Tax Planning: As an Income Tax Saving Strategy with Cost Optimization

Soffia Pudji Estiasih, Rahaju Saraswati- July 2021 Page No.: 01-08

The purpose of this study is to determine the description of tax planning on income taxes that must be paid by the company. Income is one of the most popular tax objects where taxpayers tend to carry out strategies or plans for income tax. Taxes are one of the main sources of state revenue, which has a large and significant contribution to contribute to state revenue. For tax companies it is considered an expense, so that certain efforts or strategies need to be made to reduce it. The strategy that is carried out is part of tax planning, often the strategy used in this tax planning is to take advantage of the gaps contained in the taxation law.
This research was conducted by researching based on literature or library materials. This research was conducted using a conceptual approach and a statutory approach. The conceptual and regulatory approaches are carried out by examining concepts and regulations related to tax planning, income tax savings strategies and cost optimization. Sources of data used are secondary data and data collection procedures using documentation.
The results of this study indicate that tax planning is the process of organizing the taxpayer / taxpayer group’s business in such a way that the tax debt is in the most minimal position, as long as this is made possible both by the provisions of taxation legislation and commercially. Cost optimization can be carried out in tax planning by changing costs with fiscal corrections to costs that can be deducted from taxable income, so that this tax planning does not contradict the law.

Page(s): 01-08                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 July 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5701

 Soffia Pudji Estiasih
WR Supratman University, Indonesia

  Rahaju Saraswati
WR Supratman University, Indonesia

[1] Appolos N, * Kwarbai Jerry D., and Ogundajo, Grace O. 2016. Tax Planning and Firm Value: Empirical Evidence from Nigerian Consumer Goods Industrial Sector. Research Journal of Finance and Accounting. ISSN 2222-1697 (Paper) ISSN 2222-2847 (Online). Vol.7, No.12, 2016
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[15] Zain, Mohammad. 2006. Manajemen Perpajakan. Edisi Pertama. Jakarta. Salemba Empat.

Soffia Pudji Estiasih, Rahaju Saraswati, “Tax Planning: As an Income Tax Saving Strategy with Cost Optimization” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.01-08 July 2021  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5701

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The Role of Women in Farm, Household and Environmental Waste Management.

Atoma Charity Nwamaka, Awhareno Uyoyou Sidney, Amos Oyem & Akeni Tina – July 2021 Page No.: 09-14

The agricultural practices engaged in by farmers have effect on the products, consumers and the environment. One of the targets of the Millennium Development Goals is to ensure environmental sustainability. Human survival demands that environmental consideration should be paramount in pursuit of development. Farm households and rural communities in their daily activities are major generators of wastes, in the form of manure, crop residues or mixed solid wastes. Organic farming technology is generally regarded as the solution to environmental problems that are related to agriculture and food safety. According to the Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, women account for 75 percent of the farming population in Nigeria. Waste management is an important issue in any society and is still a challenge for local authorities in many parts of the world. Insufficient and inefficient management of wastes have direct impact on the environment, human health and livelihoods. This also affects social and economic development. Considering the large number of women involved in agriculture, assessing their role in farm and household waste management is essential. This paper therefore focused on Traditional waste management and new policies on waste management, traditional waste management strategies in Nigeria, challenges of traditional waste management the 7’Rs of waste management, the role of women in , farm , household and environmental waste management, the place of organic agriculture in waste management and gender inequality in waste management,. The paper recommended among others that gender issues are mainstreamed in all governance and decision making process related to waste management and there should be a synergy of government, waste managers, public health workers and households to implement a sustainable and reliable waste management practices in Nigeria. The various roles of women and recommendations presented in this paper can be of reference for scholars and stakeholders towards enhancing gender and sustainable development goals in Africa.

Page(s): 09-14                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 July 2021

 Atoma Charity Nwamaka
Delta State Polytechnic, Ozoro, Delta State, Nigeria.

  Awhareno Uyoyou Sidney
Delta State Polytechnic, Ozoro, Delta State, Nigeria.

  Amos Oyem
Delta State Polytechnic, Ozoro, Delta State, Nigeria.

  Akeni Tina
Delta State Polytechnic, Ozoro, Delta State, Nigeria.

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[20] Mbam B N, Nwibo S U. (2013). Entrepreneurship Development as a strategy for poverty alleviation among farming households in Igbo-Eze North Local Government Area of Enugu state Nigeria: Greener Journal of Agricultural Sciences, 3(10):736-742.
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[36] Victor, I. & Choji, I. D. (2006). Composting: A viable option for urban waste management in Nigerian cities. Environ. J. Environ. Stud., 2(5).

Atoma Charity Nwamaka, Awhareno Uyoyou Sidney, Amos Oyem & Akeni Tina “The Role of Women in Farm, Household and Environmental Waste Management.” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.09-14 July 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/09-14.pdf

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Media and Information Literacy: A Critical Response to the Challenge of ‘Infodemic’ in the Covid-19 Pandemic Era in Nigeria

Elizabeth Titilayo Aduloju, Ph.D- July 2021 Page No.: 15-24

Nigeria, the most populous country in Africa is not left out in the fight against the COVID-19 outbreak that continues to ravage the entire universe. The deadly virus as of 26th June 2021 has infected more than 181.3 million people and killed over 3.9 million people globally. In Nigeria alone, it has infected over 167 thousand people and killed 2,119 people between February 27th, the day the first case was recorded and 26th June 2021. Unfortunately, as the virus continues to spread worldwide, there is also a rapid increase in the rate of infodemic – information overload majority of which are fake, disinformation and misinformation – about the virus, its transmission and cure. Thus, this paper interrogates the present reality of the infodemic in Nigeria, especially in the present COVID-19 pandemic and the vision of media and information literacy. The problem concerned the extent to which infodemic could precariously engineer crisis, disgust, fear, hostility and panic which might degenerate to conflict, insecurity, stigmatisation and eventual death. Combining textual analysis with receptor oriented, the article critically examined the social media platform posts and activities in this domain. Major findings apart from revealing that the free and unlimited access to information on social media platforms have been the active driver of the current experience, also showed that the inability of people to discern the veracity and authenticity of information within the context of the COVID-19 pandemic have made many vulnerable. Thus, the present article concluded that media and information literacy is a necessity in fighting the challenge of infodemic in Nigeria and promoting healthy information in media and technological environments. Therefore, among others, the introduction of media and information literacy to both literate and illiterate sectors of society is recommended.

Page(s): 15-24                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 July 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5702

 Elizabeth Titilayo Aduloju, Ph.D
Catholic Institute of West Africa, Nigeria

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Elizabeth Titilayo Aduloju, Ph.D, “Media and Information Literacy: A Critical Response to the Challenge of ‘Infodemic’ in the Covid-19 Pandemic Era in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.15-24 July 2021  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5702

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Domesticating Kolb’s Experiential Learning Model into the Teaching of Civic Education: A Case of Secondary Schools in Zambia

Magasu Oliver- July 2021 Page No.: 25-31

The main purpose of this study was to propose the domesticating of Kolb’s Experiential Learning Model into the teaching of Civic Education in secondary schools in Zambia. The study took a qualitative approach and employed a descriptive research design. Purposive sampling technique was used to sample thirty (30) participants. Data was collected through interviews, Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) and classroom observations of lessons. Among the key findings, this study found that while teachers were trained to teach specific subjects, some were not oriented on the demands of the Zambia Education Curriculum Framework of 2013 and found it confusing. Furthermore, this study established that even after commissioning the curriculum in 2013, schools still lacked teaching resources with which they could use to implement the curriculum. Based on the findings, the study recommends the adoption of Kolb’s Experiential Learning Model into the teaching of Civic Education in secondary schools in Zambia.

Page(s): 25-31                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 July 2021

 Magasu Oliver
Kwame Nkrumah University, Zambia

[1] Akella, D. (2010). Learning Together: Kolb’s Experiential Theory and Its Application. Journal of Management and Organisation; Volume 16, Number 1, pp 100 -112
[2] Bergersen, A. & Muleya, G. (2019). Zambian Civic Education Teacher Students in Norway for a Year- How Do They Describe Their Transformative Learning? Sustainability 2019, 11 (24), 7143; DOI: 10.3390/su11247143, pp 1-17 www.mdpi.com/journal/sustainability
[3] Branson, M. S. (2004). The Role of Civic Education. A Forthcoming Education Policy Task Force Position Paper from the Communitarian Network
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Magasu Oliver, “Domesticating Kolb’s Experiential Learning Model into the Teaching of Civic Education: A Case of Secondary Schools in Zambia” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.25-31 July 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/25-31.pdf

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An Examination of Occupational Health and Safety Management Practices in Selected Construction Sites of Lusaka City

Kaiko Mubita, Joshua Mutambo and Carol Kahale- July 2021 Page No.: 32-42

The purpose of this study was to investigate occupational health and safety management (OSH) practices in selected construction sites of Lusaka city. The study was guided by the following objectives: to identify safety and health hazards in selected construction sites of Lusaka city, to examine challenges that workers face in terms of occupation health and safety management in selected construction sites of Lusaka city, to ascertain occupational health and safety management measures put in place in selected construction sites of Lusaka district, and to suggest sustainable mitigation measures that could be put in place to improve occupational health and safety management practices in construction sites of Lusaka city. Semi-structured interviews and observations were conducted with 30 participants which comprised 7 employers, 4 sub-contractors and 19 employees. The findings of the study showed that workers in selected construction sites of Lusaka city faced many challenges with occupational health and safety management which negatively affected the way they worked. Most participants explained the challenges they faced such as communication barrier, lack of safety officers, lack of sanitary conveniences, inadequate proper personal protective equipment and lack of safety rules and regulations adherence by workers. The study concluded that occupational health and safety management practices at selected construction sites of Lusaka city were poor and this brought about injuries among workers. OSH management practices at sites would be more effective if government inspected construction sites and assessed if they were complying with safety and health rules and regulations.

Page(s): 32-42                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 July 2021

 Kaiko Mubita
School of Education, University of Zambia

 Joshua Mutambo
School of Education, University of Zambia

 Carol Kahale
School of Education, University of Zambia

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Kaiko Mubita, Joshua Mutambo and Carol Kahale, “An Examination of Occupational Health and Safety Management Practices in Selected Construction Sites of Lusaka City” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.32-42 July 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/32-42.pdf

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Foreign investment and CO2 discharge in Nigeria

Muhammad Bilyaminu Ado- July 2021 Page No.: 43-46

This study examines the influence of foreign investment, economic performance, financial progress and energy use in Nigeria, by employing ARDL technique form 1980 to 2019. The cointegration test confirmed the long run linkage among the model’s variables. The short run estimate indicates that foreign investment, economic performance, financial progress and energy positively influence the level of CO2 discharge in Nigeria. The estimate form long-run analysis also reveals that foreign investment, GDP, financial progress and energy resources accelerate the capacity of CO2 explosion. Hence, the study suggests that government and policymakers should design policies on foreign investment with aim to decouple the level of CO2 discharge. This could be through the use of efficient energy and low emission technology

Page(s): 43-46                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 July 2021

 Muhammad Bilyaminu Ado
Yusuf Maitama Sule University, Kano, Nigeria

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Muhammad Bilyaminu Ado, “Foreign investment and CO2 discharge in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.43-46 July 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/43-46.pdf

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Niqāb in Pluralistic Society: An Islamic Perspective

Seyyath Mohammed Hakeema Beevi, Ahamed Sarjoon Razick and Iqbal Saujan- July 2021 Page No.: 47-51

In Sri Lanka, which is a multi-ethnic nation in religion and cultural aspects, there is an increasing number of campaigns and allegations against Muslim women’s niqāb (face veil). Thus, the study is based on a Qualitative Method with the aim of exploring Islamic guidelines on how Muslim women should dress in their niqāb in a multicultural context, which is under threat. Data was gathered using only a secondary data collection technique. Books, journals, magazines, and websites have been used as data sources. The study concludes that although wearing the niqāb is not an obligatory duty on Muslim women who believe piously, a certain number of Muslim women are found to be fascinated with it. Although there is a law in the country to follow particular religious principles, criticisms of the niqāb (face mask) have arisen for the protection of other people, the proper expression of identification, and the coordination of everyone in the country. It has been found that, in this situation Islam allows a slight evil to be committed to prevent a serious evil in the society, it guides Muslim women to give up nothing obligatory to live in harmony in a multicultural context while adhering to only the most fundamental Islamic principles.

Page(s): 47-51                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 July 2021

 Seyyath Mohammed Hakeema Beevi
Department of Islamic Studies, South Eastern University of Sri Lanka, Oluvil

 Ahamed Sarjoon Razick
Department of Islamic Studies, South Eastern University of Sri Lanka, Oluvil

 Iqbal Saujan
Department of Islamic Studies, South Eastern University of Sri Lanka, Oluvil

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[12] The Parliament of Sri Lanka. (2020). Report on the Plan on Preparation and Implementation of Bills to Ensure National Security. Colombo : Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka

Seyyath Mohammed Hakeema Beevi, Ahamed Sarjoon Razick and Iqbal Saujan, “Niqāb in Pluralistic Society: An Islamic Perspective” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.47-51 July 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/47-51.pdf

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Determinants of Investment Decision Making among Malaysians during COVID-19 Pandemic

Lee Xue Qing, Teoh Teng Tenk, Melissa, Lee Teck Heang- July 2021 Page No.: 52-62

Previous studies show that people tend to be irrational when making investment decisions. In addition, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the global economy has been substantial and investment decision making during this period would be diverse. This research attempts to identify the determinants of investment decisions in Malaysia during the COVID-19 pandemic based on behaviour finance attributes, specifically the self-control, loss aversion, anchoring and herding. This research adopts a mixed method design. The quantitative research uses questionnaire survey to analyse the results of 213 respondents in Malaysia, whilst in the quantitative research, interviews are used to identify the responses of 10 interviewees. The results show that loss aversion and anchoring have significant influence on the investment decisions of Malaysians, while self-control and herding have no significant influence on the investment decisions of Malaysians during the current pandemic. Thestudy provides an insight on Malaysians’ investment decision making in relation to the concept of behavioural finance during the COVID-19 pandemic and economy turmoil, which contributes positively to the national economy.

Page(s): 52-62                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 July 2021

 Lee Xue Qing
HELP University, Malaysia

  Teoh Teng Tenk, Melissa
HELP University, Malaysia

  Lee Teck Heang
HELP University, Malaysia

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Lee Xue Qing, Teoh Teng Tenk, Melissa, Lee Teck Heang, “Determinants of Investment Decision Making among Malaysians during COVID-19 Pandemic” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.52-62 July 2021  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5211

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Managerial Styles as Correlate of Teachers Job Performance in Secondary Schools in Nigeria

Prof. Cletus Ngozi Uwazurike, Cordelia Ogadimma Ezenwa-Adiuku- July 2021 Page No.: 63-70

The development of any nation is primarily dependent on the education system available in the country. Education is nowhere without teachers playing a pivotal role in ensuring achievement in an educational institution. Teachers’ job performance plays a crucial role in students’ learning process. At every level of the educational system, teachers are the ones that execute the education programmes. The teacher maintains and improves the educational standard of every nation. Onye and Anyaogu (2017:1) opine that “the success or failure of any education system depends to a large extent on the quality, quantity and the caliber of teachers who are the interpreters and transmitters of desired knowledge, skill, attitudes, and values in the society”. Teachers are arguably the most important group of professionals for the future of our nation. The increased importance in teachers’ job performance has made it extremely important to identify the factors that influence their job performance.
One factor that might influence teachers’ job performance is organizational climate. The organizational climate dimensions were measured based on principals’ managerial styles. “Principals can encourage effective performance of their teachers by identifying their needs and trying to meet them” (Adeyemi, 2010:10). This encouragement is very much dependent on various aspects of the managerial styles. Nwankwo in Uwazurike (2019:136) notes that a bad administrative leader may render ineffective even the best school programme, the most adequate resources and the most motivated staff and students.

Page(s): 63-70                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 August 2021

 Prof. Cletus Ngozi Uwazurike
Professor of Educational Management and Planning, Imo State University, Owerri, Nigeria

 Cordelia Ogadimma Ezenwa-Adiuku
Department of Educational Management and Planning, Faculty of Education, Imo State University, Owerri, Nigeria.

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[34] Uwazurike, C.N. (2019). Professionals in school bureaucracy: A Nigerian perspective. Owerri: Meybiks Nig, pub.

Prof. Cletus Ngozi Uwazurike, Cordelia Ogadimma Ezenwa-Adiuku, “Managerial Styles as Correlate of Teachers Job Performance in Secondary Schools in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.63-70 July 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/63-70.pdf

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Gay Rights Policy and the United States-Nigeria Diplomatic Relations

Akuche, Andre Ben-Moses – July 2021 Page No.: 71-82

The study assessed the nexus between gay rights policy and the United States-Nigeria diplomatic relations, 2006-2015. Relations between both countries have been cordial except during military rule in Nigeria. The low moments of their diplomatic relations since democratic rule in 1999 was evident during 2013-2015 and it was centered on the controversy generated especially, by the Same-Sex Marriage (Prohibition) Act, 2013 and failed leadership. Hence, the study specifically, is to (i) ascertain whether the criminalisation of gay rights in Nigeria undermined the existing diplomatic relations between the United States and Nigeria, and, to (ii) determine whether leadership role in Nigeria accounted for the pressure by the United States for the decriminalisation of gay rights in Nigeria. The theoretical perspective of this study is rooted in the ‘centre-periphery’ theory of structural imperialism by Johan Galtung and adopted the documentary methods of data collection and content analysis as its methods of data analysis. This study found out that, the gay rights policy undermined diplomatic relations between both countries and that, the leadership role in Nigeria accounted for the pressure by the United States for the decriminalisation of gay rights in Nigeria. The study recommends among others that, the Nigerian government should formulate citizen-centric policies instead of policies that have no direct benefits to the generality of Nigerians such as the anti-gay laws. Also, over dependence on foreign aid from countries seeking to influence Nigeria’s domestic politics should be discouraged.

Page(s): 71-82                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 August 2021

 Akuche, Andre Ben-Moses
Assistant Lecturer, Department of International Relations, Madonna University, Nigeria.

Books

[1] Hout, W. (1993). Capitalism and the third world: development, dependence and world Systems, Aldershot, Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd.
[2] Onuoha, J. (2008). Beyond diplomacy: contemporary issues in international relations. Nsukka, Great AP Express. p.285
[3] Ostien, P. (2007). Sharia implementation in Northern Nigeria 1999-2006: A sourcebook, Chapter 4, Part III. Ibadan, Spectrum Books Ltd.
Book Chapters
[4] Ayam, J.A. (2004). Trends in Nigeria’s foreign policy: the conduct of foreign policy in the new democratic dispensation, 1999-2003. In Maduagwu, O and Mohammed, A.S (eds.). Challenges and prospects of democratization in Nigeria. Kuru: National Institute for Policy and Strategic Studies Press.
[5] Haruna, B. A. (2003). The application of the sharia penal system: constitutional and other related issues. In Ezeilo, J. N., Ladan, M. T. & Afolabi – Akiyode, A. (eds.).Sharia Implementation in Nigeria: Issues & challenges on women’s rights and access to justice. Enugu: Women’s Aid Collective & others.
Journals
[6] Aka, P. C. (2002). The dividend of democracy: analysing U.S. support for Nigerian democratization. Boston College Third World Law Journal, 22 (2), Pp.225-280.
[7] Akinboye, S.O (1993). Nigeria’s foreign policy under Babangida. Nigerian Forum, 13 (9&10), Pp. 240-250.
[8] Ayam, J. A. (2008). The development of Nigeria-U.S. relations. Journal of Third World Studies, 25 (2), Pp.117-132.
[9] Babaji, B. (2007). “Constitutionalism, democratic governance and sharia in Nigeria. Ahmadu Bello University Zaria Journal of Islamic Law, 4 (5), Pp.98-120.
[10] Dickson, M.E (2013). An assessment of the diplomatic relations between Nigeria and the U.S.A in the fourth republic. African Journal of Social Sciences, 3 (4), Pp. 200-213.
[11] Encarnación, O.G. (2014). Gay Rights: Why Democracy Matters. Journal of Democracy National Endowment for Democracy, 25 (3), Pp. 90-104.
[12] Ezirim, G.E. (2010). Fifty years of Nigeria’s foreign policy: A critical review. African Political Science Review, 2(1):22-40.
[13] Galtung, J. (1971). A structural theory of imperialism. Journal of Peace Research, 8 (2), Pp. 81-117.
[14] Obidimma, E., Obidimma, A. (2013). The travails of same-sex marriage relation under Nigerian law. Journal of Law, Policy and Globalization, 17, Pp.42-48.
[15] Olariwaju, F., Chidozie, F., Olarewaju, A. (2015). International politics of same-sex marriage and the Nigeria-US relations. European Scientific Journal, 11(4), Pp. 1-17.
[16] Onapajo, H. and Isik, C. (2016). The Global politics of gay rights: The straining relations between the West and Africa. Journal of Global Analysis, 6 (1), Pp. 22-45.
[17] Onuche, J. (2013). Same sex marriage in Nigeria: a philosophical analysis. International Journal of Humanities and Social Science, 3(12), Pp. 91-98.
Online Newspapers
[18] Aribisala.F. (April 2, 2014). Criminalising same-sex relationships in Nigeria. http://www.financialnigeria.com/criminalising-same-sex-relationships-in-nigeria-blog-32.html/. (Retrieved August 12, 2016).
[19] Musawa, H. (August 5, 2015). Non issue of gay rights issue. http://www.leadership.ng/columns/451632/non-issue-of-the-gay-rights-issue/ (Retrieved August 15, 2016).
[20] Ndiribe, O., Eyoboka, S. & Ojeme, V. (January 21, 2014) Gay-Marriage Law: U.S threatens to sanction Nigeria. http://www.vanguardngr.com/2014/01/gay-marriage-law-us-threatens-sanction-nigeria/ (Retrieved November 20, 2016).
[21] Obiozor, G.A (March 24, 2015). Reciprocity in Nigeria-United States relations. http://www.guardian.ng/opinion/reciprocity-in-nigeria-united-states-relations-2/ (Retrieved June 20, 2016).
[22] Etcetera Alive (July 12, 2015). Nigeria must reverse anti-gay law-United States http://www.etceteralive.com/nigeria-must-reverse-ant-gay-law-united-states/

Other Articles

[23] Ikpechukwu, C. (2013). Nigeria’s fourteen-year sentence for gay marriage. http://www.opendemocracy.net/chinedu-ikpechukwu/nigeria’s-fourte. (Retrieved 20 July, 2016).
[24] Robinson, D. (2011). Obama elevates gay rights as a foreign policy priority http://www.voanews.com/a/obama-elevates-gay-rights-as-a-foreign-policy-priority-135136743/174955.html. (Retrieved 30 August, 2016).
[25] Kerry, J. (2016). Remarks on LGBT protection. http://www.state.gov/secretary/remarks/2016/06/259257.htm (Retrieved 30 July, 2016).
[26] USCIRF (2015). Annual report: Nigeria,http://www.uscirf.gov/sites/default/files/Nigeria%202015.pdf (Retrieved 20 august, 2016).

Official Documents

[27] Blanchard, L.P & Husted, T.F (2016). Nigeria: Current issues and U.S policy. Congressional Research Service, RL33964.
[28] Criminal Code Act, Chapter 77: Laws of the federation of Nigeria, 1990.Retrieved from http://www.nigeria-law.org/Criminal%20Code%20Act-Tables.htm
[29] Downie, R.(2014). Revitalising the fight against homophobia in Africa: a report of the CSIS Health Policy Centre, Washing DC. Pp 1-17
[30] Finnish Immigration Service (2015). Status of sexual and gender minorities in Nigeria Country information service report. Pp 2-22.
[31] Human Dignity Trust (2015). Criminalisation of homosexuality: Nigeria, Pp 1-11
[32] IGLHRC Report (2006). Voices from Nigeria. Pp.1-13.
[33] Letjolane C., Nawaigo, C. & Rocca, A. (2010). Nigeria: defending human rights; not everywhere not every right: an international fact-finding mission report. The Observatory-Frontline, Pp 1-28.
[34] SSMPA, (2013). Same Sex Marriage (Prohibition) Act, 2013 in Nigeria: An Act of the National Assembly of the Federal Republic of Nigeria.
[35] United Nations (2015). UDHR Booklet: Illustrations by Yacine Ait Kaci (YAK) .
[36] U.S Department of State (2017). U.S relations with Nigeria https://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/2836.htm (retrieved 24 February, 2017)

Akuche, Andre Ben-Moses “Gay Rights Policy and the United States-Nigeria Diplomatic Relations” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.71-82 July 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/71-82.pdf

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Traffic Management Concept of Sustainable City Development in Nigeria

Solomon Oisasoje Ayo-Odifiri, Aruna Osigbemhe Alasa, Ngbede Ogoh, Obafemi Tijjsheg Obajina, Rosemary Chinonye Emeana- July 2021 Page No.: 83-89

Astonishing urban expansion has resulted in a slew of attendant urban hazards, including climate change, road traffic congestion, housing shortage, unpleasant aesthetic qualities, infrastructure deterioration, and waste disposal issues. A city is not only a location to dwell, it is also a place for experience and action as well as for everyday commuting, leisure, and physical expression. Thus, the mobility of commodities and services is critical for sustainable urban activities, interaction, and liveability; a fact that urban planners and architects have taken note of. As with human arteries, transportation is the lifeblood of a city, and its failure could result in the ineffectiveness of other sectors. The management of road and traffic networks that link and influence urban fabric has been inadequately addressed, thereby causing unparalleled urban deterioration. Lax enforcement of current environmental regulations, insufficient public engagement, and conflicting professional obligations in urban planning are evident causative elements contributing to Nigeria’s unsustainable urban expansion. Others include inadequate implementation and revision of the urban master plan and the absence of acceptable transportation policies. This paper discusses sustainable city development in Nigeria through the use of traffic management strategies. Relevant information on traffic management, sustainability, and City development was sourced from Scopus, Google Scholar, Academia, and MPDI databases to underpin the literature for this research. This study advocated the establishment of a mobile environmental tribunal, adoption of mobility policies, resilient city master plans, and public education on physical and infrastructural development.

Page(s): 83-89                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 August 2021

 Solomon Oisasoje Ayo-Odifiri
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Federal University of Technology Owerri, Nigeria

 Aruna Osigbemhe Alasa
Physical Planning Department, Auchi Polytechnic Auchi, Nigeria

 Ngbede Ogoh
National Board for Technical Education (NBTE) Kaduna, Nigeria

 Obafemi Tijjsheg Obajina
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Auchi Polytechnic Auchi, Nigeria

 Rosemary Chinonye Emeana
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Federal University of Technology Owerri, Nigeria

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Solomon Oisasoje Ayo-Odifiri, Aruna Osigbemhe Alasa, Ngbede Ogoh, Obafemi Tijjsheg Obajina, Rosemary Chinonye Emeana, “Traffic Management Concept of Sustainable City Development in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.83-89 July 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/83-89.pdf

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Relationship between students’ grades in WAEC and NECO Chemistry examination in Anambra State

Agu, N.N. (Ph.D.), Okafor, C.C- July 2021 Page No.: 90-94

Chemistry national examination results consistently for two years has recorded low grades in WAEC and NECO examinations. The recurrent poor performance of secondary school students in Chemistry in Senior School Certificate Examination (SSCE) conducted by West African Examination Council (WAEC) in Nigeria is disturbing and embarrassing. The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship between students’ grades in WAEC and NECO Chemistry examination in Anambra State. Three research questions were raised while three hypotheses were tested at 0.05 level of significance. Correlational research design was utilized for the study. The population of the study comprised 8012, 7628 and 7520 results of secondary school students who sat for WAEC and NECO Chemistry examinations respectively in Anambra State for the 2015/2016, 2016/2017 and 2017/2018 academic sessions. The sample for the study comprised 1800 results for the 2015/2016, 2016/2017 and 2017/2018 academic sessions obtained through stratified and multi-stage random sampling techniques. Data analysis was done using Pearson’s Product Moment Correlation Coefficient and Pearson Correlation Critical value table. The findings showed that a positive relationship existed between students’ grades in WAEC and NECO Chemistry examination across the years under review. Again, there is a significant relationship between students’ grades in WAEC and NECO examinations across the years under review. It was recommended in view of the findings that test developers should ensure that rigorous item analysis is done before the administration of questions papers for both WAEC and NECO exams. This is with a view to ensuring that a positive relationship exists between the performances of students in the both exams.

Page(s): 90-94                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 August 2021

 Agu, N.N. (Ph.D.)
Department of Educational Foundations, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Awka, Nigeria

 Okafor, C.C.
Department of Educational Foundations, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Awka, Nigeria

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Agu, N.N. (Ph.D.), Okafor, C.C, “Relationship between students’ grades in WAEC and NECO Chemistry examination in Anambra State” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.90-94 July 2021  DOI : https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/90-94.pdf

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Perceived Influence of Mid-Life Crises on Emotional Adjustment of Civil Servants in Benue State, Nigeria

Matthew Ruth Onoja- July 2021 Page No.: 95-100

There is a growing interest among psychotherapists to treat emotional problems among workers in midlife around the world. This study investigated the perceived influence of mid-life crises on emotional adjustment of civil servants in Benue State, Nigeria. The study looked at the perceived influence of marital crises and declining health on emotional adjustment of Civil servants. Two specific objectives with corresponding research questions guided the study and two hypotheses were formulated. The study adopted a survey research design and was carried out in Benue State, Nigeria. The population for the study comprises 19,109 civil servants in Benue State. The sample size for the study was 392 civil servants in Benue State determined using Taro Yamane Formular and was composed via accidental or convenience sampling technique. The instrument for data collection was a self-structured questionnaire titled “Mid-life Crisis and Emotional Adjustment Questionnaire” (MCEAQ). The instrument was validated by three experts. The reliability of the instrument was established using Cronbach Alpha method and a reliability coefficient of 0.77 was obtained. Data collected was analyzed using Means and Standard Deviation to answer the research questions and Chi-Square statistic to test the null hypotheses at 0.05level of significance. Findings of the study revealed that, marital crises and declining health have significant negative influence on emotional adjustment of civil servants in Benue State. It was concluded from the study that mid-life crisis can be very overwhelming, leaving civil servants to handle negative emotional state of mind and a realm of feelings they might not have had to deal with. Based on the findings, it was recommended that, counselling should be given to middle aged couples by guidance counsellors to encourage them to develop patience, tolerance and understanding for each other which may in turn help to reduce marital crises; civil servants facing mid-life crises should be encouraged by guidance counsellors to establish a healthy work/life balance – putting aside time to relax and to do the things to enjoy.

Page(s): 95-100                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 August 2021

 Matthew Ruth Onoja
Department of Educational Foundations and General Studies, Federal University of Agriculture, Makurdi, Nigeria

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Matthew Ruth Onoja, “Perceived Influence of Mid-Life Crises on Emotional Adjustment of Civil Servants in Benue State, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.95-100 July 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/95-100.pdf

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Firm-Specific Characteristics and Voluntary Disclosure of Listed Manufacturing Firms in Nigeria

Jibril Ramalan, Aminu Kado Kurfi, Aminu Muhammad Bello, Adam Muhammad Saifullahi- July 2021 Page No.: 101-108

This study examined firm specific characteristics and the voluntary disclosure of information of listed manufacturing firms in Nigeria. The study collected its data from secondary source by means of the annual reports and account of firms under the study. The analysis was conducted on thirty-eight (38) out of the fifty-four (54) listed manufacturing firms in the Nigeria Stock Exchange (NSE) for a period of ten years 2009-2018. The firm specific characteristics such as firm size, firm age, leverage, profitability, liquidity and information and communication technology on the voluntary information disclosure of listed manufacturing firms in Nigeria were used. 97 disclosure items were used as disclosure index drawn from the companies’ background general information, corporate strategic information, corporate governance information, financial performance information, risk management information, forward looking information, human intellectual information, the outlook of competitive environment and corporate social responsibilities. To achieve this objective, ordinary least square (OLS), generalized least square (GLS), descriptive statistics and correlation matrix were employed in carrying out the analysis, after the employment of the assumptions of regression model using STATA version 15. The findings of the study reveal that a positive and significant effect exists between firm size, firm age, leverage, and voluntary disclosure of the study firms. The study also shows a positive and insignificant association between ICT and voluntary disclosure. However, it recorded a negative and insignificant relationship between profitability, liquidity and voluntary disclosure of the firms under study. It recommended, among others, that the management of listed manufacturing firms should increase and expand their total asset by effective acquiring and efficient utilizing of its assets, maintained it sustainability to remain older in business, keep their leverage optimally for separation of risk, and upgrade their ICT.

Page(s): 101-108                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 August 2021

 Jibril Ramalan
Department of Business Administration and Entrepreneurship, Bayero University, Kano Nigeria

  Aminu Kado Kurfi
Department of Business Administration and Entrepreneurship, Bayero University, Kano Nigeria

  Aminu Muhammad Bello
Department of Business Administration and Entrepreneurship, Bayero University, Kano Nigeria

  Adam Muhammad Saifullahi
Department of Business Administration and Entrepreneurship, Bayero University, Kano Nigeria

[1] Abdurrauf, M.D. (2017). Firm-specific characteristics, corporate governance and voluntary disclosure in annual reports of listed companies in bangladesh; International Journal of Managerial and Financial Accounting, 9,(3), 263-282
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Jibril Ramalan, Aminu Kado Kurfi, Aminu Muhammad Bello, Adam Muhammad Saifullahi, “Firm-Specific Characteristics and Voluntary Disclosure of Listed Manufacturing Firms in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.101-108 July 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/101-108.pdf

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Social Consequences of Smuggling on the Indigenes of Idi-Iroko, Nigeria

Oyenuga, A. S., Owugah, A – July 2021 Page No.: 109-113

Much work on smuggling have focused on smuggling as a form of organised crime as well as its economic implications. The study, however, focused on the social consequences of smuggling and its impacts on society using the Idi-Iroko border community as the study’s focal point. The study is exploratory research and data was collected through the qualitative method from officials of the Nigerian Customs Service. Findings from the study show that away from economic consequences, smuggling holds stiff social consequences which negatively impacts society. These include; crime and insecurity, moral decadence, negative attitudes towards education and vocational training, laziness and acceptance of smuggling as a way of life, drug and substance abuse and health challenges.

Page(s): 109-113                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 August 2021

 Oyenuga, A. S.
Department of Sociology, Lagos State University, Ojo, Nigeria

  Owugah, A
Department of Sociology, Lagos State University, Ojo, Nigeria

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Oyenuga, A. S., Owugah, A “Social Consequences of Smuggling on the Indigenes of Idi-Iroko, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.109-113 July 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/109-113.pdf

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COVID-19 and Good Governance in Nigeria: Lessons from Europe and Asia.

Omosefe Oyekanmi – July 2021 Page No.: 114-119

The COVID-19 Pandemic has continued to have, in its trail, seismic effects which cut across all stratum and sectors of human endeavor across the globe. While many studies have emerged in the medical and scientific fields regarding the causes, effects and nature of the coronavirus disease, studies aimed at understanding and unraveling the political, social and economic factors, impacts and trajectories of the disease are still unclear and gradually emerging. Therefore, this study has the aim of generally contributing to the debate and the findings on the socio-political and economic causes, impacts and effects of the virus across geographical spaces and within political delineations. Specifically, the available data on the spread and morbidity of COVID-19 across the different regions and states presents a myriad of picture which are in need of interpretation. Importantly this study shall examine the question of whether good governance had effect on the containment and the spread of COVID-19 as well as the rate of morbidity in Europe and Asia and the lessons Nigeria can learn from it.

Page(s): 114-119                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 03 August 2021

 Omosefe Oyekanmi
Nigerian Institute of Social and Economic Research (NISER)

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Omosefe Oyekanmi “COVID-19 and Good Governance in Nigeria: Lessons from Europe and Asia.” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.114-119 July 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/114-119.pdf

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Challenging Issues in the Horn of Africa (2016-2021): The Role of the African Union Commission in Conflict Resolution

Magdalane Malinda Kikuvi – July 2021 Page No.: 120-126

This discussion paper reviews the African Union Commission peace and security achievements in 2020, and outlines the emerging issues in the Horn of Africa, The African Union Commission elected a new chairperson for the term 2021-2024 in February 2021 and the chairperson is expected to lead the continental secretariat towards achieving the 2021-2024 term plan in line with African Union Agenda 2063. In order to understand the achievements and emerging issues from the Horn of Africa during the period under study, data was collected using desk review and 3 key informant interviews (referred to as KII1, KII2 and KII3) from the Horn of Africa region, the African Union and Intergovernmental Authority on Development actors. Data analysis was done using themes. Amidst the first year of the Covid-19 pandemic, the Commission was instrumental in negotiating and requisitioning vaccines for the African Union member States. It has also continued to intervene in Somalia, South Sudan and Ethiopia to ensure peace and stability. However, the emerging issues such as border, and election-induced disputes, resource-based conflicts, upcoming volatile elections, and external actors in the Horn of Africa have slowed down Commission’s mandate. Based on data analysed, to achieve better results at the Horn of Africa, this paper recommends a strengthened political will among the leaders of the Horn of Africa and the empowering of the inter-governmental Authority to intervene in a humanitarian crisis with or without government intervention.

Page(s): 120-126                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 03 August 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5703

 Magdalane Malinda Kikuvi
Pan African Institute of Governance, Nairobi, Kenya

Communiques
[1] African Union. (2019). Communique adopted by the Peace and Security Council at its 854th meeting held on 6th June 2019, on the situation in Sudan, Addis Ababa: African Union.
[2] African Union. 2020. Communique adopted by the Peace and Security Council at its 840th meeting held on 15th April 2019 on the situation in Sudan, Addis Ababa: African Union.
[3] Department for International Trade. (2021). Ghana-UK joint statement: Ghana-UK trade partnership agreement. Press release, UK. Retrieved from https://www.gov.uk/government/news/ghana-uk-joint- statement-ghana-uk-trade-partnership agreement#:~:text=Today%20Ghana%20and%20the%20UK,exporters%20to%20the%20Ghanaian%20market.
[4] ECOWAS Commission. (2021). Communique of the ECOWAS evaluation mission on the ongoing transition in Mali, Bamako: ECOWAS Commission Economic Community of West African States.
[5] Ministry of Foreign Affairs. (2020). Somalia reopens its embassy in Kenya, Nairobi: Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Kenya.
[6] Peace and Security Council. (2020). Communique adopted by the Peace and Security Council (PSC) of the African Union (AU), at its 941st meeting. Addis Ababa: Ethiopia.
[7] Peace and Security Council. (2019). Communique adopted by the Peace and Security Council at its 840th meeting held on 15th April 2019 on the situation in Sudan, Addis Ababa: Ethiopia.
[8] The Presidency. (2020). Joint communiqué issued by His Excellency Uhuru Kenyatta, President of the Republic of Kenya and His Excellency Muse Bihi Abdi, President of Somaliland, on the occasion of the official visit to Kenya from 13th to 14th December 2020. Retrieved from https://www.president.go.ke/2020/12/15/joint-communique-issued-by-his-excellency-uhuru-kenyatta-president-of-the-republic-of-kenya-and-his-excellency- muse-bihi-abdi-president-of-somaliland-on-the-occasion-of-the-official-visit-to-kenya-f/
[9] Ministry for Foreign Affairs. (2021). Press statement on the maritime delimitation case (Somalia vs. Kenya) at the International Court of Justice 15th-24th March 2021. No 6. Retrieved from https://www.mfa.go.ke/?p=3759
[10] United Nations. (2020). Security Council 8731st meeting; Somalia’s 2020 elections will be historic milestone on long journey back to security, stability; special representative tells Security Council: United Nations Security Council.
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[11] African Union. (2010). African Union Convention on the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons in Africa, Kampala: African Union.
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[13] African Union. (2021). Statement by His Excellency Hon. Uhuru Kenyatta, C.G.H, President of the Republic of Kenya and Commander-In-Chief of the Defence Forces during the Annual Presidential Briefing to the Diplomatic Corps on Thursday, 4th March 2021 at state house, Nairobi. Nairobi: Kenya.
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[15] Bahgat G. (2015). “Egypt in the aftermath of arab spring. What lies ahead” International Crisis Group. Conflict’s trend 2015/1. https://www.accord.org.za/conflict-trends/egypt-aftermath-arab-spring/
[16] Energy Information Administration. (2019). The Bab el-Mandeb Strait is a strategic route for oil and natural gas shipments. Report for the US energy information administration, Washington DC: UK
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[20] Mahamat, F. M. (2021). My vision for the end of the term 2021-2024. Addis Ababa: Ethiopia.
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ARTICLES
[27] Obulutsa G. (2021). Africa secures 400 million more Covid-19 vaccine doses. Retrieved from https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-africa-idUSKBN29X1CE
[28] Rossiter, A., and Cannon, B. J. (2019). “Re-examining the base. The political and security dimensions of turkey’s military presence in Somalia”. pp. 167-188 JSTOR. Retrieved from https://www.jstor.org/stable/26776053
[29] Wiebusch, M., Aniekwe, C.C., Oette, L., and Vandeginste. 2019. “The African Charter on Democracy, Elections and Governance: Trends, challenges and perspectives” p 99. Sagepub. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1177/0002039719896109

Magdalane Malinda Kikuvi
“Challenging Issues in the Horn of Africa (2016-2021): The Role of the African Union Commission in Conflict Resolution” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.120-126 July 2021  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5703

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Community Policing in Nigeria: Transplanting a Questionable Model

Egbo, Ken Amaechi and Akan, Kevin Akpanke – July 2021 Page No.: 127-134

Studies on community policing program philosophy have shown the model to be problematic and highly questionable and could not be transplanted to other societies without regard to their different environmental contexts. Studies in previous efforts to implement community policing in Nigeria show that these initiatives have not only been bedeviled by factors which have proven so troublesome for the community policing model elsewhere, but also by the socio-cultural ethos of Nigerian population, the territory’s unique political and economic position and the institutionalization of the Nigerian Police’s paramilitary traditions. This paper examines the experience of community policing in Nigeria as well as problems in implementing community policing program philosophy. The article not only provides a further illustration of the questionable nature of the community policing model, but also illustrates how and why policy making should always take into account local conditions instead of simply borrowing foreign models. The Nigeria Police Force (NPF) since1960s has developed along paramilitary structure

Page(s): 127-134                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 03 August 2021

 Egbo, Ken Amaechi
Department of Criminology and Security Studies, Federal University Oye-Ekiti, Ekiti State Nigeria

  Akan, Kevin Akpanke
Department of Criminology and Security Studies, Federal University Oye-Ekiti, Ekiti State Nigeria

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Egbo, Ken Amaechi and Akan, Kevin Akpanke “Community Policing in Nigeria: Transplanting a Questionable Model” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.127-134 July 2021  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5201

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Malaysia Pornography Consumption Effects Scale (MPCES): An Overview of Malaysian Self Perceived Effects of Pornography Consumption

Nuraini, N., Syaiful, N. A. H. – July 2021 Page No.: 135-141

The reason for this study is to identify index of pornography consumption effect of Malaysian people. The data collected from 1340 respondent from the age of 15 years old to 40 years old in Malaysia from various states. Data interpretation was carried out using Factor Analysis (FA) and Discriminant Analysis (DA). Respondent was giving the pornography consumption effect scale (PCES) used to measure self-perceived effects of hardcore pornography consumption on participants’ sexual behaviors or sex life, attitudes toward sex, sexual knowledge, life in general, and attitudes towards and perceptions of the opposite gender contain in 33 question. Data is analyzed using Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA), Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) and Discriminant Analysis (DA) which then computed to identify the most dominant factors whereas reducing the initial three parameters with recommended >0.50 of factor loading. Forward stepwise of DA show the total of groups validation percentage by 89.03% (19 independent). Result showed that the highest frequency of respondent index was at the moderate level (98.41% respondents). This showed that consumption effects on pornography are still in moderate level showing that respondent use pornography to gain knowledge on sex. This also affects how every respondent perception opposite gender on positive and respectful way. Although it gave a good impact but it also has to manage because it can lead to addiction toward pornography and giving hardship to respondent to manage.

Page(s): 135-141                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 03 August 2021

 Nuraini, N.
Faculty of Applied Social Sciences, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Kuala Nerus, 20300, Terengganu, Malaysia

 Syaiful, N. A. H.
Faculty of Applied Social Sciences, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Kuala Nerus, 20300, Terengganu, Malaysia

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Nuraini, N., Syaiful, N. A. H. “Malaysia Pornography Consumption Effects Scale (MPCES): An Overview of Malaysian Self Perceived Effects of Pornography Consumption” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.135-141 July 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/135-141.pdf

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Migrants’ Remittances, Financial Development and Economic Growth in Nigeria: A Vector Error Correction Model Approach

NEJO, Femi Michael – July 2021 Page No.: 142-147

Improvement in economic growth should take note of individual welfare in developing nations like Nigeria. Migrants’ remittance inflow and financial development are both needed to influence such desired growth. This study therefore, examined the effect of migrants’ remittances and financial development on economic growth in Nigeria from 1986-2019. The study obtained secondary data like real-GDP per capita, migrants’ remittance, financial index, real exchange rate and trade openness from Central Bank of Nigeria Statistical Bulletin 2019 and Word Bank Development Indicator, 2019. The Augmented Dickey Fuller (ADF) and Phillip Peron (PP) unit root tests employed confirmed that all the variable identified above were stationary at first level difference. Johansen Co-integration confirmed a long-run relationship among the variables. The lagged error correction (ECM) established that short-run and long-run dynamic was linked at an adjustment speed of 19.0% annually. Migrants’ remittance and trade openness were significant and directly related to real-GDP per capita; while, real exchange rate indirectly related to it. Also, financial index was directly related to it, but non-significant. The study concluded that impact of remittances on economic growth depends on the degree of liberalization of the economy; while exchange rate appreciation depresses it. Therefore, recommended that Nigeria government should put in place policies such as low charges on migrants’ remittance inflows in order to reduce inflow of such remittance through informal channel. Also, government must remove any trade barriers that could affect or reduce any form of free movement of remittance inflow.

Page(s): 142-147                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 03 August 2021

 NEJO, Femi Michael
Adekunle Ajasin University, Akungba-Akoko, Ondo-State, Nigeria

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NEJO, Femi Michael
“Migrants’ Remittances, Financial Development and Economic Growth in Nigeria: A Vector Error Correction Model Approach” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.142-147 July 2021  URL : https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/142-147.pdf

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The Key Drivers of Business Model Innovation in Developing Countries’ Firms: Survey of Micro and Small Scale Enterprises in Nigeria

Dotun Olaleye Faloye, Idowu Owoeye, Kunle Jayeola – July 2021 Page No.: 148-157

Recently, the attention giving to Business Model Innovation (BMI) and also the amount of literature on BMI had been increased. However, controversies among scholars and business practitioners on the generic factors that drive BMI in firms mostly small businesses in developing countries are yet to be settled. Hence, this study sought to determine the key drivers of BMI in Nigeria’s small businesses. Survey research design was employed, and items of instrument developed by previous researchers were adapted. The respondents of this study were Micro and small businesses owners/representatives in the study area, and data from 142 of them were subjected to Principal Component Analysis. The study employed an Orthogonal method of rotation using the Varimax approach. This study finding revealed that customer satisfaction and retention, market opportunities, regular assessment of operations, employee’s capabilities, increment in revenue generation, and efficient channel functions are the key discriminating factors driving BMI in micro and small business enterprises (MSEs) in Nigeria. Thus, the study concludes that employing these attributes may influence performance-related outcomes in Nigeria MSEs. .

Page(s): 148-157                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 August 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5704

 Dotun Olaleye Faloye
Department of Business Administration, Adekunle Ajasin University, Akungba Akoko, Nigeria

 Idowu Owoeye
Department of Business Administration, Adekunle Ajasin University, Akungba Akoko, Nigeria

 Kunle Jayeola
Department of Business Administration, Adekunle Ajasin University, Akungba Akoko, Nigeria

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Dotun Olaleye Faloye, Idowu Owoeye, Kunle Jayeola, “The Key Drivers of Business Model Innovation in Developing Countries’ Firms: Survey of Micro and Small Scale Enterprises in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.148-157 July 2021  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5704

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Assessment of the Effectiveness of Online Lectures by Bingham University during the Covid-19 Lockdown in Nigeria

Anthony Igyuve, PhD, Ben Odeba, Daburi Bello Misal- July 2021 Page No.: 158-165

Following the lockdown in Nigeria as a result of COVID-19 pandemic which affected academic activities, Bingham University in order to run an unbroken academic calendar adopted digital technology to deliver lectures to its students. This research assessed the use of digital media communication technology for delivering lectures by Bingham University during the Covid-19 lockdown. Survey research design was used for the study with documentary, questionnaire and interview as the instruments to elicit information from the respondents. Anchored on the Social Presence Theory, Media Richness Theory and the Diffusion of Innovation Theory, the study validates the assumptions of the aforementioned three theories of computer mediated communication (CMC) that digital media technology creates a considerable high level of social presence in a communication encounter, interactivity and the capability of the digital media to cater for every communication need in the 21st century. Further findings show that the use of online lectures was effective and it enabled Bingham University to complete its academic calendar for 2019/2020 academic session notwithstanding the COVID-19 lockdown in Nigeria. Findings further indicate that both staff and students demonstrated positive attitude towards the use of online lectures by the University. The result of the study also established that both staff and students encountered many challenges such as insufficient proficiency and experience in the use of digital technology for teaching and learning, cost of data, poor internet connectivity and poor power supply among others. Based on the findings, it is recommended that both staff and students undergo further training to improve their skills in the use of digital media technology, provision of adequate power supply, internet facilities and a general enabling environment for virtual teaching and learning to thrive.

Page(s): 158-165                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 August 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5705

 Anthony Igyuve, PhD
Department of Mass Communication, Nasarawa State University, Keffi, Nigeria

 Ben Odeba
Directorate of Academic Planning Bingham University, Karu, Nasarawa State, Nigeria

 Daburi Bello Misal
Directorate of Information and Protocol, Bingham University, Karu, Nasarawa State

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Anthony Igyuve, PhD, Ben Odeba, Daburi Bello Misal, “Assessment of the Effectiveness of Online Lectures by Bingham University during the Covid-19 Lockdown in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.158-165 July 2021  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5705

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Students’ Culture Shock and Cultural Intelligence:

Irma, Elfiondri, Oslan Amril- July 2021 Page No.: 166-170

Culture shock due to failure in integrating with people from different cultural backgrounds has frequently caused some students studying or doing an internship abroad to be so disappointed, frustrated, and even stressed or depressed that they fail in their study or internship. This study examines Bung Hatta University students’ culture shock, cultural intelligence, and the effect of the students’ cultural intelligence on the students’ culture shock, who did an internship in Japan. The study has the objectives to find the students’ culture shock and their cultural intelligence concerning their culture shock. This study posits cultural intelligence in the examination doe to that cultural intelligence can act to minimize the impact of culture shock. To achieve the objectives, the study applied a quantitative method with an online survey based on the theoretical concept of culture shock. The results were that the students had low culture shock. Most of them did not get the impact of culture shock in integrating with people from the Japanese cultural environment. The students’ cultural intelligence had a positive relationship with the low culture shock. Cultural intelligence could minimize the negative impact of culture shock on the students. Most of the students did not feel culturally socked from Japanese culture. In internship activity in Japan, they could act verbally and non-verbally in integrating with Japanese people.

Page(s): 166-170                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 August 2021

 Irma, Elfiondri
Faculty of Humanities, Universitas Bung Hatta, Indonesia

 Oslan Amril
Faculty of Humanities, Universitas Bung Hatta, Indonesia

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Irma, Elfiondri, Oslan Amril, “Students’ Culture Shock and Cultural Intelligence:” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.166-170 July 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/166-170.pdf

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A Social Review on Nature & Reason of Cyber-Crime and the Laws Regarding Prevention in Bangladesh

Khondokar Hafijur Rahaman, Md. Abul Hasam – July 2021 Page No.: 171-178

This paper tries to identify the nature, reason and prevention laws of cybercrime in Bangladesh. The study followed the qualitative technique and data collected from secondary sources. Cybercrime is a worldwide social phenomena in present technological era as the scientists, engineers and law enforcing agencies are getting very serious regarding security and safety of mass use of technological apparatus specially computer and internet. It covers such a broad scope of criminal activity; the examples above are only a few of the thousands of crimes that are considered cybercrimes. While computers and the Internet have made our lives easier in many ways, it is unfortunate that people also use these technologies to take advantage of others in unfair ways. Even after taking many protective and preventive measures, the crime is out of controlled. Therefore, it is smart to protect yourself by using antivirus and spyware blocking software and being careful where you enter your personal information. Overall cyber means committing any crime by using computer, information technology or any act which is forbidden by law. The study may help the policy makers and government personnel who take initiative to protect and prevention the crime of a society.

Page(s): 171-178                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 August 2021

  Khondokar Hafijur Rahaman
Journalist, the Daily Janakantha, Dhaka, Bangladesh

  Md. Abul Hasam
Department of Sociology, Primeasia University, Dhaka, Bangladesh

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Khondokar Hafijur Rahaman, Md. Abul Hasam “A Social Review on Nature & Reason of Cyber-Crime and the Laws Regarding Prevention in Bangladesh” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.171-178 July 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/171-178.pdf

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Factors Responsible For Youth Radicalization in Yobe State, Nigeria: Causes, Consequences and De-Radicalization Strategies

Abdulkarim Alhaji Isa, Mustapha Muhammed, Yahaya Abdullahi Geidam, Alkali Mohammed Grema – July 2021 Page No.: 179-190

The objective of this research is to investigate the factors responsible for youth radicalization in Yobe State, Nigeria. The study adopted social structure and anomie theory. A sample size of 315 respondents was selected through multi-stage sampling which includes; cluster sampling, purposive sampling, simple random sampling technique for qualitative data, and quantitative data were collected through questionnaire and in-depth interview respectively. Thus, the analysis was mixed method. The study found out that the extent of youth radicalization in Yobe State is very high because more youths are being recruited. Illiteracy, ignorance, poverty, religious manipulation, globalisation, unemployment, injustice and political interests are some of the factors that motivated the youths to join radicalized groups. Consequences of youth radicalization include; destruction of lives, valuable properties, displacement of families and widespread public panic. To address youth radicalization in Yobe State, the study recommended that education, enlightenment, provision of employment, protecting the youths from extremist views spread by less knowledgeable preachers, community policing, guidance and counseling of arrested radicalized youths and use of intelligence gathering safeguard the border from foreign influences.

Page(s): 179-190                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 August 2021

 Abdulkarim Alhaji Isa
Department of General Studies, Mai Idris Alooma Polytechnic, Geidam, Yobe State

 Mustapha Muhammed
Department of General Studies, Mai Idris Alooma Polytechnic, Geidam, Yobe State

 Yahaya Abdullahi Geidam
Department of General Studies, Mai Idris Alooma Polytechnic, Geidam, Yobe State

 Alkali Mohammed Grema
Department of General Studies, Mai Idris Alooma Polytechnic, Geidam, Yobe State, Nigeria

[1] Abimbola, J. O. &Adesote, S. A. (2012). Domestic Terrorism and Boko Haram Insurgency in Nigeria, Issues and Trends: A historical discourse. Journal of Arts and Contemporary Society. Vol, 4, September.
[2] Adebayo, A. A. (2013). Youth’s Unemployment and Crime in Nigeria: A Nexus and Implication for National Development. International Journalof Sociology and Anthropology, 5 (8):350-357.
[3] Adenrele, A. R. (2012). Boko Haram Insurgency in Nigeria as a Symptom of Poverty and Political Alienation. IOSR Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences, 3(5): 21-26.
[4] Adewumi, A. A. (2014). The Battle for the Minds: Insurgency and Counter-insurgency in Northern Nigeria. In West Africa InsightVol. 4 No. 2. Pp 3-11
[5] Bell, A. (2010). “The Subculture Concept: A Genealogy”. In S. G. Shoham, P. Knepper &M. Keff (eds.) International Handbook of Criminology. Boca Raton: CRC Press. pp. 153-184.
[6] Benedek, W. (2010). “The Human Security Approach to Terrorism and Organized Crime in Post Conflict Situations”. In W. Benedek, C. Daase, V. Dimitrijevic ´ and P. van Duyne (eds.) Transnational Terrorism, Organized Crime and Peace-Building. London: Palgrave Macmillan.
[7] Campbell, K. M. Weitz, R. (2006). Non-Military Strategies for Countering Islamist Terrorism: Lessons Learned from Pat Counterinsurgencies. Princeton Project Papers. [online] Available: http://www.wws.princeton.edu.ppns (Retrieved on 4rd January, 2020).
[8] Edobor, F. O. (2014). The Impact of Terrorism and Violence on Entrepreneurs in Nigeria. In Research Papers on Knowledge, Innovation and Enterprise. Pp. 132-147.
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[10] Kilcullen, D. (2004). Countering Global Insurgency. Version 2.2 30th November, 2004.
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[13] Mukhtar, U., Mukhtar, J.I. & Mukhtar, H.Y. (2015). Unemployment Among Youth in Nigeria: A
[14] Challenge for Millennium Development Goals. Researchjournal’sJournal of Economics. 3 (3): 1-12.
[15] Nyong, M.O. (2013). Unemployment Convergence among the 36 States in Nigeria. Being a Revised Paper Presented at Finance and Economic Conference in Frankfurt Am Main, Germany, Thursday 4th July-Saturday 6th July, 2013.
[16] Okpaga, A., Chijioke, U.S. &Eme, O.I. (2012). Activities of Boko Haram and Insecurity Question in Nigeria. Arabian Journal of Business and Management Review. 1 (9) 77-99.
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[19] Omotor, I.G. (2009). ‘Socio-economic Determinants of Crime in Nigeria’. Pakistan Journal of Social Sciences. 6 (2): 54-59.
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Abdulkarim Alhaji Isa, Mustapha Muhammed, Yahaya Abdullahi Geidam, Alkali Mohammed Grema “Factors Responsible For Youth Radicalization in Yobe State, Nigeria: Causes, Consequences and De-Radicalization Strategies” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.179-190 July 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/179-190.pdf

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Readiness for Online Learning among Students Amidst COVID-19: A Case of a Selected HEI in Sri Lanka

D. A. Akuratiya, D. N. R. Meddage- July 2021 Page No.: 191-197

With the emergence of coronavirus, online learning has become the promising solution for the tertiary educational institutes which are currently in an environment of intense change. Considering students’ readiness for online learning under this situation is important to continue education without interruption and for the success of students especially in tertiary education. One of the aspects of online learning readiness is technological readiness. Hence present survey investigated the technological factors, ICT skills, and competencies influencing readiness in online learning and challenges faced during online learning among diploma students at the selected HEI in Sri Lanka. A self-administrated online questionnaire (Google Form) was distributed among Accountancy and Business Finance diploma students in the selected institute during the period of closure. Results show that respondents rely heavily on smartphones (62.4%) and mobile data to connect internet (74.4%). The results revealed that the respondents are familiar and experienced with the required ICT such as basic and advanced computer skills, using online tools, and online communication. However, the students’ overall readiness for online learning is moderate. The biggest challenges for the students are a poor internet connection, high cost for data, and limited broadband data. It can be concluded that students are well equipped in using technology in formal environments and are ready to use these technologies to support and continue their learning.

Page(s): 191-197                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 05 August 2021

 D. A. Akuratiya
Department of Accountancy, Department of Information Technology, ATI-Dehiwala, SLIATE, Sri Lanka

 D. N. R. Meddage
Department of Accountancy, Department of Information Technology, ATI-Dehiwala, SLIATE, Sri Lanka

[1]. Akuratiya, D. A., & Meddage, N. R. (2020). Students’ perception of online learning during COVID-19 pandemic: A survey study of IT students. International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS), IV(IX), 755-758.
[2]. Atkinson, J.K., & Blenakenship, R. (2009). Online learning readiness of undergraduate college students: A comparison between male and female learners. International Journal of Learning in Higher Education, 5(2), 49-56.
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[16]. Olayemi, O. M., Adamu, H., & Olayemi, K. J. (2021). Perception and readiness of students towards online learning in Nigeria during Covid-19 pandemic. Library Philosophy and Practice (e-journal). Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/5051
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[18]. Rafique, G. M., Mahmood, K., Warraich, N. F., & Rehman, S. U. (2021). Readiness for online learning during COVID-19 pandemic: A survey of Pakistani LIS students. The Journal of Academic Librarianship. Retrieved from https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0099133321000379
[19]. Topal, A. D. (2016). Examination of University Students’ Level of Satisfaction and Readiness for E-Courses and the Relationship between Them. European Journal of Contemporary Education, 15(1), 7-23.
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D. A. Akuratiya, D. N. R. Meddage, “Readiness for Online Learning among Students Amidst COVID-19: A Case of a Selected HEI in Sri Lanka” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.191-197 July 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/191-197.pdf

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A Study on Increasing Positive Behaviors Using Positive Reinforcement Techniques

Vivetha Gunaretnam – July 2021 Page No.: 198-219

Positive reinforcement works by presenting a motivating/reinforcing stimulus to the person after the desired behavior is exhibited, making the behavior more likely to happen in the future. Classroom management is one of the most common problems facing by teachers because disruptive students take up valuable learning time. Students with disruptive, defiant, and disrespectful behaviors often make it difficult for teachers to teach and students to learn. The techniques based on positive reinforcement lack popular and professional acceptability because they are time-intensive, offer little compensation for educators, contradict popular views of developmental psychology, threaten special interest groups, are socially unacceptable, and demean humans. To investigate more on this area, the researcher identified positive reinforcement techniques applied by school teachers on primary students, the effectiveness of the reinforcement techniques for reward, and identified social work interventions to promote positive reinforcement. To conduct this study the researcher selected the Manmunai North zone from Batticaloa, Sri Lanka. This research study was explored through a mixed-method and sequential explanatory research design. The tools such as interview schedule and questionnaire were used to collect data. The collected data were analyzed through SPSS software and thematic analysis. The researcher was able to find the techniques under sensory, natural, material, generalized and social reinforcements. From the techniques most of the teachers agreed with positive reinforcement techniques from sensory, natural, material, generalized and social reinforcements, increase the desirable behavior high in the academic performances except two techniques from generalized reinforcement. The researcher found that the issues in promoting positive reinforcement techniques through the individual level, group level system level, and the social work interventions also found under in mentioned levels. From the overall findings, the researcher can able to induct a hybrid mixture of the explanatory model from the combination of reinforcement model and social interaction model in Social Work Practice.

Page(s): 198-219                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 05 August 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5706

 Vivetha Gunaretnam
(Dip. Counselling, BSW (hons), MSW (c), Sri Lanka)
National Institute of Social Development, Sri Lanka

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[17] Tynan, K. (2017, May 15). The Reinforcement Model: Innovative Approaches to eLearning That Increase Confidence and Competence. Retrieved from Core Axis: https://coreaxis.com/the-reinforcement-model-elearning/

Vivetha Gunaretnam , “A Study on Increasing Positive Behaviors Using Positive Reinforcement Techniques” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.198-219 July 2021  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5706

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An Investigation into the Relationship between Human Resource Development on Organizational Performance a Case Study of United Bank for Africa-Sierra Leone (UBA-SL)

Shekou Ansumana Nuni, Ibrahim Alusine Kebe – July 2021 – Page No.: 220-226

Organizational performance depends on the quality of its human resources and the human resources development strategy being an integral part of organizations’ strategic plan and its practicability. Hence, this study was aimed at assessing the effectiveness of human resource development on organizational performance at the United Bank for Africa (UBA).
For this study, the scope was approximately 5 years and 100 employees who were randomly selected from a population of 135 to provide answers with the use of questionnaires and interviews, and also descriptive tools were adopted for data analysis.
Findings revealed that over ninety percent (90%) of the respondents strongly believed that the bank has a training policy which show a commitment in training awareness in the bank and majority of these respondents believed that the trainings conducted are designed to support the achievement of the bank’s goals and strategy.
The study further recommended that the Bank should capacitate employees in order to improve performance, and also adopt an attractive reward system to retain key staff.

Page(s): 220-226                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 05 August 2021

 

 Shekou Ansumana Nuni
Institute of Public Administration and Management, University of Sierra Leone
Faculty of Management Sciences, Department of Business Administration and Entrepreneurship Development

  Ibrahim Alusine Kebe
Institute of Public Administration and Management, University of Sierra Leone
Faculty of Management Sciences, Department of Business Administration and Entrepreneurship Development

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[9] Naquin, Sharon & Holton, Elwood & III, Elwood. (2002). The effects of personality, affectivity, and work commitment on motivation to improve work through learning. Human Resource Development Quarterly. 13. 357 – 376. 10.1002/hrdq.1038.
[10] Paauwe, Jaap & Guest, David & Wright, Patrick. (2013). HRM and Performance: Achievements and Challenges.
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[15] Watson, J. B. (1913). Psychology as the behaviorist views it. Psychological Review, 20(2), 158–177. https://doi.org/10.1037/h0074428

Shekou Ansumana Nuni, Ibrahim Alusine Kebe “An Investigation into the Relationship between Human Resource Development on Organizational Performance a Case Study of United Bank for Africa-Sierra Leone (UBA-SL)” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.220-226 July 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/220-226.pdf

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Analysis of Road Crashes and Categories of Vehicle Involved in Lagos Metropolis between 2010-2019

Asaju Joel Ayodeji, Ewiolo Sonnie Agbons, Ajala, Abdul-Rahman Taiwo – July 2021 – Page No.: 227-232

The study investigated Analysis of Road Crashes and Categories of Vehicle Involved in Lagos Metropolis between 2010-2019. The researchers used survey design of the descriptive type of research for the study, the research instrument used for this study was a self-structured closed ended questionnaire designed by the researchers. Inferential statistics of Pearson’s Product Moment Correlation (PPMC) was used to test the hypotheses postulated at 0.05 level of significance. The researchers affirmed that there was a significant relationship between sports and class attendance, also it was established that there was a significant relationship between sports and educational aspiration among secondary school students’ in Ondo State. The researchers recommended that, there should be orientation programme organized for secondary school students in order to make them understand the benefits of participating in sports, state government should give scholarship to students who participate in sports so as to motivate and encourage them for better and greater educational aspiration.

Page(s): 227-232                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 05 August 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5707

 Asaju Joel Ayodeji
School of Transport Lagos State University, Ojo, Lagos, Nigeria

 Ewiolo Sonnie Agbons
M.T.P. Student School of Transport Lagos State University, Ojo, Lagos, Nigeria

  Ajala, Abdul-Rahman Taiwo
MPhil/PhD Student, School of Transport Lagos State University, Ojo, Lagos, Nigeria

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Asaju Joel Ayodeji, Ewiolo Sonnie Agbons, Ajala, Abdul-Rahman Taiwo “Analysis of Road Crashes and Categories of Vehicle Involved in Lagos Metropolis between 2010-2019” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.227-232 July 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5707

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China –United States Hegemonic Politics and Capacity Dilemma of East African States: The Case of Kenya

Dr. George Katete- July 2021 Page No.: 233-241

Using secondary sources of data including credible governmental reports, international policy groups data and newspaper analysis, this study explores the outcome of hegemonic competition between the western powers led by the United States of America on the one hand and China on the other hand – on the capacity of Kenya. It particularly focuses on the outcome of interactions of the two powers – US and China on Kenya. The study addresses two questions: i) To what extent has Kenya taken full charge of human development by providing an environment through which their citizens’ access to welfare needs are not undermined, in the wake of increased China-Africa infrastructure development? ii) How have responses by the U.S in war against terrorism and other security threats affected the capacity of Kenya to deal with security challenges in the nation? State capacity is defined as the ability of a respective state to responsibly fulfill security functions and provide an amicable environment through which their nationalities can meet their welfare needs reliably, and in a sustainable manner. High capacity states are able to provide public goods including human security, health care and the social and physical infrastructure that promote human development. Low capacity states are limited in their ability to provide these goods leading to low development levels and even state failure. The article concludes that competition of the foreign powers in the east African nations have undermined the implementation of their national plans. Notwithstanding the aid and developmental infrastructure that china is engaged in within Kenya, there are other enterprises that continue to overshadow the Kenyan based middle level income opportunities and the government needs to conform to reality for the survival of the people within the country, who are abandoned – which means that the government is no-longer properly in charge of key responsibilities of security and human development since entry of China in Africa

Page(s): 233-241                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 05 August 2021

 Dr. George Katete
Lecturer, Department of Political Science and Public Administration, University of Nairobi, Kenya

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Dr. George Katete, “China –United States Hegemonic Politics and Capacity Dilemma of East African States: The Case of Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.233-241 July 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/233-241.pdf

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Project Design Approaches, Community Participation and Performance of Water Projects

Obadiah Mutinda Kithome, Dr. Angelline Mulwa, Dr. Charles M. Wafula- July 2021 Page No.: 242-250

The performance of water projects can be influenced by project design approaches and community participation. Access to water is a basic human need and a fundamental human right that is key for human and economic development. The provision of sustainable water supply in terms of quantity and quality is a critical aspect in achieving socio-economic development. The Constitution of Kenya 2010, states that every person has a right to clean and safe water in adequate quantities, however, this has been impaired by the current poor performance of water projects across the world, which has been a result of project design challenges coupled by low community participation which has led to dismal performance of water projects. The main aim of this study paper was to review existing literature to establish the relationship among project design approaches, community participation, and performance of water projects. In project planning and management context, the performance of water projects can be either positive or negative depending on whether it was implemented within the triple constraint of time, cost, and quality to the scope and delivered sustainable benefits to the clients. The study utilised a desktop review to access the available literature on project design approaches, community participation in the performance of water projects across the world. The study was based on the systems and stakeholder theories and the following propositions were made;- availability of resources, project risk management,monitoring and evaluation, and community participation have a significant influence on the performance of water projects. The paper concluded that project design approaches and community participation influence the performance of water projects. The study recommended that availability of resources, risk management, monitoring and evaluation, and community participation should be clear in the project life cycle stages to enhance performance in the water projects.

Page(s): 242-250                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 06 August 2021

 Obadiah Mutinda Kithome
PhD Student, University of Nairobi-Kenya

 Dr. Angelline Mulwa
Lecturers ,University of Nairobi-Kenya

 Dr. Charles M. Wafula
Lecturers ,University of Nairobi-Kenya

[1] Alqahtani, F., Chinyio, E., Mushatat, S., &Oloke, D. (2015). Factors effecting performance of projects: A conceptual framework. International Journal of Scientific & Engineering Research, 6(4), 670-676.
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[25] Prokopy, L. S. (2005). The relationship between participation and project outcomes: Evidence from rural water supply projects in India. World development, 33(11), 1801-1819.
[26] Rabechini Junior, R., & Monteiro de Carvalho, M. (2013). Understanding the impact of project risk management on project performance: An empirical study. Journal of technology management & innovation, 8, 6-6.
[27] Rolik, Y. (2017). Risk management in implementing wind energy project. Procedia Engineering, 178, 278-288.
[28] Rugiri, M. N., & Njangiru, J. M. (2018). Effect of resource availability on performance of water projects funded by constituency development fund in Nyeri County, Kenya. International Academic Journal of Information Sciences and Project Management, 3(2), 378-393.
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Obadiah Mutinda Kithome, Dr. Angelline Mulwa, Dr. Charles M. Wafula, “Project Design Approaches, Community Participation and Performance of Water Projects” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.242-250 July 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/242-250.pdf

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The devil in the number: Rethinking Garrett Hardin’s The tragedy of the commons and global overpopulation crisis

Taiwo A. Olaiya – July 2021 Page No.: 251-262

Critiques of the misconstrued thesis of Garrett Hardin’s (1968) classic essay entitled The Tragedy of the Commons from the futility of technical solution for overpopulation crisis to concern of managing the commons are well documented. However, little is known of the remote and proximate causes of the pejorative confusion about the important essay. This article engages the discursive reconstruction of Hardin’s thesis focussing on the original intent, which is the unscrupulousness of unchecked human breeding as the critical factor in the tragedy of the earth’s commons. Deployed is an eloquent metaphor, the devil in the number, and thematic analysis of the (Hardin’s) essay and systematic review of relevant and related literature before and after the essay was published in 1968. The texts reinvent and reinforce the illogic of overpopulating the world while simultaneously pursuing the technocratic solutions to nature’s burden. The article reports four marked factors that swayed the perception of Hardin’s thesis. In effect, the attempt stimulates a discourse showcasing the significance of Hardin’s essay, particularly the global lackadaisical attitude towards overpopulation as a strategic, if not the single most important, factor in the overburdened ecosystem and, by extension, as the harbinger for the socio-economic and governance crisis across the global divides.

Page(s): 251-262                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 06 August 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5708

 Taiwo A. Olaiya
Department of Public Administration, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria

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Taiwo A. Olaiya , “The devil in the number: Rethinking Garrett Hardin’s The tragedy of the commons and global overpopulation crisis” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.251-262 July 2021  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5708

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A Critical Analysis of the Impacts of Corporate Governance in the Banking Sector in Nigeria

Chief Ajugwe, Chukwu Alphonsus Phd. – July 2021 – Page No.: 263-268

It is absolutely necessary that each bank in Nigeria not only should put a code of corporate governance in place but must make sure it is observed by all the staff in the banks, inclusive of the board members whose duties is to ensure that the staff observe the code and to enforce sanctions should any staff goes contrary to the code of corporate governance. Therefore, it is germane to note that efficient corporate governance is necessary in the banking sector to survive and to be sanitized as it confers on the banks certain indisputable advantages such as increase in profitability, robust and sound cash flow, solid capital base, and ensuring that the interest of the staff is aligned with that of bank for greater productivity. Such banks engender the interest of the stake holders and confidentiality of the public which will in turn lead to the increase in depositors’ fund. A sound banking sector is absolutely necessary for development of financial market that will trigger economic growth and development. On the contrary, poor or lack of corporate governance on the banking sector may lead to the distress of many banks and impacting negatively on the economy.
The thrust of the paper is to examine the impacts of corporate governance on the banking sector, the negative consequences of poor or lack of corporate governance on the banking sector will be subjected to deeper analysis and the paper will go a long way to proffer recommendations to improve corporate governance on the banking sector in Nigeria.

Page(s): 263-268                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 06 August 2021

 

 Chief Ajugwe, Chukwu Alphonsus Phd.
Ajugwe Chukwu and Associates

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Chief Ajugwe, Chukwu Alphonsus Phd. “A Critical Analysis of the Impacts of Corporate Governance in the Banking Sector in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.263-268 July 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/263-268.pdf

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Challenges in the Investment of ICT Infrastructure at Secondary School in Zambia, in Promoting Quality Education Delivery

Peggy Nsama, Margaret Mwale-Mkandawire, Sibeso Lisulo, Webster Hamweete and Simuyaba Eunifridah – July 2021 – Page No.: 269-279

The Information and Communication Technology (ICT) industry has undergone unprecedented growth, making significant contribution to global trade and investment. Over the years, governments have developed plans to intensify investments in ICT in education. Most countries are now leveraging on the education and economic benefits on investing in ICT, as societies are increasingly gravitating from efficient to being knowledge based. This paper focuses on the challenges in investing in ICT infrastructure in secondary schools in promoting quality education delivery. Data was generated and gathered using a convergent parallel mixed-methods design, using questionnaires (Teachers: N=360), semi-structured interviews (18 Ministry of Education Officials and 36 Head Teachers), Focus Group Discussions (324 pupils) and supplemented by document analysis. Participants were drawn from four provinces in Zambia: Lusaka, Copperbelt, Eastern and Luapula. The paper was anchored on The Theory of Capital Investment Appraisal Technique (CIAT). Quantitative data was analysed using SPPS using both descriptive and inferential statistics while qualitative data was subjected to thematic analysis.
The paper highlights significant challenges in ICT, among others: load-shedding of power in most schools; inadequate infrastructure, which compromised the input, process and output to education. Due to lack of specialised computer laboratories, some schools converted classrooms into computer laboratories. Hence, affecting the lifespan of the facilities. The study concludes that most of the challenges the country had were a result of lack of an investment criteria and strategy in ICT for schools, making it difficult to monitor or attract support from other stakeholders. Based on the findings and conclusions, the following recommendations were made: This study proposes an investment framework in ICT (ICTCIF), under the PPP approach (BOT Model), to invest in ICT in education. Which the Ministry of Education, with support from other stakeholders, should test and assess its potential benefit to the Zambian education system.

Page(s): 269-279                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 August 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5709

 Peggy Nsama
Department of Educational Administration and Policy Studies, The University of Zambia, Zambia

 Margaret Mwale-Mkandawire
Department of Educational Administration and Policy Studies, The University of Zambia, Zambia

  Sibeso Lisulo
Department of Educational Administration and Policy Studies, The University of Zambia, Zambia

  Webster Hamweete
Department of Educational Administration and Policy Studies, The University of Zambia, Zambia

  Simuyaba Eunifridah
Department of Educational Administration and Policy Studies, The University of Zambia, Zambia

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Peggy Nsama, Margaret Mwale-Mkandawire, Sibeso Lisulo, Webster Hamweete and Simuyaba Eunifridah “Challenges in the Investment of ICT Infrastructure at Secondary School in Zambia, in Promoting Quality Education Delivery” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.269-279 July 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5709

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Impact of Alcohol Consumption on Cognitive and Academic Performance of Students at David Livingstone College of Education

Martin Chabu, Kasebula Francis, Elliot Machinyise- July 2021 Page No.: 280-286

The paper attempted to establish the impact of alcohol consumption on cognitive and academic performance of students at David Livingstone College of education. The study used a qualitative type of research based primarily on materials collected by researchers from various literatures and the observation method was used to elicit data pertaining to student’s characteristics, behaviour and attitudes towards the academic performance. This study revealed that alcohol consumption by students at David Livingstone College of education has a direct adverse effect on the cognitive and academic functioning of the students as well as other characteristics of their social life. The study has also revealed that students who come from homes where parents drink alcohol are more likely to abuse alcohol than those whose parents do not drink and are very strict with their children when it comes to beer drinking.

Page(s): 280-286                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 August 2021

 Martin Chabu
(MA in History) David Livingstone College of Education Livingstone, Zambia

 Kasebula Francis
(MED Special Education) David Livingstone College of Education Livingstone, Zambia

 Elliot Machinyise
(MED Applied Linguistics) David Livingstone College of Education Livingstone, Zambia

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Martin Chabu, Kasebula Francis, Elliot Machinyise, “Impact of Alcohol Consumption on Cognitive and Academic Performance of Students at David Livingstone College of Education” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.280-286 July 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/280-286.pdf

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Distributed Leadership Practices and Applications in Education Management: A Current Architecture for Educational Leadership, A theoretical Overview

GN Shava, P Dube, A. Maradze, C. M. Ncube- July 2021 Page No.: 287-295

Distributed leadership has become one of the most current architecture in education management. A review of literature reveals broadness in the manor and potential it has brought about in school improvement. While the concept of distributed leadership is regarded to be the most favoured normative model of education management, the understanding of its practices in education leadership discourse is still broad and contested. Distributed leadership entered the leadership and organisational theory discourse and clearly appealed to various scholars, policy makers and administrators and practitioners as a key leadership strategy to frame and promote their operations. Over the past years, distributed leadership has framed theoretical, empirical, and development work for education leadership. Despite frequently expressed reservations concerning its fundamental theoretical weakness, distributed leadership has grown to become the preferred leadership concept and has acquired an axiomatic status. The authors take a contemporary look at distributed leadership in practice by examining literature on the existing knowledge, theories and concepts focusing on distributed leadership in the education landscape. The authors draw upon a wide range of research literature to explore the available empirical evidence about distributed leadership and organisational outcomes. The authors address some common misconceptions that are associated with the concept of distributed leadership, how it can benefit the management of education institutions to improve the quality of teaching and learning and highlights future developments of distributed leadership. The authors argue that the distributed perspective in school leadership offer a new and important theoretical lens through which leadership practice can be reconfigured and reconceptualised. Hopefully, this article serves as a useful contribution to the on-going research and development work on school leadership to enhance the quality of teaching and learning from a distributed perspective.

Page(s): 287-295                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 August 2021

 GN Shava
National University of Science and Technology, Bulawayo, Zimbabwe

 P Dube
National University of Science and Technology, Bulawayo, Zimbabwe

 A. Maradze
Lupane State University, Lupane, Zimbabwe

 C. M. Ncube
Lupane State University, Lupane, Zimbabwe

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GN Shava, P Dube, A. Maradze, C. M. Ncube, “Distributed Leadership Practices and Applications in Education Management: A Current Architecture for Educational Leadership, A theoretical Overview” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.287-295 July 2021  DOI: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/287-295.pdf

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Adoption of Agricultural Innovations: The Effectiveness of Communication Channels Used in the Diffusion of Zero Grazing among Dairy Farmers in Bureti Sub County, Kericho County, Kenya

Emily Keles Muli – July 2021 Page No.: 296-299

This study was carried out to investigate the effectiveness of communication channels on the diffusion and adoption of zero grazing farming method among dairy farmers in Bureti Sub-County of Kericho County. Mixed method research approach was adopted and data was collected using observation, focus group discussions and structured interviews to provide both qualitative and quantitative data. The sample size was determined by a simplified formula provided by Yamane (1967) to obtain a sample of 396 households at 95% confidence level. The study showed that radio, TV, internet, agro-vets and ‘other farmers’ were the preferred sources of farming information among dairy farmers in Bureti Sub County. The sources used by change agents – demos/workshops, meetings/barazas and extension workers were rarely used by farmers either as sources of farming information or for decision making in the adoption of zero-grazing method. In decisions to adopt zero-grazing, the radio, the TV and internet were the preferred communication methods

Page(s): 296-299                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 August 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5710

 Emily Keles Muli
School of Science and Technology, University of Kabianga, Kenya

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Emily Keles Muli , “Adoption of Agricultural Innovations: The Effectiveness of Communication Channels Used in the Diffusion of Zero Grazing among Dairy Farmers in Bureti Sub County, Kericho County, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.296-299 July 2021  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5710

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Competitive strategies adopted by small and medium dairy processors in Nairobi County, Kenya

Veronica Mwangangi, David Kabata (PhD), Jeketule Jacob Soko (PhD) – July 2021 Page No.: 300-309

The dairy industry in Kenya plays an important role in the creation of employment and food security. It is one of the major drivers which the country is using to achieve the Sustainable Development goals and Kenya Vision 2030. The success of the sector however, is dependent on the ability of the different firms to improve performance through gaining a competitive edge that is sustainable. The main purpose of this study was to find out the competitive strategies used by small and medium dairy processors in Nairobi County. The study used a descriptive survey research design, and a census of the firms. Questionnaire was the key instrument of data collection. The data collected was analyzed using descriptive statistics. The summarized information was presented using tables and charts. The study found out that the dairy enterprises had adopted the differentiation strategy more than the cost leadership, cost focus and differentiation focus strategies as represented by 32% of the respondents. It is recommended that a longitudinal and inferential study be carried out on a larger study population of the small and medium dairy firms, which extends beyond Nairobi County. The study recommended that a replication of the study be carried out using more objective measures of performance like profits. The conclusions made from the study findings may be used by managers of both existing firms and new entrants into the industry, who may need to make decisions on what competitive strategies may be suited to their business in order to position themselves in the industry and to improve performance

Page(s): 300-309                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 August 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5711

 Veronica Mwangangi
Tangaza University College, Kenyaon

 David Kabata (PhD)
Tangaza University College, Kenya

 Jeketule Jacob Soko (PhD)
Tangaza University College, Kenya

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Veronica Mwangangi, David Kabata (PhD), Jeketule Jacob Soko (PhD) , “Competitive strategies adopted by small and medium dairy processors in Nairobi County, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.300-309 July 2021  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5711

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Influence of Sex Education on Abortion Prevention among Adolescents in High Level, Makurdi Local Government Area of Benue State

Dzer, Benjamin Terzungwe PhD, Igomu Maria Oojo N’s, Onuh, Onuh Emmanuel- July 2021 Page No.: 310-318

This study was conducted to find out the influence of sex education on abortion prevention among adolescents in High Level, Makurdi Local Government Area of Benue State. The objectives of the study were, to identify the major factors responsible for lack of sex education among adolescents, to identify the various means of carrying out sex education among adolescents, to identify if adolescents have the right information about sex and sexuality, to identify the influence of sex education on abortion prevention among adolescents. Related literatures were reviewed. A descriptive research design was used to study 100 respondents which were selected from a target population of 200 adolescents. A simple random sampling technique was employed. The instrument used for data collection was a self-constructed Sex Education questionnaire (SEQ) and Abortion Prevention questionnaire (APQ). The results were analyzed and presented using tables. Findings of the study showed that, family settings, schools, culture, peers, mass media are some of the major factors responsible for lack of appropriate sex education among adolescents in High Level, Makurdi. Parents/guardians, schools/teachers, peers/friends, religious bodies are some of the means of carrying out sex education among adolescents. Some of the influence of appropriate sex education includes, abortion prevention, reduction in the rate of teenage/adolescent pregnancy and adolescent fatherhood, prevention of STIs including HIV/AIDs etc. Based on these findings major recommendations are that the government should create and fund effective sex education programs, seminars and sex education should be included in secondary school curriculum.

Page(s): 310-318                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 09 August 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5712

 Dzer, Benjamin Terzungwe PhD
Department of Nursing College of Health Sciences Benue State University, Makurdi, Nigeria

 Igomu Maria Oojo N’s
Department of Nursing College of Health Sciences Benue State University, Makurdi, Nigeria

  Onuh, Onuh Emmanuel
Department of Clinical Psychology, Federal Medical Center, Makurdi, Benue State, Nigeria

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Dzer, Benjamin Terzungwe PhD, Igomu Maria Oojo N’s, Onuh, Onuh Emmanuel, “Influence of Sex Education on Abortion Prevention among Adolescents in High Level, Makurdi Local Government Area of Benue State” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.310-318 July 2021  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5712

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Modeling a social media-based solution for Marketing Library Services in Sri Lanka: A User-Librarian Collaborative Model (ULCM)

Dr. A.W.V Athukorala- July 2021 Page No.: 319-326

The use of social media platforms is in a very low capacity in the provision of their services in university libraries of Sri Lanka. Though a very limited number of university libraries utilize social media concepts, they do not use it as a marketing tool. The library is the place where all new information and knowledge is deposited. However, most of the students are unaware of or have little knowledge of what is available in the library. Social media can be used to increase the awareness of the library’s services among university students. This paper attempted to introduce a social media-based solution for marketing library services in Sri Lanka. To support this, a research study was carried out to look into the possibilities of using social media to market university libraries. A survey method was adapted and questionnaire was used collect the data from the academic library professionals working under higher education institutions in Sri Lanka. A total of 123 library professionals (N) were invited to respond to a survey questionnaire that was given to them through email. The totally field completed surveys were returned by 113 library professionals (n) who work at various libraries. The study identified Facebook as the most important and powerful tool used by the library professionals in Sri Lanka. Facebook was also revealed to be the most effective platform for marketing university libraries. This positive attitude of academics on Facebook can be converted into a usable tool to market the services and resources in the libraries. A User-Librarian collaborative model which can be implemented to market university libraries in Sri Lanka through social media platforms was suggested as a result of the research findings of this study. The proposed model, connects the major parties of the library, users, and library management, efficiently and effectively to function daily activities of the system smoothly. Further, it would address the basic requirements that should be fulfilled and satisfied by both parties in the process. Additionally, the model provides some functions from both points of view.

Page(s): 319-326                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 09 August 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5713

  Dr. A.W.V Athukorala
Senior Assistant Librarian, Sri Palee Campus, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka

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Dr. A.W.V Athukorala”Modeling a social media-based solution for Marketing Library Services in Sri Lanka: A User-Librarian Collaborative Model (ULCM)” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.319-326 July 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5713

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House Does Not Be for Sale,Begawan Solo Watershed Communities Forced to Survive

Dr. Mondry – July 2021 Page No.: 327-330

People who are living in the Begawan Solo watershed in Bojonegoro Regency were asked why they would not move even though they would face flooding every year, most of them felt fine with that. For them, they don’t mind because the flood is not dangerous. The answer comes from the construction they received from previous generations. However, later in the study it was found that they did not want to move because their house was difficult to sell. Residents outside the neighborhood do not want to buy, because they already know that houses in that location will be flooded every rainy season every year. The people living in the area are not able to solve their problems. Every year they will continue to experience flooding, without the participation of the district and provincial governments to overcome the problems they face.

Page(s): 327-330                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 09 August 2021

 Dr. Mondry
Universitas Brawijaya, Malang, Indonesia.

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Dr. Mondry “House Does Not Be for Sale,Begawan Solo Watershed Communities Forced to Survive” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.327-330 July 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/327-330.pdf

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Study on Socio-Economic Status and Constraints Faced by the Livestock Farmers of the Aspirational Districts of West Bengal, India

Sreetama Bhattacharjee, K. C. Dhara, S. S. Kesh, S. Ghosh, P. Dasgupta (Das), A. K. Giri, B. Sarkar, S. Roy, S. Bose, A Dey – July 2021 Page No.: 331-340

The study was conducted on socio-economic status and constraints faced by the farmers in purposively selected five aspirational districts (as identified by the NITI Aayog, Govt. of India) of West Bengal. Respondents were randomly selected from each district with a total sample size of 4285 number of farmers for the present study. The data was collected with the help of a pre-tested structured interview schedule. The study of various socio-economic indicators suggests that the majority of animal husbandry and fishery farmers in the aspirational districts were illiterate and belong to the most active age group, Hindu religion, and with lower economic status. Cultivation was the main occupation of the majority of farmers to maintain livelihood security. The analysis also revealed that the majority of the farmers were also engaged in livestock rearing. Finally, it also depicted various constraints like lack of training facilities, education etc. These were the major drawbacks for the upliftment of the socio-economic status of the farmers in the five selected districts of West Bengal which might be very much informative in the formulation of specific animal husbandry development plan in the study area.

Page(s): 331-340                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 09 August 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5714

 Sreetama Bhattacharjee
DBT Project on Establishment of Biotech-KISAN Hub at WBUAFS, Kolkata
Directorate of Research, Extension & Farms
West Bengal University of Animal & Fishery Sciences

 K. C. Dhara
DBT Project on Establishment of Biotech-KISAN Hub at WBUAFS, Kolkata
Directorate of Research, Extension & Farms
West Bengal University of Animal & Fishery Sciences

 S. S. Kesh
DBT Project on Establishment of Biotech-KISAN Hub at WBUAFS, Kolkata
Directorate of Research, Extension & Farms
West Bengal University of Animal & Fishery Sciences

 S. Ghosh
DBT Project on Establishment of Biotech-KISAN Hub at WBUAFS, Kolkata
Directorate of Research, Extension & Farms
West Bengal University of Animal & Fishery Sciences

 P. Dasgupta (Das)
DBT Project on Establishment of Biotech-KISAN Hub at WBUAFS, Kolkata
Directorate of Research, Extension & Farms
West Bengal University of Animal & Fishery Sciences

 A. K. Giri
DBT Project on Establishment of Biotech-KISAN Hub at WBUAFS, Kolkata
Directorate of Research, Extension & Farms
West Bengal University of Animal & Fishery Sciences

 B. Sarkar
DBT Project on Establishment of Biotech-KISAN Hub at WBUAFS, Kolkata
Directorate of Research, Extension & Farms
West Bengal University of Animal & Fishery Sciences

 S. Roy
DBT Project on Establishment of Biotech-KISAN Hub at WBUAFS, Kolkata
Directorate of Research, Extension & Farms
West Bengal University of Animal & Fishery Sciences

 S. Bose
DBT Project on Establishment of Biotech-KISAN Hub at WBUAFS, Kolkata
Directorate of Research, Extension & Farms
West Bengal University of Animal & Fishery Sciences

 A Dey
DBT Project on Establishment of Biotech-KISAN Hub at WBUAFS, Kolkata
Directorate of Research, Extension & Farms
West Bengal University of Animal & Fishery Sciences

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Sreetama Bhattacharjee, K. C. Dhara, S. S. Kesh, S. Ghosh, P. Dasgupta (Das), A. K. Giri, B. Sarkar, S. Roy, S. Bose, A Dey, “Study on Socio-Economic Status and Constraints Faced by the Livestock Farmers of the Aspirational Districts of West Bengal, India” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.331-340 July 2021  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5714

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The Plight of Informal Settlers in the Coastal Areas of Panabo City: A Basis for Intervention

Anthony John O. Montiel, Sherry Jean B. Capuyan, Jefferson H. Silverio, Melcris J. Olayer, Shynar P. Abiera, Ronel G. Dagohoy- July 2021 Page No.: 341-349

As urban areas flourished, informal settlements doubled their numbers in slew. Its manifestation is the influx of urban poor living in environmentally risky parts of the city, such as coastal areas. Aside from having a compromised settlement, their vulnerability to different hazards was prevalent. This study unfolds the plight of the informal settlers in coastal areas of the barangays Cagangohan, J.P. Laurel, and San Pedro of Panabo City; and their coping mechanisms used in dealing with the challenges in their everyday life. This inquiry used the qualitative case study research method to describe, elicit discussion, and analyze a particular situation. This has been understood through in-depth interviews with the informal settlers living along the coastal area for at least one year; and series of analyses made by the researchers. Through the data gathered, there were six (6) emerging themes extracted. These themes were the living condition predicaments, environmental health risks, struggles in family and livelihood instability, practicality and resiliency, resources utilization, and emergency tactics. This study proposes a basis for the understanding of the life experiences of informal settlers and formulation of various interventions in response to the problems, and upgrading projects for the betterment of the informal settlers; that will be undertaken in the future.

Page(s): 341-349                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 09 August 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5715

 Anthony John O. Montiel
Student, Bachelor of Public Administration, Davao del Norte State College, Philippines

 Sherry Jean B. Capuyan
Student, Bachelor of Public Administration, Davao del Norte State College, Philippines

 Jefferson H. Silverio
Student, Bachelor of Public Administration, Davao del Norte State College, Philippines

 Melcris J. Olayer
Student, Bachelor of Public Administration, Davao del Norte State College, Philippines

 Shynar P. Abiera
Student, Bachelor of Public Administration, Davao del Norte State College, Philippines

 Ronel G. Dagohoy
Student, Bachelor of Public Administration, Davao del Norte State College, Philippines

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Anthony John O. Montiel, Sherry Jean B. Capuyan, Jefferson H. Silverio, Melcris J. Olayer, Shynar P. Abiera, Ronel G. Dagohoy “The Plight of Informal Settlers in the Coastal Areas of Panabo City: A Basis for Intervention” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.341-349 July 2021  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5715

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The Relationship between Interest Rate and Economic Growth in Nigeria: ARDL Approach

Adegoke, Temitope Damilola, Azeez, Bolanle Aminat (Ph.D), Ogiamien, Fidelis Omoruyi, July 2021 Page No.: 350-355

This study examined the relationship between interest rate and economic growth in Nigeria, using secondary time series data. Data was collected from various issues of the Central Bank of Nigeria Statistical Bulletin and the National Bureau of Statistics. The study made use of the Augmented Dicker-Fuller (ADF) unit root tests and it was discovered that the variables were not in the same order at level, hence, the use of Autoregressive Distribution Lag (ARDL). The GDP was used to proxy economic growth as dependent variable, while Lending Rate (LR), Exchange Rate (EXC) and Treasury bill Rate (TB) were used as independent variables. It was discovered during the findings that there is a very strong long run relationship among the dependent and the independent variables and the speed of adjustment on equilibrium was set at 79.4%. The result also discovered that there is a negative relationship between the lending rate and the GDP though, statistically insignificant, while positive relationship exists between the GDP, Treasury bill rate and Exchange rate. The paper recommended that the Lending rate has some policy implication on economic growth in Nigeria and the monetary authority should handle it with care and the government should find a way of making the Treasury bill rate more attractive to the investing public

Page(s): 350-355                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 09 August 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5716

  Adegoke, Temitope Damilola
Department of Finance, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria

  Azeez, Bolanle Aminat (Ph.D),
Department of Finance, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria

  Ogiamien, Fidelis Omoruyi,
Department of Finance, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria

 Osasona, Viscker Adedeji,
Department of Finance, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria

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[4] Lyndon, M. & Peter, E. (2016). The Relationship between Interest Rate and Economic Growth in Nigeria: An Error Correction Model (ECM) Approach. International Journal of Economics and Financial Research, 2(6), 2411-9407
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[6] Obamuyi, T. M. (2009). An Investigation of The Relationship Between Interest Rates and Economic Growth in Nigeria. Journal of Economics and International Finance, 1(4), 93–98
[7] Rechard, O. (2018). Effect of Interest Rate Mechanisms on the Economic Development of Nigeria, 1986 -2016. IIARD International Journal of Economics and Business Management, 4(4), 91-115
[8] Udoka, C. O. and Roland, A. A. (2012). The effect of interest rate fluctuation on the economic growth of Nigeria, 1970-2010. International Journal of Business and Social Science, 3(20), 295–302.
[9] Utile, B. J., Okwori, A. O. & Ikpambese, M. D. (2018). Effect of Interest Rate on Economic Growth in Nigeria. International Journal of Advanced Academic Research of Social and Management Sciences, 4(1), 66-76

Adegoke, Temitope Damilola, Azeez, Bolanle Aminat (Ph.D), Ogiamien, Fidelis Omoruyi,
“The Relationship between Interest Rate and Economic Growth in Nigeria: ARDL Approach ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.350-355 July 2021  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5716

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Assessment of the Use of Digital Technologies by the Overseas Filipino Workers on Coping Up With The Global Pandemic

Crizyl R. Deputado, Irene T. Yata, Mark Van M. Buladaco- July 2021 – Page No.: 360-367

The global pandemic has affected the Overseas Filipino Workers across the world. Digital technologies have paved way on coping up with the difficulties in the new normal. The study aimed to determine the significant difference in the use of digital technologies by the Overseas Filipino Workers in coping up with the global pandemic. The study used a descriptive research design and used non-probability sampling techniques specifically quota sampling. An adaptive research questionnaire and 55 OFWs answered the survey. Result revealed that majority of the respondents are female, 18 years old to 30 years old, and working for 1 to 10 years as OFW. Further, the confirmed that the level of the OFW in Dubai often use digital technology all the time to cope with the pandemic. The study concluded that there is no significant difference in the use digital technology all the time to cope with the pandemic when analysed according to gender, age, and year of experience. This study suggested the government specifically the POEA and OWWA to conduct trainings and workshops in the use of digital technology. This program will help enhance the digital competence of the OFWs specially in the use of digital technologies most especially in coping up with the pandemic.

Page(s): 360-367                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 09 August 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5717

 

 Crizyl R. Deputado
Student, Bachelor of Science in Information Technology, Jose Maria College

 Irene T. Yata
Student, Bachelor of Science in Information Technology, Jose Maria College

 Mark Van M. Buladaco
Dean, Institute of Computing, Davao del Norte State College

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[2] A. Liem, M. R. Garabiles, K. A. Pakingan, W. Chen, A. I. Lam, S. Burchert, and B. J. Hall, “A digital mental health intervention to reduce depressive symptoms among overseas Filipino workers: protocol for a pilot hybrid type 1 effectiveness-implementation randomized controlled trial,” Implementation Science Communications, vol. 1, no. 1, 2020.
[3] A. Çebi and İ. Reisoğlu, “Digital Competence: A Study from the Perspective of Pre-service Teachers in Turkey,” Journal of New Approaches in Educational Research, vol. 9, no. 2, p. 294, 2020.
[4] Alampay, E.A., Alampay, L.P., & Raza, K. (2012). ICTs and connectedness in families of Filipino migrant workers. IDIA 2012 Conference [Conference Paper] Available: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/263755230_ICTs_and_Connectedness_in_Families_of_Filipino_Migrant_Workers. Accessed [April 22, 2021]
[5] A. Ramos, “ICT IN EDUCATION – THE TECHNO-MICROSYSTEM IN THE CONTEXT OF BRONFENBRENNER’S ECOLOGICAL THEORY,” EDULEARN11 Proceedings. [Online]. Available: https://library.iated.org/view/RAMOS2011ICT. [Accessed: 22-Apr-2021].
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[10] İ. Keskin and T. Yazar, “Examining digital competence of teachers within the context of lifelong learning based on of the twenty-first century skillsÖğretmenlerin yirmi birinci yüzyıl becerileri ışığında ve yaşam boyu öğrenme bağlamında dijital yeterliliklerinin incelenmesi,” International Journal of Human Sciences, vol. 12, no. 2, p. 1691, 2015.
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[12] J. V. Cleofas, M. C. S. C. Eusebio, and E. Joy P. Pacudan, “Anxious, Apart, and Attentive: A Qualitative Case Study of Overseas Filipino Workers’ Families in the Time of COVID-19,” The Family Journal: Counseling and Therapy for Couples an Familes, Apr. 2021. [Accessed: 26-May-2021].
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[14] Johnson, G.M. & Puplampu, K.P. (2008). Internet use during childhood and the ecological techno-subsytem. Canadian journal of Learning and technology, 34 (1). [Online] Available: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/261773488_Internet_use_during_childhood_and_the_ecological_techno-subsystem. Accessed: April 23, 2021
[15] K. A. Liao, “Operation ‘Bring Them Home’: learning from the large-scale repatriation of overseas Filipino workers in times of crisis,” Asian Population Studies, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 310–330, 2020.
[16] M. Napal Fraile, A. Peñalva-Vélez, and A. Mendióroz Lacambra, “Development of Digital Competence in Secondary Education Teachers’ Training,” Education Sciences, vol. 8, no. 3, p. 104, 2018.
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Crizyl R. Deputado, Irene T. Yata, Mark Van M. Buladaco “Assessment of the Use of Digital Technologies by the Overseas Filipino Workers on Coping Up With The Global Pandemic” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.360-367 July 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5717

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Vision of the Visually Impaired (VI): The Pursuit for Equal Access to Quality Education in ECD Settings

Phylis Mawere – July 2021 – Page No.: 368-376

The study examined challenges Early Childhood Development teachers face in their endeavour to be effective instructors in inclusive ECD settings. Children with visual impairments need to enjoy the good intentions of Education for All (EFA) targeted at ensuring provision of equal and quality education to all children notwithstanding their disability. The study focused on the challenges encountered by ECD teachers in adapting the curriculum and employing technologies to ensure that visually impaired children’s unique needs are appreciated and realised. Qualitative case design study was employed. In depth interviews and observations were used to collect data from the VI specialist, three children and ECD caregivers. The study assisted in bringing to light how the challenges teachers encounter can be overcome. Teachers in regular classes are not specifically trained to teach VI children. The challenges encountered became opportunities to create strategies to overcome them. Among the strategies a VI inclusive education framework was designed to empower ECD teachers in regular classes with appropriate skills and attitudes to deal with the integral challenges of the VI children

Page(s): 368-376                                                                                                                  Date of Publication: 10 August 2021

 Phylis Mawere
Reformed Church University, Masvingo, Zimbabwe

[1] Ackah- Jnr, F. R. and Udah. H. (2021). Implementing Inclusive Education in Early Childhood Settings: The Interplay and Impact of Exclusion, Teacher Qualities, and Professional Development in Ghana. Journal of Educational Research & Practice, Volume 11, Issue 1, Pages 112–125 DOI: 10.5590/JERAP.
[2] Brown, J. E. and Beamish, W.( 2012) The Changing Role and Practice of Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments: Practitioners’ Views from Australia Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, pp. 80 -91
[3] Creswell, J. W. (2013). Qualitative Inquiry & Research Design: Choosing Among Five Approaches, (3rd Ed.). SAGE
[4] Dakwa. J. A Reflection of Teacher’s Perceptions on the Inclusion of Children with Visual Impairment in Ordinary Schools. Zimbabwe International Journal of Open & Distance Learning Volume 1 Number (1) 2011
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[9] Huebner, K.; Brunhilde, M.A; Stryker, D and Wolffe, K. (2004). The National Agenda for the Education of Children and Youth with Visual Impairments, Including Those with Multiple Disabilities, Revised. American Foundation For the Blind, New York..
[10] Cox, P. R. and Dykes, M. K. ( 2001) Effective Classroom Adaptations for Students with Visual Impairments Council for exceptional children
[11] Family Connect ( 2021) Methods for Literacy for Children Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired. https://familyconnect.org/education/literacy/tools-for-literacy/ 8-7-2021
[12] Johnstone, C., Thurlow, M. L., Altman, J. Timmons, J.C. and Kato, K. ( 2009) Assistive Technology Approaches for Large Scale Assessment: Perceptions of Students with Visual Impairment. Exceptionality. A Special Education Journal, Vol 17, (2).
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[14] Mwakyeja, B. M. (2013).Teaching Students with Visual Impairments in Inclusive Classrooms: A Case Study of One Secondary School in Tanzania. University of Oslo
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[16] Shinali, M.C., Mnjokava,C. and Ruth Thinguri, R. ( 2014) Adaptation of the Curriculum to Suit Children with Visual Impairment in Integrated ECD Centres in Kenya: A Case of Narok Sub-County. Educational Research International Vol. 3(4)
[17] Kamenopoulou, L. ( 2016 ). Ecological Systems Theory: a valuable frame work for research on Inclusion and Special Educational Needs /Disabilities. Pedagogy; Volume 88, Number 4, pp. 515 -527
[18] Lamichhane, K. (2016).Teaching students with visual impairments in an inclusive Educational setting: a case from Nepal. International Journal of Inclusive Education
[19] Mubika, A. K. & Bukaliya, R. (2011).Education for All: Issues and Challenges: The Case for Zimbabwe
[20] Purdue, K. ( 2009) Barriers to and Facilitators of Inclusion for Children with Disabilities in Early Childhood Education. Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood Volume 10 Number 2 2009, pp133- 143
[21] Smith, D. W., Kelley, P., Maushak, N. J., Griffin-Shirley, N., & Lan, W. Y. (2009). Assistive Technology competencies for teachers of students with visual impairments. Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, 103(8), 457– 469
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[25] Zabeli, N. & Gjelaj, M. (2020). Preschool Teacher’s Awareness, Attitudes and Challenges Towards Inclusive Early Childhood Education: A Qualitative Study. Cogent Education. Vol 7, Issue 1.

Phylis Mawere “Vision of the Visually Impaired (VI): The Pursuit for Equal Access to Quality Education in ECD Settings” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.368-376 July 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/368-376.pdf

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Role of Dynamic Capabilities on the Relationship of Social Capital and Research Productivity of Academic Staff in Kenyan Universities

Grace Wairimu Mureithi, Abraham Kiflemariam, Vincent Omwenga- July 2021 Page No.: 377-385

The quality and quantity of research publications by academic staff play a major role in determining the performance of universities. In addition, research output is expected to provide solutions to challenges facing the society at large. Moreover, research productivity is a key measure of achievement as well as a key instrument in improving the quality of teaching and knowledge creation. This implies that a key priority for the academic staff in Kenyan universities is how to increase their research productivity. However, research productivity of academic staff in Kenyan universities is characterised by limited publications. Hence, the purpose of this study was to investigate the role of dynamic capabilities on the relationship of social capital and research productivity of academic staff in Kenyan universities. This study adopted a correlational research design and sampled 392 academic staff members. Both regression and bootstrap analyses were used to test the hypotheses. The findings revealed that, social capital has a significant influence on research productivity of academic staff in Kenyan universities; however, the influence is not direct, but is partially mediated by dynamic capabilities. The study concluded that while social capital is a key knowledge-based resource necessary for improving research productivity, dynamic capabilities are also needed to deploy and reconfigure these resources. The study findings enlighten the academic staff on the importance of investing seriously in both social capital and dynamic capabilities to improve their research productivity. Additionally, the study outcomes inform the university management on significant antecedents of research productivity of academic staff.

Page(s): 377-385                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 10 August 2021

 Grace Wairimu Mureithi
University of Eldoret, Kenya

 Abraham Kiflemariam
Catholic University of Eastern Africa, Kenya

 Vincent Omwenga
Strathmore University, Kenya

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[6] Aminu, M., & Mahmood, R. (2015). Mediating Role of Dynamic Capabilities on the Relationship between Intellectual Capital and Performance: A Hierarchical Component Model Perspective in PLS-SEM Path Modeling. Research Journal of Business Management, 9(3), 443-456.
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[12] Burns, N., & Grove, S. (1997). The Practice of Nursing Research: Conduct, Critique and Utilization (3rd Ed.). Philadelphia: WB Saunders Company.
[13] Cassol, A., Gonçalo, C., & Ruas, R. (2016). Redefining the Relationship between Intellectual Capital and Innovation: The Mediating Role of Absorptive Capacity. Brazilian Administration Review, 13(4), 1-25.
[14] Cloete, Maassen and Bailey (2015) Knowledge Production and Contradictory Functions in African Higher Education. Cape Town: African Minds
[15] Commission for University Education. (2019). University Statistics 2017/2018. Nairobi: Commission for University Education.
[16] Demming, C., Jahn, S., & Boztug, Y. (2017). Conducting Mediation Analysis in Marketing Research. Marketing ZFP, 39(3), 76-98.
[17] Deniz, M.S., & Alsaffar, A.A (2013). Assessing the Validity and Reliability of a Questionnaire on Dietary Fibre-related Knowledge in a Turkish Student Population. J Health Popul Nutr 31(4), 497-503
[18] Didier, W., & Frédéric, D. (2016). Interdisciplinarity and the 21st Century University. Brussels: League of European Research Universities.
[19] Dkhili, H., & Oweis, K. (2018). Does Research Output Matter for Economic Growth in Sub Saharan African Countries? Quantity and Quality Analysis. International and Multidisciplinary Journal of Social Sciences, 7(3), 221-242.
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Grace Wairimu Mureithi, Abraham Kiflemariam, Vincent Omwenga “Role of Dynamic Capabilities on the Relationship of Social Capital and Research Productivity of Academic Staff in Kenyan Universities” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.377-385 July 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/377-385.pdf

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Utilization of Information and Communication Technology in Technical, Vocational Education and Training: A Way Forward for Developing Competencies for 21st Century in Nigeria

Sylvester Chukwutem Onwusa (PhD)- July 2021 – Page No.: 386-398

ICTs are revolutionizing education by removing distance from education and making knowledge more accessible to every individual around the globe. Technology-enhanced learning will play a critical role in the development of a lifelong learning culture, and has the capacity to empower learners by providing them with multiple pathways that offer choices and channels to meet their education and training needs. It is not surprising, therefore, to see a growing interest in technology-based learning across the world. The automation of TVET workshop and machineries could be a turning point in educational system in Nigeria. The systematic approaches of using ICT-mediated learning in the classroom environment is to strengthening productivity, encourage self-employment for the youths and as well as contribute positively to the economic growth. Besides portraying the various ways in which the use of ICT promotes teaching and learning, it has become central to education in the 21st century. Unfortunately, TVET in Nigeria has been observed to be neglected and substandard due to non-utilization of ICT facilities to meet the need of modern day employers in the labour market. Thus the paper intends to examine the concept of ICT, utilization of ICT, concept of TVET, the necessity for utilization of ICT –mediated learning in TVET and what are competencies for 21st century? Additionally, the paper discussed the major challenges/.barriers on the utilization of ICT in TVET, application of ICT in TVET institutions in Nigeria, the theory of Digital Natives that is very relevant to the paper and as well as enormous benefits of ICT in TVET. It was concluded that the use of ICT is globally recognized as a veritable tool that should be employ for teaching and learning processes in educational fields especially in TVET. It was also recommended amongst others, that Nigeria government should provide the necessary ICT facilities in TVET institutions, as well as conscious effort should be made for adequate planning, financing, monitoring and implementation of the vision, mission and objectives to achieve the ICT policy document on TVET through effective management of limited resources.

Page(s): 386-398                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 10 August 2021

 

 Sylvester Chukwutem Onwusa (PhD)
Department of Technology and Vocation Education, Faculty of Education, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Nigeria

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Sylvester Chukwutem Onwusa (PhD) “Utilization of Information and Communication Technology in Technical, Vocational Education and Training: A Way Forward for Developing Competencies for 21st Century in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.386-398 July 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/386-398.pdf

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Politics: A major Conduit to Upward Social Mobility within Liberia the Liberian Society

Ambrues Monboe Nebo Sr – July 2021 – Page No.: 399-405

From qualitative analysis, this article examines politics as the major conduit to social mobility in Liberia’s social stratification system. It argues that none of the traditional determinants of social stratification (income, wealth, education, power, prestige) are strong enough to influence social mobility at the apex of the social ladder in Liberia.
Empirically, history has proven that majority of the elites arouse to the upper class through politics conceptualized as political positions characterized by elections and appointments.
This article also argues that politics is an independent variable that influences income, wealth, power, and prestige simply because of the lucrative salaries and incentives associated with political positions in Liberia. For this reason, it is argued that the desire of those entering into politics especially in contemporary Liberia is to acquire wealth, not necessarily to serve the best interest of the state.

Page(s): 399-405                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 10 August 2021

 

 Ambrues Monboe Nebo Sr
Department of Political Science/Sociology, University of Liberia/African Methodist Episcopal University

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Ambrues Monboe Nebo Sr “Politics: A major Conduit to Upward Social Mobility within Liberia the Liberian Society” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.399-405 July 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/399-405.pdf

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Reimagining an African university and its implications on pedagogic encounters and transformation in African Higher Education System.

Dr. Monicah Zembere – July 2021 Page No.: 406-411

This paper highlights the implications of a reimagined African university on teaching and learning with special reference to institutions of higher learning in Africa. Interpretive research methodologies and critical inquiry have been employed to gather data. The main arguments advanced in this paper are firstly; higher education in Africa has the potential to make students understand and respond to the socio-economic, political and environmental problems currently confronting Africa as a continent. Secondly, how in becoming pedagogy can hold potentialities that can enable students to determine their own choices on how they co-belong. To achieve these, universities have to embrace active values of democratic citizenship in their teaching and learning. Precisely, universities in Africa should promote active citizenship in their teaching and learning programs as a way of preparing students to deal with violence and other problems confronting the continent. My research conclude that education policies in African universities are a mirror to the political and historical background of the continent and this is why I am calling for the reimagining of the African university pedagogy. Furthermore, I recommend universities in Africa to be pedagogical sites where deliberative and friendship encounters are cultivated and nurtured.

Page(s): 406-411                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 11 August 2021

  Dr. Monicah Zembere
Academic University of Witwatersrand, Wits School of Education, South Africa

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Dr. Monicah Zembere “Reimagining an African university and its implications on pedagogic encounters and transformation in African Higher Education System.” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.406-411 July 2021  DOI: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/406-411.pdf

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Corporate Communication Strategy and Sustainable Community Relations of Indorama Eleme Petrochemical Limited

Ihunwo, Owhonda Justice, Richard N. Amadi, Ph.D, Dike, Harcourt Whyte, Ph.D – July 2021 – Page No.: 412-419

This study examined corporate communication strategy and sustainable community relations of Indorama Eleme Petrochemical Limited. To achieve this, four objectives were set with equivalent four research questions. Stakeholders’ theory and corporate community theory guided the study. The population of this study is 74,240 which is the sum of the respective populations of the six host communities of Indorama Elem Petrochemical Limited with survey as the research design. The researcher employed mixed method using questionnaire and interview as data gathering instruments. For the quantitative data, a sample of 382 was arrived at using Krejcie and Morgan sample determinant table and for the qualitative data; a sample size of 9 was used comprising 3 staff of corporate communication department of Indorama Eleme Petrochemical Limited and the 6 members of Project Advisory Committee (PAC). Respondents for the interview were purposively selected based on their knowledge of the subject matter and the fact that they can offer the needed answer to the study questions. The findings of the study show that corporate communication strategies of the company proved to be major contributory factor that enhanced sustainable community relations and ensured mutual understanding and harmony that currently exist between the company and host communities. The study therefore recommends that the Indorama Eleme Petrochemical Limited model of corporate communication strategies and sustainable community relations be adopted by companies operating not only in Rivers State but in Nigeria especially the 7.5% equity share to host communities. This is to ensure mutual understanding between companies and host communities.

Page(s): 412-419                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 11 August 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5718

 Ihunwo, Owhonda Justice
Postgraduate student, Department of Mass Communication, Faculty of Social Sciences, Rivers State University, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

 Richard N. Amadi, Ph.D
Postgraduate student, Department of Mass Communication, Faculty of Social Sciences, Rivers State University, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

 Dike, Harcourt Whyte, Ph.D
Postgraduate student, Department of Mass Communication, Faculty of Social Sciences, Rivers State University, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

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Ihunwo, Owhonda Justice, Richard N. Amadi, Ph.D, Dike, Harcourt Whyte, Ph.D “Corporate Communication Strategy and Sustainable Community Relations of Indorama Eleme Petrochemical Limited” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.412-419 July 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5718

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Cybercrime and Terrorism Financing: Nigeria’s Potential Vulnerabilities and Policy Options

Plangshak Musa Suchi and Peter Nungshak Wika- July 2021 Page No.: 420-427

Terrorism financing and the ways in which it intersects with organised criminal activities including drug trafficking, arms trafficking, trafficking in persons/smuggling of migrants, and kidnapping-for-ransom is increasingly attracting the attention of scholars and the international community. What is less explored however are the ways by which cybercrime facilitates terrorism financing globally. This paper attempts to fill this gap by utilizing secondary data from international, regional and national organisations as well as scholarly articles on the subject through content analysis to explaining the nexus between cybercrime and terrorism financing with specific emphasis on Nigeria. Understanding the linkages between cybercrime and terrorism financing is important for developing effective policy measures aimed at preventing and mitigating the negative impacts of these innovative crimes. The analysis revealed the mysterious links between cybercrime and terrorism financing in terms of how the former is feeding the latter through multiple channels including supply of funds from proceeds of cybercrime, as well as by making funds transfer among terrorist groups easier. The paper also highlights potential vulnerabilities in Nigeria’s critical infrastructure including computer systems and networks, computer programmes, and communication systems; defence, banking, energy, and oil and gas, as well as potential vulnerabilities among individual internet users and the private sector which may be exploited by cybercriminals in conjunction with terrorist groups in the country. It concludes by proffering some policy options including boosting partnerships between law enforcement, the academic community and the private sector towards understanding and reducing cybercrime and terrorism financing in Nigeria.

Page(s): 420-427                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 11 August 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5721

  Plangshak Musa Suchi
Department of Sociology, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Jos, Jos-Nigeria

  Peter Nungshak Wika
Department of Sociology, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Jos, Jos-Nigeria

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ITU Report, www.itu.int/ITU-D/cyb/cybersecurity/legislation.html
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Plangshak Musa Suchi and Peter Nungshak Wika”Cybercrime and Terrorism Financing: Nigeria’s Potential Vulnerabilities and Policy Options” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.420-427 July 2021  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5721

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Influence of Cost Leadership Strategy on Organizational Performance of Private Hospitals in Mombasa County Kenya

Josephine Ng’andu Malunju, Appolonius Shitiabai Kembu, Phd, July 2021 Page No.: 428-433

This study aimed at ascertaining the influence of cost leadership on organizational performance of private hospitals in Mombasa County Kenya. The study was guided by Institutional theory. The study utilized census and adopted a descriptive survey design. Using a target population of 52 respondents composed of Chief executives and Branch managers, the study employed quantitative research methodology and structured questionnaires was used to collect data. Pilot test was done to measure validity and reliability of research instruments. Descriptive as well as inferential statistics were computed to measure the relationship between variables. The results showed that there was a positive correlation between cost leadership strategy and the dependent variable organizational performance. In conclusion Cost leaders seek to improve efficiency and control costs throughout the organizations supply chain. The study recommended that Private hospitals should open more branches in different parts of Mombasa County.

Page(s): 428-433                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 11 August 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5719

 Josephine Ng’andu Malunju
Masters of Business Administration, Mount Kenya University, Kenya

  Appolonius Shitiabai Kembu, Phd
Lecturer School of Business and Economics, Mount Kenya University, Kenya

[1] Abel Embaye, (2014). Effect of employee background on perceived organizational justice:
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Josephine Ng’andu Malunju, Appolonius Shitiabai Kembu, Phd,
“Influence of Cost Leadership Strategy on Organizational Performance of Private Hospitals in Mombasa County Kenya ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.428-433 July 2021  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5719

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Accounts of Barangay Health Workers in Geographically Isolated and Disadvantaged Areas in the New Normal

Rose Angelie A. Abelardo, Khalifa B. Bustamante, Jhon Terence O. Cabanes, Ricardo G. Diana, Sanny Grande, Ronel G. Dagohoy – July 2021 – Page No.: 434-442

This study explored the experiences of Barangay Health Workers (BHW) in Geographically Isolated and Disadvantaged Areas (GIDA) amidst this new normal. This study used the Qualitative phenomenological method of research. This study was conducted in the selected GIDA barangays in Panabo City, Davao Del Norte, Philippines. It has seven (7) participants through purposive sampling, who are the BHWs among the selected barangays with one (1) year and above work experience. The researchers used a validated interview guide questionnaire. The results have revealed that barangay health workers in the new normal experience huge adjustments in rendering healthcare services during the pandemic. Also, the results exposed that barangay health workers experience deficiency of transportation and primary health care medicines and equipment. Moreover, the results disclosed that barangay health workers aspire to gain more importance, such as additional compensation and having complete medical healthcare equipment on their respective barangays.

Page(s): 434-442                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 11 August 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5720

 Rose Angelie A. Abelardo
Students, Bachelor of Public Administration, Davao del Norte State College, Philippines

 Khalifa B. Bustamante
Students, Bachelor of Public Administration, Davao del Norte State College, Philippines

 Jhon Terence O. Cabanes
Students, Bachelor of Public Administration, Davao del Norte State College, Philippines

 Ricardo G. Diana
Students, Bachelor of Public Administration, Davao del Norte State College, Philippines

 Sanny Grande
Students, Bachelor of Public Administration, Davao del Norte State College, Philippines

 Ronel G. Dagohoy
Students, Bachelor of Public Administration, Davao del Norte State College, Philippines

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Rose Angelie A. Abelardo, Khalifa B. Bustamante, Jhon Terence O. Cabanes, Ricardo G. Diana, Sanny Grande, Ronel G. Dagohoy “Accounts of Barangay Health Workers in Geographically Isolated and Disadvantaged Areas in the New Normal” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.434-442 July 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.5720

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The Bulawayo Music Festival: An Important Educational and Musicological Exhibition for Music Enthusiasts

Caleb Mauwa- July 2021 Page No.: 443-451

This article sought to explore the intricacies of the Bulawayo Music Festival, its underlying objectives, themes, approaches, significance and history. The Zimbabwean musical practices have always been diverse from region to region as a result of its multi-cultural society which includes nationalities from across the whole African content as well as foreign originating races and tribes from the colonial times. The festival, hosted in the centre of Zimbabwe’s Matabeleland Province, is unique for providing a platform that exposes the native people to exotic music through live performance demonstrations and educational workshops. The performers and audience alike, benefit immensely from these interactions, the former gaining exposure in the entertainment scenes and the latter gaining knowledge of music trends both local and exotic. Despite the outward appearance of fun and festivities that is apparent to the casual observer during the festival, there is actually more to it than meets the eye. It represents resilience of a people besieged by so many woes from so many angles and how they have all managed to thrive and eventually learning to work towards a common cause despite their differences. The Bulawayo Music Festival, just like any other social activity or trend, has evolved somewhat over the past decade however the underlying essence that prompted its inception still remains that it brings different people together through music. The article explores the essentials of the activities and significance associated with the Bulawayo Music festival both at its inception as well as in its progression over the years.

Page(s): 443-451                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 11 August 2021

 Caleb Mauwa
PhD Ethnomusicology Student: University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

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Caleb Mauwa “The Bulawayo Music Festival: An Important Educational and Musicological Exhibition for Music Enthusiasts” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-7, pp.443-451 July 2021  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-7/443-451.pdf

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Education, Conflict Resolution Strategies and National Development: A Case Study of Ethiope East, Delta State, Nigeria

Morrison Umor Iwele (Ph. D) – July 2021 Page No.: 452-458

This study focused on how education can be used as a tool for resolving conflict between herdsmen and farmers in Ethiope East Local Government Area of Delta State in particular and Nigeria by extension. This was predicted by the spate of conflict and insecurity in the country and avoidable attacks of herdsmen on farmers resulting in not only displacement of hundreds of people and entire communities but compounding the poverty situation and the national development woes and the urgent need for proffering possible solutions. The descriptive expost facto design was adopted for the study. Three research questions and three hypotheses guided the study. The population of the study comprised all traditional leader, farmers and herdsmen in Ethiope East. The sample consist of 150 farmers (traditional leaders, opinion leaders, the elite, youths and women leaders) and 50 herdsmen (leaders of the groups within the area owners of herds and paid herders). The multi-stage sampling technique adopted. Consequently, the cluster sampling technique was used to group the people; from which were assigned to the group base of the stratified sampling technique. The accidental sampling technique was also adopted. The instrument for data collection was a 4-point rating structured in-depth interview guide developed by the researcher.200 respondents were interviewed in small groups of tens by the researcher and ten guide researcher assistants. Mean and standard deviation were used for data analysis and interpretation while t-test statistical tool was used for the test of hypotheses. Findings in the study revealed among others that: there are inherent conflicts between herdsmen and farmers as a result of perceived attack on cows by farmers on one side and attacks on farms and farmers resulting in killing of several people and sacking of entire communities on the other side complicated by lack of communication due to illiteracy and inability to speak English Language for expression. It was also revealed that education of the people through regular orientation, seminars and workshops on the need for harmonious relationship and coexistence could foster tolerance, understanding of the values of others, negotiation, dialogue and resolution of pending conflict. Based on the findings, it was recommended among others that, Delta State government should as a matter of urgency set up a herdsmen/farmers’ conflict management agency and empower it to serve with all diligence, transparency and sincerity; and that government should regularly organize peace and conflict resolution seminars and workshops for farmers and herdsmen, not only in Ethiop East but across the state at large

Page(s): 452-458                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 12 August 2021

  Morrison Umor Iwele (Ph. D)
Federal College of Education (Technical), Asaba, Delta State, India

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