, Dorus Dolfinus. “Applying the Servant Leadership Qualification according to Mark’s Bible for the Pastor of the GPdI Congregation in the West Waropen Region, Papua.” EPIGRAPHE: Jurnal Teologi dan Pelayanan Kristiani Vol 4, No (2020): 23.
[3] David Eko Setiawan1), Anton Ishariyono2). “THE SPIRITUALITY OF THE MINISTER OF CHRIST AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE SERVANT OF THE LORD TODAY.” Pengarah: Jurnal Teologi Kristen Volume 2, (2020).
[4] Febriana, Mariani. “Implementation of Church Social Concern to Help Reduce Poverty Rates.” Jurnal Theologi Aletheia (2014).
[5] Ginting, Christine Fuceria. “The Concept of Pastoral Leadership Based on 1 Timothy and Its Application to the Spiritual Growth of the Church” PNEUSTOS: Jurnal Teologi Pantekosta (2018).
[6] Hendri Wijayatsih. “Pastoral Mentoring and Counseling.” Gema Teologi (2011).
[7] Markus Sudjarwo. “Applying the Pastor’s Integrity According to the Pastoral Letters.” EPIGRAPHE: Jurnal Teologi dan Pelayanan Kristiani Vol 3, No (2019): 175–176.
[8] Messakh, Besly J.T. “PASTORAL DIMENSIONS IN PRAYER: FINDING RESPONSIBLE PRAYER PRACTICES IN PASTORAL ASSISTANCE AND COUNSELING SERVICES.” Jurnal Abdiel: Khazanah Pemikiran Teologi, Pendidikan Agama Kristen, dan Musik Gereja (2019).
[9] P. Schuiling. “Taking Care of the Shepherd: A Guide to Pastoral Well-Being.” Section A: Humanities and Social Sciences (1996).
[10] R. Berhitu. “R. Berhitu, ‘THE ROLE OF THE SHEPHERD OF THE CHURCH OF THE CHURCH OF THE TABERNACLE OF Gospel of the Congregation in the Development of Holistic Services in Yogyakarta.” Jaffray Vol. 12, N (2014): 274–278.
[11] S., Sandlana N., and Majokweni O. “Religion as a Protective Mechanism for Families Affected by HIV/AIDS.” Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences Vol 4 No 1 (2013): 269.
[12] Samarenna, Desti. “God’s Secret in Paul’s Ministry According to Ephesians 3: 8-13.” EPIGRAPHE: Jurnal Teologi dan Pelayanan Kristiani (2018).

Yanto Paulus Hermanto, “The Role of Pastors to Care for Their Congregations Both During Covid-19 Outbreak and After” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.433-435 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/433-435.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Effect of Working Capital Management on Performance of Commercial SMEs in Mombasa County, Kenya

Ibrahim Makina , Robert Kenga’ra- December 2020 Page No.: 436-443

This study aimed at establishing the effect of working capital management on performance of commercial SMEs in Mombasa Kenya. Specific objectives were; to evaluate the influence of the optimum inventory management on performance of commercial SMEs in Mombasa County, to assess the effect of cash conversion cycle on performance of commercial SME’s in Mombasa County and to determine the effect of debtors’ management on performance of commercial SMEs in Mombasa County. The study employed descriptive survey research design. A population of 70 respondents was drawn from all the six sub-counties. Data was collected through questionnaires and interviews. Collected data was analyzed using multiple-regression analysis. Inferential statistics was used to determine the relationship between variables. It was revealed that there was a positive correlation between inventory management, cash conversion cycle and debts management and performance of commercial SMEs in Mombasa County. This study is important for the policy makers to come up with the strategies on how to better SMEs businesses.

Page(s): 436-443                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 26 January 2021

 Ibrahim Makina
hd candidate Kisii University Kenya

 Robert Kenga’ra
Kisii University Kenya

[1] Atieno .F.J. (2017) Determinant of Inmates Recidivism Rate in Kenya: The Case of Kamiti Maximum Prison in Nairobi City..Un published MA Degree Kenyatta University
[2] Ali, R. A. (2015) The Effects of Working Capital Management on S.M.Es Profitability in Malaysia. Unpublished masters Degree in Business Administration,University ofUtara Malaysia.
[3] Gorondutse, A. H., Abubakar. A. & Naala, M. N. (2018) The Effects of Working Capital Management on S.M.Es Polish Journal of Management Studies 16(2) 99-109
[4] Gul, S. Khan, M. B., Rehman, S. Khan, M. T. Khan, M. & Khan, W. (2013) Working Capital Management and Performance of S.M.Es Sector. European Journal of Management Vol.5 No.1-13
[5] Ha, D. T. Thahn, B. D. & Hang, T. T. (2016) Impact of Working Capital on Financial Performance of Small and Medium sized Enterprises in Vietnam, Vol. 5 No. 1 PP. 158-163
[6] Haro, P. M. & Omar, N. (2017) Effect of Working Capital Management on the Financial Performance of Small and Medium Enterprises in Mombasa County. Imperial Journal of Interdisciplinary Research Vol.-3 Issue 10
[7] Javid, S. (2014) Effect of Working Capital Management on S.M.Es Performance in Pakistan. European Journal of Business and Management ISSN 2222-1905 Vol. 6, No. 12. 2014
[8] Kiprotich, S. Kimosop, J. Sarmwei. J. Abalo, M. (2015) An Assessment of the Performance of Working Capital Management Practices on Small and Medium Enterprises in Eldoret Municipality. International Journal of Economics, Commerce and Management Vol: 111 Issue August 2015 ISSN 2348 0386
[9] Kinyanjui, D. Kiragu, D. & Kamau, R. (2017) Cash Management Practices on Financial Performance of Small Medium Enterprises in Nyeri Town, Kenya. Saudi Journal of Business and Management Studies
[10] Konak, F. & Guner, E. N. (2016) The Impact of Working Capital Management on Firm Performance: An Empirical Evidence from BIST S.M.Es Industrial Index. International Journal of Trade, Economics and Finance. Vol. 7 No. 2 2016
[11] Lamptey, L. L. Frimpong, K. & Morrrison, A. B. (2017) Empirical Study on the Influence of Working Capital Management on Performance of S.M.E.s in Developing Economy. British Journal of Economics, Management and Trade 17 (4): 1-10 2017
[12] Motlicek, Z. & Martinovicova, D. (2014) Impact of Working Capital Management on Sales of Enterprises Focusing on the Manufacture of Machinery and Equipment in the Czech Republic
[13] Musau, J. W. (2015) The Effects of Working Capital Management on Profitability on Public Listed Energy Companies in Kenya. Strathmore University, Kenya.
[14] Nando, Y. I., Mubarik, A. M. & Aziz, F. A. (2017) The Impact of Working Capital Management on Corporate Performance: Evidence from Listed Non-Financial Firms in Ghana. European Center for Research Training and Development . Vol. 5 No.3, PP.68-75
[15] Nunow, A. H. (2016) The Effect of Working Capital Management on Profitability of Small and Medium- sized Enterprises in Nairobi, Kenya. Unpublished MBA, USIU Africa
[16] Nyakuundi, T. Ombuki, C. Evusa, Z. & Ariemba, J. (2016) Influence of Working Capital Management Practices on Financial Performance of Small and Medium Enterprises in Machakos sub-county Kenya. International Journal of Sciences: Basic and Applied Research ISSN 2307-4531
[17] Padachi and Carole (2014) Focus on Working Capital Management Practices among Mauritian S.M.Es : Survey Evidence and Empirical Analysis. Journal of Business Management and Economics Vol. 5(4). PP.097-108.
[18] Stubelj, I. & Laporsek, S. (2016) The Impact of Working Capital Policy on Firms Performance and Capital Requirements Managing International Conference June 2016
[19] Usman, M. Shaikh, S. A. & Khan, S. (2017) Impact of Working Capital Management on Firm Profitability: Evidence from Scandinavian Countries. Journal of Business Strategies Vol. 11 No. PP. 99-112
[20] Wambugu, P. M. (2013) Effects of Working Capital Management Practices on Profitability on Small and Medium Enterprises in Nairobi County, Kenya. Unpublished MBA Kenyatta University, Kenya.
[21] Zariyawati, M. A. Hirnissa, M. T. & Rose, F. D. (2017) Working Capital Management and Firm Performance of Small and Large Firms in Malaysia. Journal of Global Business and Social Enterprises.
[22] Zhang, X. Chen, S. & Yu, S. (2017) Trends in Working Capital Management and its Impact on Firms Performance- An Analysis of SMEs Research on Modern Higher Education 3, 01008 (2017) Asian Academic Press.

Ibrahim Makina, Robert Kenga’ra, “Effect of Working Capital Management on Performance of Commercial SMEs in Mombasa County, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.436-443 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/436-443.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Healthcare Financing For the Aging Population in Kenya

Dr.Muganda Munir Manini, Dr.Paul Obino, Dr. Christine Nabwire, Margaret Wanambisi, Dr.Peter Anselimo, Sophy Waliaula, Steve Ogalo, Johnstone Eshirera and Blasio Amoche December 2020 Page No.: 444-448

Universal Health care and strengthening health equity for the ageing population is one of the top policy priorities of the Government of Kenya. Although an aging population is the positive result of social progress, economic development, health care improvement, it makes challenges to the growth of economies as the shortage of labor resource, rising health cost, social security, impact on savings, investment, consumption, shifting migration flows. The purpose of this study is to assess the universal health care needs for the aging population. Specifically, the study sought to examine the status of healthcare financing population among the aging population in Kanduyi Sub-county, Drawing from the Social Disengagement and Activity Theories, this study provided empirical evidence healthcare financing influence on the wellbeing of the aging population. Mixed method approach will be adopted. The target population of the study were elderly citizens of aged sixty five (65) years and above. The total sample comprised 385 respondents with a mean response rate of 95%. Data was collected through questionnaires. The results revealed most of the aging population in lacked health financing plan and medical insurance. The study demonstrated that the majority of respondents 60% had did not get health care financing form the government. The result shows that source of financial support, managing bills, source of care, medication and mode of transport and characteristics like income, size and headship commonly influence healthcare expenditure. The finding of the study provide recommendations for policy implication as the rights of aging persons are anchored in the Constitution of Kenya, Article 57, and hence the need for a policy and legislation that facilitates enjoyment of these rights

Page(s): 444-448                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 January 2020

 Dr.Muganda Munir Manini
Kibabii University

  Dr.Paul Obino
Kibabii University

  Dr. Christine Nabwire,
Kibabii University

  Margaret Wanambisi,
Kibabii University

  Dr.Peter Anselimo,
Kibabii University

 Sophy Waliaula
Kibabii University

  Steve Ogalo
Kibabii University

  Johnstone Eshirera
Kibabii University

  Blasio Amoche
Kibabii University

[1] Caley M, Sidhu K. Estimating the future healthcare costs of an aging population in the UK: expansion of morbidity and the need for preventative care. J Public Health. 2011;33 (1):117–2
[2] Caley M and Sidhu K. (2011) Estimating the future healthcare costs of an aging population in the
[3] UK: expansion of morbidity and the need for preventative care. J Public Health.33(1):117–2
[4] Chappell, N. L., Crc, F., & Chappell, N. L. (2009). Social Work in Mental Health Aging and Mental Health Aging and Mental Health, 2985(2008). https://doi.org/10.1080/15332980802072454
[5] Coley, K., Coulthart, S., Howard Degenholtz, Delitto, A., Driessen, J., Hughes, M., … Charles B. Wessel. (n.d.). Addressing the Health Needs of an Aging America New Opportunities for Evidence-Based, 1–32. Retrieved from http://www.healthpolicyinstitute.pitt.edu/sites/default/files/SternCtrAddressingNeeds.pdf%0Ahttps://ohio.app.box.com/s/0i54c24gcr0h77x1a7yutrx31ce2k2t4
[6] Christensen K, Doblhammer G, Rau R, Vaupel JW. Ageing populations: the challenges ahead. Lancet. 2009 Oct 3;374(9696):1196–208.doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(09)61460-4 PMID: 19801098
[7] Costa, A. I. A., & Jongen, W. M. F. (2010). Designing new meals for an ageing population. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, 50(6), 489–502. https://doi.org/10.1080/10408390802544553
[8] Davidson, P. (2013). Aging Population, Health-Care Costs, and the National Debt. Challenge, 56(4), 22–25. https://doi.org/10.2753/0577-5132560402
[9] Kalediene R. & Macijauskiene J.(2013) Mortality of Older Adults in the Context of Socioeconomic Transition and Health Reform in Lithuania. Gerontology 2013;59:213-219 (DOI:10.1159/000345222)
[10] Manton, K. G. & Gu, X. (2001) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 98, 6354–6359. (First Published May 8, 2001; 10.1073ypnas.111152298
[11] McPake, B., & Mahal, A. (2017). Addressing the Needs of an Aging Population in the Health System: The Australian Case. Health Systems & Reform, 8604, 00–00. https://doi.org/10.1080/23288604.2017.1358796
[12] Ministry of Health. (2012). Transforming Health : Accelerating attainment of Health Goals Health Sector Strategic And Investment Plan ( KHSSP ) July 2013-June 2017 The Second Medium Term Plan For Health, (June), 1–123.
[13] Republic, D. (2020). National Adolescent and Youth, (January), xii-2.
[14] Schafer, P., Ms, O., Wellman, N. S., Susan, P., Johnson, P., Elfenbein, P., & Neill, P. S. O. (2008). Aging in Community Nutrition , Diet Therapy , and Nutrition and Aging Textbooks Aging in Community Nutrition , Diet Therapy , and Nutrition and Aging Textbooks, 1960, 65–83. https://doi.org/10.1300/J021v25n03
[15] Tabachnick, B. G. & Fidell, L. S., (1996), Using Multivariate Statistics, New York, Harper Collins,.
[16] World Economic and Social Survey 2007: development in an ageing world. New York: United Nations Department of Social and Economic Affairs; 2007 (Report No. E/2007/50/Rev.1 ST/ESA/314; http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/policy/ wess/wess_archive/2007wess.pdf, Accessed 4 June 2020).
Xie, B., Zhou, J., & Luo, X. (2016). Mapping spatial variation of population aging in China’s mega cities. Journal of Maps, 12(1), 181–192. https://doi.org/10.1080/17445647.2014.1000984
[17] Zweifel, P., Felder, S. & Werblow, A.(2004). Population Ageing and Health Care Expenditure: New Evidence on the “Red Herring”. Geneva Pap Risk Insur Issues Pract 29, 652–666. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0440.2004.00308.x

Dr.Muganda Munir Manini, Dr.Paul Obino, Dr. Christine Nabwire, Margaret Wanambisi, Dr.Peter Anselimo, Sophy Waliaula, Steve Ogalo, Johnstone Eshirera and Blasio Amoche, “Healthcare Financing For the Aging Population in Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.444-448 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/444-448.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Participation as Transformation: Exploring the Dimensions of Women’s Empowerment in Developmental Projects in Kadoma, Zimbabwe

Munyaradzi A. Dzvimbo, Ngonidzashe Mutanana (Ph.D.), Tinashe M. Mashizha, Monica Monga – December 2020 Page No.: 449-456

Women empowerment in developmental projects is gaining traction in recent times. The study sought to explore the dimensions of women’s empowerment in developmental projects in the city of Kadoma. To achieve this purpose, the study employed a qualitative methodological approach with use of primary and secondary data collection tools such as interviews, observations, focus group discussions and document review. Findings from the study reveal that for sustainable development to be achieved, women need to be empowered. However, the research unpacked challenges that women are facing, hindering them to full participation in community development projects, which is contributing to the further underdevelopment of Kadoma. Women have limited access to resources yet they have a load of domestic responsibilities and there is less will to uplift them and hand them primary roles in development activities. The paper concludes that involving women in developmental projects and handing them power to control resources has proved to be the best way to empower them. As such, stakeholders such as the Ministry of Women Affairs, civil society, and women empowerment interest groups must take the lead in pushing the women agenda in developments through policy frameworks and lobbing. Women’s perspectives must also be brought in the political access and the cultural systems and communities need to be trained before any development initiative is introduced.

Page(s): 449-456                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 26 January 2020

 Munyaradzi A. Dzvimbo
Regent Business College, South Africa

 Ngonidzashe Mutanana Ph.D.
Women’s University in Africa, Zimbabwe

  Tinashe M.
Lower Guruve Development Association, Zimbabwe

  Mashizha Monica Monga
Kadoma City Council, Zimbabwe

[1] Aboukhsaiwan, Ola. (2014). Measuring the Impact of Income-Generating Projects on Women’s Empowerment Outcomes: Evidence from Rural Morocco. Unpublished Bachelor of Science Thesis. University of Pennsylvania.
[2] Bayeh, W. 2016. The role of empowering women and achieving gender equality to the sustainable development of women. Pacific Science Review B: Humanities and Social Sciences. 37-42.
[3] Bogere, M., Gesa, A. (2015). Understanding Research and Statistical Methods – A Guide for East African Students and Researchers (New Edition). Smmart Stationers Ltd.
[4] Bennett, Sherre, and D’Onofrio, Alyoscia (2014). Beyond Critique: Revised Approaches to Community-Driven Development. An Inception Paper 30th April 2014.
[5] Casey, Katherine., Glennerster, Rachel, and Miguel, Edward (2012). “Reshaping Institutions: Evidence on Aid Impacts Using a Preanalysis Plan.” The Quarterly Journal of Economics. 127 (4): 1755–1812.
[6] Cornwall, Andrea (2016). Women’s empowerment: What works? Journal of International Development. 342-359, https://doi:10.1002/jid.3210
[7] Chigwenya A., and Ndhlovu P. (2016) Women, Land Use, Property Rights and Sustainable Development in Zimbabwe. In: Etim J. (eds) Introduction to Gender Studies in Eastern and Southern Africa. Sense Publishers, Rotterdam
[8] DAC Network on Gender Equality (2011). Women’s Economic Empowerment. Issues paper April 2011.
[9] Duflo, Esther (2012). “Women empowerment and economic development.” Journal of Economic Literature. 50 (4):1051-1079.
[10] Essof, S. (2005). She-murenga, Opportunities and Setbacks of the Women’s Movement in Zimbabwe, Feminist Africa, Issue 4 August/September
[11] Gaidzanwa, R (1985). Images of Women in Zimbabwean Literature, Harare: College Press
[12] Johnson, Susan (2010). Gender impact assessment in microfinance and microenterprise: why and how. Development in practice. 10 (1): 89-94.
[13] Kabeer, Naila (2005). Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment: A Critical Analysis of the Third Millennium Development Goal. Gender and Development 13(1):13–24.
[14] Kabeer, N. (2001) Resources, agency, achievements: Reflections on the measurement of women‘s empowerment‘, in A. Sisask (ed.) Discussing women‘s empowerment – Theory and practice, Sida Studies No. 3. Stockholm: Swedish International Development Agency, pp. 17-59
[15] Kabeer, Naila (1999). Resources, Agency, Achievements: Reflections on the Measurement of Women’s Empowerment. Development and Change 30(3):435–464
[16] Kambarami M (2006). Femininity, Sexuality and Culture: Patriarchy and Female Subordination in Zimbabwe. University of Fort Hare, Eastern Cape
[17] Kazembe, J (1986). The Women Issues In I. Mandaza, (eds) The Political Economy of Transition, London: CODESERIA
[18] Mansuri ,Ghazala., and Rao, Vijayendra (2013). Localizing development does participation work? Washington DC: World Bank.
[19] Mashizha, Tinashe .M., and Mashizha, Margret (2017). Women Empowerment and Poverty Reduction: Can microcredit be a panacea?Saarbrucken: LAP Lambert Academic Publishing.
[20] Mbogori, Arthur. K (2014). Factors influencing the level of women participation in community development projects in Narok South District, Kenya. Unpublished Masters of Thesis. University of Nairobi.
[21] Ministry of Women Affairs, Gender and Community Development. (2015). Community dialogues report of Rushinga District Zimbabwe. Ministry of Women Affairs, Gender and Community Development, Harare
[22] Mehra, R. (1993). Gender in community development and resource management: an overview. International Centre for Research on Women, and World Wildlife Fund.
[23] Mosedale S (2003) Towards a Framework for Assessing Empowerment. Paper prepared for the International Conference, New in Impact Assessment for Development: Methods and Practice, Manchester Impact assessment research centre working paper series Paper No: 3
[24] Mutanana.N. and Bukaliya, R. (2015). Women Empowerment and Gender Related Programmes Implementation in Hurungwe District, Zimbabwe. International Journal of Research in Humanities and Social Studies, Vol 2, Issue 2, pp 1-12
[25] Mutanana, N. and Gasva, D ( The Impact of Women Empowerment to Rural Women and the Community. A Case of Chundu Women Self-Help Project in Zimbabwe. Greener Journal of Social Sciences, Vol 5, Issue 4 pp 89-96
[26] Narayan, D. (2002). Empowerment and Poverty Reduction: A Sourcebook. Washington DC: World Bank.
[27] Nhuta, S., and Mukumba, E. (2017). Empowerment of Zimbabwean Women through Entrepreneurship an Economic and Social Perspective. IRA-International Journal of Management & Social Sciences (ISSN 2455-2267), 7(3), 373-409. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.21013/jmss.v7.n3.p1
[28] Sen, A (1990), Gender and cooperative conflicts in Irene Tinker (ed.), Persistent Inequalities: Women and World Development, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 123- 49
[29] Sheunesu, R. (2007). The Benefits of Urban Agriculture as a Way of Attaining Sustainable Development in Kadoma, City of Zimbabwe. Journal of Sustainable Development in Africa, Volume 9, No.2
[30] Shunmuga, M., Sekar, M and Subburaj, A (2014). Women Empowerment: Role of Education. International Journal in Management and Social Science, Vol 2, Issue 12, pp 76-85
[31] World Bank (2007). Gender in Community Driven Development Project: implications for PNPM strategy. Working paper on the findings of joint donor and government mission. Washington DC: World Bank.
[32] World Bank (2009). Gender in Agriculture Sourcebook. Washington DC: World Bank.
[33] World Bank (2012) World Development Report 2012: Gender equality and development. Washington, DC: World Bank.
[34] World Bank (2014). Women’s Empowerment in Rural Community Driven Development Projects. Washington DC: World Bank.
[35] Zanza, Chiedza. E (2015). Gender and Community Development: Examining women’s participation in Gender Mainstreaming Community Development projects in Rushinga District, Zimbabwe. Unpublised Master’s Thesis. University of Kwazulu Natal.
[36] Zikhali, W. (2017). Participation of Women in Developmental Issues in Nkayi District, Zimbabwe, Research on Humanities and Social Vol.7, No.10
[37] ZIMVAC. 2014. Zimbabwe Vulnerability Assessment Committee Rural Livelihoods Assessment Food and Nutrition Council. Harare: SIRDC.

Munyaradzi A. Dzvimbo, Ngonidzashe Mutanana (Ph.D.), Tinashe M. Mashizha, Monica Monga, “Participation as Transformation: Exploring the Dimensions of Women’s Empowerment in Developmental Projects in Kadoma, Zimbabwe” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.449-456 December 2020  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-4-issue-12/449-456.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Exploring Effects of the Educational Investments and Returns on Teachers with Upgraded Qualifications Acquired On Self-Sponsorship in Lusaka District

Chifuwe Avien, Francis Simui and Gistered Muleya December 2020 Page No.: 457-465

An educational investment is the act of spending money on an educational programme with the goal of earning capital appreciation towards future returns. The aim of making an educational investment is that the investment will provide a stream of benefits in future for a profit. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of the educational investments and returns on the lives of the teachers with upgraded qualifications on self-sponsorship in Lusaka district. Data was generated from ten purposively sampled teachers who upgraded qualifications on self-sponsorship using in-depth interviews, and observations. Findings from the study revealed among others; adequate responses to prompt changes, natural aptitudes and inventiveness, better health, high income employment opportunities and reasonated knowledge. The study concluded that educational investments made on self-sponsorship by teachers accrued benefits of education or returns and the benefits accrued had positive effects on the lives of the teachers who made the investment. Thus it is recommended that teachers who fail to find sponsorship opportunities from the government can still upgrade their qualifications on self-sponsorship because the benefits of education accrued from their educational investments have positive effects on their lives. Additionally, teachers need to improve their knowledge reservoir by upgrading their qualifications in order to keep abreast with the world’s advancements in technology. Furthermore, upgrading of qualifications enhances efficiency and effectiveness in the teaching profession.

Page(s): 457-465                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 January 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41222

 Chifuwe Avien
University of Zambia

  Francis Simui
University of Zambia

  Gistered Muleya
University of Zambia

[1] Alika, I, J & Stan A, Journal of Business Administration and Education 2201-2958, 5, Number 1, 2014, 55-78.
[2] Armstrong, P. & Stanton.K (2006), Learning to analyze and critically evaluate ideas, arguments and points of view; The Idea Center.
[3] Benjamin. (2012). A study on the Relationship between Education level and income in the USA- Slide share.
[4] BETUZ. (2015). The Status of Education in Zambia Report: A Focus on Quality Education. Lusaka: Institutional Suppliers Limited.
[5] Blashki, K. (2013). Emerging Research and Trends in Interactivity and Human-Computer Interface; IGI Global.
[6] Bergersen, A. and Muleya, G. (2019). “Zambian Civic Education Teacher Students in Norway for a Year- How DoThey Describe Their Transformative Learning?‟ Sustainability 2019, 11 (24), 7143; doi: 10.3390/su11247143, pp 1-17 www.mdpi.com/journal/sustainability
[7] Cathy Gaynor (1998). Directions in Development: Decentralization of Education Teacher Management; Washington, D.C. The World Bank.
[8] Corbin, J. (2008). Basics of Qualitative Research Techniques and Procedures for Developing Grounded Theory. Thousand Oaks, SAGE Publications.
[9] Cohen, D. & Soto, M. (2015). Growth and human Capital: Good data, good results. Journal of Economic Growth, 1 (3), 113-207.
[10] Garba, P. K. (2016). Human Capital formation, utilization and Development of Nigeria. Selected Papers for the 2002 Arrival Conference of the Nigeria Economic Society.( NES). Ibadan: Polygraphics Ventures Ltd.
[11] Habanyati, H., Simui, F., Kanyamuna, V., & Muleya, G. (2020) Lived Experiences of Multi-Banked Bank Account Holders with a focus on Banks at Manda Hill Mall Lusaka, Zambia. Advances in Social Sciences Research Journal, 7(6) 208-223.
[12] Jeffrey. A.F & Todd, V.K (2000). Investment Opportunities in Education: Making a Difference: The Journal of Private Equity .3, .4 (fall 200), 38-51: Euro money, institutional investor PLC.
[13] Jenkins, A. (2018). Who upgrade to Higher Level Qualifications in Midlife? British Journal of Educational Studies. 66 (2). 243-266.
[14] Joyce, B.R & Showers, B. (1980). Improving in-service training: The messages of Research; Educational Leadership, 37, 5, February, 379-85.
[15] Kristain, B. & Erica, B. (2018). Evaluating the Return of Investment in Higher Education: AN Assessment of individual- State- Level Returns; Atlanta Georgia; GEORGIA State University.
[16] Machila,N, Sompa, M, Muleya, G and Pitsoe, V.J (2018). ‘Teachers’ Understanding and AttitudesTowards Inductive and Deductive Approaches to Teaching Social Sciences,”
[17] Multidisciplinary Journal of Language and Social Sciences Education, (2), 120-137. 2018
[18] Magasu, O., Muleya, G. & Mweemba, L. (2020). Pedagogical Challenges in Teaching Civic Education in Secondary Schools in Zambia. International Journal of Science and Research (IJSR). Vol. 9, Issue 3, pp. 1483-1488. DOI: 10:21274/SR 20327121153.
[19] Mason, J. (1996). Qualitative Research. Thousand Oaks: SAGE Publications.
[20] Muleya, G. (2017a). ‘The Conceptual Challenges in the Conceptualization of Civic Education’. In Journal of Lexicography and Terminology. Vol 1, Issue 1, pp 59-81
[21] Muleya, G. (2017b). ‘Civic education and Civics: Where do we draw the line?’ In Journal of Lexicography and Terminology. Vol 1, Issue 2, pp 125-148.
[22] Muleya, G. (2018b). ‘Civic Education Versus Citizenship Education? Where is the point of Convergence?’ Journal ofLexicography and Terminology, Vol 2, Issue No. 1, pp 109-130.
[23] Muleya, G. (2018a). Civic education in Zambia before and beyond the Golden Jubilee. In G. Masaiti (Ed.), Educationat fifty years of Independence and beyond. Lusaka: Unza Press.
[24] Muleya, G.(2018c). Re-Examining the Concept of Civic Education. Journal of Lexicography and Terminology, Vol 2, Issue No. 2, pp 25- 42.
[25] Muleya, G. (2019). Curriculum Policy and Practice of Civic Education in Zambia: A Reflective Perspective, In A.
Petersen et al. (eds.). The Palgrave Handbook of Citizenship and Education. https://doi/10.007/978-3-319-67905-153-1
[26] Mupeta, S and Muleya, G. (2019). Challenges and Strategies in the Implementation of Civic Entrepreneurship in the Governance of the University of Zambia, In International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) |Volume III, Issue VII, July 2019|ISSN 2454-6186, pp 94 -100
[27] Mupeta, S., Muleya, G., Kanyamuna, V., & Simui, F. (2020). Civic Entrepreneurship: The Implementation of Civic Innovations in the Governance of the University of Zambia. Advances in Social Sciences Research Journal, 7(7) 674-685.
[28] Patton, M. Q. (2002). Evaluation Methods. Thousand Oaks, California: SAGE Publications.
[29] Phiri, J.N. (2015). Education Public Expenditure Review in Zambia. Lusaka: Ministry of Education.
[30] Neuman, W.L. (2007). Basics of Social Research Methods: Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches. Boston: Pearson Education.
[31] Richard, P. & Linda, E. (2019). The Nature and Functions of Critical and Creative thinking: Maryland Rowman & Littlefields.
[32] Simui, F., Kasonde Ngandu, S., Cheyeka, A.M., and Makoe, M., (2019). Lived Disablers to Academic Success of the Visually Impaired at the University of Zambia. Sub Saharan Africa. Journal of Student Affairs in Africa 7(2), 41‑56. https://doi.org/10.24085/jsaa.v7i2.3824
[33] Simui, F., Mwewa, G., Chota, A., Kakana, F., Mundende, K., Thompson, L., Mwanza, P., Ndhlovu, D., & Namangala, B., (2018). “WhatsApp” as a Learner Support tool for distance education: Implications for Policy and Practice at University of Zambia. Zambia ICT Journal, 2, (2), 36-44, https://doi.org/10.33260/zictjournal.v2i2.55.
[34] Simui, F., Nyaruwata, L.T. and Kasonde-Ngandu, S. (2017). ICT as an Enabler to Academic Success of Students with Visually Impaired at Sim University: Hermeneutics Approach. Zambia ICT Journal Vol. 1. Issue 1. pp 5 – 9. http://ictjournal.icict.org.zm/index.php/zictjournal/article/view/9
[35] Simui, F. Mhone, M., & Nkhuwa, A., (2011). A Baseline Study on the Effectiveness of the Head Teachers’ Education Leadership and Management Course on Learner Performance. Lusaka: Ministry of Education.
[36] Simui F. (2009). Preparing Teachers for Inclusive Education: A Study of the English Approach. Paper Presented at the SANORD 2ND International Conference: Inclusive and Exclusion in Higher Education, Rhodes University, Grahmstown, South Africa, December 7 to 9, 2009.
[37] TEVET NEWS. (2011). Technical Education, Vocational and Education, Vocational and Entrepreneurship Training Authority: Lusaka: TEVET.
[38] United Nations (2018). Globalization and Social Development. New York: NY: United Nations.
[39] Vic Health, (2009). Opportunities for Social Connection; A determinant of mental health and wellbeing, vichealth.vicgov.au
[40] Wanchinga, D. Government’s stance on teacher Development; Zambia Daily Mail, 24th April, 2017, 2.
[41] Wilson, J.P. (2012). International human resource development: Learning, education and training for individuals and organizations; Philadelphia PA: Kogan Page Limited.
[42] Winters, J.V. (2013). Human Capital Externalities and Employment differences Across Metropolitan areas of the USA. Journal of Economic Geography. 13 (5). 799-822.
[43] Woessman, L. (2014). The Economic Case for Education: The International Evidence. Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics. 65(2).117-170.
[44] Zambia National Union of Teachers. (2017). Report on the Status of Teachers of Teachers Upgrade in Zambia: Lusaka Institutional Suppliers Limited.

Chifuwe Avien, Francis Simui and Gistered Muleya
“Exploring Effects of the Educational Investments and Returns on Teachers with Upgraded Qualifications Acquired On Self-Sponsorship in Lusaka District” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-4-issue-12, pp.457-465 December 2020  DOI : https://doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41222

Download PDF

pdf

Pastoral Care for Sunday School Children of Indonesian Church in Australia During Pandemic

Hans Peteryo Halim, Yanto Paulus Hermanto, Rubin Adi Abraham- December 2020 Page No.: 466-471

During this pandemic of Covid-19 in 2020, supports and encouragement are needed in the society, especially in church. Therefore, pastoral service must keep running and serving the congregation. In this regard, the researcher is obliged to explore how Indonesian churches’ pastoral care in Australia should continue, especially in Sunday school during the pandemic. The method used is literature and field research methods. From the results of this research, we obtain a clear picture of how pastoral care should continue and what the church can do to remain pastoral care in Sunday school. The most important thing is to have Sunday school teachers who can teach, guide, and lead their Sunday school children. Having a clear understanding of the children characteristic is also critical, as important as knowing how to run the online Sunday school service. Likewise, parent supports are essential for running the Sunday school as an online church service.

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2020.41223

Page(s): 466-471