Toraja, The City of Rituals (One Ritual can Introduce Many Kinds of Rituals) A Cultural Anthropology Study

Dirk Sandarupa, M.L. Manda, Burhanuddin Arafah, Fathu Rahman -February 2021 Page No.: 01-03

This study aims to show and reveal how rich Toraja is in various types of rituals and why Toraja is known as the city of rituals. This research uses qualitative methods and participant observation, where the writer conduct field research and conduct direct observations. This method uses cultural anthropology approach and ideological linguistics. The results of this study indicates that Toraja cultural practices exist today because of their beliefs. The symbols contained in the ritual shows that in general rituals in Toraja include offerings and sacrificing. Social change in Toraja between the past and the present is influenced by modernization, scientific development, the environment and ideology. Toraja rituals have a big impact in tourism.

Page(s): 01-03                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 February 2021

 Dirk Sandarupa
Faculty of Cultural Sciences, Hasanuddin University

 M.L. Manda
Faculty of Cultural Sciences, Hasanuddin University

 Burhanuddin Arafah
Faculty of Cultural Sciences, Hasanuddin University

 Fathu Rahman
Faculty of Cultural Sciences, Hasanuddin University

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Dirk Sandarupa, M.L. Manda, Burhanuddin Arafah, Fathu Rahman, “Toraja, The City of Rituals (One Ritual can Introduce Many Kinds of Rituals) A Cultural Anthropology Study” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.01-03 February 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/01-03.pdf

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The Use of Social Media Platforms as Awareness Creation Tools for the Hepatitis B Virus in Lagos State

Nsikan Senam, Charles Okonji – February 2021 Page No.: 04-12

The social media have constituted a fundamental platform for the dissemination of vital information for use by members of the society. This makes it necessary to expect that some vital information on health issues, such as Hepatitis B Virus, can be transmitted to people through social media platforms, despite some outstanding dysfunctions of the social media. This study examines the extent to which social media platforms are used to the tools for creating awareness on Hepatitis B Virus in Lagos, Nigeria. The population of the study was 14,368,332 which was the projected population of Lagos State. The sample size was 400 selected through the multi-stage sampling method. The questionnaire was the instrument for data gathering. Findings of the study revealed that majority of Lagos State residents were exposed to social media platform. Also messages on Hepatitis B Virus were transmitted through the various social media to residents of Lagos State. It was therefore recommended among other things that operator and managers of health facilities in Lagos State should make use of the social media platforms as part of the potent channels of transmitting information on health issues such as Hepatitis B Virus.

Page(s): 04-12                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 01 March 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5201

 Nsikan Senam
Department of Communication Arts, University of Uyo, Uyo, Nigeria

 Charles Okonji
Department of Mass Communication, Anchor University, Lagos, Nigeria

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Nsikan Senam, Charles Okonji “The Use of Social Media Platforms as Awareness Creation Tools for the Hepatitis B Virus in Lagos State” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.04-12 February 2021  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5201

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Socio-Demographic Predictors to Health Promotion among Pregnant Women in Okrika Local Government Area of Rivers State Nigieria

Samuel G.K (Ph.D), Balami P. A. – February 2021 Page No.: 13-21

This study examines the predictors to health promotion among pregnant women in Okrika Local Government Area, Rivers State, Nigeria based on employment status and level of income earned. The population in this study comprised of all registered pregnant women attending antenatal care in the 15 selected Primary Health Care centers in Okrika Local Government Area. A sample of 800 respondents was selected using Taro Yamen Formula out of the population of 1500. The study adopted a multi-stage sampling procedure: at stage 1, simple random sampling was used to select 15 primary health centers; at stage 2, purposive sample was adopted to select the respondents from each health center. The research instrument was a validated self-structured questionnaire. Data collected was analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 23. Two null hypotheses were tested using inferential statistics at 0.05 level of significance. Results revealed that there is high level of health promotion among pregnant women in Okrika Local Government Area with the grand mean based on employment status and level of income earned 3.37± .69, the findings revealed that employment status with 3.4 ± .64 is a predictor to health promotion among pregnant women in the area under study. Income status with the grand mean =3.4 ± .69 is not a predictor to health promotion among pregnant women in Okrika Local government area. The study concludes that pregnant women in Okrika Local Government Area of Rivers State, Nigeria have a high level of health promotion; level of income earned is not a predictor to health promotion among pregnant women in Okrika Local Government Area. The study recommends that the ministry of health should enact policies and improve basic education for all women of childbearing age both at the pre (before pregnancy), during and post pregnancy (after birth), on the need for healthy practices expected of pregnant women and not just focusing on the sensitizations and cancelling services rendered only during Antenatal and/or postnatal care which is centered towards the pregnant mothers only.

Page(s): 13-21                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 March 2021

 Samuel G.K (Ph.D)
Department of Human Kinetics, Health and Safety Studies, Ignatius Ajuru University of Education Rumuolumeni, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

  , Balami P. A
Department of Human Kinetics, Health and Safety Studies, Ignatius Ajuru University of Education Rumuolumeni, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

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Samuel G.K (Ph.D), Balami P. A. “Socio-Demographic Predictors to Health Promotion among Pregnant Women in Okrika Local Government Area of Rivers State Nigieria ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.13-21 February 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/13-21.pdf

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Social Media Marketing Towards Consumer Buying Behavior: A Case in Panabo City

Jade Xuccheney N. Jacinto, Joylyn S. Pintado, Louie Jay M. Ibañez, Ronel G. Dagohoy, Mark Van M. Buladaco- February 2021 Page No.: 22-30

Consumers are the kings of markets. No business enterprise can operate without the presence of the consumer, and with the advancement of technology, consumers tend to make countless decisions in purchasing with the use of social media. This study aims to evaluate the influence of social media marketing on consumer buying behavior, particularly among Panabo City citizens who mostly use social media websites to purchase products and services. The study utilizes a non-experimental quantitative research approach, combining correlational and regression techniques. Convenience sampling and Slovin’s formula was used to identify the 399 respondents. With the application of mean, frequency, Pearson r, and Regression Analysis, the result shows that there is a positive, moderate, and significant correlation between social media marketing and consumer buying behavior. Thus, it has been found out that among the indicators of social media marketing, all are predictors of consumer buying behavior. Furthermore, regression analysis results revealed that social media marketing significantly influences consumer buying behavior. Hence, consumers are influenced by process factors and external stimuli brought by social media marketing.

Page(s): 22-30                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 March 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5202

 Jade Xuccheney N. Jacinto
Student, Bachelor of Science in Information Technology, Davao del Norte State College

 Joylyn S. Pintado
Student, Bachelor of Science in Information Technology, Davao del Norte State College

 Louie Jay M. Ibañez
Student, Bachelor of Science in Information Technology, Davao del Norte State College

 Ronel G. Dagohoy
Faculty, Institute of Leadership, Entrepreneurship and Good Governance, Davao del Norte State College

 Mark Van M. Buladaco
Dean, Institute of Computing, Davao del Norte State College

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Jade Xuccheney N. Jacinto, Joylyn S. Pintado, Louie Jay M. Ibañez, Ronel G. Dagohoy, Mark Van M. Buladaco, “Social Media Marketing Towards Consumer Buying Behavior: A Case in Panabo City” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.22-30 February 2021  DOI : https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5202

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Aspirations and Challenges of LGBTQIA+ Community in India
Dr. Saundarya Rajesh, Ms. Anju Rakesh, Ms. Nisha Chandran, Dr. Divya Kumar- February 2021 – Page No.: 31-37

Historically, the social acceptance of the LGBTQIA+ community has been very low across the globe. In India the scenario was no different though the landscape began shifting post the progressive judgement rendered by the Supreme Court of India, in 2018, decriminalizing homosexuality. The introduction of the third gender as a part of recognised gender spectrum in 2014 and the right to change legal gender in 2019 were other progressive measures in this direction. Despite the mandate the societal awareness and acceptance of the LGBTQIA+ community continues to be a challenge in the Indian socio cultural milieu. Against this backdrop, a research study was undertaken to understand the aspirations of, and challenges faced by members of the community in India, today. A qualitative survey questionnaire with questions including when they developed self-awareness of their identity, how their experience of acceptance and inclusion was and how they embarked on their pursuit of aspirations, was used. The research sample consisted of 31 respondents who identified themselves as part of the LGBTQIA+ Community. From a self-awareness standpoint, 70% respondents said they accepted their own identity only after the age of 20. 48% of respondents reported facing mental health challenges because of a lack of acceptance. The paper also includes a discussion on the measures that individuals, organizations and institutions can undertake to be more inclusive of the LGBTQIA+ community.

Page(s): 31-37                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 March 2021

 Dr. Saundarya Rajesh
Founder & President, AVTAR Group

 Ms. Anju Rakesh
Assistant Vice President – Research & Solutions, Avtar

 Ms. Nisha Chandran
Assistant Vice President – Consulting & Solutions, Avtar

 Dr. Divya Kumar
Associate Manager – Research, Avtar

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[18] The Working Mother & Avtar Best Companies for Women in India and the Most Inclusive Companies India (2020) – https://www.avtarinc.com/best-companies/most-inclusive-companies-index-overview
[19] Nagel Joane (2003), Race, Ethnicity and Sexuality: Intimate Intersections Forbidden Frontiers. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 204-205.
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[24] Rostosky, S.S., & Riggle, E.D.B. (2002). out at work: The relations of actor and partner workplace policy and internalized homophobia to disclosure status. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 49, 411-419.
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Dr. Saundarya Rajesh, Ms. Anju Rakesh, Ms. Nisha Chandran, Dr. Divya Kumar “Aspirations and Challenges of LGBTQIA+ Community in India” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.24-28 February 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/31-37.pdf

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A Correlational Analysis between Self-Control and Student’s Video Game Performance in Panabo City

Pamela Dela Cerna, Noreen Mae Malinao, Jannie Jenny Mahipos, Glendell Razon Jadraque, Mark Van M. Buladaco- February 2021 Page No.: 38-47

As technology continuously advancing in today’s era, electronic technologies became one of the creations that most people need for communication. They deemed a kind of leisure or recreational tool such that Video Games. In some studies, self-control seems strongly associated with counterproductive behavior, but not much research about video game performance. Thus, a lack of knowledge concerning the influence of self-control on video game performance is present. This research aims to analyze the correlation between an individual’s self-control and the student’s video game performance in Panabo City. The questionnaire splits into three parts: Students’ demographic profile, Students Self-Control, and Students Video Game Performance. In participants, 32 of the respondents participated in the study—researchers used quantitative non-experimental correlational research design to approach the research question. In the result, the mean level of students’ self-control is 3.2188 with a standard deviation of 0.38882. It shows that the level of students’ self-control is moderate while the mean level of students’ video game performance is 3.5042 with a standard deviation of 0.46062. It shows that the level of students’ video game performance is high. The researchers concluded that there is no significant relationship between students’ self-control and video game performance, showing a weak positive relationship.

Page(s): 38-47                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 March 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5203

 Pamela Dela Cerna
Student, Bachelor of Science in Information Technology, Davao Del Norte State College, Philippines

  Noreen Mae Malinao
Student, Bachelor of Science in Information Technology, Davao Del Norte State College, Philippines

 Jannie Jenny Mahipos
Student, Bachelor of Science in Information Technology, Davao Del Norte State College, Philippines

 Glendell Razon Jadraque
Student, Bachelor of Science in Information Technology, Davao Del Norte State College, Philippines

 Mark Van M. Buladaco
Student, Bachelor of Science in Information Technology, Davao Del Norte State College, Philippines

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Pamela Dela Cerna, Noreen Mae Malinao, Jannie Jenny Mahipos, Glendell Razon Jadraque, Mark Van M. Buladaco, “A Correlational Analysis between Self-Control and Student’s Video Game Performance in Panabo City” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.38-47 February 2021  DOI : https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5203

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Representation Pangulu Keris Bugis Community: Study Cultural Semiotics

Yusmah, Tadjuddin Maknun, Hamzah A. Machmoed, Gusnawaty – February 2021 Page No.: 48-51

This research aims to represent the meaning of pangulu in Bugis society. This type of research is a qualitative research with a descriptive analysis method. The data of this study were sourced from pengulu in the Bugis community. Data collection used participatory observation methods with interview techniques, documentation techniques, recording techniques, and note taking techniques. The results showed that the Bugis community represented Pangulu as the head or leader. In this study, it was also found that there are four types of pagulu found in the Bugis community, namely the pangulu tau-tau, the pangulu sikori, the pangulu takala and the pangulu rekko. Pangulu tau-tau are symbolized as symbols of greatness and elevation. Pangulu sikori is symbolized as a symbol of steadfastness to the leader. Pangulu takala is symbolized as a symbol of heroism and courage. While the pangulu rekko is symbolized as a symbol of obedience and obedience.

Page(s): 48-51                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 March 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5204

 Yusmah
Linguistic Study Program, Faculty of Humanities, Hasanuddin University, Makassar

 Tadjuddin Maknun
Linguistic Study Program, Faculty of Humanities, Hasanuddin University, Makassar

 Hamzah A. Machmoed
Linguistic Study Program, Faculty of Humanities, Hasanuddin University, Makassar

 Gusnawaty
Linguistic Study Program, Faculty of Humanities, Hasanuddin University, Makassar

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Yusmah, Tadjuddin Maknun, Hamzah A. Machmoed, Gusnawaty, “Representation Pangulu Keris Bugis Community: Study Cultural Semiotics” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.48-51 February 2021  DOI : https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5204

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An Investigation into the Effect of Concept-Based Instruction on Senior High School Students’ Geometric Thinking and Achievement in Circle Theorem

Yunus Hissan and Forster D. Ntow – February 2021 Page No.: 52-60

This study was grounded on Van Hiele’s geometric levels of thinking as a conceptual framework to assess and analyse senior high school students’ geometric understanding. A non-equivalent quasi experimental design was used to compare the geometrical achievements of students taught with concept-based method and those instructed with traditional method. The study employed purposive sampling technique to select two schools; experimental group (41) and control group (37). Quantitative analysis was carried out using a two-way mixed factorial analysis of variance(ANOVA). The findings of the study revealed a significant difference in the mathematics achievement of learners taught circle theorem with concept-based instruction as compared to those taught with traditional method. The study reveals that students achieved higher geometric thinking when taught with concept-based instruction.

Page(s): 52-60                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 05 March 2021

 Yunus Hissan
Wa Senior High School, Wa Municipality, Upper West Region, Ghana

 Forster D. Ntow
Department of Basic Education, University of Cape Coast, Ghana

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Yunus Hissan and Forster D. Ntow, “An Investigation into the Effect of Concept-Based Instruction on Senior High School Students’ Geometric Thinking and Achievement in Circle Theorem” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.52-60 February 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/52-60.pdf

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Drivers of Weedicide Adoption among Peseant Maize Farmers in the Northern Region of Ghana

Benedict Afful Jr., Ph.D – February 2021 Page No.: 61-71

Globally, weeds wreak significant damages on plants and this situation calls for instantaneous measures to overcome the harm done by the weeds. Weeds can be removed by hand/hoe weeding but these are time consuming, laborious and do not even promise thorough removal of weeds. Weeds control through such traditional method has even become much problematic in Ghana as large portions of the rural youth, especially from the Northern Region, are migrating to the urban centers. Weedicide, on the other hand, offers a considerable promise of thoroughly removing weeds using few labours and time. However, there is evidence of low weedicide adoption among maize farmers in the Northern Region of Ghana. It is against this background that this study investigates the drivers of weedicide adoption among maize farm households in the Northern Region of Ghana. To achieve this objective, a correlated random-effects probit model was applied to a 3-year panel data from Innovation for Poverty Action-Farmer Survey of Ghana. A sample of 1728 peasant farm households was used for the study. The analysis of data revealed that dependency ratio, price of weedicide and communal labour were negatively related to weedicide adoption. It was also found that farm income, NPK fertilizer, other inorganic fertilizer, and the price of labour were positively related to weedicide adoption. It is recommended that: government should reduce dependency ratio through job creation and birth rate, subsidize weedicide, and promote the use of complementary farm inputs.

Page(s): 61-71                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 March 2021

  Benedict Afful Jr., Ph.D
Department of Economic Studies, School of Economics. University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast

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Benedict Afful Jr., Ph.D “Drivers of Weedicide Adoption among Peseant Maize Farmers in the Northern Region of Ghana” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.61-71 February 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/61-71.pdf

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Barriers to Geography Teachers’ Engagement with Research in Selected Secondary Schools of Serenje District in Central Zambia

Patricia Lako and Kaiko Mubita – February 2021 Page No.: 72-78

The purpose of this study was to establish the barriers to geography teachers’ engagement with research in selected secondary schools of Serenje district. Interviews were conducted with fourteen geography teachers, two heads of social sciences departments, and one official each from Provincial Resource Centre (PRC) and District Resource centre (DRC) respectively. Purposeful sampling was used to select the participants. Two focus group discussions were also conducted with teachers of geography. Data was analysed thematically. Findings showed that teacher engagement with research was constrained by barriers such as lack of time, lack of support from administrators, financial constraints, lack of access to relevant research literature, and societal and organizational culture. Therefore, to establish and sustain research engagements of geography teachers in the district attention is needed in the following areas: policy, job description and schedules of the teachers, school culture, libraries, and funding for research.

Page(s): 72-78                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 March 2021

 Patricia Lako
Department of Language and Social Sciences Education,University of Zambia

  Kaiko Mubita
Department of Language and Social Sciences Education,University of Zambia

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Patricia Lako and Kaiko Mubita, “Barriers to Geography Teachers’ Engagement with Research in Selected Secondary Schools of Serenje District in Central Zambia ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.72-78 February 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/72-78.pdf

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Impact of Learning Management System as a New Platform of Instruction towards Learning Satisfaction of BSED English Students of Davao del Norte State College

Cent Kenneth T. Peria, Margie V. Candolita, Jedidiah A. Mahinay, Ellvan Campos, Mark Van M. Buladaco- February 2021 Page No.: 79-88

This study dealt with the impact of the Learning Management System (LMS) as a new platform of Instruction towards learning satisfaction of BSEd English students; also, the primary objective of this study was to determine the level of student learning satisfaction in education towards the use of LMS as a learning tool and to find out if there would be a significant relationship between LMS as a learning tool and its impact to the students’ learning satisfaction among BSEd English students. Utilizing correlational research method with a total of (160) enrolled BSEd English Students of Davao del Norte State College from 1st year to 4th-year level as selected participants. Data gathering was done through the use of questionnaires via an online survey; the questionnaire was divided into three parts, namely: demographic roles students; focus on the factors of Learning Management System (LMS) and as a learning tool. Tested at 0.05 level of significance Pearson Product Moment of Correlation Coefficient was utilized resulting in rejection of the null hypothesis. There is a significant relationship in Student Learning Satisfaction to Learning Management System as a new Platform of Instruction.

Page(s): 79-88                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 08 March 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5205

 Cent Kenneth T. Peria
Student, Bachelor of Science in Information Technology, Davao del Norte State College

  Lawal Bala Isa
Student, Bachelor of Science in Information Technology, Davao del Norte State College

  Asma’u Idris
Student, Bachelor of Science in Information Technology, Davao del Norte State College

  Ellvan Campos
Faculty, Institute of Teacher Education, Davao del Norte State College

  Mark Van M. Buladaco
Dean, Institute of Computing, Davao del Norte State College

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Cent Kenneth T. Peria, Margie V. Candolita, Jedidiah A. Mahinay, Ellvan Campos, Mark Van M. Buladaco, “Impact of Learning Management System as a New Platform of Instruction towards Learning Satisfaction of BSED English Students of Davao del Norte State College .” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.79-88 February 2021  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5205

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The Nature of Administrative Process, Challenges and Possible Solutions in Waste Disposal and Pollution Prevention Policies in Eldoret Municipality-Kenya

Abel Cheruiyot, Shadrack Kipkoech Sitienei- February 2021 Page No.: 89-96

With the unexpected increase in population globally, especially in Sub Saharan Africa, waste management has been crucial for good health, good environment and aesthetics urban centers. This paper seeks to examine the nature of administrative processes, challenges and possible solutions to waste disposal management and pollution policies in Eldoret municipality in Kenya. The paper will be guided by the following objectives: To establish the nature of administrative process in waste disposal and pollution policy implementation and to find out the challenges and possible solutions facing waste disposal and pollution policy implementation. The paper will adopt a qualitative approach by getting response from the stakeholders through interviews and questionnaires, the respondents were chosen through purposive sapling technique. The geographical scope of the study was Eldoret municipality while the time scope covered the period 2012-2015. The findings were: Administrative process that exists in Eldoret includes both administrative politics such as mayoral office and councilors and administrative policy making such as rule-making and law enforcement. Challenges include: Waste from hospitals and industries are disposed of as untreated waste, the lack of adequate transport vessels and vehicles, low participation of households, management problems and operational problems. Possible solutions include: provision of large bins for all the residential areas and collection should be made compulsory, mass public emancipation, garbage pails should be provided and placed at strategic points open spaces, decentralize solid waste collection and disposal, necessity for a better solid waste management. This paper makes a conclusion that solid waste management is on decline due to inadequacy of modern equipment’s, financial misappropriation and bribery and corruption among the municipal employees. In order to adequately solve these not only in Eldoret-Kenya but in all urban centers facing such problems, the strategies employed by private sectors should be adopted and all other stakeholders in the waste management so as to make the whole system more proactive.

Page(s): 89-96                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 08 March 2021

 Abel Cheruiyot
Department of History, Political Science and Public Administration, Moi University

 Shadrack Kipkoech Sitienei
Department of History, Political Science and Public Administration, Moi University

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Abel Cheruiyot, Shadrack Kipkoech Sitienei, “The Nature of Administrative Process, Challenges and Possible Solutions in Waste Disposal and Pollution Prevention Policies in Eldoret Municipality-Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.89-96 February 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/89-96.pdf

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Estimating the Demand for International Reserves Function in Nigeria: Evidence from Vector Auto-Regressions

Blessing Ose Oligbi Ph D, Milton A. Iyoha Ph D – February 2021 Page No.: 97-108

This study estimates the demand for international reserves function in Nigeria using vector auto-regressions, and annual time-series data for 1980-2017. The result obtained indicates that there is a stable, long- run relationship between international reserves, exports, openness, interest rate and export earnings volatility. Variance decomposition analysis shows the main sources of economic growth variations in Nigeria are attributable to “own shocks” and only slightly to other variables, namely, exports and openness. Thus, the study recommends that the government should adopt trade and exchange rate policies to promote exports in order to increase international reserve holdings and accelerate economic growth in Nigeria.

Page(s): 97-108                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 10 March 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5206

 Blessing Ose Oligbi Ph D
Ag Head, Department of Economics & Development Studies, Igbinedion University, Okada, Edo State, Nigeria.

 Milton A. Iyoha Ph D
Professor of Economics, University of Benin, Benin City, Nigeria

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Blessing Ose Oligbi Ph D, Milton A. Iyoha Ph D “Estimating the Demand for International Reserves Function in Nigeria: Evidence from Vector Auto-Regressions” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.97-108 February 2021  DOI : https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5206

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The Impact of Social Media in Disseminating Information to Small-Scale Businesses in Chinhoyi, Zimbabwe

Enesiti Chirume- February 2021 Page No.: 109-118

Many scholars and researchers have since established that social media usage by businesses is gaining prominence in the global markets. This current paper explores the impact of social media in disseminating information to small-scale businessesin the town of Chinhoyiin Zimbabwe. The central objective of the study is to identify the role of social media in the dissemination of information to small-scale businesses in Chinhoyi, Zimbabwe. Thestudy adopts qualitative research methodand uses purposive sampling to administer a questionnaire to educe responses from fifty-(50) small-scale business owners in Chinhoyi. The study provides insight into the advances in social media that are enabling social and cultural changes in business. The major findings of the study are that, social media may help in novel ways to congregate geographical markets for higher sales, transform traditional business approaches, and initiate the much needed and viable consumer-focused communication. The study contributes to the understanding of the impact of social media in disseminating information to small-scale businesses in Chinhoyi, Zimbabwe. Owing to the increase in social media usage more than the traditional platforms, for information consumption, the study argues that. (i) Where clients frequent should naturally become important for business, since business is about clients. (ii) In addition, now that social media is so available to anyone with an internet connection and even more now for everyone with a smartphone, small-scalebusinesses should embrace it for information dissemination.Overall, the study recommends that social media should be a platform to increase business brand awareness and facilitate direct feedback from customers.

Page(s): 109-118                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 10 March 2021

 Enesiti Chirume
PhD Student, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Catholic University of Zimbabwe

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Enesiti Chirume, “The Impact of Social Media in Disseminating Information to Small-Scale Businesses in Chinhoyi, Zimbabwe” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.109-118 February 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/109-118.pdf

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A comparative analysis of the depiction of Socialisation of the girl child in the Ndebele plays.

Netty Magura- February 2021 Page No.: 119-131

Due to various political and economic factors, the Ndebele family institution has undergone tremendous changes. These changes have impacted the socialisation of the girl child within the family set-up. The girl child still faces socialisation problems due to the nature of the present-day family set up. Guided by the Social Learning Theory, the paper examines the family’s role in the girl child’s upbringing as depicted in Makhalisa and Ndlovu’s plays. It is found that the environment in which a girl child grows up influences their behaviour. The study adopted a textual analysis method, and its primary aim was to carry out a comparative analysis of the depiction of the socialisation of the girl child in the Ndebele plays Umhlaba lo! (B.Makhalisa) and Lakanye Wangenza (T.P Ndlovu). The analysis revealed that both plays depict the Ndebele family set-up. Colonisation, Industrialisation and Urbanisation are presented in the plays as the factors contributing to the decline of the traditional Ndebele extended family whilst giving rise to the nuclear family set-up. Both plays present the socialisation of a girl child, with Makhalisa portraying the advantages of extended family in the upbringing of a girl child whilst bringing out the social and economic aspects encountered by a girl child. Ndlovu on the other hand is successful in capturing the contemporary urban family, characterised as the nuclear family and how it has a negatively impacted in the upbringing of a girl child. The study, therefore, concluded that the family stands out to be the core of every girl child’s upbringing, and it determines an individual’s future. Both playwrights successfully depict the girl child’s socialisation in the family whilst bringing out the Ndebele people’s lived experiences during the colonial era and post-colonial.

Page(s): 119-131                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 10 March 2021

 Netty Magura
BA Hon. Linguistics and African Languages, University of Zimbabwe
Pan-African University of Governance, Humanities and Social Sciences (PAUGHSS) Yaounde, Cameroon

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[2] Ndlovu, T.P. 2000. Lakanye Wangenza. Gweru: Mambo Press.
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UNPUBLISHED DISSERTATIONS
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Netty Magura “A comparative analysis of the depiction of Socialisation of the girl child in the Ndebele plays.” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.119-131 February 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/119-131.pdf

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Farmer-grazier conflict resolution methods and mitigation mechanisms in Bui-Donga Mantung Divisions, North West Cameroon

Kinsam James S, Tankou Christopher M, Nobert Tohnain Lengha- February 2021 – Page No.: 139-147

This article examines the general underlying crop farmer grazer conflict resolution methods/mitigation mechanisms in the North West region of Cameroon and in Bui-Donga Mantung Divisions in particular. It argues that the recurrent conflict that has hit the crop farming and livestock sector for several decades still suffers from arriving at a lasting solution. Several strategies have been put in place to bring peace between the two land users, but the dialogue platform (66%) has been sorted out the most effective mechanism. It also argues that the agro-pastoral commission (9.5%) has lost its credibility as the legal forum of conflict resolution, for in several attempts, has never arrived at a lasting solution to the farmer-grazer squabbles. Its effects are devastative and are felt in sectors such as food crop production, peace and harmony, justice, and sustainable development that are needed in the area of study. Therefore, we recommend that different methods can provide solutions, but a well-publicized demarcation of stock routes is by far the best assurance of a sense of belonging that cattle herders can appreciate and adapt to protection of farmlands. The government should therefore make better legislation on the farmer-grazer problem and revise the old ones for their conditions do not satisfy the both the crop farmers and grazers. Both land users should focus on the use of the dialogue platform as the main medium of conflict resolution, for its outcomes are often lasting and satisfactory to both parties. .

Page(s): 139-147                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 10 March 2021

 

 Kinsam James S
Department of Agricultural Extension and Rural Sociology, Faculty of Agronomy and Agricultural Sciences, University of Dschang, Cameroon

  Tankou Christopher M
Department of crop Science, Faculty of Agronomy and Agricuktural Sciences, University of Dschang, Cameroon

  Nobert Tohnain Lengha
Department of Agricultural Extension and Rural Sociology, Faculty of Agronomy and Agricultural Sciences, University of Dschang, Cameroon

Manu I, Bime, Juliet, Fon. D, Ajaga N. (2014). Effects of Farmer-Grazer Conflicts on Rural development: a socio-economic analysis. Scholarly Journal of Agricultural Science Vol. 4(3), pp.113-120http://www.scholarly-journals.com/SJAS.ISSN2276-7118
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[4] Kinsam James S, Tankou Christopher M, Nobert Tohnain Lengha , Augustine Toh Gam* Assessment of Grazing Characteristics and Effects on Livelihoods of Food Crop Farmers in Bui and Donga Mantung, North West Cameroon
[5] BUCREP. (2005). Répertoire Actualisé des Villages du Cameroun. Volume IV-Tome 7
[6] Ofem and Inyang, B. (2014). Livelihood and Conflict Dimension among Crop Farmers and Fulani Herdsmen in Yakurr Region of Cross River State. Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences, MCSER Publishing, Rome-Italy, Vol 5 No 8
[7] Adelakun O.E, Adurogbangba B and Akinbile L; A (2015). Socioeconomic Effects of Farmer-Pastoralist Conflict on Agricultural Extension Service Delivery in Oyo State, Nigeria
[8] Nchinda, Che, Ijang, Shidiki and Chi (2014). Expert interview report for the project “In Search of Common Grounds for Farmer-Grazer conflicts in the North West Region of Cameroon
[9] Pas, C.T and Tah, C.K. (2014). Food Security Programme of SNV Cameroon: Improving food Security for Maize, Livestock and Dairy producers in Cameroon. Yaounde, Cameroon: SNV Cameroon
[10] Moritz M (2006). The politics of permanent conflict: Framer-Herder conflicts in Northern Cameroon. Canadian Journal of African Studies, pp101-126
[11] Brockhaus, MariaTanja Pickard and Barbara Rischkowsky, (2005). Potentials and Obstacles in the Arena of Conflict and Natural Resource Management: A Case Study on Conflicts, Institutions, and Policy Networks in Burkina Faso. Gottingen, Germany: CuvillierVerlag

Kinsam James S, Tankou Christopher M, Nobert Tohnain Lengha “Farmer-grazier conflict resolution methods and mitigation mechanisms in Bui-Donga Mantung Divisions, North West Cameroon” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.139-147 February 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/139-147.pdf

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An Assessment of the Factors Affecting Borno State Policy on Maternal Mortality Reduction

Martins Ekunke Eniemeh, Professor Haruna Dantaro Dlakwa – February 2021 – Page No.: 139-147

Nigeria has been mentioned by the United Nations as having one of the highest rates of maternal mortality in the world. Reducing high maternal mortality ratio is not just a technical and medical challenge but largely a political one which requires the attention and commitment of political leaders. This study brought together some of the determinants of maternal mortality mentioned in extant literature and used simultaneous multiple regression on fourteen variables for maternal mortality modelling in Nigeria. Stepwise regression was then applied to identify, from among the fourteen variables, the major determinant factors that appear to affect maternal mortality ratio more than the others. Narrowing down attention to a small number of the major determinants of high maternal mortality should help gain the focused attention of government since maternal mortality is just one among hundreds of issues competing for the attention of political leaders at any given time. Data on the 36 states of the federation and the FCT Abuja was obtained from the Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey 2008, the Annual Abstract of Statistics of the National Bureau of Statistics and the Society of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of Nigeria. The study found that delivery by a skilled health professional and educational attainment of women had more effect on maternal mortality ratio than the other factors. The implication of this finding is that advocates of maternal mortality reduction in Nigeria will need to focus more attention on developments in the educational sector and not just on making direct improvements to the healthcare system.

Page(s): 139-147                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 10 March 2021

 

 Martins Ekunke Eniemeh
University of Maiduguri, Department of Public Administration, Bama Road, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria

  Professor Haruna Dantaro Dlakwa
Department of Public Administration, University of Maiduguri, Nigeria

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Martins Ekunke Eniemeh, Professor Haruna Dantaro Dlakwa “An Assessment of the Factors Affecting Borno State Policy on Maternal Mortality Reduction” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.139-147 February 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/139-147.pdf

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The Right of Women to Land and Housing in Cameroon’s North West Region: A Legal and Socio-political Analysis

Lidwina Dope Nyadjroh Gabsa- February 2021 Page No.: 148-157

This study is a contribution to the literature on patterns of women empowerment within the framework of a legal and socio-political approach. It uses the women’s right to ownership of land and housing property as a yardstick of effective women empowerment in the grasslands region of Western Cameroon, a region known to be dominated by patriarchal practices. It finds that women’s right to ownership of property has been disproportionately shaped by legal and socio-political factors. From a legal point of view, women like men have the right to ownership of property but from a socio-political stand point, it is not always the case. There is a significant mismatch between women property rights and their effective ownership of property. Women in North West Cameroon make use of property but hardly secure it in their own names. The paper is inviting feminist stakeholders such as government and NGOs to effectively address implementation of ownership procedures and in particular those regarding ownership of land and housing.

Page(s): 148-157                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 11 March 2021

 >Lidwina Dope Nyadjroh Gabsa
Department of English Law, University of Yaounde II-Soa, Cameroon

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Lidwina Dope Nyadjroh Gabsa, “The Right of Women to Land and Housing in Cameroon’s North West Region: A Legal and Socio-political Analysis” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.148-157 February 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/148-157.pdf

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Financial Openness and Poverty Level: The Empirical Investigation in Nigeria

Oluwayemisi Kadijat ADELEKE & Omowunmi Monisola AJEIGBE- February 2021 Page No.: 158-164

This study examined the effect of financial openness on poverty level in Nigeria from 1981 to 2018, using Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) technique. The study found that the lagged value of poverty has a positive and significant relationship with itself. This buttresses the point that poverty in the previous period’s filters directly into the present period. Again, the study found that financial deepening has an inverse and significant effect on poverty, while financial openness was found to have a positive and significant impact on poverty. Finally, the lagged value of growth rate, investment, inflation and institutional quality has an inverse and significant effect on poverty.

Page(s): 158-164                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 11 March 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5206

 >Oluwayemisi Kadijat ADELEKE
Department of Economics, Redeemer’s University, Ede, Osun State, Nigeria

 >Omowunmi Monisola AJEIGBE
Department of Economics, Redeemer’s University, Ede, Osun State, Nigeria

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Oluwayemisi Kadijat ADELEKE & Omowunmi Monisola AJEIGBE, “Financial Openness and Poverty Level: The Empirical Investigation in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.158-164 February 2021  DOI : https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5207

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Orphans Rights in Accessing the Educational Support in Selected Public Secondary Schools in Lusaka, Zambia

Melody Ziile, Gistered Muleya and Francis Simui- February 2021 Page No.: 165-171

This study explored Orphans Rights in accessing the educational support in selected public secondary schools in Lusaka district. The study was guided by qualitative research methodology and case study design under pinned by three objectives namely: (i) describe the awareness of the rights on Educational support by the orphans and teachers, (ii) explore challenges faced by orphans’ in accessing education and (iii) explore strategies that should be put in place in order to allow them have access to education. .Emergent findings indicated that very feel learners were knowledgeable about the support system existing for them as orphans. Some teachers were aware of the educational support to be given to orphans but they were not sure if there was a policy in Zambia supporting such rights. The study revealed that orphans faced a lot of challenges in accessing education such as lack of sponsorship, Social stigma and Corruption in sponsorship awards. Among the measure to ensure that the orphans have access to education included, increased financial support system, enhancing collaboration among stakeholders, empowering orphans with diverse skills, and motivation ventures for well performing orphans. Thus, there is need for the relevant authority to coordinate organizations that look into the plight of orphans to come on board for support.

Page(s): 165-171                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 12 March 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5208

 Melody Ziile
University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia

 Gistered Muleya
University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia

 Francis Simui
University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia

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Melody Ziile, Gistered Muleya and Francis Simui, “Orphans Rights in Accessing the Educational Support in Selected Public Secondary Schools in Lusaka, Zambia” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.165-171 February 2021  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5208

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Educating Adolescents in Life Skills for Achieving Sustainable Development in Nigeria

Mohammed Garba, Azizatu Aliyu, Abdu Alhaji Garba, Surajo Muhammad- February 2021 Page No.: 172-176

Education was recognized globally as the key to overall development. The understanding of the value of education in human life and with the change in policies of recruitment materialisms which demand employable youth especially in Nigeria, it become necessary to provide youth with life skills education. This disquisition focus on ways forward in educating adolescence on life skills for achieving sustainable development in Nigeria. Been adolescence are the most powerful, active, diligent, creative, contributive, innovative and energetic people. Life skills education is essential tool for empowering those adolescent to act responsible, increase civil capacity by enhancing and improving the workforce, social tolerance and less likely to resort to anti-social behaviour for achieving sustainable development. It is said to be recommended among others that government should provide adequate provision of social services that are beneficial to the poor masses, fostering economic growth, empowerment of youth to boast business in different dimension toward achieving sustainable development goals.

Page(s): 172-176                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 12 March 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5209

 Mohammed Garba
Department of Psychology, School of Education, Aminu Saleh College of Education, Azare, Bauchi State, Nigeria

 Azizatu Aliyu
School of Educational Services, Aminu Saleh College of Education, Azare, Bauchi State, Nigeria

 Abdu Alhaji Garba
Department of Educational Psychology, School of Education, Federal College of Education, Okene, Kogi State, Nigeria

 Surajo Muhammad
Department of History, School of Arts and Social Sciences , Jigawa State College of Education, Gumel, Nigeria

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[5]. John and Locke (1632–1704). Historical Views of Child and Adolescent Development. Retrieved from https://courses.lumenlearning.com/atd-fscj-childpsychology/chapter/historical-views-of-child-and-adolescent-development/ on 03/12/2020.
[6]. Nasiru, G. (2019). Education and Sustainable Development in Nigeria: Issues, Challenges and the Way Forward. Paper Presented at National Conference, School of Arts and Social Sciences, Aminu Saleh College of Education, Azare.
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[11]. UNESCO (2014). Contributing to a more Sustainable Feature: Quality Education, Life Skills and Education for Sustainable Development.

Mohammed Garba, Azizatu Aliyu, Abdu Alhaji Garba, Surajo Muhammad, “Educating Adolescents in Life Skills for Achieving Sustainable Development in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.172-176 February 2021  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5209

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Ethnic Politics and Nigerian Democracy: The Way Forward

Martins Ekunke Eniemeh, Prof. Sale Y. Ibrahim- February 2021 Page No.: 177-186

Ethnic politics in Nigeria’s political system have come to be a tragic and constant in Nigeria’s political system; where one must belong to the mainstream of ethnic politics for political relevance. Without any form of prejudice, it is a fact that Nigeria is a multi-ethnic state with differences in its socio-political and economic development all of which have resulted in conflicts and counter conflicts. It depicts attachments to the sub-national ethnic groups which threaten to undermine national integration and therefore divide the nation. Significantly, ethnicity in Nigeria was orchestrated by a long period of colonialism, a period which witnessed the ascendancy of the three major ethnic groups in Nigeria to the socio-political domination of other ethnic groups. It was a period when the three major ethnic groups were used by the colonialist as a pedestal for the distribution of socio-political and economic goods. Using a mixed method, this work argues that Nigeria’s political problem hinges on the negative consequences of ethnic politics. The paper concludes that if Nigeria’s political system must progress, it must be anchored on the need for the review of the constitutional and political structure of Nigeria to restore healthy political competition as opposed to the existing outdated political mechanism imposed on Nigeria by the military under the 1999 Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria.

Page(s): 177-186                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 12 March 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5210

 Martins Ekunke Eniemeh
University of Maiduguri, Department of Public Administration, Bama Road, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria

 Azizatu Aliyu
University of Maiduguri, Department of Public Administration, Bama Road, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria

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Martins Ekunke Eniemeh, Prof. Sale Y. Ibrahim, “Ethnic Politics and Nigerian Democracy: The Way Forward” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.177-186 February 2021  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5210

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Post-Election Litigation and Socio-Economic Underdevelopment in Nigeria: The Nexus and Effectual Exposition

OGBE Henry Ejotubu, Onyemekihian Jude (Ph. D)- February 2021 Page No.: 187-191

The study focuses on post- election litigations as it has become a norm in the conduct of election in Nigeria and its effects on socio- economic development. Through secondary and primary data particularly observation methods of injury, the study reveal that reign of systemic corruption in Nigeria has negative effects on the electoral ecosystem which equally affects the genuine operations of the judiciary over true verdicts of post-election litigations. The paper also reveal that diversion of public funds meant for developments in pretext into elephant (big and unending) projects but financial conduit for financing post-election litigations depicts the nexus between post-election litigation and socio-economic underdevelopment in Nigeria. Besides, the paper establish that the role of godfatherism in Nigeria politics, appointment of incompetent hands in government at the expense of technocrats, enthronement of nurtured fraudulent politicians as leaders and fear of uncertainty which deters investors among others are effects of post-election litigations on socio-economic development in Nigeria. Political education, life imprisonment for corrupt electoral staff, Judges and Justices, stoppage of money politics which fuels the role of godfatherism and its related illegality are among others are recommended herein by this paper.

Page(s): 187-191                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 13 March 2021

 >OGBE Henry Ejotubu
Department of Political Science, College of Education, Agbor Delta State, Nigeria

 >OGBE Henry Ejotubu
Department of Political Science, College of Education, Agbor Delta State, Nigeria

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[9] Ogbe, E.H (2015) Democracy in elements of Political Science; Otite, A.A (ed): a publication of department of Political Science, College of Education, Agbor, Benin City: Allen publications.P.16- 22.
[10] Ogbe, E.H., Mgboneybi V.C. & Ejovi, A. (2015) Leadership recruitment and democratic governance in Nigeria. Journal of Political inquiry of department of political science, Nigeria phones academy. Wudil. Vol. 1, April 2015. P.198
[11] Okereka, O.P and Ogbe, E.H (2016) Electoral malfeasance and the impact on political reengineering in Nigeria: Understanding the correlate in Ewhrudjakpor,
[12] C. Sanubi; F.A.and Ogege, S.O (ed) Town and Gown: The Reciprocal linkage for Nigeria development, Abraka: faculty of the social sciences, Delta State University, Abraka. P.77.
[13] Omoregbe, J (2010) Socio-political philosophy: A systematic and historical study. Volume two,Lagos: Joja educational research and publishers Ltd. P.84
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[15] PremiumTimes (2016) “Shocking: Rickey Tarfa Bribed Justice Yunusa with N225,000, habitually manipulates judges-EFCC”. Retrieved on 27/06/2016 from www. premiumtimesng.com/news/headlin…
[16] The Pointer Sunday. (2016, February 7th). “Ogor Hails supreme court judgment on Okowa”. The pointer Sunday, P3.

OGBE Henry Ejotubu, Onyemekihian Jude (Ph. D), “Post-Election Litigation and Socio-Economic Underdevelopment in Nigeria: The Nexus and Effectual Exposition” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.187-191 February 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/187-191.pdf

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Tulembang Community Order: Have the Form, Structure, Oral and Value Context

Sumarlin Rengko HR, Tadjuddin Maknun, Inriati Lewa, Lukman- February 2021 Page No.: 192-197

This study aims to obtain the structure of the text, the form of the text, the context of the narrative and the values contained in the speech texts in the Tulembang community, Gowa Regency. Broadly speaking, the speech in the Tulembang akulty community consists of two parts, namely mantra and kelong. The division is differentiated based on the shape and structure. The method used is descriptive qualitative method which means describing in general the contents of the text, namely describing the form of the text, the structure of the text and revealing the values contained in the text of the tulembang community’s speech. The analysis was carried out on the text using the theory of the combination of language and society. The theory referred to by the researcher is the anthropological linguistic theory which is directly related to language and its society. Through speeches in the Tulembang community, this research produces several important parts related to language and society in the Tulembang community. From the results of the research conducted, through the anthropological linguistic approach, the researcher got several important parts related to the speeches of the Tulembang community in Gowa Regency, namely; (1) the form of language in the speech text in the Tulembang community is in the form of literary text, (2) the speech in the Tulembang community has its own language structure, which contains the pattern of arranging stanzas, lines or paragraphs, (3) there are several values contained in the the text of Tulembang’s utterances, namely: religious values, work ethic values, positive thinking values, the value of cooperation, and the value of the human relationship with God, the value of the relationship between humans and other humans, and the relationship between humans and nature.

Page(s): 192-197                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 13 March 2021

 Sumarlin Rengko HR
Cultural Sciences Faculty, Hasanuddin University

 Tadjuddin Maknun
Cultural Sciences Faculty, Hasanuddin University

 Inriati Lewa
Cultural Sciences Faculty, Hasanuddin University

 Lukman
Cultural Sciences Faculty, Hasanuddin University

[1]. Arafah , B., Hasyim, M. 2020. Covid-19 Mythology And Netizens Parrhesia Ideological Effects Of Coronavirus Myths On Social Media Users. Palarch’s Journal Of Archaeology Of Egypt/Egyptology, 7 (4), 1398-1409
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[18]. Wellek, Rene and A. Warren. 1990. Literary Theory. Jakarta, Gramedia.

Sumarlin Rengko HR, Tadjuddin Maknun, Inriati Lewa, Lukman, “Tulembang Community Order: Have the Form, Structure, Oral and Value Context” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.192-197 February 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/192-197.pdf

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Household Factors as Predictors of Pupils’ Competency in Mathematics in universal Primary Education (UPE) Schools in Luweero District, Uganda

Asmaa Elsayed Emara, Sofia Sole Gaite, Kayindu Vincent- February 2021 Page No.: 198-204

This study was carried out in Luweero district, Uganda with three objectives namely: to establish how parents’ provision of mid-day meals affects Universal Primary Education (UPE) children’s competency in Mathematics in Luweero district, Uganda; to examine how parents’ visiting of the schools to talk about their children’s learning affects their children’s competency in Mathematics in Universal Primary Education (UPE) primary schools in Luweero district, Uganda; and to assess how parents’ level of education affects their children’s competency in Mathematics in Universal Primary Education (UPE) schools in Luweero district, Uganda. A total of 500 pupils from ten primary schools participated in the study. The findings of the study were that the provision of mid-day meals had a positive influence on pupils’ competency in mathematics; parents’ visiting the school to talk about their children’s learning had a relatively positive influence on their children’s competency in mathematics; and parents’ level of education had minimal influence on their children’s competency in mathematics. Based on these findings, it was recommended that parents in Luweero district, Uganda should put in more effort to provide all their children with meals for lunch; there is need for parents to regularly visit schools where their children are studying from to discuss with teachers their children’s progress and to forge the way forward; and that all parents, educated or not, should support and urge their children to study very hard so as to excel academically.

Page(s): 198-204                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 February 2021

 Asmaa Elsayed Emara
(Kampala International University, Uganda)

 Sofia Sole Gaite
(Kampala International University, Uganda)

 Kayindu Vincent
(Kampala International University, Uganda)

[1]. Abeya Degefe (2018). The Relationship Between Parental Education and Children’s Academic Performance: The Case of Genda Tesfa Primary School, Dire Dawa. Research on Humanities and Social Sciences. Vol.8, No.5.
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[4]. Starn, C. (2008). Benefits of an Integrated Curriculum. University of La Verne. Retrieved Technologies. Issue 4, Volume 2, 226 – 237.
[5]. UWEZO (2011). Are our children learning? Annual learning assessment report. Kampala, Uganda.
[6]. Farzana, A. (2011). The impact of school meals on school participation: Evidence from rural India. Journal of Development Studies, Vol.47, issue 11, pg 1636-1656.

Asmaa Elsayed Emara, Sofia Sole Gaite, Kayindu Vincent, “Household Factors as Predictors of Pupils’ Competency in Mathematics in universal Primary Education (UPE) Schools in Luweero District, Uganda” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.198-204 February 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/198-204.pdf

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Influence of Internet-Based Tools on Students’ Performance in Biology in Public Secondary Schools in Likuyani, Kakamega County Kenya

Kiyeng Edwin, Dr. Kimamo Githui, Dr. Benson Njoroge- February 2021 Page No.: 205-210

Candidates have been scoring low grades in Biology Likuyani sub-county. Therefore, the research sought to assess the influence of internet-based tools on students’ performance in Biology in public secondary schools in Likuyani, Kakamega County. The objective of the study was; to find out the Influence of Internet-based tools. The study assumed that the target groups are readily available within the study area. This study employed mixed methodology and descriptive survey were used to generate both qualitative and quantitative data from public secondary schools in Likuyani Sub-County based on study objectives. The sample size for this study was 321 respondents. The instruments which were used include; questionnaires, interview schedule, observation check list and document analysis. Content validity was determined using constructive criticism by professionals from department of Educational Psychology and Technology of Mount Kenya University. Piloted data were used to test for reliability using Split half type of reliability test. The test questions were divided into two parts using odd numbers and even numbers. The divided questions were administered to respondents and score of each half were correlated using Cronbarch Alpha. Collected data were coded into SPSS software version 24 and cleaned and data were analyzed using descriptive statistics.The study findings showed that internet-based tools were statistically significant with a positive influence on students’ performance in Biology. The study findings concluded that that Internet problem solving in ICT, Internet search and Teaching machines integration in ICT enhances student’s performance. From the findings of the study, it was recommended that; teachers to be given sufficient training on how to use ICT in teaching and learning processes to acquire the requisite knowledge and skills in integrating the technology in classrooms.

Page(s): 205-210                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 February 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5211

 Kiyeng Edwin
Master of Education Degree in Instructional Technology

  Dr. Kimamo Githui
Lecturer Mount Kenya University

  Dr. Benson Njoroge
Lecturer Mount Kenya University

[1]. Bumia, W. (2018). Emerging technologies for 21st century education─ strategies for the use of video mediated instruction. International Journal for Innovative Technology Integration in Education, 1(2), 47-56.
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[12]. Witten, I., Frank, E., Hall, M., & Pal, C. (2016). Data Mining: Practical machine learning tools and techniques. Morgan Kaufmann.

Kiyeng Edwin, Dr. Kimamo Githui, Dr. Benson Njoroge, “Influence of Internet-Based Tools on Students’ Performance in Biology in Public Secondary Schools in Likuyani, Kakamega County Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.205-210 February 2021  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5211

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Exams Past, God Forgotten :(Ir) religiousness In Algerian Tertiary Schools

Kassim Boudjelal Safir- February 2021 Page No.: 211-215

“I am spiritual, but I am not religious”. This is the confession of one of the students when asked about his religiousness. The students ‘(ir) religiousness seems to be a deserted issue in the sociological studies about tertiary schools. In this study context, irreligiousness should not be understood as the absence of religion only, but the indifference towards it as well. Contexts, situations, and mood may affect students’ attitudes about religion. Despite the over-mediatisation of religious content in the Arab TV channels and social media, the Algerian society witnesses an unprecedented “loss of faith”. Has the rise of youth irreligiousness coincided with the rise of the technological revolution, social media and rationalism? This paper tries to identify the main reasons that are leading to this hypothesized “loss of faith” in religion. A semi-structured interview with ten schooled participants has been conducted to scrutinize their perception of religion. The results of the study yielded surprising ambivalent facts about the psycho-social profile of the modern Algerian young Muslim who acknowledged the presence of God. Religiousness can attain an unprecedented peak in exams time and tend to disappear as soon as far as exams finished. Exams Past, God forgotten?

Page(s): 211-215                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 15 March 2021

 >Kassim Boudjelal Safir
Mustapha Stanbouli University- Mascara, Algeria

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Kassim Boudjelal Safir, “Exams Past, God Forgotten :(Ir) religiousness In Algerian Tertiary Schools” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.211-215 February 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/211-215.pdf

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The Internationalisation of Higher Education Institutes (HEIs) in the Southern Africa Development Community (SADC): A comparative content analysis

Mashombotwa Mukwena- February 2021 Page No.: 216-222

In the thrust to achieve the goal of internationalisation, the mission statements of Higher Education Institutes (HEIs) serve as a standard to guide the translation of policy into practice. Since the first organisational guide by Drucker in 1974, mission statements have become normative in all sectors including education. Pedagogical challenges caused by the COVID-19 pandemic in education sectors the world over has led to immense discourse regarding internationalisation, a concept substantially debated even before the pandemic. This study takes stock of the current standing of 127 mission statements from HEIs in Southern Africa. Additionally, a comparative analysis between the SADC mission statements and 164 HEIs from the world’s Top 200 Universities in 2020. A quantitative content analysis approach utilising Voyant Tools © software allowed for a large volume of text (corpus) to be analysed and meaningful aggregates produced. This approach does not utilise hypotheses or pre-set taxonomies allowing for exploratory inductive data analysis. Previous studies have been restricted to country contexts with no open access data and based on small samples. This study established that both datasets (SADC and Top 200) exhibited similar global tenets of mission statement components. However, notable differences exist with SADC mission statements attempting to align themselves with the goal of contributing to their respective nations’ economic development. The global (Top 200) dataset’s international orientation focused on student exchanges and collaborative research while in SADC provision of high-quality education meeting international standards is the focus. The study recommends that post pandemic realignment of mission statements in accordance to the intended internationalisation goal is required to ensure policy to practice harmonisation.

Page(s): 216-222                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 15 March 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5212

 Mashombotwa Mukwena
University of University (UNILUS), Lusaka, Zambia

[1] Alegre, I., Berbegal-Mirabent, J., Guerrero, A., & Mas-Machuca, M. (2018). The real mission of the mission statement: A systematic review of the literature. Journal of Management & Organization, 24(4), 456-473.
[2] Alemu, S. K. (2014). An appraisal of the internationalisation of higher education in sub-Saharan Africa. CEPS Journal, 4(2), 71-90.
[3] Altbach, P. G., & Knight, J. (2007). The internationalization of higher education: Motivations and realities. Journal of Studies in International Education, 11(3-4), 290-305.
[4] Cortés Sánchez, J. D. (2018). Mission statements of universities worldwide: Text mining and visualization. Intangible Capital, 14(4), 584.
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[6] Dumanig, F. P., & Symaco, L. P. (2020). Internationalisation of higher education in Malaysia and the Philippines: A comparative analysis of mission and vision statements of selected universities. Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, 1-13.
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[9] Ganu, J. (2013). Institutional mission statements and attitudinal outcomes of selected faith-based tertiary institutions in Ghana. The Journal of Applied Business and Economics, 14(2), 20.
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Mashombotwa Mukwena, “The Internationalisation of Higher Education Institutes (HEIs) in the Southern Africa Development Community (SADC): A comparative content analysis” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.216-222 February 2021  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5212

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Role of DESC (District e-Service Centre) in Promoting e-Governance in Bangladesh: A Case Study of Netrokona District e-Service Centre

Nefertum Mursheda, Mujahidul Islam- February 2021 Page No.: 223-227

The core objective of e-governance is to provide services to people in a less time consuming, easily accessible and corruption free process using internet based platforms. Considering its positive aspects, the government of Bangladesh is trying to assure best possible use of modern technologies in rendering government services to the people which also resembles their commitment in upgrading the country as a digital one. Establishment of District e-Service Centers (DESCs) across the country is among the major steps towards promoting e-governance. The DESCs of Bangladesh are using modern information technology for service delivery and information dissemination. Introduction of an e-service center in Netrokona made some government services easily accessible and cost effective for the recipients in addition to that, the system reduced discrepancies and assured more accountability in service delivery process. Lack of updated data base for service recipients, lack of proper tracking system and lack of feedback receiving option are some of the major limitations existing at current DESCs. Moreover, some services like bill payment, telemedicine, e-education, etc. were expected to be there but not available at the moment. Interruption in power supply, poor coverage of internet, insufficient manpower and equipments and poor literacy on information technology are some of the major challenges faced by DESC of Netrokona. Initiatives to fulfill the lacking and assistance to overcome the challenges are need of time for a more effective district e-service center. Continuous research by service providers and academicians are necessary for better e-service delivery.

Page(s): 223-227                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 15 March 2021

 Nefertum Mursheda
Honors and Master’s in Development Studies from University of Dhaka, Bangladesh

  Mujahidul Islam
Lecturer of Development Studies, Hajee Mohammad Danesh Science and Technology University, Bangladesh

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Nefertum Mursheda, Mujahidul Islam, “Role of DESC (District e-Service Centre) in Promoting e-Governance in Bangladesh: A Case Study of Netrokona District e-Service Centre” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.223-227 February 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/223-227.pdf

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Decision-Making Quality towards Effectiveness of Conciliation Process of Lupong Tagapamayapa

Jan Fritz M. Villamor, Ronel G. Dagohoy – February 2021 Page No.: 228-236

This study assessed the decision making quality towards the effectiveness of conciliation process of lupong tagapamayapa. The main purpose and objective of this study is to determine which domain of decision making quality significantly influences the effectiveness of conciliation process of lupong tagapamayapa. This study used the descriptive-correlational method of research. This study was conducted in Barangay Tibal-og, Santo Tomas, Davao del Norte, Philippines and it has 100 respondents through quota sampling, who are the constituents of the barangay who availed the services of the lupong tagapamayapa. The researchers adopted two questionnaires from online sources, which were validated through pilot testing. The results have shown that the level of the decision making quality of lupong tagapamayapa is very high, additionally the results also revealed that the level of the effectiveness of conciliation process of lupong tagapamayapa is very high. The study also resulted that decision making quality and effectiveness of conciliation process of lupong tagapamayapa has a positive high significant correlation and lastly, it was found out that evaluation is the domain of the decision making quality that significantly influences effectiveness of conciliation process of Lupong Tagapamayapa.The result of the study will be used to make interventions and programs to maintain and continue the efficiency and effectiveness of lupong tagapamayapa.

Page(s): 228-236                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 15 March 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5213

 Jan Fritz M. Villamor
Student, Bachelor of Arts in Psychology, Ateneo de Davao University

  Ronel G. Dagohoy
Program Chairperson, Bachelor of Public Administration at Institute of Leadership, Entrepreneurship and Good Governance, Davao del Norte State College

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Jan Fritz M. Villamor, Ronel G. Dagohoy, “Decision-Making Quality towards Effectiveness of Conciliation Process of Lupong Tagapamayapa” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.228-236 February 2021  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5213

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Reflective Practices to Student Teachers on Internship Programme in Ghana: Effectiveness and Challenges

Nana Asimah Adam-Yawson, Victoria Aba Mensah & Asihene Kwaku Oppong-Masu- February 2021 Page No.: 237-242

The research was undertaking at Komenda College of Education to consider the effectiveness of reflective practices used as a means of recapping student teachers (STs) classroom teaching and learning. Reflective Practices are ways of equipping STs with core competencies, confidence experiences as professional teachers to mitigate complexities and challenges of becoming a teacher: the population for the study were all the three hundred and eighty (380) final year STs who completed their internship during 2018/2019 academic year. The researchers used both quota and random sample techniques to sample one hundred and sixty (160) final year student teachers as prerequisite for becoming professional teachers. STs were selected from our partnership schools. The researchers used quantitative method for the study. The instruments used to collect data for the study was questionnaire. The researchers used the questionnaire to collect the initial data. This means were used to check the consistencies of the responses that the STs gave. The questionnaire was offer comprehensive data for explanation to the issue at stake. The findings were that reflective practices help equip the STs with important skills and competencies that will strengthen the STs Competencies and to enhance their confidence.

Page(s): 237-242                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 16 March 2021

 Nana Asimah Adam-Yawson
Department of Education, Komenda College of Education – Ghana

 Victoria Aba Mensah
Department of Education, Komenda College of Education – Ghana

 Asihene Kwaku Oppong-Masu
Department of Education, Komenda College of Education – Ghana

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Nana Asimah Adam-Yawson, Victoria Aba Mensah & Asihene Kwaku Oppong-Masu, “Reflective Practices to Student Teachers on Internship Programme in Ghana: Effectiveness and Challenges” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.237-242 February 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/237-242.pdf

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Availability and Utilization of ICT in Secondary Schools in Rivers State

THANKGOD James Nwuke, INNOCENT Onyelachika Ucheju- February 2021 Page No.: 243-250

The study examined availability and utilization of ICT in Secondary Schools in Rivers State. The study adopted the descriptive research design. Three research questions guided the study, while three hypotheses were tested at 0.05 level of significance. The population of the study comprised of all the 455 secondary schools both public and private schools in Rivers State. The sample size of the study was 136 respondents. Simple random sampling technique was used to select 10 schools using 30% of the study. The reliability of the instrument was ascertained using Cronbach Alpha method. The overall reliability was 0.73 indexes. The availability and utilization of Information and Communication Technology Questionnaire. (AUICTQ) was used for data collection. Data were collected through the researcher with the help of two research assistants. Means, standard deviation and rank order were used to answer the research questions, while Z-test was used to test the hypotheses at 0.05 level of significance. It was found that the extents of ICT accessibility are not available in secondary schools in Rivers State.

Page(s): 243-250                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 18 March 2021

 THANKGOD James Nwuke
Department of Educational Management, Faculty of Education, Ignatius Ajuru University of Education, Port-Harcourt, Nigeria

 INNOCENT Onyelachika Ucheju
Department of Educational Management, Faculty of Education, Ignatius Ajuru University of Education, Port-Harcourt, Nigeria

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THANKGOD James Nwuke, INNOCENT Onyelachika Ucheju, “Availability and Utilization of ICT in Secondary Schools in Rivers State” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.243-250 February 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/243-250.pdf

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The Political Model of the Prophet Muhammad and His Rightly Guided Caliphs: An Overview

Bashir Malam, PhD- February 2021 Page No.: 251-259

Never before was exemplary leadership demonstrated as was the period of the prophet Muhammad. In him was seen a social leader, a noble character with an outstanding sense of morality and extraordinary self-sacrifice. He was an exemplary spiritual and state leader who was adjudged the best role model in ethical leadership. The Medinan State was described as the best, just, and civilized society. The legacies of the Medinan state, would ever remain a role model for generations yet unborn. These paper using mainly secondary sources of data, and content analysis in its assessment. Examines the Islamic model of the prophet Muhammad (SAW), which was widely known as the “Medinan State” his life and leadership was exemplary worthy of emulation, likewise the event that took place during and after his departure are full of lessons that has become a reference point that guides our lives today and will continue to do so till the end.

Page(s): 251-259                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 19 March 2021

 Bashir Malam, PhD
Department of Political Science Gombe State University

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Bashir Malam, PhD, “The Political Model of the Prophet Muhammad and His Rightly Guided Caliphs: An Overview” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.251-259 February 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/251-259.pdf

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Social Structural Dysfunction in the Era of COVID19; An Assessment of the Effects on Christian Churches in Ghana: A case of the Presbyterian Church of Ghana

Felicia Esinam Pufaa (PhD), Felicia S. Odame (PhD), Stephen Ameyaw- February 2021 Page No.: 260-268

Globally, the outbreak of an acute respiratory disease known as Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) adversely impacted on economies of countries and religious bodies. The emergence of the pandemic led to the interruption of most public socio-economic activities including religious gatherings, local and international flights, borders, road transportation, large commercial activities, public and private schools, among others worldwide, including Ghana. These measures sought to forestall a further spread of the disease. Suspension of religious gatherings foists considerable consequences on religious activities, especially in the developing world. In the mainstream academic discourse, scholars contended that the novel pandemic adversely affected economies of countries, but there is paucity of empirical evidence on how the pandemic has affected Christian Spirituality and religious socialization in Ghana. This study however fills this knowledge gap and unveils the possible effects of COVID-19 on Christian Spirituality in Ghana by using the Presbyterian Church of Ghana as a case. Qualitative approach was employed using data from in-depth interviews from eight (8) purposively selected respondents and four (4) regions in Ghana. The analysis revealed that, the pandemic disrupted the annual plans of churches and compelled them to alter their 2019/2020 annual plans. This affected spiritual activities like baptisms, holy matrimony and communion services, among others. It was also found that Church members had to significantly revoke their wedding schedules leading to premarital sex among especially young people. The study argues that the pandemic is a spirit-lice infestation depriving Christians of active spiritual operations. It was recommended that Church policy planners ought to broaden the scope of their programmes to accommodate supplementary programmes and activities for tackling future emergency situations like the COVID-19 pandemic.

Page(s): 260-268                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 19 March 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5214

 Felicia Esinam Pufaa (PhD)
SDD University of Business and Integrated Development Studies,School of Education and Life Long Learning
Wa-Upper West Region, Ghana

  Felicia S. Odame (PhD)
SDD University of Business and Integrated Development Studies, Department of Social, Political and Historical Studies

  Stephen Ameyaw
SDD University of Business and Integrated Development Studies, Department of Social, Political and Historical Studies

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Felicia Esinam Pufaa (PhD), Felicia S. Odame (PhD), Stephen Ameyaw, “Social Structural Dysfunction in the Era of COVID19; An Assessment of the Effects on Christian Churches in Ghana: A case of the Presbyterian Church of Ghana” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.260-268 February 2021  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5214

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Interrogating Civic Education Pedagogies that Stimulate Political Participation in Selected Secondary Schools in Zambia

Davy Mainde, Daniel Katongo Chola, Daniel L. Mpolomoka – February 2021 – Page No.: 269-279

: The core focus of this study was to investigate the teaching pedagogies used in Civic Education in Zambian secondary schools and how they promote effective political participation. This study used a qualitative case study. 20 Civic Education teachers and 35 learners in Civic Education classes from 5 selected secondary schools in Lusaka District were purposively selected through homogenous sampling. One – on – one interview were used to collect data from teachers while focus group discussions were used to collected data from learners in Civic Education classes. Thematic data analysis method was used in this study. Findings established that teachers use lecture, debate, discussion, community engagement, education tour, and pupils’ management boards in teaching Civic Education in secondary schools. Apart from the lecture method which depends on the teacher as the sole source of knowledge, the other methods are incorporated well in teaching Civic Education and have potential to promote effective political participation among secondary school learners. The study recommends that schools should strengthen Continuous Professional Development (CPD) activities such as Lesson Study Circle, Cluster Meetings and Professional Subject Association Workshops to reinvigorate pedagogies of Civic Education and spur innovative pedagogical approaches that promote effective political participation; The Ministry of General Education should constantly hold educational conferences to sensitise Civic Education teachers on pedagogies that help to prepare learners for political participation as outline in the 2013 Zambia Education Curriculum Framework; The Ministry of General Education and the Curriculum Development Centre (CDC) should consider introducing community based assessment in Civic Education as part of final examination grading than current theoretical based approaches.

Page(s): 269-279                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 19 March 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5215

 

 Davy Mainde
University of Zambia

  Daniel Katongo Chola
Mulungushi University

  Daniel L. Mpolomoka
Zambian Open University

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Davy Mainde, Daniel Katongo Chola, Daniel L. Mpolomoka “Interrogating Civic Education Pedagogies that Stimulate Political Participation in Selected Secondary Schools in Zambia” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.269-279 February 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5215

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Relationship between Sports and Quality Education among Secondary School Students

Alade, T. T. Ph D, Bamidele, T. O, Owoeye, S. T – February 2021 – Page No.: 280-282

The study investigated relationship between sports and quality education among secondary school students. The researchers used survey design of the descriptive type of research for the study, the research instrument used for this study was a self-structured closed ended questionnaire designed by the researchers. Inferential statistics of Pearson’s Product Moment Correlation (PPMC) was used to test the hypotheses postulated at 0.05 level of significance. The researchers affirmed that there was a significant relationship between sports and class attendance, also it was established that there was a significant relationship between sports and educational aspiration among secondary school students’ in Ondo State. The researchers recommended that, there should be orientation programme organized for secondary school students in order to make them understand the benefits of participating in sports, state government should give scholarship to students who participate in sports so as to motivate and encourage them for better and greater educational aspiration.

Page(s): 280-282                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 19 March 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5216

 Alade, T. T. Ph D
Department of Human Kinetics and Health Education,Bamidele Olumilua University of Education, Science and Technology, Ikere-Ekiti (BOUESTI)

 Bamidele, T. O
Department of Human Kinetics and Health Education,Bamidele Olumilua University of Education, Science and Technology, Ikere-Ekiti (BOUESTI)

  Owoeye, S. T.
Department of Human Kinetics and Health Education,Bamidele Olumilua University of Education, Science and Technology, Ikere-Ekiti (BOUESTI)

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[8] UNESCO, (2017). Promoting the Role of Sport in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals

Alade, T. T. Ph D, Bamidele, T. O, Owoeye, S. T “Relationship between Sports and Quality Education among Secondary School Students” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.280-282 February 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5216

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Developing Countries’ Underdeveloped Institutional Settings: Can the Evidence-based Policy Approach be an Effective Tool in the Effort at Reducing Poverty? A Study of the MASLOC Program of Ghana

Charles Amoyea Atogenzoya- February 2021 Page No.: 284-290

Never before was exemplary leadership demonstrated as was the period of the prophet Muhammad. In him was seen a social leader, a noble character with an outstanding sense of morality and extraordinary self-sacrifice. He was an exemplary spiritual and state leader who was adjudged the best role model in ethical leadership. The Medinan State was described as the best, just, and civilized society. The legacies of the Medinan state, would ever remain a role model for generations yet unborn. These paper using mainly secondary sources of data, and content analysis in its assessment. Examines the Islamic model of the prophet Muhammad (SAW), which was widely known as the “Medinan State” his life and leadership was exemplary worthy of emulation, likewise the event that took place during and after his departure are full of lessons that has become a reference point that guides our lives today and will continue to do so till the end.

Page(s): 284-290                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 21 March 2021

 Charles Amoyea Atogenzoya
Department of Building Technology and Estate Management, Dr. Hilla Limann Technical University

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Charles Amoyea Atogenzoya, “Developing Countries’ Underdeveloped Institutional Settings: Can the Evidence-based Policy Approach be an Effective Tool in the Effort at Reducing Poverty? A Study of the MASLOC Program of Ghana” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.284-290 February 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/284-290.pdf

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Why Bangladeshi Higher Educational Institutions Should Introduce Community Economic Development as a New Field of Study: Some Suggestions

Mohamed K Haq, Saleh Md Arman, Farzana Nazera- February 2021 Page No.: 291-299

Community Economic Development (CED) is a popular field of study in the top North American universities. But, this field of study is completely absent in Bangladesh, even not a single course has been found in their course curricula based on their websites. Some courses are under development studies but those are insufficient compared to the required courses offered in foreign universities. Interestingly, CED approach is a countrywide approach practiced by NGOs, specialized bank and corporate houses of Bangladesh. CED approach is highly associated with sustainable development by fulfilling numerous goals successfully. The study aims at to develop urgency of the concerned stakeholders of the higher educational institutions of Bangladesh to design, implement and execute program and courses on CED in order to make the country sustainable and in doing so the paper showed CED professions in Bangladesh and in the world, which considered pragmatic in CED course at the university level. The study considered different CED study programs and courses offered by reputed universities of the world including reasons behind introducing the program in their course curriculum and expected benefits derived from the courses. The paper finally suggests ways of implementing it at the university level of Bangladesh. The study makes the concerned stakeholders aware about CED programs and courses for successful development, implementation and execution.

Page(s): 291-299                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 21 March 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5217

 Mohamed K Haq
Ph.D. Student in Management, Limkokwing University of Creative Technology, Malaysia
Former Lecturer, Department of Management, University of Dhaka, Bangladesh

  Saleh Md Arman
MSc in Sustainable Development, Uppsala University
Researcher in Circular Economy and Community Economic Development
Assistant Professor (on leave), RP Shaha University, Bangladesh

  Farzana Nazera
Ph.D. Student in Management, Limkokwing University of Creative Technology, Malaysia

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Mohamed K Haq, Saleh Md Arman, Farzana Nazera, “Why Bangladeshi Higher Educational Institutions Should Introduce Community Economic Development as a New Field of Study: Some Suggestions” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.291-299 February 2021  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5217

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Healthcare Providers and Outpatients Relationship: A Study of Three Selected Public Hospitals in Sokoto Metropolis

Bello Almu, Dankani Ibrahim Mustapha – February 2021 Page No.: 300-306

This paper examines healthcare providers and outpatients relationships in three selected public hospitals in Sokoto metropolis. It is the contention of this paper that good interpersonal relationship is the key to the health and wellbeing of patients. In fact the professional ethics of healthcare givers revolves around promotion of human dignity; observation of professional ethics and respect; orientation for quality services; patients centered management; and possession of good interpersonal relationship. Data for the study was collected via administration of structured questionnaire at three public health facilities ranging from primary health care facility (Kofar Rini PHC), secondary health facility (Specialist Hospitals) and a tertiary health facility (Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital Sokoto). A total of 450 respondents were selected purposively for the study. Major findings of study reveals that there seems to be a cordial relationship between healthcare givers and their patients and the management of the hospital provided an effective and efficient ways a lodging complaints or displeasure with service delivery. The study concludes by recommending ways to reduce long queues and waiting time by employment of more staffs and also the hospital management needs to be organizing regular training for staff on ethics, rules and regulations.

Page(s): 300-306                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 21 March 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5218

 Bello Almu
Medical Social Services Department, Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, Nigeria

  Dankani Ibrahim Mustapha
Department of Geography, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria

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Bello Almu, Dankani Ibrahim Mustapha, “Healthcare Providers and Outpatients Relationship: A Study of Three Selected Public Hospitals in Sokoto Metropolis” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.300-306 February 2021  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5218

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The benefits of a shared language among informal cross-border traders at Chirundu one-stop border post between Zambia and Zimbabwe

Netty Magura – February 2021 Page No.: 307-314

Trade is identified as one of the main drivers of economic growth. It sets the basis for economic, political and social growth. In order for Informal Cross Border Trade to be achieved, language plays a pivotal role in negotiating trade transactions. Language is used to mitigate trade forms such as transportation costs, currency costs, customs costs, information acquisition and communication costs. Therefore, it is crucial to have a shared language in executing informal cross border trade. A shared culture is also identified as a communication tool since culture is engraved in language. The paper’s primary objective was to investigate the benefits of a shared language in Informal Cross border trade at Chirundu. The study employed three primary research methods, namely interviews, questionnaires, and secondary sources. Findings revealed that a shared language has many benefits that include increased bilateral transactions costs; it becomes easy to convey transaction costs; it reduces communication barriers and increases the accessibility of product information. Cultural heritage is also communicated through shared language. It was concluded that the border lacks a shared language, and Informal Cross Border Traders are experiencing communication barriers, miscommunication of business transactions, fraud, a decrease in sales rates, inaccessibility of product information, and difficulties in advertising products.

Page(s): 307-314                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 24 March 2021

 Netty Magura
Msc. Governance and Regional Integration
Pan African University
Institute of Governance, Humanities and Social Sciences (PAUGHSS), Yaounde, Cameroon

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Netty Magura , “The benefits of a shared language among informal cross-border traders at Chirundu one-stop border post between Zambia and Zimbabwe” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.307-314 February 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/307-314.pdf

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Can Risk Taking Strategies Lead To Survival of Manufacturing Firms Operating in an Economic Crisis? Lesson from the Zimbabwean Economic Crisis

Nyoni Josphat, Dandira Martin, Kandjinga Elias, Matowanyika Kudzanai, Mapanga Arthur- February 2021 Page No.: 315-319

Firms may use several strategies to survive in periods of economic crisis. The effectiveness of these strategies however varies with the nature and scope of the economic crisis. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of the risk-taking strategies on the performance of manufacturing firms during the period of the economic crisis in Zimbabwe. In addition, the study examined how the risk-taking strategies influenced profitability and growth of manufacturing firms during the period of the economic crisis. Data was collected from 86 manufacturing firms that exercised risk taking strategies to survive. The study used a survey data collection method based on the positivism research philosophy. The study revealed that while risk taking strategies may be effective in some economic crisis context, they all proved to be less effective in improving performance in periods of economic crisis experienced in the Zimbabwean context. The study indicated that firms that take on high risk business operations and ventures in periods of economic crisis experience negative profit margins and negative growth. It was noted that the adoption of limited conservative approach in major business decisions in periods of economic crisis leads to negative profit margins and negative growth. The study noted that firms that the adoption of new projects without due diligence in terms of the return and sustainability of such projects in periods of economic crisis will lead to negative profit margins and negative growth. Firms that make use of new and less “tried and tested production, marketing and operations experience negative profit margins and negative growth in periods of economic crisis. The study recommends that firms must not use risk taking strategies to survive in economic crisis like the one experienced in Zimbabwe from 1996 to 2014. In addition, where firms decided to use risk taking strategies to survive in economic crisis, it is recommended that that adopt risk management approaches. It is also recommended that manufacturing firms operating in economic crisis must use other strategies which are analysis oriented to reduce exposure of their firms to risks. Firms may also adopt other strategies that pro-active, defensive, or innovative oriented.

Page(s): 315-319                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 24 March 2021

 Nyoni Josphat
Women’s University in Africa, Harare, Zimbabwe

  Dandira Martin
Namibia University of Technology

  Kandjinga Elias
Namibia University of Technology

  Matowanyika Kudzanai
Chinhoyi University of Technology, Zimbabwe

  Mapanga Arthur
Walter Sisulu University, South Africa

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Nyoni Josphat, Dandira Martin, Kandjinga Elias, Matowanyika Kudzanai, Mapanga Arthur, “Can Risk Taking Strategies Lead To Survival of Manufacturing Firms Operating in an Economic Crisis? Lesson from the Zimbabwean Economic Crisis” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.315-319 February 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/315-319.pdf

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Local Government and The Politics of Decentralization In Cameroon: The Case of Elak-Oku Municipality, 2007-2017

René Ngek Monteh, PhD. – February 2021 Page No.: 320-333

Government authorities owe their populations the responsibility to plan, facilitate and sustain the provision of communal services. This is usually achieved through several methods, one of which is decentralization. The concept of decentralization consists in breaking down heavy government machinery into smaller administrative units down at local levels. In Africa, some states are in the process of decentralizing the central government decision-making process to offer more acceptable local services. Though some states are engaged in the decentralisation process, their programs are far from being effective. The design of the decentralization process in Cameroon, an ethnically diverse country, constitutes a major challenge for state power and government. In response to these demands and threats, and in conjunction with reforms to improve democratic governance and service delivery, Cameroon’s state administration has, in the last decade, resorted to decentralization as a technique for promoting national unity. In Cameroon, the reorientation of the Local Governments (LGs) system towards decentralization has been a major preoccupation since the advent of democracy. This paper adopts a historical approach to provide an account of why and how the Elak-Oku Council Area via the system of Local Governments has considerably achieved in terms of economic and social development during recent times despite the difficulties faced in the decentralization process in Cameroon. This work equally highlights the historical background, difficulties faced and the way forward for Local Governments to meet the Council’s objectives.

Page(s): 320-333                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 24 March 2021

 René Ngek Monteh, PhD
HTTC/University of Yaounde 1 , P.O. Box 47 Yaounde

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[9] Gohnchu Cuba Haman, “Resource Mobilization by Local Councils in Cameroon: A Case Study of Local Councils in the Fako Division, South West Region”, Master Dissertation in Regional Planning and Project Management, Pan African Institute for Development, Buea, 2015.
[10] Implementation of Decentralisation in Cameroon: Problems, Challenges and Strategies, Policy Paper by the Ministry of Territorial Administration and Decentralization, in charge of Local Councils, Republic of Cameroon, 2007.
[11] Kauzya J. Mary, “Political Decentralization in Africa: Experiences of Uganda, Rwanda and South Africa”, Discussion Paper by Division for Public Administration and Development Management Department of Economic and Social Affairs United Nations New York. December 2007.
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[17] Touo Herman, “Decentralization, crises of governance and citizens’ participation in Cameroon”, in PSA World Congress, Montréal Canada, 2014.

René Ngek Monteh, PhD., “Local Government and The Politics of Decentralization In Cameroon: The Case of Elak-Oku Municipality, 2007-2017” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.320-333 February 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/320-333.pdf

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Utilising a life course perspective to explain women over 55 being the fastest growing group of homeless people in Australia

Nicole Cullinan- February 2021 Page No.: 334-338

This paper analyses that homeless women over the age of 55 are a product of a modern institutionalised life that is highly segmented and individualised. Life course theory forms the foundation of discussion for exploring understanding of this phenomenon. This paper acknowledges that life always takes place within a bounded agency that is subject to the social conditions of that time

Page(s): 334-338                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 25 March 2021

 Nicole Cullinan
The University of Melbourne

[1] Anderson, A. (2019). Understanding the Life Course – Seminar Week four.
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[3] Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2020). Homelessness in Australia source data. [online]Available at: https://aifs.gov.au/facts-and-figures/homeless-australia/homeless-australia-source-data [Accessed 10 Feb. 2021].
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Nicole Cullinan “Utilising a life course perspective to explain women over 55 being the fastest growing group of homeless people in Australia” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.334-338 February 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/334-338.pdf

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The Influence of Organizational Culture and Work Motivation on Employee Performance

Yenni Mariani Sinurat, Christin Natalia Sianipar- February 2021 – Page No.: 346-353

This study aims to determine the effect of organizational culture and work motivation on employee performance (a case study on employees of Metro Cash & Credit Tebing Tinggi). The results of hypothesis testing using multiple linear regression analysis with two independent variables and one dependent variable. The results showed that: The first hypothesis proposed states that: Organizational Culture has an effect on Employee Performance, from table 4.12 it is obtained that the tcount value is 13.878 with α = 5%, t table (5%; 40-2 = 38) obtained a t-table value of 2, 02439. From this description it can be seen that tcount (13.838)> ttable (2.02439), as well as the significance value of 0.000 <0.05, it can be concluded that the first hypothesis is accepted, meaning that the Organizational Culture Variable (X1) affects the Employee Performance Variable (Y ). The second hypothesis proposed states that: Work Motivation has an effect on Employee Performance, from table 4:12 it is obtained that the t-count value is 2,150. With α = 5%, t table (5%; 40-2 = 38) obtained t table value of 2.02439. From this description it can be seen that tcount (2.150)> ttable (2.02439), and the significance value is 0.038 <0.05, it can be concluded that the second hypothesis is accepted, meaning that the Work Motivation Variable (X2) has an effect on the Employee Performance Variable (Y). The third hypothesis proposed states that: Organizational Culture and Work Motivation simultaneously influence employee performance. Table 4.13 shows that the Fcount value is 166.004. With α = 5%, dk numerator: 2, dk denominator: n-k-1 (5%; 2; 37) obtained Ftable value of 3.25. From this description it can be seen that Fcount (166.004)> Ftable (3.25), and a significance value of 0.000 <0.05, it can be concluded that the third hypothesis is accepted, meaning that the Organizational Culture Variable (X1) and Work Motivation Variable (X2) have a significant effect together (simultaneously) on Employee Performance Variables (Y).

Page(s): 346-353                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 25 March 2021

 

 Yenni Mariani Sinurat
Bina Karya Institute of Economics and Business, Indonesia

  Christin Natalia Sianipar
Bina Karya Institute of Economics and Business, Indonesia

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Yenni Mariani Sinurat, Christin Natalia Sianipar “The Influence of Organizational Culture and Work Motivation on Employee Performance” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.346-353 February 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/346-353.pdf

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Peace and Stability in Somalia: Kenya’s National Prospects

John Kisilu Reuben, Dr. Susan Namaemba Kimokoti (PhD), Dr. George Akolo Lutomia (PhD) – February 2021 – Page No.: 346-353

This paper article reviews Somalia reaction towards Kenya before and after the collapse of the Somalia Government, effects of State Collapse, efforts made to restore peace and opportunities for Kenya within the context of stabilizing Somalia. The researcher used both primary and secondary data collection techniques to gather data. Under primary, the researcher used qualitative techniques by using interview schedules and FGDs. The population comprised key informants from both Kenya and Somalia governments and opinion shapers in Somalia. The study found that the “bad neighborhood”, between Kenya and Somalia had existed since independence. Kenya had experienced cross border influenced insecurity on its Northern Frontier Districts emanating from Somalia, even before the collapse of the Somalia State in 1991 and this was manifested in form of irredentism and border contestations. Generally, the Horn of Africa(HoA), including Kenya, had been faced with threat of increase of illicit firearms, cross border criminality, terrorism, conflict spill-over and refugee crises arising from Somalia’s statelessness. The ripple effects of Somalia State failure had been witnessed through the regional insecurity perpetuated by Al Shabaab. The Somalia conflict ailed from the spoiler effect from within and without Somalia who wanted to influence the outcome of any political process. Kenya’s bitter relationship with Somalia was compounded by the formation of the Horn of Africa Cooperation (HoAC) between Eritrea, Ethiopia and Somalia, a unified entity that could reduce the Kenyan influence in the regional politics. This notwithstanding, Kenya continued to foster its support for Somalia’s peace process and creating a positive business environment, despite the outstanding maritime dispute. The study concluded that a stable relationship between Kenya and Somalia would result in an expanded economic partnership and stable borders, which will reduce the influence of Al-Shabaab in the region.

Page(s): 346-353                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 25 March 2021

 

 John Kisilu Reuben
Department of Peace and Conflict Studies, Masinde Muliro University of Science & Technology, P.O. Box 190-50100, Kakamega-Kenya

  Dr. Susan Namaemba Kimokoti (PhD)
Department of Peace and Conflict Studies, Masinde Muliro University of Science & Technology, P.O. Box 190-50100, Kakamega-Kenya

  Dr. George Akolo Lutomia (PhD)
Department of Peace and Conflict Studies, Masinde Muliro University of Science & Technology, P.O. Box 190-50100, Kakamega-Kenya

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John Kisilu Reuben, Dr. Susan Namaemba Kimokoti (PhD), Dr. George Akolo Lutomia (PhD) “Peace and Stability in Somalia: Kenya’s National Prospects” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.346-353 February 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/346-353.pdf

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Effect of Financial Performance on Capital Structure of Listed Manufacturing Companies in Kenya

Olanrewaju Isola Fatoki, Fredrick Wafula, Gabriel Waweru- February 2021 Page No.: 354-360

This paper examines the portability of the reverse causality hypothesis between financial performance and capital structure of listed manufacturing firms in Kenya. Most research carried out in East Africa, Kenya inclusive shunned the likely effect of performance on capital therefore, to achieve this objective, financial performance was proxy by return on assets and return on equity while the capital structure was measured by total debt ratio and debt to equity ratios. The data employed covered 7 companies for the period from 2010 to 2016. While the Panel Vector Auto regression was applied and analysed using EVIEWS 10, the Wald granger causality test was carried out to determine the possibility of causality between the variables. The result reveals that past performance does not have a significant effect on the capital structure as measure by total debt ratio while it was established that capital structure composition of the firms affects their financial performance as measured by return on assets and return on equity. However, employing the debt-equity ratio as a measure of capital structure, it was established that a bi-directional relationship exists between DER and ROA while it was the opposite in the case of ROE. The study, therefore, concludes that the behaviour of the listed manufacturing firms in their choice of capital structure composition reflects both the efficiency risk and franchise value hypotheses. It, therefore, recommends that firms should strive more for returns to enhance the value of the firm to maximize the wealth of the shareholders.

Page(s): 354-360                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 26 March 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5219

 Olanrewaju Isola Fatoki
College of Business, KCA University, Nairobi, Kenya

  Fredrick Wafula
College of Business, KCA University, Nairobi, Kenya

  Gabriel Waweru
College of Business, KCA University, Nairobi, Kenya

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Olanrewaju Isola Fatoki , Fredrick Wafula, Gabriel Waweru “Effect of Financial Performance on Capital Structure of Listed Manufacturing Companies in Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.354-360 February 2021  DOI : https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5219

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A Phenomenological Study of Face to Face Teaching and Learning in the Context of Social Distancing Principle in Bulawayo Central District Private Primary Schools during COVID 19 Pandemic

Benny Chitsa PhD- February 2021 – Page No.: 361-367

This qualitative study employed hermeneutical phenomenological method with snowball sampling technique, guided by the theoretical framework of Levy Vygotsky’s sociocultural theory, to explore the teachers’ lived experiences on the face to face teaching and learning in the context of social distancing principle in private primary schools during Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID 19) pandemic. In-depth interviews and open-ended questionnaires in conjunction with participant observations were used to generate data from 16 participants. Thematic data analysis was used to present participants’ (primary school teachers and Heads) lived experiences on the phenomenon under the study. The study revealed that primary schools sternly paid attention to physical guides like tape marking on floors or signs on walls, directing young learners to remain at least 2 metres apart from each other during the lesson. It also disclosed that primary school learners fiercely concentrated on maintaining space or distance apart at all times during lessons to avoid the spread of corona virus on the expense of effective teaching and learning. The findings reveals that face to face teaching and learning in the context of social distancing principle during COVID 19 pandemic was not significantly effective due to some difficulties in implementing learner-centred teaching techniques; social distancing settings when teaching young children with varied learning disabilities such as fidgeting, attention deficit and autism spectrum disorders; and challenges in maintaining a safe distance between desks due to large number of learners per class and scarcity of classrooms. The results also revealed that social distancing principle affected primary school learners’ morale and relationship; and increased fear and stigma among young children during the lesson due to false information and dangerous myths about corona virus.The study recommended that there is need for educational psychologists to use resilience dynamics during their young children’s lessons that can serve as a crucial context where learners can make sense of their real life through narrative thoughts, recognizing and sharing their emotions hence minimizing the risk of long-lasting trauma hence promoting effective learning in the context of social distancing principle during COVID 19 pandemic. There is need for primary school teachers to assist learners to adapt to social distancing principle during the lesson. There is need for primary school teachers to provide opportunities for learners to reconnect socially within the social distancing principle of COVID 19 pandemic learning based environment through speaking up, reading aloud, and use of gestures since the mouth is covered by the face mask.

Page(s): 361-367                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 26 March 2021

 

 Benny Chitsa PhD
Department of Psychology; Department of Education, Zimbabwe Open University

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Benny Chitsa PhD “A Phenomenological Study of Face to Face Teaching and Learning in the Context of Social Distancing Principle in Bulawayo Central District Private Primary Schools during COVID 19 Pandemic” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.361-367 February 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/361-367.pdf

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A Comparative Study of Canadian Immigration Trends between 2000-2019

Tariq Sardar – February 2021 – Page No.: 368-376

Canada is a country in North American continent, known as a “Land of Immigrants” where an averagely 252,962 immigrants since 2000 arrive to live permanently from worldwide every year. Canadian Immigration system is more than 200 years old. The two neighboring countries in South Asian region, India and Pakistan also participate in the immigration program equally however the percentage of migrants is not equal. Some community groups and individuals from Pakistan criticize on Canadian immigration selection policies. The descriptive-comparative research study was designed to understand the gender-wise percentage of worldwide immigration, people from India and Pakistan according to the total population and what contribution the immigrants of both countries make in the growth of overall Canadian population. The study findings are based on previous twenty years’ data from 2000 to 2019.

Page(s): 368-376                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 26 March 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5220

 

 Tariq Sardar
Research Alumnus, Universidad Azteca Mexico and PRC- Pilot Research Foundation Toronto (ON) Canada

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[31] Statista (2020) Number of Permanent Residents admitted to Canada in 2019, by status, statista.com, Retrieved 25 November 2020 from • Number of permanent residents admitted to Canada, by status 2019/Statista
[32] Statistics Canada (2018) Linguistic Characteristic of Canadians, statcan.gc.ca, Retrieved 31 February 2021 from Linguistic Characteristics of Canadians (statcan.gc.ca)
[33] Variyam, M. N. (2007) Canada ‘s Skilled Worker Immigration Regulation and Its Impact on the Canadian Economy, Laws and Business Reviews of Americas, Volume 3, November 2, Article 11
[34] Wiginton, L. K. (2013) Canada’s Decentralised Immigration Policy through a local Lens: How Small Communities Are Attracting and Welcoming Immigrants, Montreal, Canada: School of Urban Planning McGill University

Tariq Sardar “A Comparative Study of Canadian Immigration Trends between 2000-2019” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.368-376 February 2021 DOI : https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5220

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Women Community Based Self-help Groups, Access to Credit and the Effect on the Wellbeing: A Case of Kiambu Sub-County

Anne Muthoni Kinyua, Maurice M. Sakwa -February 2021 Page No.: 377-385

Women play a key role in the development of their households because of their day to interaction with issues, needs, and emergencies. Relying on men as sole bread winner for married women, or acting as sole bread winner for single winner may be difficult, if the women do not take action. Through collective agency, many women especially in informal urban settings and rural set-ups are joining self-help groups to enhance their collective capabilities. This study sought to establish the effect of women self-help group credit access on the member’s wellbeing. The study was undertaken as quantitative survey where a targeted 135 members of the 8 different women Self-Help Groups were interviewed. The study happened during COVID-19 disease period and therefore the questionnaires were sent to the women via a mobile-based online questionnaire. The study received 130 questionnaires representing 96.3% response rate. Data was analysed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences. The study utilised both descriptive and inferential statistics to generate results. Findings indicate that credit access have a positive effect on family wellbeing. It is recommended that banking solutions be tailored to suit women in self-help groups. Secondly, there is need to mobilise more women to participate in SHGs within their locality.

Page(s): 377-385                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 March 2021

 Anne Muthoni Kinyua
Department of Development Studies, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Kenya

 Maurice M. Sakwa
Senior Lecturer, Department of Development Studies, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Kenya

[1] Bineta, B. S. C. & J. D. (2013). Women’s role in economic development: Overcoming the constraints Background paper for the High-Level Panel of Eminent Persons on the Post-2015 Development Agenda. Sustainable Development Solutions Network, (May 2013), 1. Retrieved from http://unsdsn.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/130520-Women-Economic-Development-Paper-for-HLP.pdf
[2] Blackstone, A. M. (2003). Human Ecology: An Encyclopedia of Children, Families, and Environments. Gender Roles and Society, 335–338. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.library.umaine.edu/soc_facpub
[3] Ch.Pavani, C. P., & V.Chandrika, V. C. (2014). Rural Women Empowerment and Development. Global Journal For Research Analysis, 3(8), 1–2. https://doi.org/10.15373/22778160/august2014/89
[4] Ekpe, I., Mat, N., Mamun, A. Al, & Nik Mahdi, N. M. B. (2015). Enhancing the Socio-Economic Wellbeing of Malaysian Local Women through Social Capital and Micro-Enterprise Performance. Journal of Entrepreneurship and Business, 3(2), 13–25. https://doi.org/10.17687/jeb.0302.02
[5] Kesanta, J., & Andre, B. (2015). Impact of Women Empowered through Community Savings Groups on the Wellbeing of their Families : A Study from Mgubwe , Tanzania. Interdisciplinary Journal of Best Practices in Global Development, 1(1). Retrieved from http://knowledge.e.southern.edu/ijbpgd/vol1/iss1/4
[6] Kiruja, K. B. (2014). procurement methods and procurement performance amongst state corporations under the national treasury of kenya karani benson kiruja a research project submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the award of the degree of master in business .
[7] Kirton, R. M. (2013). Gender, trade and public procurement policy: Kenya, India, Australia, Jamaica. Retrieved from http://thecommonwealth.org/sites/default/files/news-items/documents/Gender, Trade and Public Procurement Policy.pdf
[8] Kyuvi, S. N. (2017). Women Self-Help Groups as Vehicles to Women Empowerment in Kenya: A Case Study of WomenSelf-Help Groups in Mathare Valley, Nairobi Kenya, (November).
[9] Makena, P., Kubaison, S. T., & Njati, C. I. (2014). Challenges facing women entrepreneurs in accessing business finance in Kenya : Case of Ruiru Township , Kiambu County. IOSR Journal of Business and Management (IOSR-JBM), 16(4), 83–91. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevB.68.233303
[10] Mandal, K. C. (2013). Concept and Types of Women Empowerment. International Forum of Teaching and Studies, 9(2), 17–30. Retrieved from http://scholarspress.us/journals/IFST/pdf/IFOTS-2-2013/IFOTS_v9_n2_art3.pdf
[11] Mwakumanya, M. A., Maghenda, M., & Juma, H. (2016). Socio-economic and environmental impact of mining on women in Kasigau mining zone in Taita Taveta County. Journal of Sustainable Mining. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsm.2017.04.001
[12] Narang, U. (2012). Self Help Group : an Effective Approach To Women. International Journal of Social Science % Interdisciplinary Research, 1(8).
[13] Packson, N., & Wleh, N. (2015). Factors Influencing Youth Access to Public Procurement Opportunities in the Government Ministries in Kenya. Journal of Procurement and Policies, 2(3), 56–77.
[14] Saul, C., Pamela, A., Nyaboke, G., Osoro, A., Mburu, N., & Students, P. (2015). Challenges Affecting Public Procurement Performance Process in Kenya. European Journal of Business and ManagementOnline), 7(7), 2222–2839.
[15] UN-Women. (2017). Facts and Figures: Economic Empowerment | UN Women – Headquarters. UN-Women. Retrieved from http://www.unwomen.org/en/what-we-do/economic-empowerment/facts-and-figures

Anne Muthoni Kinyua, Maurice M. Sakwa, “Women Community Based Self-help Groups, Access to Credit and the Effect on the Wellbeing: A Case of Kiambu Sub-County” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.377-385 February 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/377-385.pdf

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Effectiveness of Grapevine as a Communication Strategy in Tertiary Administration in the dynamic world of social media: COVID-19 PANDEMIC

Noreen Sarai, Tatenda Trust Gotora – February 2021 Page No.: 386-392

Nowadays, technology has led to cheap and easy communication through use of various social media platforms. Traditionally grapevine was communicated from one person to another directly without any media in between. The rate of transmission of information by grapevine has increased significantly due to social media. This paper seeks to find the effectiveness of grapevine as a communication strategy in tertiary administration operating during the COVID-19 pandemic. A case study was done within the department of Computer Science at a state university in Zimbabwe. Information which got to employees and students from management in a structured manner was compared to that which got to employees and students through grapevine. The information was obtained through document analysis and interviews. This information was analysed and the effectiveness of grapevine was deduced.
The effectiveness of communicating through grapevine was measured in terms of the information being able to be accessed, its clarity level, the level of distortion, rate of transmission from sender to receiver and whether there was a two way communication.

Page(s): 386-392                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 March 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5221

 Noreen Sarai
Computer Science, Midlands State University, Gweru, Zimbabwe

 Tatenda Trust Gotora
Computer Science, Midlands State University, Gweru, Zimbabwe

[1] Cohen, J. (2003). Applied multiple regression/correlation analysis for the behavioural sciences. London, England: Lawrence Erlbaum.
[2] Creswell (2017), Research Design Qualitative, Quantitative and Mixed Methods Approaches. Sage, Los Angeles.
[3] Garrett ( 2016), Critiquing Quantitative Research Reports: Key Points for the Beginner, international journal of faith community
[4] Grapevine Communication. (2017, Feb 20). Retrieved May 8, 2020, from https://phdessay.com/grapvinecommunication/
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[7] Patil Sandeep. (2017) Advantages and Disadvantages of Grapevine Communication, Articles Junction Blog
[8] Saunders M, (2009) Research Methods for Business Students. Pearson, New York.
[9] Hutton, G. & Fosdick, M. (2019). The globalization of Social Media, Consumer Relationships with Brands Evolve in the Digital Space. Journal of Advertising Research
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[12] Zohrabi, (2015), Reliability & Validity of Research Instruments, Researchgate

Noreen Sarai, Tatenda Trust Gotora “Effectiveness of Grapevine as a Communication Strategy in Tertiary Administration in the dynamic world of social media: COVID-19 PANDEMIC” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.386-392 February 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5221

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Effectiveness of the Business Environment in Supporting the Implementation of Public-Private Partnership Policies in Tanzania’s Education sector

Robert Mukasa, Cosmas Mnyanyi and Coletha Ngirwa – February 2021 Page No.: 393-400

This study investigated whether the Business Environment is effective in supporting the implementation of Public-Private Partnership (PPP) policies in Education in Tanzania. The study adopted the qualitative research technique whose data collection process included: documentary reviews and interviews. Three (3) semi-structured interviews were conducted involving five (5) officials from the Tanzania National Business Council (TBNC) and Tanzania Private Sector Foundation (TPSF) officials. Findings indicated TNBC plays a leading Public-Private sector intermediary with the responsibility of coordinating and promoting the Public–Private Dialogue. Based on the TNBC experience, outstanding challenges were related to the negative mindsets on both sides of the Public-Private Dialogue (PPD), the uncoordinated approaches by the major players, and limited advocacy for PPP investment in education. It is therefore recommended that institutions like the TNBC need to increase their advocacy for the PPP policies in education in several ways including increasing the awareness of the PPP policies; increased training and capacity building for the various stakeholders before and after entering their respective PPP contractual obligations; establish information desks to serve as regular and sustainable contact points for the dissemination PPP policy guidelines and protocol.

Page(s): 393-400                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 March 2021

 Robert Mukasa
The Open University of Tanzania, Faculty of Education, P.O. Box 23409, Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania

  Cosmas Mnyanyi
The Open University of Tanzania, Faculty of Education, P.O. Box 23409, Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania

  Coletha Ngirwa
The Open University of Tanzania, Faculty of Education, P.O. Box 23409, Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania

[1] Creswell, J. W. (2007). Qualitative inquiry and research design: Choosing among five approaches (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
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[4] Mnenwa R. and Maliti E. (2009). ‘Tanzania, poverty reduction, macroeconomic, institutional framework, regulation enforcement, economic reforms, growth, development, micro and small enterprises’ Research Report 08.6, Dar es Salaam, © REPOA, ISBN: 978-9987-615-39-1
[5] Mwapachu, Juma (2005) Confronting New Realities: Reflections on Tanzania’s Radical Transformation. Dar es Salaam: E and D Ltd.
[6] Ngowi, H., P., (2005). Public-Private Partnership (PPPs) in the Management of Municipalities in Tanzania – Issues and Lessons of Experience; Economics Department, Mzumbe University
[7] OECD (2013), “Overview of Progress and Policy Challenges In Tanzania”, in OECD Investment Policy Reviews: Tanzania 2013, OECD Publishing. http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264204348-6-en [8.1.2018]
[8] PricewaterhouseCoopers (2019).Sustaining the Momentum National Budget Bulletin 2019/20“PwC” refers to PricewaterhouseCoopers Limited
[9] Twaakyondo H., M., Bhalalusesa E., P., &Ndalichako L., (2002). Factors Shaping Successful Public Private Partnership in the ICT Sector in Developing Countries, the Case of Tanzania (2002)
[10] UNCTAD (2011). Report on the Implementation of the Investment Policy Review United Republic of Tanzania. New York and Geneva,
[11] URT (2001) Presidential Circular number 1 of 2001
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[16] URT (2016). National Five Year Development Plan 2016/17 – 2020/21 “Nurturing Industrialization for Economic Transformation and Human Development” Ministry of Finance and Planning
[17] USAID (2018). Tanzania Investment Policy Assessment; East Africa Trade and Investment Hub. Velma Law
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[19] White S. (2010). Synthesis Report of Key Investment Climate and Business Environment assessments in Tanzania. Southern African IDEAS (Pty.) Ltd. www.saideas.com
[20] White, J., O‘Hanlon, B, Chee, G., Malangalila E.,Kimambo, A., Coarasa, J., Callahan, S., Levey I., and McKeon K. (2013). Tanzania Private Health Sector Assessment. Strengthening Health outcomes through the Private sector.
[21] World Bank (2010). Implementation Completion and Results Report to The United Republic of Tanzania for a Privatization and Private Sector Development Project. Report No: ICR00001459
[22] World Bank (2018). Tanzania – Country partnership framework for the period FY18-FY22 (English). Washington, D.C.: World Bank Group. http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/669801521338458808/Tanzania-Country-partnership-framework-for-the-period-FY18-FY22
[23] World Bank Group. 2019. Economy Profile of Tanzania. Doing Business 2020;. World Bank, Washington, DC. © World Bank https://openknowledge. Worldbank.org/handle/10986/32847 License: CC BY 3.0 IGO.

Robert Mukasa, Cosmas Mnyanyi and Coletha Ngirwa “Effectiveness of the Business Environment in Supporting the Implementation of Public-Private Partnership Policies in Tanzania’s Education sector” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.393-400 February 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/393-400.pdf

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Admission Policies and Quality Teaching in Universities in Lagos State, Nigeria: Implications for Educational Planners and Policy Maker

Gbesoevi Emmanuel Semako- February 2021 Page No.: 401-407

This study examined admission policies and quality teaching in universities in Lagos State, Nigeria. Two research hypotheses were formulated and the study adopted descriptive survey and correlational designs. The population of the study comprised of all the 2623 academic staff and all 400 level students from three universities in used, public and private each in Lagos State, Nigeria with a sample size of 1187 using the simple random, multistage, stratify, disproportionate and purposive sampling techniques. Data were collected through the structured rating scale, Admission Policy Scale (APS) and Quality Teaching Questionnaire (QTQ). The instruments were validated through face, content and construct validity and were found reliable at 0.75 and 0.78 coefficient of test-retest method for each item respectively. The data collected were analysed using Pearson’s Product-Moment Correlation Coefficient. The hypotheses formulated were tested at 0.05 level of significance. The test of the first hypotheses showed a non-significant relationship between admission policies and quality teaching in universities in Lagos State, Nigeria(r=.024, p >.05), while the second hypothesis showed a no statistical significant difference in the admission policies(F (2, 584) = .989, p>.05) amongst universities in Lagos State. The study concluded that admission policies may not necessarily guarantee quality teaching in the universities. The study, therefore, recommends, among others that educational planner and policy makers in education that includes: university managements, National Universities Commission, Federal and State Ministry of Education, Joint Admission and Matriculation Board should ensure that admission into universities should be based purely on merit. The quota system of admission which constitutes catchment area and educationally less developed area for instance, which has its root in the federal character policy, negates the principle of equity and should be abolished. Also to improve quality teaching, teaching and non-teaching staff should be motivated with educational grants for further research by government, university management to make them more dedicated, devoted, committed and effective in their jobs.

Page(s): 401-407                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 March 2021

 Gbesoevi Emmanuel Semako
Department of Educational Management, Lagos State University, Ojo, Nigeria

[1] Adeniyi T. A. and Ladanu, W, K. (2016) Teaching Quality In Higher Education: Implications On Entrepreneurship in Nigeria: International Journal of Advanced Research 2 (2), 198 – 209
[2] Agboola, B., Adeyemi, J. K., & Ogbodo, C. M. (2014) Academic Achievement and Admission Policy asCorrelate of Student Retention in Nigerian Federal Universities. Journal of Educaon, 1(8), 324-335
[3] Ajayi, I. A and Ekundayo, H. T. (2008) Funding Initiatives in University Education in Nigeria. Being a paper presented at the National Conference of Nigeria Association for Educational Administration and Planning (NAEAP). Enugu State University of Science and Technology, Enugu State
[4] Akintayo, M.O. (2014) Public Finance and The Problems of Access to University Education. InternationalJournal of Literacy Education (UNESCO Chair). 2(1), 1-23
[5] Akpotu, N. E. (2006) ‘Deregulating the Nigerian university system: implications for equity and access’, in G. O. Akpan, S. U. Udoh and E. O. Fagbamiye (eds), Deregulating the Provision and Managementof Education in Nigeria. Lagos: Nigerian Association of Educational Administration and Planning (NAEAP), pp. 57-62.
[6] ASUU-LASU (2019) Academic Staff Union Career Structure Hand Book.
[7] Babalola et (2007) Access, Equity and Quality in Higher Education. NAEP Publication
[8] Biggs, J. & Tang, C. (2011). Teaching for Quality Learning at University: What the Student does, Maidenhead: Society for Research into Higher Education & Open University Press.
[9] Blackmore, J. (2009). ‘Academic pedagogies, quality logics and performative universities: evaluating teaching and what student wants’, Studies in Higher Education,34(8), 857- 872.
[10] Chukwurah, C. C. (2011) ‘Access to higher education in Nigeria: the University of Calabar at a glance’,Canadian Social Science, 7 (3): 108-13. College of Engineering and Environmental Studies Sokoto state Polytechnic Nigeria
[11] Dada, J. A. (2004). Access to Education in Democratic Nigeria: Issues and Problems. In O. E. Uya, D. I. Denga, J. Emeh and J. Okoro (Eds.). Education for Sustainable Democracy: The Nigerian Experience. Calabar: University of Calabar. Press: (1) 44-54.
[12] Eluemunor, T. (2005, November 13) Post UME test: Education Minister Versus Representatives. Sunday Independent Newspaper, pp.13–16.)
[13] Federal Government of Nigeria (2004). National policy on education. Lagos: NERDC Press
[14] Fransisca O and Terfa S. (2016) Nigerian University Quota Admission System and Quality of Education in Universities in Cross River State, Nigeria. International Journal of Scientific Research in Education, Vol. 9(4), 325-332.
[15] Gbenu, J.P (2012), State of Nigerian Secondary Education and the Need for Quality Sustenance: Greener Journal of Educational Research, Vol. 2 (1) 007-012
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[17] Imhanlahimi, E. O. and Maduewesi, B. U. (2006) ‘Implementing panacea for admission crisis into Nigerian universities: an innovation diffusion plan’, College Student Journal, 40 (3): 12-21. journal of education and review. Vol. 3(2). Pp.115-118. Joint Admission Matriculation Board (JAMB) Bulleting May edition, 2019
[18] International Management in Higher Education (2012), Learning our lesson; Review of Quality Teaching in Higher Education
[19] JAMB (2016). Joint Admission and Matriculation Board. Brochure, JAMB Publication, Lagos
[20] Kember, D. & Mcnaught, C. (2007). Enhancing University Teaching: Lessons from research into award-winning teachers, Oxon: Rout ledge
[21] Moon, J. (2008). Critical Thinking: An Exploration of Theory and Practice, London: Rout ledge.
[22] Moti, U.G. (2010). The challenges of access to university education in Nigeria. Retrieved on 26th may, 2019 from dsmbusinessreview.com/pdf/vol2no2/di-v2n2nc.pdf.
[23] Obasi, I. N., Akuchie, R. C. & Obasi, S. N. (2010). Expansion of Higher Education Access through Private Universities in Nigeria (1999-2009): A Decade of Public Policy Failure? Paper presented at a National Conference on Education for Nation Building and Global Competitiveness, organized by NERDC at the International Conference Centre, Abuja
[24] Odekule, K. S. (2011). Access to University Education under Democratic Rule in Nigeria: Problems and prospects. Proceedings of the 21St General Assembly of SSAN.
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[27] Okebukola, P. A. O. (2012). Education reform imperative for achieving vision 20-2020. National summit on education on repositioning Nigeria’s educational system for the achievement of the national 20-2020 vision organized by senate committee on education, December 10-11
[28] Okoli, N.J. (2015). Impact of fees increase on university students’ education in Nigeria. MeritProblems and prospects. Proceedings of the 21st general assembly of SSAN
[29] Rowland, S. (2006). The Enquiring University: Compliance and contestation in higher education, Maidenhead: Society for Research into Higher Education & Open University Press
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Gbesoevi Emmanuel Semako, “Admission Policies and Quality Teaching in Universities in Lagos State, Nigeria: Implications for Educational Planners and Policy Maker” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.401-407 February 2021  https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/401-407.pdf

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Utilizations’ of ICT Resources among Tertiary Institutions in Sokoto State, Nigeria
Shehu Attahiru Jabo, Muhammad Idris, Isah Yahaya & Bashar Ibrahim- February 2021 – Page No.: 408-410

This paper investigated ICT resources utilization among students of tertiary institutions for sustainable development in Sokoto metropolis. Survey research designed was used in this study, simple random sampling procedure was used in selecting the sample size of 300 students from sscoe, polytechnics and state university The instrument employed in this study was “ICT utilization Checklist” adapted from the work of Abubakar (2016). The checklists design for the study was validated by expert in the department of education. The reliability of the instruments was determined by the use of test re-test method and reliability index of 0.8 was obtained. Data collected were analyzed using simple frequencies count and percentages. The finding of the study show that majority of the institutions have ICT facilities. But the performance of ICT training to student is negligible. It was recommended that proper training and constant power supply should be provided in order to enhance ICT utilization among students and manifested the learning among students of tertiary institutions. Audio-visual aids and computers should be provided to the tertiary institutions for effective teaching of the ICTs oriented subjects. The available ICT tools should be effectively utilized by both lecturers and students. Training and retraining of the lecturers in ICTs should be of paramount importance to stakeholders in education. Both lecturers and student should effectively utilize the ICT tools. There is need for training and retraining of ICT personnel’s at every sector of learning for effective learning outcome. Provision of ICT tools such as Audio-visual aids in educational institutions should be adopted for effective teachings.

Page(s): 408-410                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 March 2021

 Shehu Attahiru Jabo
Department of Educational Psychology, Shehu Shagari College of Education Sokoto, Nigeria

 Muhammad Idris
Department of Educational Curriculum, Shehu Shagari College of Education Sokoto, Nigeria

 Isah Yahaya
Department of General Studies, Shehu Shagari College of Education Sokoto, Nigeria

 Bashar Ibrahim
Department of Adult and Non-formal Education, Shehu Shagari College of Education Sokoto, Nigeria

[1]. Aguolu, C. C., &Aguolu, I. E., (2002).Libraries and Information ManagementMaiduguri: Ed-Linform Services.
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Shehu Attahiru Jabo, Muhammad Idris, Isah Yahaya & Bashar Ibrahim “Utilizations’ of ICT Resources among Tertiary Institutions in Sokoto State, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.408-410 February 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/408-410.pdf

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Rethinking the Herdsmen-Land Cultivators Crises in Nigeria: A Historical Perspective

Kenneth Chidi Oforji, Mmanti Monday Benjamin Akpan, Ph. D- February 2021 Page No.: 411-418

Peaceful coexistence is crucial to socio-economic development. In a country like Nigeria where political, ethnic and religious crises are the order of the day, economic development becomes slow, at best, and elusive at worst. Herdsmen and land cultivators clashes have cost the country so much in terms of finance and loss of lives. Consequently, if nothing tangible is done to ameliorate the situation, more finance and human lives would go down the drain. The study takes a historical perspective on the clashes between herdsmen and land cultivators with the aim of identifying the causes and effects, as well as projecting possible solution. Textual analysis of existing literatures was carried to boost hindsight on previous researches on the subject. Also, face-to-face interviews with some resource persons were also conducted to ensure that historical methodology was adhered to. The study shows that the crises have assumed ethno-religious dimension among other findings. Consequently, deliberate, concerted and sincere effort by the different tiers of government is recommended to resolve the psychological impact of the crises.

Page(s): 411-418                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 March 2021

 Kenneth Chidi Oforji
Department of History and International Studies, Ritman University, Ikot Ekpene, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria

  Mmanti Monday Benjamin Akpan, Ph. D
Department of Peace and Conflict Resolution, National Open University of Nigeria, Uyo Study Centre, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria

[1] Achebe, C. (1958). Things fall apart. Portsmouth: Heinemann.
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[3] Akpaki, A. Z. (2002). Ackerbauern and mobile tierhatter in Zentral & Nord- Benin. Berlin: Dietrich Reiner Verlag.
[4] Alaribe, U. (2016). Herdsmen/Farmers’ Clashes: Abia Police set up Conflict resolution committees. Retrieved 5/01/2018 from https://.www.vanguardngr.com/2016/11/ herdsmen-farmers-Clashes- Abia- police –set-Conflict-resolution-committees;
[5] Bello, A. U. (2013). Herdsmen and farmers conflicts in North-Eastern Nigeria: Causes, repercussions and resolution. In: MCSER-CEMAS-Sapienza, University of Rome. 2(5)
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[8] Godwin, A.C. (20 November 2017).Why we won’t accept ranching in Nigeria –Fulaniherdsmen Dailypost.ng>News why-we-wont
[9] Hankuyi, M.I. (24 July 2017). Miyetti Allah to Challenge Taraba grazing Ban in Court. Retrieved 06/08/2017 from https://www.dailytrust.com.ng/news/ general/miyetti-allahto-challenge-taraba-grazing-ban-in-court/206774Html.http://www.nairaland.com/ahmadu-bell…)
[10] Iro, I. (1994). Grazing reserve development: A panacea to the intractable strife between farmers and herders. File: localhost:conflicts-%20fulani- farmers%20 Fulani 8htm J. Isawa Eliagwu and R. A. Akindele-1996, foundations of Nigerian federalism
[11] Nzeh, E. (2015). The effects of migration by nomadic farmers in the livelihoods of rural crop farmers in Enugu State, Nigeria. Global Journal of Science Frontier Research: Agriculture and Veterinary, 15(3).
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[14] The Land and native right law, No.9 of 1910
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[16] Ugwu, E. (23 September 2017). Tension in Abia Community as Herdsmen insist on choosing grazing Area. https://www.thisday.com/index.php/2017/09/23/tension-in-abiacommunity-as-herdsmen-insist-on-choosing -grazing-area/
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[9] Vanguard Newspaper, June 26, 2018, in Headlines News Trending, Vanguard newsonline.ng
[10] Vanguard Newspaper, March 24, 2018
[11] Vanguard Newspaper, May 2, 2019

Kenneth Chidi Oforji, Mmanti Monday Benjamin Akpan, Ph. D, “Rethinking the Herdsmen-Land Cultivators Crises in Nigeria: A Historical Perspective” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.411-418 February 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/411-418.pdf

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Teachers challenge of physical facilities on curriculum implementation in public day secondary schools in Hamisi Sub-County, Kenya

Mr. Maluha Dennis Ndori – February 2021 Page No.: 419-426

The main objective of this study was to investigate teachers’ challenge of physical facilities on curriculum implementation in day secondary schools in Hamisi Sub County, Kenya. The study adopted descriptive research design and the systems theory (Ludwing Von Bertalanffy, 1968). The study had a sample of 12 principals and 108 teachers selected through stratified random sampling and simple random sampling techniques. The instruments used to collect data were questionnaire, interview and observation guides. The study tested for face and content validity. Test-retest technique enhanced instruments reliability. A pilot study was conducted IN TWO schools. Descriptive data was analysed in form of frequencies, percentages, mean and standard deviation and presented in pie charts and tables. The inferential statistics t-test was used to test relationship of variables at 0.05 significant levels. The qualitative data was analysed in form of narratives and excerpts form. The findings established that most teachers in in day secondary schools in Hamisi Sub County had a challenge of inadequate physical facilities that limited effective curriculum implementation. The study recommended that the government should increase secondary school capitation and provide adequate physical facilities aimed at improving teacher efficiency during teaching and learning process and also ensure promote female gender in school leadership position.

Page(s): 419-426                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 March 2021

 Mr. Maluha Dennis Ndori
Ishiru Secondary School, Kaimosi, Kenya

[1] Adegbesan, S. O. (2007). Adequacy of school facilities in Nigerian vocational and technical colleges: An empirical study. Nigerian Journal of Educational Administration and Planning (NAEAP), 7(2), 169-177
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[3] Bandele, S., & Faremi, Y. (2012). An investigation into the challenges facing the implementation of technical college curriculum in South West, Nigeria. Journal of Education and Practice, 3(12), 8–13.
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[5] Crawford, L. & Tindal, G. (2006). Policy and Practice: Knowledge and Beliefs of Education Professionals Related to the Inclusion of Students with Disabilities in a State Assessment. Remedial and Special Education, 27, 208-217.
[6] Higgins, S., Hall, E., Wall, K., Woolner, P. and McCaughey, C. (2005). The Impact of School Environments: A literature review, The Centre for Learning and Teaching, School of Education, Communication and Language Science, University of Newcastle.
[7] Kyongo, J. K. (2006). Factors Influencing Job Satisfaction among Public Health Employees of Local Authorities in Kenya: Case of the City council of Nairobi. Unpublished Master’s Thesis Kenyatta university.
[8] Lumuli, N. C. (2009). An investigation into Internal Efficiency measures in Promotion of Access and completion Rates in Public Secondary Schools in Bungoma South District. Unpublished M. Ed Thesis, University of Nairobi.
[9] Lyons, J. B. (2001). Do school facilities really impact a child’s education. CEFPI Brief Issue Trak, 1–6.
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[12] Okongo, R.B., Ngao, G., Rop, N.K. & Wesonga, J.N. (2015). Effect of Availability of Teaching and Learning Resources on the Implementation of Inclusive Education in Pre-School Centers in Nyamira North Sub-County, Nyamira County, Kenya. Journal of Education and Practice Vol.6, No.35.
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[14] school teachers in Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria. International Journal of Educational Administration, Planning and Research, 6(1), 36-43.
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[16] Orodho, A.J., Waweru, P.N., Getange, K.N & Miriti, J.M.(2013).Progress towards attainment of education for All (EFA) among nomadic pastoralists : Do home-based variables make a difference in Kenya? Research on Humanities and Social Sciences. Vol3.No.21, 2013 pp54-67.
[17] Otube, N. (2004). Job Motivation of Teachers Educating Learners with Special needs in Four Provinces in Kenya. Unpublished Phd Thesis: Hamburg University.
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[30] World Bank (2005). Expanding Opportunities and Building competencies for young people. A new Agenda for secondary Education, Washington DC: World Bank.

Mr. Maluha Dennis Ndori, “Teachers challenge of physical facilities on curriculum implementation in public day secondary schools in Hamisi Sub-County, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.419-426 February 2021  URL : https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/419-426.pdf

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Effect of teacher’s characteristics on child friendly school initiative in public pre-schools in Mombasa County, Kenya

Josphine Logedi, Mary Jebii Chemagosi and Sellah Lusweti – February 2021 Page No.: 427-433

This study investigated effect of teachers’ characteristic on child friendly school initiative in public pre-schools in Mombasa County, Kenya. The study was premised on descriptive research design. A sample of 145 that included 29 head teachers and 116 teachers were drawn from a stratified target population of 97 public pre-primary schools using purposive and simple random sampling technique. Questionnaire and observation guides were the instruments adapted to collect data. The responses were analyzed both quantitatively and qualitatively. The findings concluded that there is a statistical difference between schools with effective teacher characteristics and child friendly school initiatives. The study also concluded that teachers’ age and gender do not influence child friendly initiative. The study recommend that the Ministry of education and County government should motivate the pre-school teachers to improve by improving their performances with provision of work environment, increased remunerations and other privileges as compared to their professional in other levels of learning.

Page(s): 427-433                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 March 2021

 Josphine Logedi
Pwani University, Kenya

 Mary Jebii Chemagosi
Pwani University, Kenya

 Sellah Lusweti
Pwani University, Kenya

[1] Agbo-Egwu,A, O., Adadu, C., A, Nwokolo-Ojo, J. &Enaboifo, M. A. (2017) Teachers’ teaching experience and students’ academic performance in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (Stem) programs in secondary schools in Benue State, Nigeria. World Educators Forum, Vol. 9 No. 1, July, 2017.
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[4] Akpo, S.E. (2012). The impact of teacher-related variables on students‟ junior secondary Certificate mathematics results in Namibia, Ph.D Thesis, University of South Africa, School of Education.
[5] American Institute for Research (2009). UNICEF’S Child-Friendly schools programming: Global evaluation final report. New York.
[6] Anderson, J.B. (2000). Factors affecting learning of Mexican primary school children.EstudiosEconomicos. 15(1):117-152.
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[8] Ayodele, J.B., &Ige, M.A. (2012). Teachers’ utilization as correlate of students’ academic performance i n senior secondary schools in Ondo State, Nigeria. European Journal of Educational Studies, 4(2), 281-287.
[9] Chistopher, J. (2011). Inclusive education and child-friendly schools, Miske: Witt and Associates.
[10] Daso, P.O. (2013). Teacher variables and senior secondary students‟ achievement in Mathematics in Rivers State, Nigeria.European Scientific Journal, 9 (10), 271- 289.
[11] Emmer, E. T., Evertson, C. M., & Anderson, L. M. (1980).Effectiveness classroom management at the beginning of the school year.The Elementary SchoolJournal, 80, 219-231.
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[13] Ewetan, O. O. (2010). Influence of teachers‟ teaching experience and school facilities on the academic performance of senior secondary school students in Ado- Odo/Ota and Ifo Local Government Areas of Ogun State. M.ED Research Project, Lagos State University, Department of Educational Management.
[14] Ewetan, O. E. and Ewetan, O. O. (2015). Teachers’ Teaching Experience and Academic Performance in Mathematics and English Language in Public Secondary Schools in Ogun State.International Journal of Humanities, SocialSciences and Education, 2(1), 123-134.
[15] Etkina, E. (2015). Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Preparation of High School Teachers. Journal of Physics Education Research, 6 (6): 20-27.
[16] Frost, J. (2010). A history of children’s play and play environments: Toward a contemporary Child saving movement. London: Routledge.
[17] Indimuli, J., Mushira, N., Kuria, P., Ndung’u, R., &Waichanguru, S. (2009), Teachingprimary mathematics. Jomo Kenyatta Foundation, Enterprise Road, Nairobi.
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[19] Osman.(1989). Poor performance in KCPE in North Eastern Province. A case study based on some schools in Wajir and Garissa Districts. Nairobi.Kenyatta University.
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[21] Raudenbush, S., Rowen, B., & Cheong, Y., (1993).Contextual effects on the self-perceived efficacy of high school teachers.Sociology of Education, 65, 150-167.
[22] Reche, N. G., Bundi, K. T., Riungu, N. J., Mbugua, K. Z. (2012). Factors contributing to poor performance in Kenya certificate of primary education in public primary schools in Kenya. International Journal ofEducation and Research: Vol 2 No. 5.
[23] Schneider, M. (2002).Do school facilities affect academic outcomes? National Clearing House for educational facilities. Washington D.C. Retrievedfrom ERIC database (ED470979).
[24] Slater, H., Davies, N. & Burgess, S. (2009). Do teachers matter? Measuring thevariation in teacher effectiveness in England. (Centre for Market and PublicOrganisation (CMPO) Working Paper Series; number 09/212). Bristol:CMPO.
[25] Ubogu, R. E, (2004). The causes of absenteeism and dropout among secondary school students in Delta Central Senatorial District of Delta State.Abraka.Delta State University.
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[27] United Nations Development Program. (2003). Human development report: millennium development goals; A compact among nations to end poverty. New York. Oxford University Press.
[28] UNICEF (2009) (2009). Child Friendly Schools Programming Global Evaluation Report. Evaluation Office, Division of Communication, New York www.unicef.org.
[29] Wammula, A. J. (2013). factors influencing academic performance in Kenya certificate of secondary education examinations in private schools in Kenya: Nairobi. University of Nairobi.
[30] Wirth, K.R. & Perkins, D. (2013) Learning to learn www .macal e s te r . e d u / aca d e m i c s / g e o l og y / w i r t h / l e a r n i ng . doc
[31] Wong, H. K., & Wong, R. T. (1998).The first days of school. Sunnyvale, CA: Harry K. Wong.
[32] Yara, P.O., &Surumo, T.N. (2012). Performance indicators of secondary school mathematics in Nyimira south district of Kenya.British Journal of Arts andSocial Sciences, 8(2), 230-240.

Josphine Logedi, Mary Jebii Chemagosi and Sellah Lusweti, “Effect of teacher’s characteristics on child friendly school initiative in public pre-schools in Mombasa County, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.427-433 February 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-2/427-433.pdf

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An Assessment of Economic Efficiency of Smallholder Irish Potato Producers in Nyanga District of Zimbabwe

Ruvaraishe Tapera, Dube Phamela and Nyasha Chipunza- February 2021 Page No.: 434-444

The purpose of this study was to analyse the technical and resource use efficiency of the smallholder potato farmers in Nyanga District. Measuring the efficiency levels at farm level will help inform whether farmers are using the production resources to full potential given that efficiency can be used as an indication of performance A purposive sampling method was employed in selecting 10 villages with Irish potato producers, 180 respondents were selected using the systematic random sampling method. The Stochastic Frontier Approach with the application of the Cobb Douglas function and inefficiency was used to analyse technical efficiency while allocative efficiency of the production inputs was measured using Marginal Productivity Analysis. The results show that the mean technical efficiency is estimated at 55.5% with a minimum of 4.6% and a maximum of 84.2%. Seed, labour and fertilizers positively contributed towards the improvement in the level of efficiency. The analysis further revealed that age of the farmer negatively influenced technical efficiency and experience positively influenced efficiency. The results also show that the farmers are operating at increasing returns to scale with returns to scale coefficient of 1.131. Computed allocative efficiency indices of the inputs showed that seed (0.305) was over utilized while fertilizer (1.207) and labour (5.833) were underutilized. The analysis shows that 79% of the variation in the Irish potato output is as a result of technical inefficiency. In order to enhance technical efficiency levels of the farmers the government and stakeholders in the potato sector should facilitate training and support programmes targeted for younger farmers to encourage them to engage in production of the crop. Improved farmer’s education will help farmers to allocate their production resources more efficiently. Use of improved quality seed reduces the replanting and overutilization of seed in potato production. Adherence to recommended production practices can also ensure that fertilizers are used at economic rates.

Page(s): 434-444                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 March 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5222

 Ruvaraishe Tapera
Department of Agricultural Economics and Development, Manicaland State University of Applied Sciences

  Dube Phamela
Department of Agricultural Economics and Development, Manicaland State University of Applied Sciences

  Nyasha Chipunza
Department of Agricultural Economics and Development, Manicaland State University of Applied Sciences

[1] Abedullah, Khuda, B. and Ahmad, B. (2006) ‘Technical Efficiency and its Determinants in Potato Production, Evidence from Punjab, Pakistan’, The Lahore Journal of Economics, 11(2), pp. 1–22.
[2] Aheisibwe, A.R., Lokina, R.B. & Hepelwa, A.S., (2018). Technical Efficiency in Seed Potato Production Systems in Uganda. Journal of Economics and Behavioral Studies, 10(3(J)), pp.122–140. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.22610/jebs.v10i3.2322.
[3] Andaregie, A., & Astatkie, T. (2020). Determinants of technical efficiency of potato farmers and effects of constraints on potato production in Northern Ethiopia. Experimental Agriculture, 56(5), 699-709. doi:10.1017/S0014479720000253
[4] Aigner, D., Lovell, C. A. K. and Schmidt, P. (1977) ‘Formulation And estimation Of Stochastic Frontier Production Function Models’, Journal of Econometrics, 6(1), pp. 21–37. doi: 10.1016/0304-4076(77)90052-5.
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[6] Battese, G. E. and Coelli, T. J. (1995) ‘A Model for Technical Inefficiency Effects in a Stochastic Frontier Production Function for Panel Data’, Empirical Economics, 20, pp. 325–332. doi: 10.1007/BF01205442.
[7] Ellis, F. (1988) Peasant economics: farm households and agrarian development. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
[8] Esobhawan, A. (2010) Economic Efficiency of Aquaculture Production in Edo State , Nigeria, IIFET 2010 Montpellier Proceedings.
[9] Herald, 2020 Food security – Government embarks on potato seed production. Available at: https://www.herald.co.zw/just-in-food-security-government-embarks-on-potato-seed-production/
[10] [10] Herald (2012) ‘Potato deared strategic food security crop’. Available at: http://www.herald.co.zw/potato-declared-strategic-food-security-crop/
[11] [11] Inoni, O. E. (2007) ‘Allocative efficiency in pond fish production in Delta State, Nigeria: a production function approach’, Agricultura Tropica et Subtropica, 40(4), pp. 127–134. Available at: agriculturaits.czu.cz/pdf_files/vol_40_4_pdf/1Inonix.pdf.
[12] Jwanya, B.A., Dawang, N.C., Mashat I.M., B.S Gojing (2014) Technical Efficiency of Rain-Fed Irish Potato Farmers in Plateau State, Nigeria: A Stochastic Frontier Approach. Developing Country Studies Vol.4, No.22. ISSN 2224-607X (Paper) ISSN 2225-0565 (Online). www.iiste.org
[12] Kamau, P.N., Gathungu, G.K. & Mwirigi, R.N., (2020). Technical Efficiency of Irish Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) Production in Molo Sub County, Kenya. Asian Journal of Advances in Agricultural Research, pp.1–9. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.9734/ajaar/2020/v13i330104.
[13] Kibaara, B. W.(2005) Technical Efficiency in Kenyan’s Maize Production: An Application of the Stochastic Frontier Approach. Colorado State University.
[14] King, B. B. and Stark, J. C. (2009) Potato Irrigation Management.
[15] Maganga, A. M. (2012) ‘Technical efficiency and its determinants in Irish potato production: Evidence from Dedza District, Central Malawi’, African Journal of Agricultural Research, 7(12), pp. 192–197. doi: 10.5897/AJAR11.1463.
[16] Makhura, L. M. (2001) Overcoming transaction costs barriers to market participation of smallholder farmers in the Northern Province of South Africa. Pretoria.
[17] Mkodzongi, G., & Lawrence, P. (2019). The fast-track land reform and agrarian change in Zimbabwe. Review of African Political Economy, 46, 159, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03056244.2019.1622210
[18] Mpande, R. and Madziwa, B. (2011) Policy and advocacy issues: Developing the organic agriculture sector in Zimbabwe: The case study of Mashonaland East Province. Available at: www.zoppa.org.zw/index.php/organic-farming/downloads?download=1…
[19] Mpemba, T. R. (2016). Evaluation of new Irish Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) Varieties for Yield Potential in Zimbabwe. Department of Agronomy Faculty of Natural resources Management and Agriculture Midlands State University, Zimbabwe
[20] Muthoni, K & Nyamongo, D.O (2009). A Review of Constraints To Ware Irish Potatoes Production In Kenya.Journal Of Horticulture And Forestry 1(7);98-102. Retrieved 18 September 2013 from http://www.acedemicjournal.org/jhf
[21] Ogundari, K. and Ojo, S. O. (2006) ‘An Examination of Technical, Economic and Allocative Efficiency of Small Farms: The Case Study of Cassava Farmers in Osun State of Nigeria’, Bulgarian Journal of Agricultural Science, 7(3), pp. 185–195.
[22] Ohajianya, D. O., Onu, P. N., Ugwu, J. N., Osuji, M. N., Nwaiwu, I. U., Orebiyi, J, S., Godson-Ibeji, C, C. and Enyia, C, O. (2013) ‘Technical Efficiency of Table Egg Producers in Imo State , Nigeria’, Asian Journal of Agricultural Extension, Economics and Sociology, 2(2), pp. 118–127.
[23] Sakadzo, N., Mavugara, J and Musara, A. (2020), Critical Review of Value Chain for Irish Potato in Zimbabwe with Specific Regards to the Economic Policy: A Review}, Agriculture Sciences, Vol 2., doi 10.30560/2n2p42.
[24] Svubure, O., Struik, P. C., Haverkort, A. J., & Steyn, J. M. (2017). Analysis of the Potato (Solanum tuberosum) Value Chain in Zimbabwe. Outlook on Agriculture Journal, 46(1), 49-46. https://doi.org/10.1177/0030727017690655
[25] Svubure, O., Struik, P. C., Haverkort, A. J. and Steyn, J. M. (2015) ‘Yield gap analysis and resource footprints of Irish potato production systems in Zimbabwe’, Field Crops Research. Elsevier B.V., 178, pp. 77–90. doi: 10.1016/j.fcr.2015.04.002.
[26] Ugwumba, C. O. A. (2010) ‘Allocative Efficiency of “Egusi” Melon (Colocynthis citrullus lanatus) Production Inputs in Owerri West Local Government Area of Imo State , Nigeria’, 1(2), pp. 95–100.
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Ruvaraishe Tapera, Dube Phamela and Nyasha Chipunza, “An Assessment of Economic Efficiency of Smallholder Irish Potato Producers in Nyanga District of Zimbabwe” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-2, pp.434-444 February 2021  URL: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5222

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Application of Internet Services for Effective Service Delivery in University Libraries in Plateau State, Nigeria

Martyns Eric Godwin – February 2021 Page No.: 445-450

The study investigated the application of Internet services for effective service delivery in university libraries in Plateau State. Three specific objectives with corresponding research questions guided the study. The study adopted a survey research design. The population for the study was the entire 285 library staff made up of professional and nonprofessionals in the university libraries in Plateau State which include: University of Jos and Plateau State University. Since the population was not large, the study made use of all the 285 staff in the universities. The instrument for data collection for this study was a structured questionnaire titled “Internet Services and Library Service Delivery Questionnaire” (ISLSDQ). The questionnaire was validated by experts. The reliability of the questionnaire was established using Cronbach Alpha method and a reliability coefficient of 0.75 was obtained. Data collected was analyzed using descriptive statistics of Frequency Counts, Percentages, Mean and Standard Deviation to answer the research questions. Findings of the study revealed that, the kinds of internet services applied for effective services delivery in university libraries in Plateau State include: Electronic Mail (email), World Wide Web (www), Internet Chat, Internet Telephone, Online Public Access Catalogue (OPAC), Electronic Library (e-library), Own Website, Web 2.0, Archie and Mailing list. The areas of application of internet services for effective library service delivery in university libraries in Plateau State include: acquisition services, cataloguing/classification services, awareness services, reference services, selective dissemination of information services, inter-library loan services, documentary services, circulation services, bibliographic services and resource sharing. The findings also revealed that, these internet services were applied to a high extent for library services delivery. The study concluded that, Internet services are to a high extent applied for effective library services delivery in university libraries in Plateau State. Recommendations were made that, Network and related internet services should be provided in university libraries to enhance library services delivery since the need for connectivity can no longer be ignored in this era of information and communication technology and management of university libraries should ensure that adequate hardware support facilities are provided that can enhance effective library services delivery in university libraries

Page(s): 445-450                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 March 2021

 Martyns Eric Godwin
Library Department, University of Jos, Nigeria

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