Analysis of the Legal Obligation of Suppliers and Manufacturers to Consumers in Nigeria and the United Kingdom

Michael Sunday Afolayan, PhD, Eniola Adedayo Arogundade- November 2021- Page No.: 01-05

This paper analysed the obligations of the suppliers and manufacturer of goods to the consumers under the legal regime for the protection of consumers in Nigeria and the United Kingdom. The work examined the legal framework in Nigeria and United Kingdom, which governs the relationship between the manufacturers, producers, suppliers and consumers. The work also compared the legal regime in the two jurisdictions for the purpose of observing the similarities and differences in the suppliers/manufacturers and consumers relationship. Doctrinal Legal research methodology was adopted with the use primary and secondary sources of legal material. It was discovered that the attitude of Nigerian courts to the obligations of the manufacturers to the consumers has been strictly viewed from the negligence point of view (fault theory) contrary to what obtained in the United Kingdom, where the courts make use of the negligence theory and the strict liability theory whenever the court is called upon to adjudicate on issues bothering on the obligations of manufacturers to consumers. The work concluded that the obligations of the manufacturers to consumers must be reviewed in Nigeria, using the United Kingdom’s combined approach of the negligence and strict liability theories, in addition to criminal prosecution, in appropriate cases, of erring manufacturers in the discharge of their obligation to the consumers. This will in no small measure rid the Nigerian market of fake and counterfeit products from manufacturers who are only profit-oriented. The work made attempt at proffering solutions or better way of doing business in the supplied chain in Nigeria considering the global best practices around the globe.

Page(s): 01-05                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 22 November 2021

 Michael Sunday Afolayan, PhD
Senior Lecturer, Business & Industrial Law Department, Faculty of Law, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria

 Eniola Adedayo Arogundade
LL.M Research Student, Faculty of Law, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria

[1] Asikhia O, Oni-Ojo EE, An Investigation into the legal framework of marketing in Nigeria, Australian Journal on Business and Management 2011, 4(2)
[2] Akomolede T.I. and Afolayan M.S. “Socio-Legal Analysis of Electronic Commercial Transactions in Nigeria.” Nnamdi Azikwe University Journal of International Law and Jurisprudence, Vol. 11, Issue No.2, pgs 20-33 (2020).
[3] Afolayan M. S. “Legal Analysis of Electronic Payment System and Frauds Associated with E-Commerce Transactions in Nigeria.” Nnamdi Azikwe University Journal of Commercial and Property Law, Vol. 8, Issue No. 3, pgs. 116-125 (2021).
[4] Babatunde A.Sodipe, At a glance: the source of product liability law in Nigeria October 2020 https://www.lexology.com/library/dtail.asp?g=c1960386-15ed-4b7b-a226-1d3a4b7cb8f1
[5] Edith Ebeguki Oni-Ojo and Oluwole Iyiola, Legal Implication of Manufacturer’s negligence and its effect on Consumer: A study of South west of Nigeria, Global Scholar Journal of Marketing 1(1) 2014 https://www.globalscholarjournals.org/MS/GSJMK
[6] Ekanem EE, Institutional Framework for consumer protection in Nigeria, International Journal advance Legal Studies and Governance (2011) 2(1) 38
[7] Gbade Akinrinmade, The jurisprudence of product liability in Nigeria: A need to Complement the Existing Fault theory, Afe Babalola University Journal of Sustainable Development Law and Policy, 7 (1) 2016 http://dx.doi,org/10.4314ljsdlp,v7i2.9
[8] M.C Okany, Nigerian Commercial Law (Africana First Publisher 2009) 383
[9] Pinsent Mason, Product Liability under the Consumer Protection Act 2020 pinsentmasons.com/out-law/guides/product-liability-under-the-consumer-protection-act
[10] Ron A. Bender, Liability of the Manufacturer to the Ultimate consumer, Montana Law Review Vol. 31(1) 1969 https://www/scholarship.law.umt.educgi view content

Michael Sunday Afolayan, PhD, Eniola Adedayo Arogundade, “Analysis of the Legal Obligation of Suppliers and Manufacturers to Consumers in Nigeria and the United Kingdom” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.01-05 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/01-05.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Mentoring Young People in Veeplaas Seventh-day Adventist Church: The Role of the Local Church Leadership

Bulelani Bomela – November 2021- Page No.: 06-11

Youth Ministries is the lifeblood of the Church today. This ministry is also designed to assist youth within and youth in the communities. The Seventh day Adventist World Church membership is mainly composed of young people with an estimate of 75%. Young people have been and continue to take leadership roles in the local church. Yet, the Church’s challenge of losing young people and failure to uphold Christian standards has been discovered to be increasing day by day. The degrading standards and morals within church youth hinder one of Adventist youth Ministries’ objectives, which is ‘Youth working for other youth.’ It is further discovered that the neglect of mentoring programmes which provide opportunities for youth to develop spiritually and mentally and the absence of spiritual and mentally matured mentors in the local churches is the cause for either the loss of young people or poor decision making by youth in matters relating to life. This article seeks to discover and display the use of mentorship programs at Veeplaas church of Seventh day Adventist as means to retain youth, reduce or prevent moral degeneration and providing counseling and guidance among them. Literature is used to review, define and critically look at mentoring as a discipline effective for youth development.

Page(s): 06-11                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 22 November 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51101

 Bulelani Bomela
Adventist University of Africa, Kenya

[1] Arzola. F. et al., Youth Ministry in the 21st Century: Five Views (Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2015), 148.
[2] Blakeslee, Jennifer E. and Keller, Thomas E. “Mentoring: Building the Youth Mentoring Knowledge Base: Publishing Trends and Coauthorship Networks,” Journal of Community Psychology Vol. 40 (September 2012): 845-859, accessed 17
[3] Coppedge, A. The Biblical Principles of Discipleship. Grand Rapids: Francis Asbury Press, 1989.
[4] Crosby, John C. “On the Importance of Mentorship,” Accessed 18 July 2019, http://www.healio.com/journals/ortho/2009-4-32-4/%7B3b54a1b2-a9fa-4d46-a6c2-a517f8b2dcb4%7D/on- the-importance-of-mentorship.
[5] Earl, P. Mentoring. Renewal Journal. Discipleship, 11. Retrieved December 5, 2007, from www. pastornet.au
[6] Engstrom, Ted H., and Norman B. Rohrer, The Fine Art of Mentoring: Passing on to Others What God Has Given to You. Tennessee: Wolgemuth and Hyatt, 1989. Fields, D. Purpose Driven Youth Ministries: 9 Essential Foundations for Healthy Growth. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1998. Fernando Arzola et al., Youth Ministry in the 21st Century: Five Views. Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2015.
[7] Herman, L. from teaching to mentoring: Principle and Practice, dialogue and life in adult education. London: Routledge Falmer, 2004.
[8] Kram, K.E. Mentoring at Work: Developmental Relationships in Organizational Life (Glenview, IL: Scott Foresman, 1985.
[9] Lundin, Stephen. C. Harry Paul and John Christensen, Fish! A Remarkable Way to Boost Moral and Improve Results. London: Hodder and Stoughton, 2000.
[10] Mallison, J. Mentoring to develop disciples and leaders. Buckinghamshire, Buckinghamshire, UK: Scripture Union, 1998.
[11] Mbiti, J.S. African Religions and Philosophy, 2nd Ed. (Heinemann Educational Publishers, 1969),
[12] Meyer, M. and Fourie, L. Mentoring and Coaching: Tools and Techniques for implementation. Randburg, South Africa: Knowres Publishing, 2004.
[13] Moore, W.B. Mentoring side by side: Mentoring in the Bible. Retrieved 5 December 2007, from www.mentoring-disciples .org
[14] Rhodes, J.E. “Youth Mentoring in Perspective,” accessed 18 January 2016, http://www.infield.org/learningmentors/youth_mentoring _in_ perspective.htm.
[15] Shea, G.F. The Mentoring Organization. Menlo Park, CA: Crisp Publications, 2003.
[16] Stanley, P.D., and Clinton, R.C. Connecting: The Mentoring Relationship you need to succeed in life. Colorado Springs: Navpress, 1992.
[17] Steinmann, N. Fundamentals for Effective Mentoring: Raising giant killers. Randburg, South Africa: Knowres Publishing, 2006.
[18] White, E.G. Education. Mountain View, CA: Pacific Press, 1903. White, E.G. Patriarchs and Prophets. Washington, DC: Review and Herald, 1890.
[19] Write, W.C. Mentoring: The Promise of Relational Leadership (Waynesboro, GA: Paternoster Press, 2004), 137. Zachary, L.J. Creating Mentoring Culture: The Organizations Guide. San Francisco, Jossey-Bass, 2005.

Bulelani Bomela , “Mentoring Young People in Veeplaas Seventh-day Adventist Church: The Role of the Local Church Leadership” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.06-11 November 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51101

Download PDF

pdf

Students’ Personal Stories: Modular Distance Learning First Experiences in the New Normal

Marjorie P. Caslib, Ronald S. Decano – November 2021- Page No.: 12-16

The pandemic has altered the lives and activities of people all across the world in ways that no one could have predicted. The once-in-a-lifetime circumstance presented both problems and opportunities to all segments of the community and society. The key purpose of this descriptive qualitative phenomenological study is to explore the personal stories of students in the modular distance learning first experiences in SY 2020-2021. Insights, opinions, and ideas were sought from six (6) low performing students through Key Informant Interview. Considering the lockdown problems, data were gathered through phone calls, and video calls and were recorded, transcribed, coded analyzed, and categorized responses into themes. Five emergent themes were generated, are as follow: (1) Poor reading comprehension level (2) Lack alternative learning materials (3) No strict daily learning routine (4) No constant communication from parents and teachers for support (5) Unmotivated learning system at home. Findings revealed that the most difficult experiences met by students are the lack of comprehension and insufficient learning resources. With these findings, the school administrator and teachers should provide necessary learning strategies and alternative resources to increase learners’ performance.

Page(s): 12-16                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 22 November 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51102

 Marjorie P. Caslib
Graduate Student, Doctor of Philosophy in Educational Management, Davao del Norte State College, Philippines

 Ronald S. Decano
Dean, Institute of Advanced Studies, Davao del Norte State College, Philippines

[1] Clark, C. (n.d.). Why it is important to involve parents in their children’s literacy. National Literacyb trust.
The Basic Education Learning Continuity Plan in the Time Of COVID-19
https://www.teacherph.com/downloaddeped-basic-education-learning-continuity- plan-in-thetime-of-covid-19/
Najib A. Kofahi and Nowduri Srinivas (May 2004),Distance Learning: Major Issues and Challenges, May 2004 https://itdl.org/Journal/May_04/article02.htm
[2] Labrado, Gay L, Ike Paul Q Labrado, Emily C Rosal, Analiza B Layasan, Esmeralda S Salazar, Dev Ed, D Cebu Technological, et al. (2020). “RESEARCH ARTICLE NAGA- -CEBU DURING COVID-19 PANDEMIC.”
[3] Pe Dangle, Ysthr Rave, and Johnine Danganan Sumaoang. (2020). “The Implementation of Modular Distance Learning in the Philippine Secondary Public Schools.” Icate.
[4] Yeong, May Luu, Rosnah Ismail, Noor Hassim Ismail, and Mohd Isa Hamzah (2018). “Interview Protocol Refinement: Fine-Tuning Qualitative Research Interview Questions for Multi-Racial Populations in Malaysia.” Qualitative Report 23 (11).
[5] Eleanor Edstrom (2021). “Reading During a Global Pandemic “World Literacy Foundation Organization
https://worldliteracyfoundation.org/reading-during-a-global-pandemic/
[6] Dr. Jayaram, K. and Dr. Dorababu, K. K (2020). Self-learning materials in distance education system” International of current research
[7] Hemmeter, Mary Louise; Michaelene Ostrosky, and Lise Fox (2006). “Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning: A Conceptual Model for Intervention.”School Psychology Review 35(4) (2006): 583–601.

Marjorie P. Caslib, Ronald S. Decano “Students’ Personal Stories: Modular Distance Learning First Experiences in the New Normal” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.12-16 November 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51102

Download PDF

pdf

Impact of Covid-19 on Teaching Effectiveness in Selected Private Secondary Schools in Makerere Kikoni

David Mutagubya- November 2021- Page No.: 17-23

The study was meant to establish the impact of Covid-19 on teaching and learning effectiveness in Makerere Caltect and Modern private secondary schools in Kikoni. It was guided by three objectives that is, to establish the impact of Covid-19 on teacher student interaction instructional materials and sanitation on teaching and learning effectiveness. It was descriptive in nature involving a few students as study participants. These were purposively selected. It was thematically analyzed thematically. Findings revealed that Covid 19 negatively affected interaction, instructional materials provision and use above all negatively affected teaching and learning due to diversion of resources on sanitation facilities., From the objective on teacher student interaction, it was concluded that Covid impacted negatively on teacher-student interaction which consequently had a negative impact on teaching and learning of students. From the second objective, it was concluded that Covid-19 had a negative impact on instructional materials, as resources were diverted on sanitation thus, negatively impacting on teaching and learning. From the last objective, it was concluded that Covid-19 impacted negatively on sanitation of the schools thus, interfering with teaching and learning. From the findings, conclusions, it was recommended that to realize effective teaching and learning in Covid period, the responsible bodies in schools, private schools organizations and in partnership with Ministry of Education and Sports should do the following; Should ensure that the environment of teaching is made teacher-learner friendly for interaction purposes. This may be done by providing cheap laptops and widening study space. Should ensure that all schools are provided with loans to access computers and other instructional materials like books handouts, during Covid. Sanitation facilities in schools are provided at a cheap price, also there ought to reduce on taxes pertaining sanitation facilities.

Page(s): 17-23                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 23 November 2021

 David Mutagubya
School of Education, Makerere University, Uganda

[1] Jaramillo, J.G. (2020) Covid-19 and primary and secondary education. The impact of crisis and public policy implication for Latin America and Caribbean: UNDP Latin America and Caribbean UNICEF.
[2] Mishra, L. Gupta. T.& Shree, A. (2020) online teaching-learning in higher education during lockdown period of Covid-19 pandemic. International journal of educational research open. Elsevier. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijedro.2020.100012
[3] Pokhel, S. & Chletri, R. (2021). A literature on impacts of Covid 19 pandemic on teaching and learning research article, http://dol.org/10.1177/2347631/20983481
[4] UKAID (2020). The effects of Covid-19 on education in Africa and its implication for the use of technology e-learning Africa . Ed-Tech. Dol.105281/zenodo.4018774.
[5] Vlochus, J, Hertegard, Eand Svaleryd, H.B. (2020). The effect of school closures on SARS-COV 2 among parents and teachers. Departments of economics, PNAS, 118(9) 1-7 http://org/10.1073/pnas.2020834118

David Mutagubya, “Impact of Covid-19 on Teaching Effectiveness in Selected Private Secondary Schools in Makerere Kikoni” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.17-23 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/17-23.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Linking Teaching and Training Methods: Classroom Teaching vis-a-vis Workplace Training within the Hospitality Industry

Lucy Ajambo, Leikny Øgrim, Justine Nabaggala – November 2021- Page No.: 24-32

Harmonization of teaching and training methods (TTMs) continue be prerequisite and critical for teachers and trainers as they promote successful acquisition of essential and practical skills for further training in workplaces in Uganda. As the linkage is enfolded, it is confronted with increasingly distinctive challenges. This study aimed at exploring the linkage of TTMs between classroom teaching and workplace training in the hospitality industry in Uganda. A qualitative research approach using a case study design was used. A sample of 16 participants was purposively selected from vocational institutions and workplaces. In-depth interview were used to collect data. The study found out that the linkage of TTMs played a significant role in developing and strengthening of essential and practical competencies. Minimal participation, unsatisfactory use of teacher initiated methods, exhaustion and neglectful listening, unavailability, inadequate and obsolete tools, equipment and materials were also identified. The study recommends that TTMs in the hospitality industry should be allowed to evolve through a systematic harmonization, horizontal expertize and collaboration in order to have effective linkage of classroom teaching to workplace training that encourage and facilitate motivation, critical thinking and avail up-to-date tools, equipment and materials in vocational institutions .

Page(s): 24-32                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 23 November 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51103

 Lucy Ajambo
Faculty of Educational Sciences for Teacher Education and International Studies, Oslo Metropolitan, University/ Kyambogo University, Uganda

 Leikny Øgrim
Faculty of Education and International Studies, Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway

 Justine Nabaggala
Faculty of Vocational Studies, Kyambogo University, Uganda

[1] M. W. Johansson and M. W. Johansson, “Tracing the moving ‘ target ’ in Didaktik of vocational classroom instruction instruction,” J. Curric. Stud., vol. 52, no. 6, pp. 870–883, 2020, doi: 10.1080/00220272.2020.1795270.
[2] J. M. La Lopa, Y. N. M. K. Elsayed, and M. L. Wray, “The State of Active Learning in the Hospitality Classroom,” J. Hosp. Tour. Educ., vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 95–108, 2018, doi: 10.1080/10963758.2018.1436971.
[3] S. Chau and C. Cheung, “‘Bringing Life to Learning’: A Study of Active Learning in Hospitality Education,” Asia-Pacific Education Researcher, vol. 26, no. 3–4. pp. 127–136, 2017, doi: 10.1007/s40299-017-0333-6.
[4] S. Chau and C. Cheung, “Academic satisfaction with hospitality and tourism education in Macao: the influence of active learning, academic motivation, and student engagement,” Asia Pacific J. Educ., vol. 38, no. 4, pp. 473–487, 2018, doi: 10.1080/02188791.2018.1500350.
[5] L. G. Sisson and A. R. Adams, “Essential hospitality management competencies: The importance of soft skills,” Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Education, vol. 25, no. 3. pp. 131–145, 2013, doi: 10.1080/10963758.2013.826975.
[6] W. C. Griffin, “Hospitality faculty: are we meeting the demands of industry?,” J. Teach. Travel Tour., vol. 0, no. 0, pp. 1–22, 2020, doi: 10.1080/15313220.2020.1746225.
[7] J. Shi, J. Zhang, and L. A. Cai, “Active learning for an introductory tourism course—a case study,” J. Teach. Travel Tour., vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 1–18, 2020, doi: 10.1080/15313220.2020.1770663.
[8] E. D. Kalanda, F. L. Malenya, and E. J. Otiende, “An Exploration of Students Workplace Learning Placements Practice of Universities in Uganda,” vol. IV, no. Xi, pp. 203–211, 2020.
[9] R. Konkola, T. Tuomi-Gröhn, P. Lambert, and S. Ludvigsen, “Promoting learning and transfer between school and workplace,” J. Educ. Work, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 211–228, 2007, doi: 10.1080/13639080701464483.
[10] L. Sikoyo, “Cambridge Journal of Education Contextual challenges of implementing learner-centred pedagogy: the case of the problem-solving approach in Uganda,” Taylor Fr., vol. 40, no. 3, pp. 247–263, 2010, doi: 10.1080/0305764X.2010.509315.
[11] D. Kintu, K. M. Kitainge, and A. Ferej, “Trainers ’ perception of the teaching and learning approaches used for competence development in the Technical Vocational Education and Training institutions in Uganda,” IOSR J. Res. Method Educ., vol. 9, no. February, pp. 8–20, 2019, doi: 10.9790/7388-0901040820.
[12] D. M. A. Baker and R. Unni., “USA and Asia Hospitality & Tourism Students ’ Perceptions and Satisfaction with Online Learning versus Traditional Face-to-Face Instruction,” vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 40–54, 2018.
[13] D. J. Deming, “THE GROWING IMPORTANCE OF SOCIAL SKILLS IN THE LABOR MARKET *.” p. 37, 2017.
[14] P. Lambert, “The boundary fade away: Innovative learning as a collaboration between vocational teacher education, educational institutions and working life Helsinki organizations.” Helsinki Polytechnic, Helsinki, 1999.
[15] P. Lambert, “Learning tasks producing developmental transfer,” in At the boundary-zone between school and work: new possibilities of work-based learning, T. T.-G. & Y. Engeström, Ed. Helsinki: Polytechnic University Press, 2001, pp. 96–147.
[16] T. Baum, A. Kralj, R. N. S. Robinson, and D. J. Solnet, “Tourism workforce research: A review, taxonomy and agenda,” Ann. Tour. Res., vol. 60, pp. 1–22, 2016, doi: 10.1016/j.annals.2016.04.003.
[17] M. Ddungu-kafuluma, S. John, and S. Wanami, “The role of training philosophy in the training of quality technical teachers and instructors in Uganda,” vol. 4, no. 5, pp. 580–585, 2018.
[18] Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities, “National Diploma in Hotel Management Curriciulum; National Diploma in Tourism Management Curriciulum; National Diploma in Pastry and Bakery Curriciulum,” Kampala, 2013.
[19] J. C. Okware and W. Ngaka, “Rationale and challenges of technical vocational education and training in Uganda,” Tech. Educ. Vocat. Train. Dev. Nations, no. October 2019, pp. 26–44, 2017, doi: 10.4018/978-1-5225-1811-2.ch002.
[20] A. Nassazi, “EFFECTS OF TRAINING ON EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE . Evidence from Uganda,” VAASAN AMMATTIKORKEAKOULU UNIVERSITY OF APPLIED SCIENCES, 2013.
[21] A. B. K. Kasozi, “The African universities capacity to participate in global higher education for supply and production: A case of Uganda,” Uganda J. Educ., vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 45–63, 2003.
[22] O. H. Nakelet, I. Prossy, O. B. Bernard, E. Peter, and O. Dorothy, “Assessment of Experiential Learning and Teaching Approaches in Undergraduate Programmes at the School of Agricultural Sciences, Makerere University, Uganda,” Int. J. High. Educ., vol. 6, no. 5, p. 155, 2017, doi: 10.5430/ijhe.v6n5p155.
[23] S. Bunoti, “The quality of post-secondary education in developing countries needs professional support,” Cent. Educ. Innov. An Initiat. Results Dev. Inst., pp. 1–10, 2010.
[24] J. Otaala, J. S. Maani, and G. G. Bakaira, “Effectiveness of university teacher education curriculum on the secondary school teacher performance in Uganda: The case of Kyambogo University,” J. Int. Coop. Educ., vol. 15, no. 3, pp. 95–112, 2013.
[25] Ministry of Education and Sports, “Private Sector Contribution to the Provision of Relvant Skills Development in Uganda: Commissioner, Private Schools and Institutions,” Kampala, 2014.
[26] Ministry of Education and Sports, “THE TECHNICAL VOCATIONALEDUCATION AND TRAINING (TVET) POLICY IMPLEMENTATION GUIDELINES,” Kampala, 2019.
[27] Budget Monitoring and Accountability Unit, “Business, Technical and Vocational Training: Are the objectives being met?,” Kampala, BMAU Briefing Paper 26 / 19, 2019. [Online]. Available: www.finance.go.ug.
[28] L. Muganga and P. Ssenkusu, “Teacher-Centered vs . Student-Centered,” Cult. Pedagog. Inq., vol. 11, no. 2, pp. 16–40, 2019, doi: 10.18733/cpi29481.
[29] Y. Engeström, Learning by Expandinding, An Activity – Theory approach to Developmental Research., 1st Ed. Helsinki: Orienta-Konsultit, 1987.
[30] Y. Engeström and A. Sannino, “Studies of expansive learning Foundations, findings and future challenges – ScienceDirect,” Educ. Res. Rev., vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 1–24, 2010, doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.edurev.2009.12.002.
[31] Y. Engeström, studies in Expansive Learning: Learning What is Not Yet there, 1st Ed. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2016.
[32] H. Engeström, Y; Kerosuo, “From workplace learning to inter-organizational learning and back: The contribution of activity theory.,” J. Work. Learn., vol. 19, pp. 336–342, 2007.
[33] D. K. Moore, Effective Instructional Strategies: From Theory to Practice, 4th editio. Thousand Oaks/London/ New Dheli: Sage Publications, 2014.
[34] D. R. Daniel Muijs, Effective Teching: Evidence and Practice, 3rd ed. Los Angeles/ London/ New Delhi: Sage Publications, 2011.
[35] P. Sammons, Effective teaching, no. January 2013. 2020.
[36] H. M. Egeberg, A. Mcconney, and A. Price, “Classroom Management and National Professional Standards for Teachers : A Review of the Literature on Theory and Practice,” Aust. J. Teach. Educ., vol. 41, no. 7, p. 18, 2016, doi: 10.14221/ajte.2016v41n7.1.
[37] M. Lytras and L. Daniela, Learning Strategies and Constructionism in Modern Education Settings. 2018.
[38] C. Elman, J. Gerring, and J. Mahoney, “Case Study Research : Putting the Quant Into the Qual,” vol. 45, no. 3, pp. 375–391, 2016, doi: 10.1177/0049124116644273.
[39] A. Y. Selcuk Kendirli, Yakup Ulker, “ACCOUNTING EDUCATION AT FACULTY OF ECONOMIC ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCE IN KYRGYZSTAN UNIVERSITIES AND EXPECTATION OF STUDENTS FROM ACCOUNTING EDUCATION , A CASE STUDY IN BISHKEK,” Res. J. Bus. Manag., vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 52–68, 2015, doi: 10.17261/Pressacademia.201519787.
[40] S. Mikkonen, L. Pylväs, H. Rintala, P. Nokelainen, and L. Postareff, “Guiding workplace learning in vocational education and training: A literature review,” Empir. Res. Vocat. Educ. Train., vol. 9, no. 1, 2017, doi: 10.1186/s40461-017-0053-4.
[41] D. E. Lorenz, “Pedagogies of Resistance: Living Resistance by Writing,” pp. 6–14, 2018.
[42] E. Kalanda, “Industrial Training a Workplace learning approach for Hotel trainees of Kyambogo University,” Kyambogo University, 2012.
[43] J. E. Okou, “[PDF] Meeting the challenges of technical_vocational education the Ugandan experience Semantic Scholar.” Ministry of education and sports, Kampala, pp. 1–11, 2002, doi: N/A.
[44] Ministry of Education and Sports, “Handbook on Polices- Acts, Policy Guidelines and Regulations,” Kampala, 2011.
[45] K. Maršíková and E. Šlaichová, “Perspectives of employee training and development: methods and approachee,” ACC J., vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 13–23, 2015, doi: 10.15240/tul/004/2015-3-002.
[46] A. Thapa et al., Teacher Quality, Instructional Quality and Student Outcomes. Relationships Across Countries, Cohorts and Time (A Series of In-depth Analyses Based on Data of the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA)), vol. 52, no. 4. 2016.
[47] T. A. Kleinbort et al., “Writing in the Discipline: A Writing Mentorship Program to Enhance Student Writing Skills in the Leisure Field,” Sch. A J. Leis. Stud. Recreat. Educ., vol. 35, no. 1, pp. 46–53, 2020, doi: 10.1080/1937156x.2020.1720467.
[48] T. C. M. Lam, “Training Methods : A Review and Analysis,” no. April, pp. 10–35, 2016, doi: 10.1177/1534484313497947.
[49] Å. H. S. D. Bakkevig, R. J. Mykletun, and S. Einarsen, “‘We’re not slaves – we are actually the future!’ A follow-up study of apprentices’ experiences in the Norwegian hospitality industry,” J. Vocat. Educ. Train., vol. 67, no. 4, pp. 460–481, 2015, doi: doi/full/10.1080/13636820.2015.
[50] K. Sonnenschein, M. Barker, and R. Hibbins, “Investigating higher Education Students’ Professional Socialisation: a revised framework,” Higher Education Research and Development, vol. 37, no. 6. pp. 1287–1301, 2018, doi: 10.1080/07294360.2018.1458286.
[51] K. Yin, R, Case Study Research. Los Angeles/ London/ New Delhi: Sage Publications Limited, 2014.
[52] B. Yazan, “Three Approaches to Case Study Methods in Education : Yin , Merriam , and Stake Three Approaches to Case Study Methods in Education : Yin , Merriam , and Stake,” vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 134–152, 2015.
[53] D. Silverman, Doing Qualitative Research, 4th Ed. Los Angeles: Sage, 2014.
[54] L. Bartlet and F. Vavrus, Rethinking Case Study Resesrch: A Comparative Approach. New York: Routledge, 2017.
[55] V. Braun, V; Clarke, “Using thematic analysis in psychology,” Qual. Res. Psychol., vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 77–101, 2006, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1191/1478088706qp063oa.
[56] E. Tuck and M. McKenzie, “Relational Validity and the ‘Where’ of Inquiry: Place and Land in Qualitative Research,” Qualitative Inquiry, vol. 21, no. 7. pp. 633–638, 2015, doi: 10.1177/1077800414563809.

Lucy Ajambo, Leikny Øgrim, Justine Nabaggala , “Linking Teaching and Training Methods: Classroom Teaching vis-a-vis Workplace Training within the Hospitality Industry” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.24-32 November 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51103

Download PDF

pdf

The Extent of the Implementation of the Learning Continuity Plan of Panabo City National High School During Covid-19 Pandemic

Theresa R. Baman, Ronald S. Decano – November 2021- Page No.: 33-36

Covid-19 disease brought threats to humankind worldwide that made the closure of establishments, especially schools, to protect mainly the students, teachers, and its school staff. For this reason, face-to-face sessions were discouraged and other modalities were introduced based on the local Learning Continuity Plan of the school. Panabo City National High School crafted its Learning Continuity Plan based on the Department of Education Order No. 19 series of 2020. This study aims to determine the extent of implementing the Learning Continuity Plan of Panabo City National High School in its learning modalities utilized, the challenges, opinions, and recommendations by the parents, teachers, students, and other stakeholders. The challenges, opinions, and recommendations were identified through a quantitative deductive research design by conducting surveys to the 100 Panabo City National High School participants through quota and purposive sampling. The results showed that the school has implemented its Learning Continuity Plan (LCP) very well and observed by the parents, teacher, students, and other stakeholders and private individuals. The challenges that emerged were limited supply of printing materials in the production and delivery of modules; students struggle with self-studying, parents’ lack of knowledge to academically guide their child/children, internet, and other technical capacity issues. In conclusion, the study determined the extent of the implementation of the Learning Continuity Plan and recommendations for any room of improvement. The result of this study may serve as a springboard for the future improvements of the schools’ existing programs and guidelines on implementing the Learning Continuity Plan for the next school year.

Page(s): 33-36                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 23 November 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51104

 Theresa R. Baman
Graduate Student, Doctor of Philosophy in Educational Management, Davao del Norte State College, Philippines

 Ronald S. Decano
Dean, Institute of Advanced Studies, Davao del Norte State College, Philippines

[1] Bernardo, J. (2020, July 30). Modular Learning most preferred parents: DepEd. ABS-CBN News.https://news.abs-cbn.com/news/07/30/20/modular-learning-most-preferred-by-parentsdeped
[2] FlipScience. (2020, October 5). ‘Tagapagdaloy’: How Filipino parents can help ensure successful modular distance learning. FlipScience – Top Philippine Science News and Features for the Inquisitive Filipino. https://www.flipscience.ph/news/features-news/tagapagdaloymodular-distance-learning/
[3] The University of Saskatchewan, Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Planning, Unit Planning Guide and Workbook,Feb (2006) Sarah Gonser Tips for Principals Shifting Their Schools to Distance Learning. March 25, 2020
[4] Quinones, M. T. (2020, July 3). DepEd clarifies blended, distance learning modalities for SY 20202021. Philippine Information Agency. https://pia.gov.ph/news/articles/1046619
[5] Tria, J. Z. (2020, June 3). The COVID-19 Pandemic through the Lens of Education in the Philippines: The New Normal. ResearchGate. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/341981898_The_COVID-19_Pandemic_through_the_Lens_of_Education_in_the_Philippines_The_New_Normal
[6] Llego, MA. (n.d). DepEd Learning Delivery Modalities for School Year 2020-2021. TeacherPh. https://www.teacherph.com/deped-learning-delivery-modalities/

Theresa R. Baman, Ronald S. Decano “The Extent of the Implementation of the Learning Continuity Plan of Panabo City National High School During Covid-19 Pandemic” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.33-36 November 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51104

Download PDF

pdf

Correlation Analysis of Developer Interaction on Stack Overflow Website towards Perceived Programming Skills among Information Technology Students in Jose Maria College

Jerwin Carreon, Japhet Floren, Jory Benedicto, Erica Celine Fernandez, Vishy Te, Kate Saramosing, Riza Mae Sinangote- November 2021- Page No.: 37-40

There is massive information and addresses that can be found through the internet. Internet users visit websites like forums and blogs worldwide to seek information, communicate especially to get ideas. Stack Overflow is one of the popular sites ever visited by communities. The main objective of this site is to enable users to ask questions, collaborate and seek help commonly to a certain programming context or errors. Furthermore, programmers find it an effective and interesting collaborating site. Considering this site has been for many years on the internet. May it be a beginner trying to figure out programming, average or professionals with different logics and ways of contributions find this site very influential. This alone has shaped individuals’ programming skills both negatively and positively. This study aims to produce a statistical record of correlation between developer interactions of Stack Overflow within Jose Maria College IT students and perceived programming skills. Jose Maria College is an institution that runs an IT program which means programming as one of their core subjects, students are no excuse and exposed to encountering programming issues. Often, the students are susceptible to visiting Stack Overflow to find answers for their assignments and projects. Nevertheless, this study will show the impact of the site on the programming skills of the students. Commonly visualization figures and text inputs indicating the instruments and findings.

Page(s): 37-40                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 23 November 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51105

 Jerwin Carreon
Student, Bachelor of Science in Information Technology Jose Maria College, Philippine

 Japhet Floren
Student, Bachelor of Science in Information Technology Jose Maria College, Philippine

 Jory Benedicto
Student, Bachelor of Science in Information Technology Jose Maria College, Philippine

 Erica Celine Fernandez
Student, Bachelor of Science in Information Technology Jose Maria College, Philippine

 Vishy Te
Student, Bachelor of Science in Information Technology Jose Maria College, Philippine

 Kate Saramosing
Faculty, Jose Maria College

 Riza Mae Sinangote
Student, Bachelor of Science in Information Technology Jose Maria College, Philippine

[1] Bachschi T., Hannak A., Lemmerich F., and Wachs J., “From Asking to Answering: Getting More Involved on Stack Overflow”, arXiv e-prints, 2020.: Getting More Involved on Stack Overflow
[2] Amalarethinam, George & Lucia, T., “ScienceDirect International Conference on Information and Communication Technologies (ICICT 2014) Customer Facilitated Cost-based Scheduling (CFCSC) in Cloud”.2015. 660-667.
[3] R. Dagohoy, M.V. Buladaco, J. Jacinto, J. Pintado, & L. Ibañez, “Social Media Marketing Towards Consumer Buying Behavior: A Case in Panabo City”,5, 22-30, 10.47772/IJRISS, 2021, 5202.
[4] R. Dekeyser, ”Skill acquisition theory”, In B. VanPatten & J. Williams (Eds.), Theories in second language acquisition: An introduction (pp. 97-113). New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.,2007.
[5] C. P. Speelman, & K. Kirsner, “Beyond the learning curve: The construction of mind. Oxford University Press”, 2005.
[6] K. Buckreus, “Connectivism: Informing Distance Education Theory”, Pedagogy and Research, Morinville, Alberta, Canada, 2020.
[7] L. Harasim, Learning Theory and Online Technologies, RoutledgeFalmer, Taylor & Francis Group, 2012, New York.
[8] T. Ahmed, & A. Srivastava, “Understanding and evaluating the behavior of technical users. A study of developer interaction at StackOverflow”, Human-centric Computing and Information Sciences, 7 (1), doi: 10. 1186/s13673-017-0091-8, 2017.
[9] C. Magallanes, M. Ortiz, M.N. Seville, E. Tuliao, S. Tejada, N.G. Eroy & M.V. Buladaco, “Analysis And Design Of A Sales And Inventory Management Information System For A Motorcycle Parts And Accessories Store”, International Journal of Scientific Research and Engineering Development-– Volume 4 Issue 3, May -June 2021.
[10] [M.V. Buladaco & F.L. Ubay, “GETMOSYS: A Plant Pathologists Geotagging And Monitoring System For Infected Banana Plant”, International Journal Of Scientific & Technology Research Volume 9, Issue 04, April 2020.

Jerwin Carreon, Japhet Floren, Jory Benedicto, Erica Celine Fernandez, Vishy Te, Kate Saramosing, Riza Mae Sinangote, “Correlation Analysis of Developer Interaction on Stack Overflow Website towards Perceived Programming Skills among Information Technology Students in Jose Maria College” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.37-40 November 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51105

Download PDF

pdf

Parenting Style and Psychological Well-being of Secondary School Children

Agoha, Benedict C; Adewole, Iteoluwa; Adekeye, Olujide; Elegbeleye Ayotunde – November 2021- Page No.: 41-44

The quality of parent-child interaction is critical to child development. Parental communication of warmth tends to impact the development of emotional control, identity, and components of personality, which contribute to positive mental health. This cross-sectional survey aimed to determine the effects of parenting style on the psychological well-being of secondary school children. Three hundred students selected from five Secondary Schools in Amuwo-Odofin Local Area Council of Lagos State participated in the study. They ranged between 13-19 years (X= 15.51± 3.95) in age. 201 (67%) were female, 99(33%) were male. Participants completed the PAQ (Baumrind, 1991) and the Ryff’s Psychological Well-being scales. Path analysis using the IBM AMOS 23 indicated a positive effect of permissive parenting on anxiety/depression and environmental mastery facets of psychological well-being. Authoritative parenting negatively affected social dysfunction and positively affected autonomy, personal growth, and purpose in life. The findings show that children who experienced permissive parenting are more likely to report poor psychological well-being than authoritative parenting. Community programmes aimed at providing training on parenting may improve the mental health status of children in the community.

Page(s): 41-44                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 23 November 2021

 Agoha, Benedict C
Department of Psychology, Covenant University Ota, Nigeria

 Adewole, Iteoluwa
Department of Psychology, Covenant University Ota, Nigeria

 Adekeye, Olujide
Department of Psychology, Covenant University Ota, Nigeria

 Elegbeleye Ayotunde
Department of Psychology, Covenant University Ota, Nigeria

[1] Adler, Alfred (1927). Understanding human nature. New York: Garden City Publishing Inc.
[2] Adler, Alfred (1927). Understanding human nature. New York: Garden City Publishing Inc.
[3] Alika, H. I., Akanni, D. O., & Akanni, O. O. (2016). Parenting styles and family characteristics as correlates of psychological distress among Nigerian adolescents. International Journal of Psychology and Counselling, 8(9), 102–108. https://doi.org/10.5897/ijpc2016.0451
[4] Baumrind, D. (1991). The influence of parenting style on adolescent competence and substance use. The journal of early adolescence, 11(1), 56-95.
[5] Becvar, R. J., Becvar, D. S., & Bender, A. E. (1982). Let us first do no harm. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 8(4), 385-391.
[6] Clarke, P. J., Marshall, V. W., Ryff, C. D., & Wheaton, B. (2001). Measuring psychological well-being in the Canadian study of health and aging. International psychogeriatrics, 13(S1), 79-90.
[7] Darling, N. (1999). Parenting style and its correlates (pp. 1-3). Champaign: ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education, University of Illinois.
[8] Efobi, A., & Nwokolo, C. (2014). Relationship between parenting styles and tendency to bullying behaviour among adolescents. Journal of Education and Human Development, 3(1), 507-521.
[9] Enefazu-Ossai, E. I., Agoha, B. E., Adekeye, O. A., Igbokwe, D. O., & Ologun, S. (2017). Impact of family bond on the academic adjustment of college freshmen.
[10] Erikson, E. H. (1963). Childhood and society 2nd ed. Erikson-New York: Norton.
[11] Goodwin, R. (1991). Parenting styles and the adolescent. Pastoral Care in Education, 9(4), 17–20. https://doi.org/10.1080/02643949109470764
[12] Greenwood, B. (2013). The Baumrind theory of parenting styles. Global Post International News. Retrieved Desember, 15, 2013.
[13] Helson, R., & Srivastava, S. (2001). Three paths of adult development: Conservers, seekers, and achievers. Journal of Personality and Social psychology, 80(6), 995.
[14] Jahan, A., & Suri, S. (2016). Parenting Style in Relation to Mental Health among Female Adolescents. Abnormal and Behavioural Psychology, 02(03). https://doi.org/10.4172/24 72-0496.1000125.
[15] Klein, M. (1987). Selected Melanie Klein, U.S.A: The Free Press.
[16] León-del-Barco, B., Mendo-Lázaro, S., Polo-Del-Río, M. I., & López-Ramos, V. M. (2019). Parental psychological control and emotional and behavioral disorders among Spanish adolescents. International journal of environmental research and public health, 16(3), 507.
[17] Macleod, A. K., & Moore, R. (2000). Positive thinking revisited: Positive cognitions, well‐being, and mental health. Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy: An International Journal of Theory & Practice, 7(1), 1-10.
[18] Nasrollahzade, S., Mahmoudfakhe, H., & Rahmani, A. (2015). Comparison of Parenting Styles and Mental Health among Students. International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences, 62, 147–156. https://doi.org/10.18052/www.scipress.com/ilshs.62.147
[19] Rezvan, A., & D’Souza, L. (2017). Influence of Parenting Styles on Mental Health of Adolescents. European Online Journal of Natural and Social Sciences, 6(4), 667–673.
[20] Ryff, C. D. (1989). Happiness is everything, or is it? Explorations on the meaning of psychological well-being. Journal of personality and social psychology, 57(6), 1069.
[21] Ryff, C. D., & Keyes, C. L. M. (1995). The structure of psychological well-being revisited. Journal of personality and social psychology, 69(4), 719.
[22] Sahithya, B. R., Manohari, S. M., & Vijaya, R. (2019). Parenting styles and its impact on children–a cross cultural review with a focus on India. Mental Health, Religion & Culture, 22(4), 357-383.
[23] Seligman, M. (2018). PERMA and the building blocks of well-being. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 13(4), 333-335.
[24] Vaingankar, J. A., Abdin, E., Chong, S. A., Sambasivam, R., Jeyagurunathan, A., Seow, E., … Subramaniam, M. (2016). Psychometric properties of the positive mental health instrument among people with mental disorders: a cross-sectional study. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 1–13. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12955-016-0424-8
[25] Wissing, M. P., & Van Eeden, C. (2002). Empirical clarification of the nature of psychological well-being. South African Journal of Psychology, 32(1), 32-44.
[26] Xia G, Qian M (2001) The relationship of parenting style to self-reported mental health among two subcultures of Chinese. J. Adolesc, 24: 251-260.

Agoha, Benedict C; Adewole, Iteoluwa; Adekeye, Olujide; Elegbeleye Ayotunde , “Parenting Style and Psychological Well-being of Secondary School Children” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.41-44 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/41-44.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Effects of Infrastructure on Development of Small to Medium Enterprises (SMEs): (A Case of Small to Medium Enterprises in Mutoko Service Center)

William Mbewe, Charles Mavhunga- November 2021- Page No.: 45-50

The objective of this research was to present an analysis of the effect of infrastructure on development of Small to Medium Enterprises (SMEs) at Mutoko. In pursuit of this broad aim, the study used SMEs, Residents of ward 20, District Development Officers, Council Chairperson and council staff in Mutoko Service Center, Mashonaland East, Zimbabwe as the key research informants. The work of authoritative writers anchored the study. The study methodology was mainly descriptive and a comprehensive data collection was done using questionnaires to assess the views of the respondents. Interviews were also used to compliment on the shortcomings of questionnaires to ensure that adequate data was collected. The infrastructure components was broken down into four elements; roads infrastructure; water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) infrastructure; electricity infrastructure and serviced stands. The main study findings were that the availability of infrastructure was an effective way to foster world class growth and development for SMEs at Mutoko. SMEs in Mutoko have great growth potential in the granite industry and agriculture but infrastructure development was blocking the full growth of industries. There was very little adherence to town planning policies as enshrined in the RDC Act Chapter 29:13 resulting in a haphazard arrangement of workspaces for SMEs. This setup was notably an impediment to SMEs development since this directly affected SMEs access to roads, electricity and WASH infrastructure. The main study conclusion was that roads and parking infrastructure critically contributes towards the SMESs development in Mutoko growth point. Formalized work-spaces through serviced stands and developed structures form the pillars of SMEs development. Electricity and other sources of energy promotes mechanization and adoption of modern technology by SMEs, a move that promotes quality and quantity production. WASH infrastructure correlates with formal work spaces for SMEs and instrumental in the viability of day to day business operations for SMEs in Mutoko. The main study recommendations were that: Mutoko Rural District Council (MRDC) may need to construct shelter for leasing by SMEs to motivate growth and development of SMEs and to eliminate floating locations by those operating on non-formalized work-spaces. Schemes such as rent–to-buy may need to be encouraged to bring a lasting solution on issues to do with WASH, electricity and road infrastructure. The study also recommends that there should be full capacitation of local authorities and Parastatals by the central government as a means to steer up SMEs development.

Page(s): 45-50                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 25 November 2021

 William Mbewe
Faculty of Commerce and Law, Zimbabwe Open University (ZOU) Harare Region, Zimbabwe

 Charles Mavhunga
Faculty of Commerce and Law, Zimbabwe Open University (ZOU) Harare Region, Zimbabwe

[1] Aaker et al (2007:79) Testing the role of service quality on the development of brand association and brand loyalty. Managing Service Quality: An international journal 18(30,239-254
[2] Blumberg et al 2011:16 Business Research Methods 3rd edition: McGraw-Hill higher Education- London
[3] Boote & Beille 2005 The effect of Corporate Social Responsibility Investment, Assurance and Percieved fairness on Investor’s judgment –digtalcommons.tacona.aw.edu
[4] Bouazza, A.B, Ardjouman, D.and Abada, O. 2015. Establishing the Factors Affecting the Growth of Small and Medium-sized Enterprises in Algeria. American International Journal of Social Science, 4 (2):101-103.
[5] Chivasa, O. (2014), “The role of standards in consolidating operational opportunities for SMEs,” ZNCC, Harare
[6] Discombe 2014 – Service quality and its effects on customer satisfaction in online banking: A quantitative study about the relationship between service quality and customer satisfaction C.Tegelber – diva-portal.org
[7] Egbide, B., Samuel, F.A. and Samuel, F.O. 2013. Empowering Small and Medium Scale Enterprises in Nigeria: A Key Poverty Alleviation Strategy, International Journal of Business and Management Invention, 2 (5):6-12.
[8] Gates B, Culemn, – Insight from the world’s greatest Entrepreneur, New York Time Syndicate July 31,1996
[9] Gopaul & Monley 2015 SME perception of Government Assistance within S.A – virtusinterpress.org
[10] Kothari, C.R.2005. Research methodology: Methods and Techniques, 2nd edition, New Delhi: New age international.
[11] Kenneth Odero (2006), “Small and Medium Enterprises Support System in Zimbabwe”
[12] Kapoor, K. Mugwara, D and Chidavaenzi, I. (1992), “Enterpreneuring Small Enterprises in Zimbabwe” World Bank Discussion, paper 379
[13] Lutwama S. Joseph (2008), “Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) Financing in Uganda: Are Capital Markets a Viable Option?”
[14] McPherson, M.A. (1998), Zimbabwe: A Third Nationwide Survey of Micro and Small Enterprises in Zimbabwe. GEMINI Technical Report, Bethesda, MD.
[15] Magwa S and Magwa W (2017) – A guide to conducting Research – Strategic book publishing . USA
[16] Mudavanhu V, Bindu S, Chigusiwa L, Muchaiwa L (2011), Determinants of Small and Medium Enterprises Failure in Zimbabwe, International Journal Of Economics Research, vol 2 No 5, pp.83-89.
[17] Muranda, Z (2004), “Dissertation Writing, Concept and Practice”, University of Zimbabwe, Harare.
[18] Ngorora, G.P.K. and Mago, S. 2013. Challenges of rural entrepreneurship in South Africa: insights from Nkonkobe municipal area in the Eastern Cape Province. International Journal of Information Technology and Business Management, 16 (1):1-11
[19] Rosen bloom, B. (2007), “Multi-Channel Strategy in Business-to-Business Markets Prospects and Problems”, Industrial Marketing Management, Vol.36, pp.4-9. Rural District Council Act Chapter 29:13
[20] Saunders, Lewis, P. and Thorn hill, A., (2004), Research Methods for Business Students, Pitman Publishing, London
[21] Sukulwenkosi Dube-Matutu, (2017), The Chronicle: Gvt unveils SMEs infrastructure Policy
[22] Tawana 2014 How platform Governance Changes when Customers become Developers- Aaccademy of management 2014 journal.aom.org
[23] The Entrepreneurs Square (2016), “10 Smart Ways Of Encouraging Entrepreneurship In Nigeria” from pdf https://www.entrepreneurssquare.com (Retrieved on 15/05/19)
[24] The Government of Zimbabwe, (2000), “Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs)-Policy and Action Plan – Ministry of Industry and Commerce.”
[25] Uddin, M, R and Kanti, T, B. 2013.Factors Affect the Success of SME in Bangladesh: Evidence from Khulna City. Journal of Management and Sustainability, 3 (3):166-172.
[26] United Nations Workshop (2018), “Improving the Competitiveness of SMEs in Developing Countries” (UNDP)
[27] Victor Bhoroma (2018), “SMEs transition key in uplifting the Zimbabwean Economy” Bulawayo24 News: (18/05/18)
[28] Vitaliy Kramarenko [et al.] International Monetary Fund on Zimbabwe: “Challenges and policy options after hyperinflation” Washington, D.C.
[29] Williman Nichollas 2011For Research project Designing and planning your work. Sage publication
[30] Zigmund, W.G. (2003), “Business Research Methods” 7th Ed, Thomson, South- Western, Australia

William Mbewe, Charles Mavhunga, “The Effects of Infrastructure on Development of Small to Medium Enterprises (SMEs): (A Case of Small to Medium Enterprises in Mutoko Service Center)” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.45-50 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/45-50.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

A Comparative Legal Analysis of Elements of Contract of Sale under the Laws Regulating Contract of Sale in Nigeria, South Africa and United States

Michael Sunday Afolayan, PhD and Adejumoke Olusola Kumapayi – November 2021- Page No.: 51-56

This seminar paper focused on the comparative legal analysis of elements of contract of sale under the laws regulating contract of sale in Nigeria, South Africa and United States. It examined the various laws regulating elements of contract of sale in the three jurisdictions mentioned above looking at the similarities and differences in their statutory provisions. The research methodology adopted is doctrinal approach. The Primary and Secondary sources of materials were consulted in the writing of the work. Primary sources such as law reports, case laws, statutes etc. and secondary sources such as law textbooks, journals etc. This work finds out that there is similarity in the essential elements of a contract of sale in the three jurisdictions but there are slight differences in their practices. The work also found out that the law regulating contract of sale in Nigeria is obsolete and archaic and therefore needs to be amended to suite the current practices of modern-day commercial transactions. It is important that our laws be reviewed from time to time to incorporate changes that occur day in day out in our societies. This work advocates for timely review of laws governing contract of sale and commercial transactions in Nigeria.

Page(s): 51-56                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 25 November 2021

 Michael Sunday Afolayan, PhD
Senior Lecturer, Business & Industrial Law Department, Faculty of Law, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria

 Adejumoke Olusola Kumapayi
LL.M Research Student, Faculty of Law, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria

[1] Achike Okay, Commercial Law in Nigeria (1985)
[2] Adesanya M.O. and Oloyede E.O., Business Law in Nigeria (1983)
[3] Akomolede T.I. and Afolayan M.S. “Socio-Legal Analysis of Electronic Commercial Transactions in Nigeria.” Nnamdi Azikwe University Journal of International Law and Jurisprudence, Vol. 11, Issue No.2, pgs 20-33 (2020).
[4] Afolayan M. S. “Legal Analysis of Electronic Payment System and Frauds Associated with E-Commerce Transactions in Nigeria.” Nnamdi Azikwe University Journal of Commercial and Property Law, Vol. 8, Issue No. 3, pgs. 116-125 (2021).
[5] Agbonika J.A.M. and Agbonika J.A.A, Sale of Goods (with Sale of Goods Act) (Ababa Press Ltd, Ibadan 2011)
[6] Hackwill G, Mackeurtan’s Sale of Goods in South Africa (5th ed, Juta 1984)
[7] Handout on Commercial Law 201: Paper 1 The Law of Sale, Carriage & Lease (2012) compiled by Helen Kruuse
[8] Igweike K.I, Nigerian Commercial Law: Sale of Goods (3rd edition Malthouse Press Ltd, Lagos 2015) Law of South Africa vol 24 at 3
[9] Meltzer S. and Smith C. and Bubu C. Sale and Storage of Goods in South Africa: Overview https://uk.practicallaw.thomsonreuters.com/w-011-9988?transitionType=Default&contextData=(sc.Default)&firstpage=true> accessed on July 4, 2021
[10] Nwocha M.E, Law of Sale of Goods in Nigeria: Interrogating Key Elements of the Sale of Goods Act Relating to the Rights of Parties to a Sale of Goods Contract [2018] (9) Beijing Law Review.
[11] Okany M.C, Nigerian Commercial Law (Africana First Publishers, Onitsha, Nigeria 2009) < https://www.contractscounsel.com/t/us/sales-contract> accessed on 22nd June, 2021. <https://content.next.westlaw.com/8-618-0307?transitionType=Default&contextData=(sc.Default)&_IrTS=20180520120306646&firstPage=true> accessed on 22nd June, 2021. <https://openstax.org/books/business-law-i-essentials/pages/8-1-the-nature-and-origins-of-sales-contracts>. accessed on 22nd June, 2021

Michael Sunday Afolayan, PhD and Adejumoke Olusola Kumapayi , “A Comparative Legal Analysis of Elements of Contract of Sale under the Laws Regulating Contract of Sale in Nigeria, South Africa and United States” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.51-56 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/51-56.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Energy intensity and industrialization in Cameroon

Gael FOKAM, Christelle MAPA, Mathurin ISSABE – November 2021- Page No.: 57-67

This paper assesses the effect of energy intensity on industrialization in Cameroon over the period 1980-2020. The energy sector plays an essential role in economic prosperity and development. Energy consumption is an integral part of the growth process of any economy, whether it is an industrialized or a developing country. We estimate a panel data model using the Econometrics-Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) method. Our results show that at all levels of estimation of both long-run and short-run co integration tests, energy intensity does not favor the industrialization process in Cameroon. This leaves an important policy implication for Cameroon’s stakeholders, namely that they can focus on research and development to encourage investment in the development of new energy sources, increase energy intensity and stimulate economic growth.

Page(s): 57-67                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 25 November 2021

 Gael FOKAM
Faculty of Economics and Management, University of Dschang, Dschang, Cameroon

 Christelle MAPA
Faculty of Economics and Management, University of Dschang, Dschang, Cameroon

 Mathurin ISSABE
Faculty of Economics and Management, University of Dschang, Dschang, Cameroon

[1] Al-Iriani, M. A. (2006). Energy–GDP relationship revisited: an example from GCC countries using panel causality. Energy Policy, 34(17), 3342–3350.
[2] Apergis, N., & Payne, J. E. (2009). Energy consumption and economic growth: evidence from the Commonwealth of Independent States. Energy Economics, 31(5), 641–647.
[3] Asafu-Adjaye, J. (2000). The relationship between energy consumption, energy prices and economic growth: time series evidence from Asian developing countries. Energy Economics, 22(6), 615–625.
[4] Bahmani-Oskooee, M., & Bohl, M. T. (2000). German monetary unification and the stability of the German M3 money demand function. Economics Letters, 66(2), 203–208.
[5] Blanchard, O. (1992). Energy consumption and modes of industrialization: four developing countries. Energy Policy, 20(12), 1174–1185.
[6] Blanchard, O. J., & Summers, L. H. (1992). Hysteresis in unemployment. In Economic Models of Trade Unions (pp. 235–242). Springer.
[7] Brown, R. L., Durbin, J., & Evans, J. M. (1975). Techniques for testing the constancy of regression relationships over time. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society: Series B (Methodological), 37(2), 149–163.
[8] Cheng, B. S. (1995). An investigation of cointegration and causality between energy consumption and economic growth. The Journal of Energy and Development, 21(1), 73–84.
[9] Coakley, J., Fuertes, A.-M., & Smith, R. (2006). Unobserved heterogeneity in panel time series models. Computational Statistics \& Data Analysis, 50(9), 2361–2380.
[10] Cole, M. A. (2006). Does trade liberalization increase national energy use? Economics Letters, 92(1), 108–112.
[11] Dolado, J. J., Jenkinson, T., & Sosvilla-Rivero, S. (1990). Cointegration and unit roots. Journal of Economic Surveys, 4(3), 249–273.
[12] Eberhardt, M., & Bond, S. (2009). Cross-section dependence in nonstationary panel models: a novel estimator.
[13] Eberhardt, M., & Teal, F. (2010). Productivity Analysis in Global Manufacturing Production.
[14] Eberhardt, M., & Teal, F. (2011). Econometrics for grumblers: a new look at the literature on cross-country growth empirics. Journal of Economic Surveys, 25(1), 109–155.
[15] Engle, R. F., & Granger, C. W. J. (1987). Co-integration and error correction: representation, estimation, and testing. Econometrica: Journal of the Econometric Society, 251–276.
[16] Gregory, A. W., & Hansen, B. E. (1996). Practitioners corner: tests for cointegration in models with regime and trend shifts. Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, 58(3), 555–560.
[17] Johansen, S. (1988). Statistical analysis of cointegration vectors. Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, 12(2–3), 231–254.
[18] Jones, M. C., & Sheather, S. J. (1991). Using non-stochastic terms to advantage in kernel-based estimation of integrated squared density derivatives. Statistics \& Probability Letters, 11(6), 511–514.
[19] Karanfil, F. (2009). How many times again will we examine the energy-income nexus using a limited range of traditional econometric tools? Energy Policy, 37(4), 1191–1194.
[20] Kraft, J., & Kraft, A. (1978). On the relationship between energy and GNP. The Journal of Energy and Development, 401–403.
[21] Lee, C.-C. (2005). Energy consumption and GDP in developing countries: a cointegrated panel analysis. Energy Economics, 27(3), 415–427.
[22] Lee, C.-C., & Chang, C.-P. (2008). Energy consumption and economic growth in Asian economies: a more comprehensive analysis using panel data. Resource and Energy Economics, 30(1), 50–65.
[23] Lee, K., & Mathews, J. A. (2008). Upgrading in the same industry and successive entries in new industries for sustained catchup: cases of Korean and Taiwanese Firms. Catch–up Workshop Held in Mexico City, 22–24.
[24] Liddle, B. (2004). Demographic dynamics and per capita environmental impact: Using panel regressions and household decompositions to examine population and transport. Population and Environment, 26(1), 23–39.
[25] Liew, V. K.-S. (2004). Which lag length selection criteria should we employ? Economics Bulletin, 3(33), 1–9.
[26] Mahadevan, R., & Asafu-Adjaye, J. (2007). Energy consumption, economic growth and prices: A reassessment using panel VECM for developed and developing countries. Energy Policy, 35(4), 2481–2490.
[27] Narayan, P. K. (2005). The saving and investment nexus for China: evidence from cointegration tests. Applied Economics, 37(17), 1979–1990.
[28] Narayan, P. K., & Smyth, R. (2008). Energy consumption and real GDP in G7 countries: new evidence from panel cointegration with structural breaks. Energy Economics, 30(5), 2331–2341.
[29] Ozturk, I., Aslan, A., & Kalyoncu, H. (2010). Energy consumption and economic growth relationship: Evidence from panel data for low and middle income countries. Energy Policy, 38(8), 4422–4428.
[30] Parikh, J., & Shukla, V. (1995). Urbanization, energy use and greenhouse effects in economic development: Results from a cross-national study of developing countries. Global Environmental Change, 5(2), 87–103.
[31] Persan, M. H., & Pesaran, B. (1997). Microfit 4.0: interactive econometric analysis. Oxford University Press Oxford.
[32] Pesaran, M. H., Shin, Y., & Smith, R. J. (2001). Bounds testing approaches to the analysis of level relationships. Journal of Applied Econometrics, 16(3), 289–326.
[33] Pesaran, M. H., Shin, Y., & Smith, R. P. (1999). Pooled mean group estimation of dynamic heterogeneous panels. Journal of the American Statistical Association, 94(446), 621–634.
[34] Pesaran, M. H., & Smith, R. (1995). Estimating long-run relationships from dynamic heterogeneous panels. Journal of Econometrics, 68(1), 79–113.
[35] Revue synthétique des résultats pays. (2017).
[36] Sadorsky, P. (2013). Do urbanization and industrialization affect energy intensity in developing countries? Energy Economics, 37, 52–59. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eneco.2013.01.009
[37] Samouilidis, J.-E., & Mitropoulos, C. S. (1984). Energy and economic growth in industrializing countries: the case of Greece. Energy Economics, 6(3), 191–201.
[38] siècle avec la révolution industrielle britannique. Des mouvements d’industrialisation se sont ensuite succédé au cours du XIX. (2009). 1–13.
[39] Stern, D. I. (1993). Energy and economic growth in the USA: a multivariate approach. Energy Economics, 15(2), 137–150.
[40] Wolde-Rufael, Y. (2006). Electricity consumption and economic growth: a time series experience for 17 African countries. Energy Policy, 34(10), 1106–1114.
[41] York, R. (2007). Demographic trends and energy consumption in European Union Nations, 1960–2025. Social Science Research, 36(3), 855–872.
[42] Yu, E. S. H., & Choi, J.-Y. (1985). The causal relationship between energy and GNP: an international comparison. The Journal of Energy and Development, 249–272.

Gael FOKAM, Christelle MAPA, Mathurin ISSABE “Energy intensity and industrialization in Cameroon” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.57-67 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/57-67.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Impact Assessment of Roads Infrastructure on Agricultural Productivity in Konshisha Local Government Area of Benue State

Fidelia Ngufan Gbenyi, Omenka, J.I., Gaavson, T.- November 2021- Page No.: 68-76

This research investigated the state of rural agricultural production and how the infrastructure on ground has helped in improving agricultural sector. Konshisha Local Government which is one of the rural Local Governments areas in Benue State was chosen as the study area. The infrastructural facility assessed based on relationship with agriculture was road network. Descriptive design was used while stratified sampling technique was employed as each ward was considered a stratum. Purposive sampling technique was also adopted based on homogeneity of the population. Data was collected using primary sources which were: researcher’s personal interviews, observations and photographs were also used to support and further explain the observations. The theoretical framework used in this study was the integrated rural development strategy (IRDS). From the survey conducted, the available infrastructural facilities assessed (road network) was in very deplorable state, and therefore incapable of boosting agricultural productivity in the area. Good road network is therefore recommended, especially the revival of the only federal road across Konshisha local government area. When this is fully completed, it will boost the market for farm produce within the local government area, and attract other investors in agro related ventures. Therefore IRDS is suggested to government of Benue State in order to bring the rural Konshisha Local Government Area out of this low agricultural production state.

Page(s): 68-76                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 25 November 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51110

 Fidelia Ngufan Gbenyi
Department of Public Administration, Federal Polytechnic Mubi, Adamawa State, Nigeria

 Omenka, J.I.
Department of Political Science, Benue State University Makurdi, Nigeria

 Gaavson, T.
Department of Political Science, Benue State University Makurdi, Nigeria

[1] Ahmed, M. (2010).Engineering imperatives for national development. A Lecture at Colloquium of the 27th President in Jubilee Year of Nigeria.
[2] Aliegba, E.T.(2005). Economic development and the sustainability of democracy in Nigeria’s fourth republic. In: Proceedings of the 1st National Conference of the Department of Political Science, Benue State University, Makurdi on June 29th – 30th, 2005.
[3] Aliegba, E.T. (2011). The impact of land reforms on agricultural development in Nigeria: Lessons from others: Department of Political Science, Benue State University, Makurdi. Nigerian Journal of Political and Administrative Studies, 2(2).
[4] Aminu, A.A. (2000). Achievements of Governor Bukar Abba Ibrahim in rural development: Kano Flash Publishers.
[5] Amalu, U.C. (1998). Agricultural research and extension delivery systems in sub-Saharan Africa: Calabar; University of Calabar Press.
[6] Brinkerhoff, D.W. (1981). Effectiveness of integrated rural development: A Synthesis of research and experience: Agency of International Development Office of Rural Development and Development Administration.
[7] Economist, (2003). Economic structure. The economist, 4th November, 2003. www.economist.com/country-briefings nigeria.htm.
[8] Forest, T. (1995). Politics and economics development in Nigeria: West View Press Colorado,.
[9] Iwuchukwu, J. C. & Igbokwe, E.M. (2012). Lessons from agricultural policies and programmes in Nigeria: Department of Agricultural Extension, University of Nigeria, Nsukka: Journal of Law, Policy and Globalization Vol. 5.
[10] Mathers, N., Fox N. & Hunn A. (2002). Using interwiews in a research project. Institute of General Practice, Northern General Hospital Sheffield. Tent Focus Group.
[11] National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) (2006). Annual abstract of statistics 2006. Federal Republic of Nigeria 2006.
[12] Nchuchuwe, F.F. & Adejuwon. K.D. (2012). The challenges of agriculture and rural development in Africa: The Case of Nigeria. International Journal of Academic Research in Progressive Education and Development, 1(3), 45-61.
[13] Obetta, K.C. & Okide, C.C. (2013). Problems affecting the academic performance of rural secondary school students in Enugu State. http://www.doublegist.com
[14] Okoye, I. C. (2003). Research manual: Guide for research in applied science, education technology, medicine, engineering and business studies, Yola; Paraclete Publishers.
[15] Ogunnowo, C.O. & Oderinde, F.O. (2012). Sustainable development of infrastructure for effective transformation of rural communication of rural communities in Nigeria: implications for food security. Ozean Journal of Social Sciences, 5(3), 87-94.
[16] Oni, T. O. (2013). Challenges and prospects of agriculture in Nigeria: The way forward. Journal of Economics and Sustainable Development, 4(16), 37-44.
[17] Scudder, T. (1981). From belief to development; some comments on refugee and other settlement in Somalia: California Institute of Technology.
[18] William, S.K.T. (1994). Issues and priority in agricultural extension in Nigeria in the 21st century keynote address presented at the Maiden Conference of Society for Nigerian Agricultural Extension. ARMTI, Ilorin. February 28-March 4, 1994

Fidelia Ngufan Gbenyi, Omenka, J.I., Gaavson, T., “Impact Assessment of Roads Infrastructure on Agricultural Productivity in Konshisha Local Government Area of Benue State” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.68-76 November 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51110

Download PDF

pdf

Factors Influencing Assessment Conceptions among Basic School Teachers: A Multiple Analysis of Variance

Shani Osman – November 2021- Page No.: 77-86

This study examined teacher variables that influence assessment conceptions of basic school teachers in the Sissala East Municipality of Ghana. Gender, academic levels, class assigned, teaching experience, age and assessment-based training were investigated to determine the effects of these individual variables on the teachers’ conception of assessment. The data for this study were collected and analyzed using a strictly quantitative approach. Teachers Conception of Assessment III was used to collect data from 204 teachers. Using multiple analysis of variance (MANOVA), out of the six variables included in the study, the results revealed that the main effect for gender was significant, Wilks’ Lambda = .95, F (4, 198) = 2.53, p < .05; multivariate η2 = 0.05. A follow-up Bonferroni adjustment analysis, the dependent variables were verified individually, and the only variable to attain a difference in statistical significance was improvement assessment conception, F (1, 201) = 6.56, p = .011, partial eta squared = .03. An analysis of the mean scores revealed that females recorded marginally higher levels of improvement conception (M = 4.84, SD = .55) than males (M = 4.63, SD = .59). It is therefore recommended that stake holders should ensure the development of ways to improve the assessment literacy of especially male teachers.

Page(s): 77-86                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 25 November 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51111

 Shani Osman>/strong>
Department of Social Sciences, Tumu College of Education, Ghana

[1] Alderson, J. C. (2005). Principles and practice in language testing. Keynote address at RATE-QUEST Conference, Cluj, Romania, 5th August, 2005.
[2] Benson, T. L. (2014). Sixth through eighth grade teachers’ conceptions (beliefs) about assessment practices. Unpublished D. Ed dissertation presented to the Wingate University School of Graduate and Adult Education, Union Country.
[3] Bonner, S. (2016). Teachers’ perceptions about assessment: Competing narratives. In G. T. L. Brown & L. Harris (Eds.), Handbook of social conditions in assessment (pp. 21–40). New York: Routledge.
[4] Brown, G. T. L. (2004). Teachers’ conceptions of assessment: Implications for policy and professional development. Assessment in Education: Policy, Principles and Practice, 11(3), 305-322.
[5] Brown, G. T. L. (2006). Teachers’ conceptions of assessment: Validation of an abridged instrument. Psychological Reports, 99, 166-170.
[6] Brown, G. T. L. (2008). Conceptions of assessment: Understanding what assessment means to teachers and students. Nova Science Publishers.
[7] Brown, G. T. L., & Gao, L. (2015). Chinese teachers’ conceptions of assessment for and of learning: Six competing and complementary purposes. Cogent Education, 2(1), 1-19.
[8] Brown, G. T. L., & Hirschfeld, G. H. F. (2008). Student’ conceptions of assessment: Links to outcomes. Assessment in Education: Principles, Policy and Practice, 15(1), 3 – 17.
[9] Brown, G. T. L., Lake, R. & Matters, G. (2011). Queensland teachers’ conceptions of assessment: The impact of policy priorities on teacher attitudes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 27, 210-220. doi: 10.1016/j.tate.2010.08.003
[10] Calveric, S. B. (2010). Elementary teachers’ assessment beliefs and practices. (Doctoral dissertation, Virginia Commonwealth University, Virginia, USA).
[11] Daniels, L. M., Poth, C., Papile, C., & Hutchison, M. (2014). Validating the conceptions of assessment-III scale in Canadian pre-service teachers. Educational Assessment, 19(2), 139-158. doi:10.1080/10627197.2014.903654
[12] DeLuca, C., Chavez, T., & Cao, C. (2013). Establishing a foundation for valid teacher judgement on student learning: The role of pre-service assessment education. Assessment in Education: Principles, Policy & Practice, 20(1), 107 – 126.
[13] Elliott, A. C., & Woodward, W. A. (2007). Statistical analysis quick reference guidebook with SPSS examples (1st ed.). London: Sage Publications
[14] Fulmer, G. W., Tan, K. H. K., & Lee, C. H. I. (2017): Relationships among Singaporean secondary teachers’ conceptions of assessment and school and policy contextual factors. Assessment in Education: Principles, Policy & Practice, 1 – 17. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0969594X.2017.1336427
[15] Harris, L. (2008). Secondary teachers’ conceptions of the purpose of assessment and feedback. Paper presented to the Australian Association for Research in Education (AARE) Annual Conference, December 2008, Brisbane, Australia.
[16] Izci, K., & Caliskan, G. (2017). Development of prospective teachers’ conceptions of assessment and choices of assessment task. International Journal of Research in Education and Science (IJRES), 3(2), 464 – 474.
[17] Krejcie, R. V. & Morgan, D.W. (1970). Determining sample size for research activities. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 30, 607-610.
[18] Levy-Vered, A., & Alhija, F. N. (2015). Modelling beginning teachers’ assessment literacy: The contribution of training, self-efficacy, and conceptions of assessment. Educational Research and Evaluation, 21(5), 378 – 406.
[19] McMillan, J. H. (2018). Classroom assessment: Principles and practice that enhance student learning and motivation (7th ed.). New York: Pearson.
[20] Mehrgan, K., Hayati, A., & Alavi, S. M. (2017). Investigating the impacts of EFL teachers’ age, educational background, instructional experience and gender on their beliefs about formative assessment. International Journal of Foreign Language Teaching & Research, 5(18), 143 – 160.
[21] Moiinvaziri, M. (2015). University teachers’ conception of assessment: A structural equation modelling approach. Journal of Language, Linguistics and Literature, 1(3), 75-85.
[22] National Council for Curriculum and Assessment (NaCCA) (2019). Resource guide for the orientation of primary school teachers towards the implementation of the revised curriculum for primary schools. Accra: Ministry of Education.
[23] Ndalichako, J. L. (2015). Secondary school teachers’ perceptions of assessment. International Journal of Information and Education Technology, 5(5), 326 – 332.
[24] Okyere, M., Kuranchie, A., Larbi, E., & Twene, C. (2018). Essentials of assessment in schools. Sunyani: Aduana Printing Press
[25] Pallant, J. (2016). SPSS survival manual, a step by step guide to data analysis using IBM SPSS (6th ed.). Berkshire, England: McGraw Hill
[26] Remesal, A. (2007). Educational reform and primary and secondary teachers’ conceptions of assessment: The Spanish instance, building upon Black and Wiliam (2005). The Curriculum Journal, 18(1), 27-38.doi: 10.1080/09585170701292133
[27] Remesal, A. (2011). Primary and secondary teachers’ conceptions of assessment: A qualitative study. Teaching and Teacher Education, 27, 472-482.
[28] Sahikarakas, S. (2012). The role of teaching experience on teachers’ perceptions of Language assessment. Procedia – Social and Behavioural Science, 47(2), 1786 – 1792.
[29] Smith, L. F., Hill, M. F., Cowie, B., & Gilmore, A. (2014). Preparing teachers to use the enabling power of assessment. In C. Wyatt-Smith, V. Klenowski, & P. Colbert (Eds.), Designing assessment for quality learning (pp. 303–323). Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer.
[30] Tabachnick, B. G. & Fidell, S. (2013). Using multivariate statistics (6 ed). Boston: Pearson Education, Inc.
[31] Vardar, E. (2010). Sixth, seventh, and eighth grade teachers’ conception of assessment. (Master’s Thesis, Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey).
[32] Xu, Y., & Brown, G. T. L. (2016). Teacher assessment literacy in practice: A reconceptualization. Teaching and Teacher Education, 58(2), 149 – 162.
[33] Yetkin, R. (2017). Pre-service English teachers’ conception of assessment and their future assessment practices in a Turkish context. Master’s thesis. Hacettepe University.
[34] Yetkin, R. (2018). Exploring prospective teachers’ conceptions of assessment in Turkish context. European Journal of Education Studies, 4(5), 133-146. DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.1230554
[35] Yidana, M. B. & Anti Partey, P. (2018). Economics teachers’ conceptions of classroom assessment: A study of senior high schools in the Central and Ashanti Regions of Ghana. International Journal for Innovation Education and Research, 6(10), 153 – 174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.31686/ijier.Vol6.Iss10.1176

Shani Osman , “Factors Influencing Assessment Conceptions among Basic School Teachers: A Multiple Analysis of Variance” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.77-86 November 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51111

Download PDF

pdf

Teacher Professionalism in Zambia: Reality or Pipe-Dream?

Simuyaba Eunifridah- November 2021- Page No.: 87-92

This article highlights the strategies that the newly established Teaching Council has put in place in its quest to professionalise teaching in Zambia. Since Zambia attained her political independence in October, 1964, there has been a great desire to ensure that teachers acquire professional status which would translate into an occupational status symbol. Against this background, the Government of the Republic of Zambia in conjunction with other stakeholders in the education sector has made strides in the direction of professionalising the teaching occupation. In this regard, the enactment of the Teaching Profession Act no.5 of 2013 and the development of a Code of Ethics and Conduct to regulate teachers’ practice and professional conduct in government and private schools are some of the major milestones in trying to regulate the teaching profession. Despite having made tremendous strides in this direction, many structural and operational challenges have since made it difficult to actualise this status. It is for this reason that the paper discusses some structural and operational challenges associated with teacher professionalism in Zambia which make teacher professionalism a pipe-dream. The paper concludes by highlighting some prospects in Teacher professionalism in the post 2015 era.

Page(s): 87-92                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 November 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51106

 Simuyaba Eunifridah
Department of Education Administration and Policy Studies, The University of Zambia

[1] Brehm, B. Breen, P., Brown, B., Long, L., Smith, R., wall, A. and Wallen, N.S (2006). “Instructional Design and Assessment: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Introducing Professionalism’. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education. Vol.70 (4), 1-5.
[2] Brown, D. and Ferril, M.J. (2009). “The Taxonomy of Professionalism: Reframing the Academic Pursuit of Professional Development”. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education. Vol.83 (4)1-10.
[3] Grady, M.P., Helbling, K.C. and Lubeck, D.R. (2008) Teacher Professionalism since a Nation at Risk. Phi Delta Kappan, Vol 89, 603-604, 607.
[4] Kelly, M.J. (1996). The Origins and Development of Education in Zambia. Lusaka: Image publishers.
[5] Kim, L.C. (2015). “Defining Professionalism in Teacher Education Programmes”. Vol. 2(2)23-25.
[6] Manchishi, P.C. and Masaiti, G (2011) “The University of Zambia Pre- Service Teacher Education Programme: Is it Responsive to Schools and Community’s Aspirations?” European Journal of Education Studies. Vol 3, No. 2.
[7] Manchishi, P.C. (2015). Reforming Zambian Pre-service Teacher Education for Quality Learning. Lusaka: University of Zambia Press.
[8] MoE (1996). The National Policy on Education, Educating our Future. Lusaka: MoE.
[9] Musaazi, J.C.S (1988). The Theory and Practice of Educational Administration. London: Macmillan.
[10] Pratte, R. and Rury, J.L. (1991) “Teachers, Professionalism and the Craft”. Teachers’ College Record, 93 (1) 59-72. http//www.tcrrecord.org ID No.255. Date Accessed 5.6.2015.
[11] Simuyaba, E. Falconer-Stout, Z. J. and Mayapi, T. (2015) “Government Teachers in Community Schools: Two Zambian Success Stories”. Time to Learn Case Study Series. Lusaka: USAID.
[12] Simuyaba, E. and Chibwe Portipher (2016) Teacher Professionalism in Zambia: Practices, Challenges and Prospects in the Post 2015 Era. Proceedings of the 67th IIER International conference, Sweden, Stockholm, 02 April, 2016. ISBN 978-93-85973-89-5. Available on http://dspace.unza.zm/handle/123456789/6960.
[13] Simuyaba, E.; Stout Falconer Z.J and Kalimaposo, K. (2014) “The Role of Active Parent Community School Committees in Achieving Strong Relative School Performance in Zambian Community Schools”. Southern Africa Review of Education. Vol. 20, 2. 59-79.
[14] Simuyaba, E.; Banda, D, Mweemba, L. and Muleya, G (2015). “Theory against Practice: Training of Teachers in a Vacuum”. Journal of Education and Social Policy. Vol. 2, No. 5. 2015. Also available on http://www.encompassworld.com/resources/role-active-parent-community-school-committee. Accessed on 2nd March, 2016.
[15] Masaiti G. and Simuyaba E. (2018). ‘University Education in Zambia in the Face of Austerity: History, Trends and Financing’ in Education in Zambia at Fifty years of Independence and beyond. Lusaka: Unza press. Also available on https://www.researchgate.net/publication/
[16] Simuyaba, E and Manchishi, P.C. (2016). “Teacher Education in Zambia: History, Current Status and Future Prospects”.in Vol 3 of The International Handbook on Teacher Education Worldwide’ available on https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/662001?journalCode=cer
[17] The Teaching Council of Zambia. (2016). Code of Ethics for the Teaching Profession in Zambia. Lusaka: TCZ (UP. 2016 Version).
[18] GRZ. (2013). The Teaching Profession Act No. 5 of 2013. Lusaka: Government Printers.
[19] ZNUT (2007). The Zambia National Union of Teachers Report (2007). Lusaka. ZNUT.

Simuyaba Eunifridah, “Teacher Professionalism in Zambia: Reality or Pipe-Dream?” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.87-92 November 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51106

Download PDF

pdf

Attitudes of English Language Lecturers and Students on ICT Mediated Teaching in Gombe State University, Nigeria

Joseph N. Gusen (Ph. D), Usman, Jamila Abubakar (Mrs) – November 2021- Page No.: 93-103

The paper is on Attitudes of English Language Lecturers and Students on ICT Mediated Teaching in Gombe State University. Cross-sectional survey design was adopted as research design for the study. ICT has revolutionized every aspect of human life endeavour, more especially the aspect of education. The study was designed to observe the attitude of English language lecturers and students towards the use of ICT mediated teaching and learning. The research work was guided by four research questions. The samples of the study consist of English language lecturers and available students studying English language from Gombe State University as population. The instrument for the study was a self-designed structured questionnaire administered to five (5) English language lecturers and twenty (20) students of English. The instrument was validated by ICT lecturer from University of Jos. The reliability of the instrument was conducted using Cronbach Alpha Correlation coefficient which stood at 0.85%. Even though this study has limitation related to sample size, the results contributes to the existing theory and practice related to ICT mediated teaching/learning. This study could be an incentive for improving readiness of English language lecturers/teachers regarding ICT use in learning activities.

Page(s): 93-103                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 November 2021

 Joseph N. Gusen (Ph. D)
Associate Professor, ICT Lecturer, Department of Science and Technology Education, University of Jos, Nigeria

 Usman, Jamila Abubakar (Mrs)
English Language Lecturer, Gombe State University & M.Phil/PhD student English Language, Department of Arts Education, Faculty of Education, University of Jos, Nigeria

[1]. Gusen, J.N. (2019). SWOT Analysis of ICT in English Language Education In: Gusen, J.N. (Ed) SWOT Analysis of ICT Across the Curriculum. Jos. Byang Publisher and Co.
[2]. Alkamel M. A.A. & Chouthaiwale, S.S. (2018). The use of ICT tools in English Language Teaching and Learning: A Literature Review. Veda’s journal of English language and literature (JOELL), 5(2), 29-33. alkamel2030@gmail.com
[3]. Federal Ministry of Education (FME, 2019a).National Policy on Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in Education, Abuja: Nigeria.
[4]. Mahdum M., Hadriana H. & Safrianti, M. (2019) Exploring Teacher Perception Motivations to ICT Use in Learning Activities in Indonesia Journal of Information Technology Education: Research, An official publication of the informing science institute JITE Research 18.293.
[5]. Sharma, A., Gandhar, K., & Sharma, S. (2011). (PDF) Role of ICT in the Process of Teaching and Learning. Journal of Education and Practice 2, (5). Retrieved on 20th August, 2020 from: www.researchgate.net › publication
[6]. Lata, S.(2009). ICTs and Technophobia among teachers in Higher Education. In Saxena,I., Saxena M.K.,&Gihar S,(Eds). ICT in Professional Education. Delhi: A.P.H. Publication Corperation
[7]. Rank, T., Warren, C. & Milum, T.(2011). Teaching English using ICT: A Practical guide for secondary school teachers. London: Continuum
[8]. United Nation, Educational and Scientific Cooperation (UNESCO, 2012). ICT in Primary Education – UNESCO IITE. Retrieved on 16th April, 2020 from: iite.unesco.org › publications › files
[9]. Usman, J.A. (2017). A Comparison of Direct and Indirect Method of Teaching the Sounds of English among Nyimatli Secondary School: A Thesis Submitted to the Department of Arts Education, Faculty of Education, University of Jos, in Partial Fulfillment of Requirements for the Award of Masters Degree in English Education
[10]. Dogo P. (2016) Effects of English language on students’ performance in teaching and Learning of Mathematical modeling at junior secondary school level in Bauchi state Nigeria a thesis Submitted in Fulfillment of The requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the Department of Educational Communication and Technology School of Education, Kenyatta University, Kenya
[11]. Nikhat Y. S., Mohd, I. (2016) Teacher’s attitude towards the use of Information and Computer Technology (ICT) in Classroom Teaching The International Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities Invention 3,(6) 2323-2329 Retrieved on 16th May, 2021 from: http:// valleyinternational.net/index.php/our-jou/theijsshi
[12]. Gusen, J.N.&, Dang L.P. (2020). Assessment of the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in Teaching English Language in Primary Schools in Mangu Local Government Area of Plateau State, Nigeria. American Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences Research (AJHSSR), 4, (5), 97-106
[13]. British Education Communications Technology Agency (BECTA, 2003). Information and communication technology, knowledge and pedagogy. Education, Communication and Information, 1, (1), pp. 37-57
[14]. Yildirim, Z. & Goktas, Y. (2007). ICT Integration in Primary Education and Teacher Education Programs in Turkey and In EU Countries. Middle East Technical University
[15]. Federal Ministry of Education (FME, 2019b). National Implementation Guidelines for ICT in Education, Abuja: Nigeria
[16]. Alexander, B. (2012). Application Of ICT in Teaching and Learning English. Retrieved on 20th August, 2020 from: www.academia.edu › Application_of_ICT_in_Tea..
[17]. Rhalmi, M. (2017). ICT tools and English Language Teaching | My English Pages. Retrieved on 20th August, 2020 from: www.myenglishpages.com › blog
[18]. United Nation Development Program (UNDP, 2006). Information and communication Technologies and Development. Retrieved on 16th June, 2021 from: http://usdng. undp.prg/it4dev.
[19]. Adhyaru, J. Tafe, C. (2019). SWOT analysis of digital literacy in real class for … – VicTESOL. Retrieved on 20th April, 2020 from: victesol.vic.edu.au › uploads › S..
[20]. Ahmadi, M.R.(2018).The Use of Technology in English Language Learning: A… Retrieved on 20th April, 2020 from: ijreeonline.com › article-1-120-en
[21]. Wheeler, S (2001). Information and Communication Technologies and the Changing role of teacher. Journal of Edu. 26, pp. 7-17
[22]. Maduabuchi, C.H.(2016). ICT and the Teaching of Reading Comprehension in English .Retrieved on 14th June, 2021 from: https://www.journals.aiac.org.au › IJELS › article › view
[23]. Marzban A.(2011). Improvement of reading comprehension through computer. Retrieved on 12th June, 2021 from: https://www.sciencedirect.com › science › article › pii › pdf

Joseph N. Gusen (Ph. D), Usman, Jamila Abubakar (Mrs) “Attitudes of English Language Lecturers and Students on ICT Mediated Teaching in Gombe State University, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.93-103 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/93-103.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Teaching Practice and Motivation of Students in Schools

Mohamed Eddahby, Bouchra Gourja, Rachid Cherouaki, Aouatif Dezairi, Benyouness Bettioui and Mohamed Sardi- November 2021- Page No.: 104-109

The aim of this article is to study the obstacles to motivation, its role in the learning process, the difficulties encountered with this concept, both by teachers and by students, and finally to propose solutions to these difficulties to optimize the development of motivation in students. Academic success is linked to a prior and necessary motivation allowing perseverance and the maintenance of positive attitudes to allow the student to achieve self-actualization, as well as the achievement of previously set goals. This process is highly desirable for the good process of teaching and learning in the school environment. Several studies have been carried out to improve the level of education and defuse the issue of demotivation in students. This is what motivated this contribution, which aims to demonstrate, the main factors that can cause the lack of motivation for students and highlight the challenges to the good process of the course and the acquisition of new knowledge.

Page(s): 104-109                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 November 2021

 Mohamed Eddahby
Regional Center for the professions of education and training, Casablanca- Setta – Settat, Morocco.
Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics (URAC10), Faculty of Science Ben M’Sik, University Hassan II-Mohammedia Casablanca, Morocco

 Bouchra Gourja
Regional Center for the professions of education and training, Casablanca- Setta – Settat, Morocco.
Physical chemistry laboratory of materiels, Faculty of Science Ben M’Sik, University Hassan II-Mohammedia Casablanca, Morocco.

 Rachid Cherouaki
Regional Center for the professions of education and training, Casablanca- Setta – Settat, Morocco.
Physical chemistry laboratory of materiels, Faculty of Science Ben M’Sik, University Hassan II-Mohammedia Casablanca, Morocco.

 Aouatif Dezairi
Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics (URAC10), Faculty of Science Ben M’Sik, University Hassan II-Mohammedia Casablanca, Morocco

 Benyouness Bettioui
Regional Center for the professions of education and training, Casablanca- Setta – Settat, Morocco.

 Mohamed Sardi
Regional Center for the professions of education and training, Casablanca- Setta – Settat, Morocco.

[1] Linnenbrink , E. A. , Pintrich, P. R. , (2002).“ Motivation as an Enabler for Academic Success,” School Psychology Review, vol.31,n°3, p.313327. DOI: 10.1080/02796015.2002.12086158
[2] Ryan, M., Deci, E. L. , (2000).“Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivations: Classic Definitions and New Directions“, Contemporary Educational Psychology, vol. 25, p.54–67, Richard University of Rochester. available online at http://www.idealibrary.com DOI:10.1006/ceps.1999.1020
[3] Brophy ,J., (1983). “ Conceptualizing student motivation”, Educational Psychologist, vol.18, n°3, p.200-215. DOI: 10.1080/00461528309529274
[4] Lam, S., Cheng, R. W. , Choy, H. C. , (2010).“ School support and teacher motivation to implement project-based learning”, Learning and Instruction”, vol. 20, Issue 6, p.487-497. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.learninstruc.2009.07.003
[5] Slemp, G. R. , Field, J. G. , Cho, A.S.H. , (2020).“A meta-analysis of autonomous and controlled forms of teacher motivation”, Journal of Vocational Behavior, Vol. 121,103459. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvb.2020.103459
[6] Osman, D. J. , Warner, J. R. , (2020).“measuring teacher motivation: The missing link between professional development and practice”, Teaching and Teacher Education, Vol. 92,103064. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2020.103064
[7] Husman , J., Lens , W., (1999).“ The role of the future in student motivation”, Educational Psychologist, vol.34, n°2, p.113-125. DOI: 10.1207/s15326985ep3402_4
[8] Price, F., Kadi‐Hanifi , K., (2011).“E‐motivation! The role of popular technology in student motivation and retention”, Research in Post-Compulsory Education, vol.16, n°2, p. 173187. DOI: 10.1080/13596748.2011.575278
[9] Han, J., Yin, H., (2016).“Teacher motivation: Definition, research development and implications for teachers”, Cogent Education, vol.3,n°1. DOI: 10.1080/2331186X.2016.1217819
[10] Abazaoglu, Ilkay; Aztekin, Serdar, (2016).“ The Role of Teacher Morale and Motivation on Students’ Science and Math Achievement: Findings from Singapore, Japan, Finland and Turkey”, Universal Journal of Educational Research, vol.4, n°11, p.2606-2617.
[11] Börü, N., (2018).“The Factors Affecting Teacher-Motivation”, International Journal of Instruction, vol.11, n°4, p761-776.
[12] Andúgar, A., Cortina-Pérez , B., , (2018).“EFL Teachers’ Reflections on Their Teaching Practice in Spanish Preschools: A Focus on Motivation, “M. Schwartz (ed.), Preschool Bilingual Education”, Multilingual Education 25. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-77228-8_8
[13] Anderman, L. H. , Midgley, C. , (1998).“Motivation and Middle School Students”, Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education.
[14] Thoonen, E.E.J., Sleegers, P. J. C. , Oort, F. J. , Peetsma1, T. T. D. , and Geijsel , F. P. , (2011).“How to Improve Teaching Practices: The Role of Teacher Motivation, Organizational Factors, and Leadership Practices”, Educational Administration Quarterly ,vol.47,n°3, p.496–536.

Mohamed Eddahby, Bouchra Gourja, Rachid Cherouaki, Aouatif Dezairi, Benyouness Bettioui and Mohamed Sardi, “Teaching Practice and Motivation of Students in Schools” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.104-109 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/104-109.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Irrigated Farming a Panacea to Food Security-Constrains and Way Forward: The Case of Tunyo Division in Marakwet District- Kenya

Richard Maiyo Yego, Shadrack Kipkoech Sitienei – November 2021- Page No.: 110-116

Due to effects of climate change and resultant unpredictable rain patterns compounded with rising human population necessitates the adoption of modern agricultural techniques to ensure food sufficiency not only in the arid and semi-arid lands (ASAL) but the entire globe wherever they are. Eleven out of fourty seven counties in Kenya fall under the category of ASAL. This study delves into the subject of irrigated farming to find out the ‘how’ and what can be done to ensure there is adequate food supply for the growing population. The study adopted both the qualitative and quantitative techniques to arrive at the conclusion. The study was guided by the following main objective; to find out how irrigated farming can enhance food security, the challenges faced in irrigated farming and the way forward to these challenges by the residents of Tunyo division in Marakwet district-Kenya. The study found out that irrigated farming faces a myriad of challenges; inadequate water for irrigated farming, small parcels of land for farmers, lack of legal documents on ownership of land. The ways forward for the challenges are; environmental conservation, government should expedite legal documentation of land, motivation to farmers on irrigated farming, financial support, and formation of co-operative societies. The study finally concludes that government should put more efforts on irrigated agriculture to ensure food security.

Page(s): 110-116                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 November 2021

 Richard Maiyo Yego
Holds MA in Public Administration and Policy, Currently PhD Candidate (Political Science and Public Administration), Moi University, Kenya

 Shadrack Kipkoech Sitienei
Lecture Department of Philosophy, History and Religion at Egerton University, Kenya

[1] Alila, O. Patrick and Rosemary Atieno (2006). ‘‘Agricultural Policy in Kenya: Issues and Processes.’’ Paper presented at Future Agricultures Consortium Workshop, Institute of Development Studies. Nairobi, 20 – 22 March. Print.
[2] Barau, A.D., T.K. Atala and C.I. Agbo (1999). Factors affecting efficiency of resource use under large scale farming: A case study of dadin kowa irrigation project, Bauchi State. Nig. J. Rur. Econ. Soc., 1: 1-6.
[3] Eicher C. & Staatz J. (1985). Food Security Policy in Sub-Saharan Africa. Invited Paper Prepared For The XIXth Conference Of The International Association Of Agricultural Economists, August 25 – September 5 1985. Malanga, Spain.
[4] FAO, 1997. Agriculture food and nutrition for Africa. A resource book for teachers in agriculture. Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO). Food and nutrition division. Rome, 1997.
[5] Hussain, I.; Regassa, N.; Deeptha W.; and Samad, M.(2002). Water, Health and Poverty Linkages: Conceptual Framework and Empirical Evidences. Paper prepared for the National Workshop on Water, Health and Poverty Linkages in Sri Lanka. GWP Colombo Advisory Center and IWMI
[6] Peacock T. (1995). Financial & Economic Aspects of Smallholder Irrigation in Zimbabwe & Prospects for Future Development in Water Development for Diversification within Smallholder Farming Sector. Paper presented at Monomotapa Hotel, Harare, May 30 1995. Zimbabwe Farmers Union.
[7] Republic of Kenya (1987). ‘‘Inventory and Study of Traditional Irrigation Furrows In Elgeyo Marakwet District: A Proposal for Furrow Rehabilitation and Improvement, Volume 1 Report.’’ Nairobi: Sir Alexander Gibb & Partners; Consulting Engineers, Print.
[8] Republic of Kenya (2006). ‘‘Annual Progress Report: Investment Programme for Economic Recovery Strategy for Wealth and Employment Creation 2003 – 2007.’’ Nairobi. Government Printer, Print.
[9] Rukuni M & Benstern R. H. (1987). Major Issues in Designing a Research Programme on Household Food Insecurity in Southern Africa. Food Security Policy Option. UZ/MSU.
[10] Rukuni M, Eicher C.K & Blackie (Eds). (2006). Zimbabwe’s Agricultural Revolution, Revisited, University of Zimbabwe Publications, Harare.
[11] Ruttan, V. W. (2006). Productivity, Growth in World Agriculture: Sources and Constraints. Economic Perspectives. Journal of the American Economic Association 16 (4), 161-184.
[12] Tyner, Wallace, He, Lixia and Gamal (Siam 2004). ‘‘Improving Irrigation Water Allocation Efficiency Using Alternative Policy Options in Egypt.’’ Selected paper prepared for presentation at the American Agricultural Economics Association Annual Meeting, Denver, Colorado. In International Water Management Institute (Working Paper 4), 1 – 4 August, Print.
[13] Wani, Suhas P., Johan Rockström., and Theib Oweis.(2009). Rainfed Agriculture : unlocking the potential p. cm. — (Comprehensive assessment of water management in agriculture series ; 7) MPG Books Group; UK.
[14] International Water Management Institute (IWMI) (2001). IWMI Annual report 2000-2001. Colombo, Sri Lanka: International Water Management Institute (IWMI). 72p. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5337/2011.0020.
[15] Gardner, B. T., Woodrow, S.M., (2011). A history of Draper Irrigation: Celebrating 100 Years of water services. Draper Irrigation Company, DBA Water Pro, Inc.

Richard Maiyo Yego, Shadrack Kipkoech Sitienei , “Irrigated Farming a Panacea to Food Security-Constrains and Way Forward: The Case of Tunyo Division in Marakwet District- Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.110-116 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/110-116.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Peacebuilding in a Conflict-Torn North–Eastern Nigerian Society: Going Beyond Reconstructive Peacebuild

ng

Philip Onyinye Egbusie & Modupe Oluremi Albert – November 2021- Page No.: 117-123

Members of the Boko Haram sect have a preference for the Arabic name Jama’atu Ahlis Sunna Lidda’awati Wal-Jihad which means “People committed to the propagation of the Prophet’s Teachings and Jihad”. This insurgent group is alleged to have been founded in Maiduguri, the capital city of Borno State, in the North East of Nigeria. It is however argued that the sect is one of the bloodiest militant groups in the world which has continuously targeted both civilian and non-civilian citizens and has constantly inflicted devastating mayhem on the people of the north-eastern Nigeria. With over a decade-long of conflict in that region and its devastating effects in terms of loss of human lives, destruction of properties and infrastructure as well as economic loss, one then begins to doubt the possibility, certainty, practicability, and efficiency of peacebuilding in that conflict-torn society. This paper thus proposes a more tactical and pragmatic approach towards peacebuilding in a conflict-torn society by going beyond reconstructive peacebuilding,

Page(s): 117-123                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 November 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51107

 Philip Onyinye Egbusie
Department of Politics and International Relations, Lead City University, Ibadan, Nigeria

 Modupe Oluremi Albert
Department of Politics and International Relations, Lead City University, Ibadan, Nigeria

[1] Abimbola Adesoji, The Boko Haram Uprising and Islamic Revivalism in Nigeria, Africa Spectrum, Vol.45, No.2 (August, 2010): 95-108.
[2] Adam Nossiter, Boko Haram Militants Suspected in Attacks at Mosques in Nigeria, The New York Times, 2nd July, 2015. Retrieved 29.10.2021.
[3] Nurudeen Aderibigbe, Theories of Peace Education and Conflict, (Lagos: National Open University of Nigeria, 2010), 54-56.
[4] Joseph Adesina, Predicting the Effect of Counselling on the Psychological Adjustment of Book Haram Victims In Nigeria, International Journal of Arts And Humanities, Vol. 2, Iss. 4 (2013): 205-216.
[5] Al Jazeera English, Nigeria Killings Caught on Video – Africa, 10 February 2010. Retrieved 06.08.2021.
[6] Amnesty International, Nigeria 2020, Retrieved from www.amnesty.org/en/location/africa/west-and-central-africa/nigeria/report-nigeria/ 29.10.2021.
[7] Bayo Adekanye, Review Essay: Arms and Reconstruction in Post-Conflict Societies, Journal of Peace Research, Vol. 34, No. 3 (August, 1997):359 – 366.
[8] BBC News, Nigeria’s “Taliban” Enigma, 28 July 2009. Retrieved 01.08.2021.
[9] BBC, Nigeria Militants Burn To Death Motorists As They Sleep In Their Cars, Retrieved from www.bbc.com/news/world-africa, February 10, 2020. 29.10.2021.
[10] Boutros Ghali, An Agenda For Peace: Preventive Diplomacy, Peacemaking and Peace- Keeping Document A/47/227-S/241111 (New York: Department Of Public Information, United Nations (June 17, 1992).
[11] David Cook, The Rise of Boko Haram in Nigeria, Combating Terrorism Center, Vol. 4, Iss. 9 (September, 2011): 3.
[12] Duncan Gardham & Laura Heaton, (25 Coordinated bomb attacks across Nigeria kill at least 40, The Telegraph Newspaper, (25 December, 2011), Retrieved August 2014.
[13] Emmanuel Aiyede, Theories in Conflict Management, (Lagos: National Open University of Nigeria, 2006), 57-58, 94-95.
[14] Evans-Kent Bronwyn, Reconstruction Over Transformation: The Structural Appropriation of Peacebuilding. (New York: Thames and Hudson, 2001), 2, 95.
[15] Farouk Chothia, Who are Nigeria’s Boko Haram Islamists? BBC News 11January, 2012. Retrieved 01.08.2021.
[16] Freedom Onuoha, Boko Haram and the Evolving Salafi Jihadist Threat in Nigeria, In Pérouse de Montclos, Marc-Antoine. Boko Haram: Islamism, politics, security and the state in Nigeria, (Leiden: African Studies Centre, 2014), 158–191.
[17] Ibrahim Mshelizza, Islamist Sect Boko Haram Claims Nigerian U.N. Bombing, Reuters (29 August, 2011).
[18] Isaac Albert, Introduction to Third Party Intervention in Community Conflicts, (Ibadan: PETRAF & John Archers Publishers Ltd. 2001),61.
[19] Johan Galtung, Peace by Peaceful Means: Peace and Conflict, Development and Civilization, (London: Sage Publications, 1996), 70.
[20] John Paul Lederach, Preparing for Peace Conflict Transformation across Cultures, (Syracuse: University Press, 1995), 20.
[21] Joshua Bolarinwa, Introduction to Peace Studies, (Lagos: National Open University of Nigeria, 2006), 33.
[22] Kunle Sani, 110 People Killed In Boko Haram Attack On Borno Farming Community – UN, Premium Times, 29th November, 2020. Retrieved 29.10.2021.
[23] Mahatma Gandhi, The Mind of Mahatma Gandhi: Encyclopedia of Gandhi’s Thoughts, 2nd ed., (Ahmedabad: Navajivan Publishing House, 2007), 52.
[24] Martin Ewi, Why Nigeria Needs A Criminal Tribunal and Not Amnesty for Boko Haram, Institute for Security Studies, (Pretoria, 2013).
[25] Michael Diyoke & Christopher Oguche, A Critical Appraisal of Boko-Haram Insurgency and the Criminal Topography of Sambisa Geosphere, International Journal of Academic Research in Business, Arts and Science, Vol. 1, Iss. 1, (August, 2019): 4.
[26] Monsuru Kasali, Concepts and Practice of Peacebuilding, (Lagos: National Open University of Nigeria, 2006), 150.
[27] News Wires, Suspected Boko Haram Extremists Kill Dozens Of Nigeria Farmers, FRANCE 24, November 29, 2020. Retrieved 29.20.2021.
[28] Olalekan Adetayo, Boko Haram Has Infiltrated My Govt. –Jonathan, The Punch Newspaper, (9 January, 2012). Retrieved 10 August 2021.
[29] Oluwatosin Babalola, Combating Violence Extremism and Insurgency in Nigeria, (Fort Leavenworth, KS: Foreign Military Studies Office, 2016), 4-5.
[30] Oyedolapo Durojaye, Understanding Peace and War, (Lagos: National Open University of Nigeria, 2010), 44-45.
[31] Philip Egbusie, Post-Conflict Reconstruction and the Mental Health of Victims of Armed Conflicts in Nigeria: A Study of the Boko Haram Insurgency, (2021, Unpublished): 202.
[32] Sabrina Ford, Laura Italiano & Post Wires, Boko Haram Kidnaps More Children, Kills Villagers In Nigeria, New York Post, May 11, 2014. Retrieved 29.10.2021.
[33] Segun Mausi, Dispatches: What Really Happened in Baga, Nigeria? Human Rights Watch, 14 January 2015.
[34] Stephen Browne, Developing Capacity through Technical Cooperation: Country Experiences, (London: Earthscan, 2002), 2-4.
[35] The Guardian, Nigeria Accused of Ignoring Sect Warnings Before Wave of Killings (London: 2009) 2 August 2009. Retrieved 06.08.2021.
[36] The Independent, Nigeria Committing War Crimes To Defeat Boko Haram, 19 August 2014. Retrieved 06.08.2021.
[37] Tolu Ogunlesi, Nigeria’s Internal Struggles, The New York Times, 23 March 2015. Retrieved 01.08.2021.

Philip Onyinye Egbusie & Modupe Oluremi Albert “Peacebuilding in a Conflict-Torn North–Eastern Nigerian Society: Going Beyond Reconstructive Peacebuilding” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.117-123 November 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51107

Download PDF

pdf

Effect of Covid-19 on Small and Medium Scale Businesses in Nigeria

Dr. Ernest Jebolise Chukwuka, Dr. Fidelis U. Amahi- November 2021- Page No.: 124-135

The study examined the effect of COVID 19 on small and medium businesses in Nigeria. The objective of the study is to investigate the impact of COVID-19 on small and medium businesses. To ascertain the impact of government COVID-19 safety protocols on the performance of small businesses and to find out ways of minimizing the impact of COVID – 19 on small and medium businesses in Nigeria. A descriptive survey research design was adopted for the study. The sample of the study was achieved using random sampling technique. The sample for this study was 400 respondents. These respondents were selected from proprietor/ proprietress of small and medium scale enterprises in Asaba. The instrument used to collect data was the questionnaire. The data collected were analyzed using simple percentage, mean, standard and chi square. The overall findings of the study are that Covid-19 safety protocols have significant and positive effect on SMEs performance. The study discovered that Covid-19 impact on small and medium businesses can be reduced through increase engagement on digital online businesses; the study also reveals that shortage of supplies, production stoppage and suspension, reduces product lines/ingredient and short−term change in production are impact of COVID – 19 on small and medium businesses in Asaba Metropolis and the study also discovered that government guidelines related to Covid19 has impact on performance of small businesses which are inflation, smooth transaction, prevention of transmission of the virus in the cause of transaction and reduction of crowd in business environment.

Page(s): 124-135                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 November 2021

 Dr. Ernest Jebolise Chukwuka
Department of Business Administration, Michael and Cecilia Ibru University Delta State, Nigeria

 Dr. Fidelis U. Amahi
Department of Accountancy, University of Delta, Agbor, Nigeria

[1] Adebisi, S.A., Alaneme, G.C., & Ofuani, A.B. (2015). Challenges of finance and the performance of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in Lagos state. Developing Country Studies, 5(8), 46-58.
[2] Adedipe, B. (2004). The impact of oil on Nigeria’s economic policy formulation. In Proceedings of Overseas Development Institute Conference in Collaboration with the Nigerian Economic Summit Group.
[3] Akinlo, A.E. (2012). How important is oil in Nigeria’s economic growth?. Journal of Sustainable Development, 5(4), 68-84.
[4] Anthony, O., John, A. and Helen, O. (2020) CBN Releases Measures to Battle Economic Impact of Coronavirus, Report Available at https://t.guardian.ng/news/cbn-releases-measures-to-battle-economic-impact-of-coronavirus/.
[5] Balunywa, W. (2010). What are Small Scale Enterprises? Entrepreneurship and Small Business Enterprise. Makerere University Business School. Accessed at http://evancarmicheal.com/AficaAccount/1639/40.
[6] Balunywa, W. (2010). What are Small Scale Enterprises? Entrepreneurship and Small Business Enterprise. Makerere University Business School. Accessed at http://evancarmicheal.com/AficaAccount/1639/40
[7] Corona Virus Cases from Countries Around the World were Obtained from Worldometer Website Available at https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/coronavirus-cases/.
[8] Data on China population on COVID-19 Cases is obtained at National Bureau of Statistics of China. Available at http://www.stats.gov.cn/english/.
[9] Ekpeyong, D.B. and. Nyong, M.O (2002). Small and Medium Scale Enterprises Development in Nigeria. Seminar paper on Economic Policy Research for Policy Design and Management in Nigeria
[10] Femi, A., Adeyemi, A., Sulaimon, S., Benjamin, A. and Bankole, O. (2020) How Coronavirus Outbreak Threatens Nigeria’s Economy, the Guardian News. Available at https://guardian.ng/news/how-coronavirus-outbreak-threatens-nigerias-economy.
[11] Josephine, O. (2020). SMEs closures seen after covid-19 pandemic. Retrieved May 28, 2020, from https://businessday.ng/enterpreneur/article/smes-closures-seen-after-covid-19-pandemic/
[12] Kozak S. (2007),
[13] KPMG in Nigeria (2020) Top 10 Business Risks in 2020/2021.
[14] Maijama’a, R., Musa, K. S., Garba, A. and Baba, U. M. (2020), Coronavirus Outbreak and the Global Energy Demand: A case of People’s Republic of China, American Journal of Environmental and Resource economics, 5 (1):
[15] Max, R., Hannah, R and Esteban, O. (2020) “Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) “Published online at Our World In Data. Retrieved from:’ https://ourworldindata.org/coronavirus’.
[16] NCDC (2020). Nigeria Centre for Disease Control Situation Report for 19th March, 2020 on “COVID-19 Outbreak in Nigeria” Pages 1-3. Available at www.ncdc.gov.ng.
[17] Odinaka, A. & Josephine, O. (2020). SMEs closures seen after covid-19 pandemic. Retrieved May 28, 2020, from https://businessday.ng/enterpreneur/article/smes-closures-seen-after-covid-19-pandemic/
[18] OECD (2005). OECD SME and entrepreneurship outlook 2019. OECD Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1787/34907e9c-en
[19] Ojo, M. O. (2017): Transition to full-fledge Inflation Targeting: A proposed Programme for Implementation by the Central Bank of Nigeria, Occasional Paper No.44.
[20] Rabiu, M. Kabiru, S. M., Ahmad, A. I. and Samaila, A. (2020). Analysis of the Impact of Coronavirus Outbreak on the Nigerian Economy. American Journal of Environmental and Resource Economics (5), 2 39-43
[21] Richard, E. & Beatrice, W. M.(2020). Economics in the Time of COVID-19. Centre for Economic Policy Research. CEPR Press
[22] Ryder, G. (2020). The economic impact of COVID-19 on the labour market. Retrieved May 08, 2020 from https://www.stearsng.com/article/the-economic-impact-of-covid-19-on-the-labour-market
[23] WHO Director General’s Opening Remarks at the Media Briefing on COVID-19 11th March, 2020.
[24] World Bank (2020). Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) finance. https://www.worldbank.org/en/topic/smefinance
[25] World Health Organization (2020) Press Conference on Novel Coronavirus Outbreak.

Dr. Ernest Jebolise Chukwuka, Dr. Fidelis U. Amahi, “Effect of Covid-19 on Small and Medium Scale Businesses in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.124-135 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/124-135.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Effect of Emerging Information and Communication Technology (ICT) on Bauchi Radio Corporation (BRC), Bauchi State, Nigeria

Abubakar Bappayo, Ahmad Abubakar, Abdul Ahmad Burra – November 2021- Page No.: 136-141

Information and Communication Technology (ICT), has revolutionized the media industry. It has transformed information gathering and dissemination in Radio Production. This study examines the application of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) by professional of Bauchi Radio Corporation (BRC). The objective of the study was to identify the various areas of application of Information & Communication technology (ICT) resources in Bauchi Radio Corporation. Survey design was adopted for the study using personal interview (focus group) and the data collected was qualitative. The survey revealed that ICTs have been widely applied in Radio production by professional at Bauchi Radio Corporation (BRC).133 sample size was used in the study. The recommendation of this study include making fund available to upgrade ICT facilities and digitalized equipment’s should be made available to Bauchi Radio Corporation (BRC).

Page(s): 136-141                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 November 2021

 Abubakar Bappayo
Abubakar Tatari Ali Polytechnic Bauchi, Bauchi State, Nigeria

 Ahmad Abubakar
Abubakar Tatari Ali Polytechnic Bauchi, Bauchi State, Nigeria

 Abdul Ahmad Burra
Abubakar Tatari Ali Polytechnic Bauchi, Bauchi State, Nigeria

[1] Adamu B.S. & Abubakar, A. (2019). Application of information and communication technology in News Production. Bauchi State Polytechnic Press.
[2] Adeniyi, O. (2009). Importance of electronic media and societal development. www.broadcastmedia.com retrieved on 20 octorber,2021.
[3] Adigwe, I. (2010). The impact of information and communication technology on news processing: a study of NTA and AIT. Unpublished project Lagos State University, School of Communication.
[4] Adigwe, I. (2012). Impact of information and communication technology (ICTs) on News Processing, reporting and dissemination on broadcast station in Lagos, Nigeria. Library Philosophy and practice (e-journal). Paper 861. Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/861
[5] Aniogbolu, C. Nina, M. & Ememeriagbon, E. (2009). The status of information and communication technology in Nigeria: Implication for national development.
[6] Bozzkowski, P.J. (2004). Digitalizing the news: Innovation in online newspapers. Massachusetts: The MIT Press.
[7] Chari T. (2013). The use of Computer in processing and reporting News: Stands for subsequent broadcast.
[8] Dooley, H. (1999). What will be: How the new world of information will change our lives, San Francisco: Harper Edge.
[9] ESCAP, (2000). Techniques of Information and Communication Technology. Federal Ministry of Communication Technology-FMCT, (2012).
[10] Garba, A.B. (2014). Mass media and community development in Nigeria: an appraisal of community development campaign on selected BRC FM Radio Stations in Bauchi state. Journal of humanities and social sciences (JOHSS), 4(2):90-104.
[11] Kaduna, Duban printers Google Public D. (2012). Internet Megabits speed.
[12] Garrison, B. (2001). Diffusion of online information technologies in newspaper newsrooms. Penny Ivia: University of Park.
[13] Gipson, N.D. (2011). „Effect of Information and Communication Technologies on news gathering and processing” an unpublished final year lecture note. Mass Communication department, university of Maiduguri, Borno state Nigeria.
[14] Ishaku, K. (2018). DG, NBC: Annual report on radio broadcasting in Nigeria.
[15] Internet world start, (2014). Internet users in developing Countries.
[16] Jimo, Pate, Lin & Schulman, (2012). Internet Penetration and use of ICT in Developing Countries. Abeokuta. W.T.O. Press
[17] Maid, I. (1996) Application of ICT in radio broadcasting: H.T.O. Publications.
[18] Marcelle, G. (2000) Gender justice and ICTs. http/www.un.org/womenwatch. Accessed on 20 Octorber 2021.
[19] National Information Technology Development Agency, (2001). ICT Policy in Nigeria.
[20] Nigeria’s National Broadband Plan, (2018). Nigeria Internet Penetration.
[21] Nwadamma, H. (1997). Invention of writing. www.shorthandtypewriting retrieved on 20 octorber,2021.
[22] Nwodu, O. (2006). Advancement of ICT in sharing of news and information across the globe.
[23] Ogunsola & Aboyade, (2005). Information and Communication Technology and related Computer assisted reporting. www.infcom.com retrieved on 20 octorber,2021.
[24] Rodriguez & Wilson, (2000). Concept of Information and Communication Technology.
[25] Rogers, E.M. (2003). Communication and development: Passing of the dominant paradigm in communication and development, critical perspectives. California: Newbury Park.
[26] Rogers, Samadar, R. (1995). New Technology at the ship flow level. (New Technology and Workers Response to Micro-Electronics – Labour and Society). New Delhi, India: Sage.
[27] UNP & MDGS, M. (2010). Malaysia report: Malaysian Communications and Multimedia Commission, MCMCs, 234next.com

Abubakar Bappayo, Ahmad Abubakar, Abdul Ahmad Burra , “Effect of Emerging Information and Communication Technology (ICT) on Bauchi Radio Corporation (BRC), Bauchi State, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.136-141 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/136-141.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Marketing Force Automation and Usage in Electronics Industry: An Analysis on Walton BD

Sajia Islam & Mohammad Nazmul Huq – November 2021- Page No.: 142-155

Understanding how technology investments create business value is a research priority in today’s technology-intensive world. Building on this distinction, this quantitative analysis reveals that marketing technology impacts market person performance directly when used as a customer relationship tool. In contrast, it has a perfectly mediated impact when used for internal coordination purposes. To unleash its real potential, marketing technology should be designed to enable customer relationships rather than being perceived as a cost cutting tool. In addition, the motivational structure for using sales technology differs between two MFA-use dimensions. While the customer relationship dimension is driven by factors that trigger voluntary usage, the internal coordination dimension is predominantly explained by factors imposed from outside. Management should not impose technology usage. Rather, they should support self-initiating factors that stimulate technology usage for improving customer relationships. Combining upstream research focusing on the drivers of MFA-usage with downstream research shedding light on its performance impact, the study offers important implications for maximizing the pay-back from MFA-technology investments.

Page(s): 142-155                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 November 2021

 Sajia Islam
Master of Business Administration (MBA), Human Resource Management Stamford University Bangladesh

 Mohammad Nazmul Huq
Assistant Professor and Coordinator Department of Business Administration Stamford University Bangladesh

[1] D Zumstein, C Oswald, M Gasser, R Lutz, A Schoepf – 2021 – Marketing automation report 2021: lead generation and lead qualification through data-driven marketing in B2B- digitalcollection.zhaw.ch
[2] Content Marketing Institute & Marketing Profs (2020). B2B Content Marketing 2020. Retrieved from https://con- tentmarketinginstitute.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/2020_B2B_Research_Final.pdf
[3] Herrmann, T. (2017). Strengthening Internationalization with Inbound Marketing and Marketing Automation. In: Hannig, U. (Ed.): Marketing and Sales Automation. pp. 285-294. Wiesbaden: Springer Gabler.
[4] Hubspot (2020). What is inbound marketing. Retrieved from https://www.hubspot.de/in-bound-marketing.
[5] Hummel, F. (2017). How to deliver on the promises of marketing automation. In: Hannig, U. (Ed.): Marketing and Sales Automation. pp. 149-160. Wiesbaden: Springer Gabler.
[6] M Serdaroglu – 2009 – core.ac.uk, Sales force automation use and salesperson performance, University of Paderborn
[7] Ph. D. Dissertation, Järvinen, J., Taiminen, H. (2015). Harnessing marketing automation for B2B content marketing. In: Industrial Mar- keting Management, Vol. 54, pp. 164-175. Retrieved from https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/arti-cle/pii/ S0019850115300018.
[8] PWC (2018). Marketing Automation in B2C Companies 2018. Retrieved from https://www.pwc.de/de/digitale- transformation/pwc-studie-marketing-automation-b2c-2018.pdf.
[9] Salmi, M. (2020). Aligning Marketing and Sales – The case of Marketing Automation in Finnish B2B companies (Master’s thesis). Tampere: Tampere University.
[10] Sanderson, A. (2017). Marketing Automation Leads to Process Optimization. In: Hannig, U. (Ed.): Marketing and Sales Automation. pp. 73-86. Wiesbaden: Springer Gabler.
[11] Ab Hamid, N. R. 2008. Consumers’ Behavior Towards Internet Technology And Internet Marketing Tools. International Journal of Communications, 2, 195-204.
[12] Adam, S., Vocino, A. & Bednall, D. 2009. The World Wide Web in Modern Marketing’s Contribution to Organizational Performance. Marketing Intelligence & Planning, 27, 7-24.
[13] Adegoke, Y. 2004. Web Still Fastest Growing Channel in Marketing Mix. New Media Age, 22, 12. Akçura, M. T. 2010. Affiliated Marketing. Information Systems and E-Business Management, 1-16.
[14] Andrews, L., Kiel, G., Drennan, J., Boyle, M. V. & Weerawardena, J. 2007. Gendered Perceptions of Experiential Value in Using Web-Based Retail Channels. European Journal of Marketing, 41, 640-658.
[15] Arbnor, I. & Bjerke, B. 2008. Methodology for Creating Business Knowledge, Sage. Baker, M. J. & Hart, S. 2007. The Marketing Book, Butterworth-Heinemann.
[16] Chaffey, D. & Smith, P. R. 2008. E-Marketing excellence: planning and optimizing your digital marketing, Butterworth-Heinemann.
[17] Danaher, P. J. & Rossiter, J. R. 2011. Comparing perceptions of marketing communication channels. European Journal of Marketing, 45, 6-42.
[18] Dou, W. & Chou, D. C. 2002. A structural analysis of business-to-business digital markets. Industrial Marketing Management, 31, 165-176.
[19] Gruhl, D., Guha, R., Kumar, R., Novak, J. & Tomkins, A. Year. The predictive power of online chatter. In, 2005. ACM, 78-87.
[20] Regina Noriega 2019, 5 Digital Marketing Trends That Businesses Can’t Afford To Ignore. Retrieved from https://www.oneinfluencer.com/5-digital-marketing-trends-that-businesses-cant-afford-to-ignore/
[21] HO, L. H. 2010. The application of search engine optimization for internet marketing: An example of the motel websites 2010 The 2nd International Conference on Computer and Automation Engineering, ICCAE 2010.
[22] Kaplan, A. 2010. Users of the world, unite! The challenges and opportunities of Social Media. Business horizons, 53, 59-68.
[23] Kaplan, A. M. & Haenlein, M. 2010. Users of the world, unite! The challenges and opportunities of Social Media. Business horizons, 53, 59-68.
[24] Mangold, W. G. & Faulds, D. J. 2009. Social media: The new hybrid element of the promotion mix. Business horizons, 52, 357-365.
[25] Martin, B. A. S. 2003. Email advertising: Exploratory insights from Finland. Journal of advertising research, 43, 293.
[26] OPPENHEIM, C. 2006. Evaluation of web sites for B2C e-commerce. Aslib Proceedings, 58, 237-260.
[27] Roach, G. 2009. Consumer perceptions of mobile phone marketing: a direct marketing innovation. Direct Marketing: An International Journal, 3, 124-138.
[28] Schumann, D. W. & Thorson, E. 2007. Internet advertising: theory and research, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
[29] Shankar, V. & Batra, R. 2009. The growing influence of online marketing communications.
[30] Thorpe, R., Easterby-Smith, M., Lowe, A. & Jackson, P. R. 2008. Management Research, SAGE.
[31] Wang, C., Zhang, P., Choi, R. & Eredita, M. D. Year. Understanding consumer’s attitude toward advertising. In, 2002. Citeseer, 1143–1148.

Sajia Islam & Mohammad Nazmul Huq “Marketing Force Automation and Usage in Electronics Industry: An Analysis on Walton BD” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.142-155 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/142-155.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Item’s Analysis in Health Education at the High School of Health Science of Tunis

Kaouther MEJRI, Sonia MAHJOUB, Fatma AYDI, Issam SALOUAGE- November 2021- Page No.: 156-161

Assessment is a crucial step in learning evaluation since it reflects the improvement of the quality of education. Thus, educators are always challenged while analyzing the performance of their students. The study aims to evaluate the quality of written exams set for under graduated students (2017-2019) in the biology department of the high school of health science and technologies. We used the item analysis tools: difficulty index, discrimination index and for the reliability the Cronbach alpha assessing available data during the study period (2017-2019). The study involved 2960 copies related to 104 tests including 1367 questions. We found that 5.3% of the questions were difficult, 44.18% were easy 49.52% with moderate difficulties, 19.38% with excellent discrimination, 10.53% with good discrimination. The test reliability was good in only 10.5% of the tests. Our research objectively analyzed the quality of questions, yet it revealed the presence of some deficiencies suggesting the improvement of the quality of assessment.

Page(s): 156-161                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 November 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51108

 Kaouther MEJRI
The high school of health science and technologies of Tunis. El Manar University, Tunisia

 Sonia MAHJOUB
Faculty of Medicine of Tunis, El Manar University, Tunisia

 Fatma AYDI
The high school of health science and technologies of Tunis. El Manar University, Tunisia

 Issam SALOUAGE4
The high school of health science and technologies of Tunis. El Manar University, Tunisia

Fuentealba C. (2011) The role of assessment in the student learning process. J Vet Med Educ: 38(2):157-62. doi: 10.3138/jvme.38.2.157.
[2] Wass V, Van der Vleuten C, Shatzer J, Jones R.(2001) Assessment of clinical competence. Lancet: 357(9260):945-9. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(00)04221-5.
[3] Palmer E, Devitt P. (2007) Assessment of higher order cognitive skills in undergraduate education: modified essay or multiple choice questions? BMC Med Educ:7:49. doi: 10.1186/1472-6920-7-49.
[4] Mujeeb AM, Pardeshi ML, Ghongane BB. (2010) Comparative assessment of multiple choice questions versus short essay questions in pharmacology examinations. Indian J Med Sci: 64(3):118-24. doi: 10.4103/0019-5359.95934.
[5] Baig M, Ali SK, Ali S, Huda N. (2014) Evaluation of Multiple Choice and Short Essay Question items in Basic Medical Sciences. Pak J Med Sci: 30(1):3-6. doi: 10.12669/pjms.301.4458.
[6] Khan MU, Aljarallah BM.(2011) Evaluation of Modified Essay Questions (MEQ) and Multiple Choice Questions (MCQ) as a tool for Assessing the Cognitive Skills of Undergraduate Medical Students. Int J Health Sci (Qassim):5(1):39-43.
[7] Holzinger A, Lettner S, Steiner-Hofbauer V, Capan Melser M. (2020) How to assess? Perceptions and preferences of undergraduate medical students concerning traditional assessment methods. BMC Med Educ ;20(1):312. doi: 10.1186/s12909-020-02239-6.
[8] Tariq, S., Tariq, S., Maqsood, S., Jawed, S., & Baig, M (2017). Evaluation of Cognitive levels and Item writing flaws in Medical Pharmacology Internal Assessment Examinations. Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences;33(4), 866–870. https://doi.org/10.12669/pjms.334.12887
[9] Kaur M, Singla S, Mahajan R. (2016) Item analysis of in use multiple choice questions in pharmacology. Int J Appl Basic Med Res: 6(3):170-3. doi: 10.4103/2229-516X.186965
[10] Abdel-Hameed AA, Al-Faris EA, Alorainy IA, Al-Rukban MO (2005). The criteria and analysis of good multiple choice questions in a health professional setting. Saudi Med J: 26(10):1505-10.
[11] Laveault and Grégoire (2017). Introduction to the Theories of Tests in Psychology and Sciences of Education. (3rd Edition). Brussels: De Boeck.
[12] Puthiaparampil T., Rahman M., Fong Lim I (2017). From Item Analysis to Assessment Analysis: Introducing New Formulae, MedEdPublish. 6, [1], 7, https://doi.org/10.15694/mep.2017.000007
[13] George, D., & Mallery, P. (2003). SPSS for Windows step by step: A simple guide and reference. 11.0 update (4th ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
[14] Ben Salah, N., Salouage, I., Hatira, Z. Z., Goucha, R., Meherzi, A., & Kallel, K (2019). Multidisciplinary exams in medical studies: Interest of docimologic analysis. La Tunisie Medicale; 97 (1), 93–99.
[15] Hingorjo, M. R., & Jaleel, F (2012). Analysis of one-best MCQs: the difficulty index, discrimination index and distractor efficiency. JPMA. The Journal of the Pakistan Medical Association;62 (2), 142–147.
[16] Patil, R., Palve, S. B., Vell, K., & Boratne, A. V (2016). Evaluation of multiple-choice questions by item analysis in a medical college at Pondicherry, India. International Journal Of Community Medicine And Public Health; 3,(6). http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2394-6040.ijcmph20161638
[17] Sakly, N., Massaoudi, S., Mastouri, M., Azaiez, R (2019). Analyse docimologique des épreuves du concours de résidanat en pharmacie en Tunisie. Available at : http://www.fphm.rnu.tn/sites/default/files/Annexe%2074%20Analyse%20docimologique%20concours%20r%C3%A9sidanat.pdf
[18] Hermi, A., & Achour, W (2015). Difficulty, discrimination and cognitive level of Microbiology exam questions of the Faculty of Medicine of Tunisia. La Tunisie Medicale; 93(8–9), 487–490.
[19] Hermi, A., & Achour, W (2016). Item analysis of examinations in the Faculty of Medicine of Tunis. La Tunisie Medicale; 94 (4), 247–252.
[20] Pais, J., Silva, A., Guimarães, B., Povo, A., Coelho, E., Silva-Pereira, F., Lourinho, I., Ferreira, M. A., & Severo, M (2016). Do item-writing flaws reduce examinations psychometric quality? BMC Research Notes: 9(1), 399. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13104-016-2202-4
[21] Kowash M, Alhobeira H, Hussein I, Al Halabi M, Khan S (2020). Knowledge of dental faculty in gulf cooperation council states of multiple-choice questions’ item writing flaws. Med Educ Online.;25(1):1812224. doi:10.1080/10872981.2020.1812224.
[22] Abdulghani, H. M., Irshad, M., Haque, S., Ahmad, T., Sattar, K., & Khalil, M. S (2017). Effectiveness of longitudinal faculty development programs on MCQs items writing skills: A follow-up study. PloS One; 12(10), e0185895. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0185895
[23] Shaikh S, Kannan SK, Naqvi ZA, Pasha Z, Ahamad M (2020). The Role of Faculty Development in Improving the Quality of Multiple-Choice Questions in Dental Education. J Dent Educ: 84(3):316-322. doi: 10.21815/JDE.019.189.
[24] Abdulghani HM, Ahmad F, Irshad M, Khalil MS, Al-Shaikh GK (2015). Faculty development programs improve the quality of multiple-choice questions items’ writing: 5: 9556. DOI: 10.1038/srep09556
[25] Naeem N, van der Vleuten C, Alfaris EA (2012). Faculty development on item writing substantially improves item quality. Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract: 17:369–376. DOI: 10.1007/s10459-011-9315-2
[26] Gupta P, Meena P, Khan AM, Malhotra RK, Singh T. Effect of Faculty Training on Quality of Multiple-Choice Questions (2020). Int J Appl Basic Med Res: 10(3):210-214. doi: 10.4103/ijabmr.IJABMR_30_20.
[27] Sajjad M, Iltaf S, Khan RA. Nonfunctional distractor analysis: An indicator for quality of Multiple-choice questions (2020). Pak J Med Sci: 36(5):982-986. doi: 10.12669/pjms.36.5.2439.
[28] Tarrant, M., Ware, J., & Mohammed, A. M (2009). An assessment of functioning and non-functioning distractors in multiple-choice questions: a descriptive analysis. BMC Medical Education; 9, 40. https://doi.org/10.1186/1472-6920-9-40
[29] Testa S, Toscano A, Rosato R (2018). Distractor efficiency in an item pool for a statistics classroom exam: Assessing its relation with item cognitive level classified according to Bloom’s taxonomy. Front Psychol.;9:1-12. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2018.01585
[30] Hamamoto Filho PT, Silva E, Ribeiro ZMT, Hafner MLMB, Cecilio-Fernandes D, Bicudo AM (2020). Relationships between Bloom’s taxonomy, judges’ estimation of item difficulty and psychometric properties of items from a progress test: a prospective observational study. São Paulo Med J.;138(1):33–39.
[31] Shad, M. N., Fatima, A., Fatima, S., & Chiragh, S (2018). Item analysis of MCQs of a pharmacology term exam in a private medical college of Pakistan. Pakistan Journal of Medical and Health Sciences; 12, 700–703.

Kaouther MEJRI, Sonia MAHJOUB, Fatma AYDI, Issam SALOUAGE, “Item’s Analysis in Health Education at the High School of Health Science of Tunis” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.156-161 November 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51108

Download PDF

pdf

Learning Experiences of Frustrated-Level Readers in the Implementation of Self-Learning Modules in the New Normal Education

Honey Lyn P. Valentos, Ronald S. Decano – November 2021- Page No.: 162-166

The turn of a single page is the beginning of knowledge. Reading is known as one of the most vital skills that a person should have. The aim of this descriptive qualitative phenomenological study was to explore the learning experiences of Frustrated -Level Readers in the implementation of self-learning modules. Insights, opinions and ideas were sought from ten (10) Grade 8 students through Key Informant Interview. Responses were recorded, transcribed, coded analyzed, and categorized into themes. Six emergent themes were generated, namely: (1) Increasing reading comprehension (2) Providing Filipino-English Dictionary (3) Enhancing interest in reading (4) Repeated reading (5) Acquiring support from teachers and parents (6) Providing supplemental learning resources. Findings revealed that the most challenging experiences met by the Frustrated -level Readers are the lack of comprehension and insufficient learning resources. With these findings, the school administrator and reading teachers should provide necessary learning strategies and supplementary resources to increase reading comprehension.

Page(s): 162-166                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 November 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51109

 Honey Lyn P. Valentos
Graduate Student, Doctor of Philosophy in Educational Management, Davao del Norte State College, Philippines

 Ronald S. Decano
Dean, Institute of Advanced Studies, Davao del Norte State College, Philippines

[1] Aquino, M. & De Vera, P. ( 2018) “Development of Learning Material for Grade 7 Struggling Readers,” Pangasinan State University – School of Advanced Studies, Urdaneta City Pangasinan
[2] Bano, et. Al (2018) Perceptions of Teachers about the Role of Parents in Developing Reading Habits of Children to Improve their Academic Performance in Schools. Journal of Education and Educational Development Reading Comprehension: Essential for Sustainability. Sustainability Series Number 8 • September 2009 https://www2.ed.gov/programs/readingfirst/support/readlores.pdf
[3] Creswell, John W. (2013). Qualitative inquiry and research design: choosing among five approaches / John W. Creswell. — 3rd ed.
[4] Jose & Raja (2011).TEACHERS’ ROLE IN FOSTERING READING SKILL: EFFECTIVE AND SUCCESSFUL READING. -manager’s Journal on English Language Teaching, Vol. 1lNo. 4lOctober – December 2011. file:///C:/Users/User/Documents/EJ1071046.pdf.
[5] Kaya, E. (2015). The Role of Reading Skills on Reading Comprehension Ability of Turkish EFL Students. Üniversitepark Bülten, 4(1-2), 37-51.
[6] Sana (2013) “Importance of Early Reading Intervention,” ESSAI: Vol. 10, Article 30. Available at: http://dc.cod.edu/essai/vol10/iss1/30
[7] Sepehr Safaie (2020) The effects of explicit and implicit teaching of connectors on the reading comprehension performance of Iranian EFL lea rners, Cogent Education, 7:1, 1777806, DOI: 10.1080/2331186X.2020.1777806
[8] Sergio Medina (2019) Effects of Reading Strategy and Dictionary Instruction in an Undergraduate Foreign Language Reading Comprehension Group a https://doi.org/10.17227/folios.50-10226
[9] Shinawatra International University, Bangkok, Thailand https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1186/2229-0443-2-1-45.pdf
[10] Steve Mckee (2012) | P a g e Reading Comprehension, What We Know: A Review of Research 1995 to 2011. Language Testing in Asia Volume two, Issue one February 2012 45
[11] Tadesse, S., & Muluye, W. (2020). The Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Education System in Developing Countries: A Review. Open Journal of Social Sciences, 08(10). https://doi.org/10.4236/jss.2020.810011

Honey Lyn P. Valentos, Ronald S. Decano, “Learning Experiences of Frustrated-Level Readers in the Implementation of Self-Learning Modules in the New Normal Education ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.162-166 November 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51109

Download PDF

pdf

Civil-Military Cooperation of African Mission in Somalia as Tool of Peace-building in Kismayo District, Lower Jubbaland, Somalia (2011-2020)

Moses Kamau Muchemi, Dr. Xavier Francis Ichani – November 2021- Page No.: 167-177

The conflict in Somalia presents a typical example of crisis where sometimes the international response is at odd with the wishes of local administration and community. Whereas debate on the most appropriate and sustainable approach to resolving complex conflict like the one in Somalia continues, Civil-Military Cooperation (CIMIC) has emerged as a key determinant of successful peacekeeping operation. Whereas the scope of activities under the rubric of CIMIC is this article analyzed SSR carried out by AMISOM troops in Kismayo District of Somalia from year 2011 to 2020 as a thematic area of security enhancement. The study was anchored on liberal peacebuilding, state building and democratization theories. The target population of the study included residents of Kismayo district entailing community leaders, humanitarian workers, civil society, Jubbaland Security Forces (JSF) and AMISOM troops operating in the district. Onwuegbuzie and Collins (2007) typology of determining sample size in social science research was used to arrive at a sample size of 200 respondents. Primary data was collected using semi-structured questionnaires, interviews guide and Focused Group Discussions guide. Secondary data was sourced from published books, e-books, journals, reports, newsletters and conference papers. Collected data was grouped, corroborated, and presented using both quantitative and the qualitative research techniques in themes corresponding the objectives of the study. The study found out that 97% of Kismayo residents felt that AMISOM CIMIC program had reduced conflicts in the district, 83% felt that the security sector was effective in ensuring security and safety of the population. The study also found that demobilization, disarmament and reintegration CIMIC program had reduced chances of violent clashes in Kismayo by 89% chance. Al-Shabaab terror gang continued to threaten the peace efforts in Kismayo. The study recommends that more donor funding be channeled to Federal Governments of Somalia so that they develop strong security sector capable of defeating peace spoilers such as Al-Shabaab.

Page(s): 167-177                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 November 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51112

 Moses Kamau Muchemi
Department of International Relations, Conflict and Strategic Studies of Kenyatta University, Kenya

 Dr. Xavier Francis Ichani
Department of International Relations, Conflict and Strategic Studies of Kenyatta University, Kenya

[1] Abdeta, D. (2020). The security sector reform paradox in Somalia. London: London School of Economics and Political Science. Retrieved from http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/103683/1/Dribssa_Beyene_security_sector_reform_paradox_somalia_published.pdf
[2] Annan, K. (1999). Peace and Development – One Struggle, Two Fronts. Address to World Bank Staff. Washington DC: United Nations Press. Retrieved from https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwju14PypNbzAhUKFRQKHVsDDG8QFnoECCQQAQ&url=http%3A%2F%2Fsearch.archives.un.org%2Fuploads%2Fr%2Funited-nations-archives%2F9%2Fb%2Fa%2F9ba43bf83c498ed02ac7403d4d8938b8452
[3] Crouch, J., & Chevreau, O. (2016). Forging Jubbaland: Community perspectives on federalism, governance and reconciliation. London: Saferworld. Retrieved from https://www.saferworld.org.uk/downloads/pubdocs/forging-Jubbaland.pdf
[4] Hänggi, H. (2005). Approaching Peacebuilding from a Security Governance Perspective. Geneva: DCAF. Retrieved from https://www.dcaf.ch/sites/default/files/publications/documents/YB2005.pdf
[5] Hans-Jürgen, K. (2012). Civil-Military Cooperation: A Way to Resolve Complex Crisis Situations. PRISM, 4(1), 17-29. Retrieved from https://www.jstor.org/stable/26469791
[6] Hofreiter, L. (2015). About Security in Contemporary World. Securitologia, 21(1), 7-17. Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/285545711_About_Security_in_Contemporary_World/fulltext/58878c754585150dde5033ef/About-Security-in-Contemporary-World.pdf
[7] Huntington, S. (1993). The Clash of Civilizations? Foreign Affairs, 22-49. Retrieved from https://www.jstor.org/stable/20045621
[8] Majid, N., & Abdirahman, K. (2021). The Kismayo bubble – justice and security in Jubbaland. London: London School of Economics and Political Science. Retrieved from http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/109317/2/The_kismayo_bubble_updated.pdf
[9] Menkhaus, K. (2006). Governance without Government in Somalia Spoilers, State Building, and the Politics of Coping. International Security, 31(3), 74-106. Retrieved from https://www.jstor.org/stable/4137508
[10] Olsen, G. (2018). The October 2011 Kenyan invasion of Somalia: fighting al-Shabaab or defending institutional interests? Journal of Contemporary African Studies, 36(1), 39-53. Retrieved from https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02589001.2017.1408953
[11] Pugh, M. (2001). Civil-Military Relations in Peace Support Operations: hegemony or. eminar on Aid and Politics: Debates, Dilemmas and. London: University of Leeds.
[12] Simon, R., & Hiscock, D. (2017). Evaluating for security and justice challenges and opportunities for improved monitoring and evaluation of security system reform programs. Geneva: DCAF. Retrieved from https://issat.dcaf.ch/download/11967/120859/Evaluating%20for%20security%20and%20justice.pdf
[13] Sunil, R. (2018). History of United Nations Peacekeeping Operations During the Coldwar: 1945-1987. Williamsburg: Peace Operations Training Institute. Retrieved from https://cdn.peaceopstraining.org/course_promos/history_of_peacekeeping_1/history_of_peacekeeping_1_english.pdf
[14] UNDP. (2020). Joint Security Sector Governance Programme. New York: UNDP. Retrieved from https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwiaopDmpdbzAhUPjRQKHVPLAyMQFnoECAIQAQ&url=https%3A%2F%2Finfo.undp.org%2Fdocs%2Fpdc%2FDocuments%2FSOM%2FJSSG%2520Programme%2520Document%2520Signed%2520ALL%2520April2019
[15] Webersik, C. (2004). Differences That Matter: The Struggle of the Marginalised in Somalia. Africa: Journal of the International African Institute, 74(4), 516-533. Retrieved from https://www.jstor.org/stable/3556840
[16] Zaalberg, T. (2006). The Tools at Hand: Civil-Military Cooperation in Kosovo. In T. Zaalberg, Soldiers and Civil Power: Supporting or Substituting Civil Authorities in Modern Peace Operations (pp. 391-414). Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press.

Moses Kamau Muchemi, Dr. Xavier Francis Ichani “Civil-Military Cooperation of African Mission in Somalia as Tool of Peace-building in Kismayo District, Lower Jubbaland, Somalia (2011-2020)” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.167-177 November 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51112

Download PDF

pdf

Work Place Environment: Implications of Workplace Accidents and the Necessity for Safety cum Health Programmes in Organizations

Asadu, Ikechukwu, Ph.D, Chukwujekwu Charles Onwuka Ph.D- November 2021- Page No.: 178-186

Every employee is entitled to work in a setting where jeopardy to his health and security are suitably controlled. Hence, employers have a liability to consult with their workers or representatives on health and safety matters. Notwithstanding the laws mandating employers to guarantee the protection and health of their employees, several employees have been victims of work place accidents. While some have died as a product of an industrial accident, others have sustained different extent of injuries. The study examined the dimensions and implications of workplace accidents and the necessity for safety and health programme in establishments. The methodology of the study is qualitative and descriptive. Relevant data for the study were gathered through secondary source. The data generated were analyzed using descriptive-qualitative approach. The findings of the study, among other things, revealed that while work place accidents are of varied nature with wide adverse consequences, both employers and employees have significant roles to play in ensuring workplace safety and health. Moreover, the findings showed that an accident free plant or organization with good health and safety programmes enjoys certain benefits such as motivated workforce, increased productivity and profitability, cost savings, lower staff turnover, lesser absenteeism, lower insurance costs and good corporate reputation..

Page(s): 178-186                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 November 2021

 Asadu, Ikechukwu, Ph.D
University of Nigeria, Nsukka Department of Public Administration and Local Government

 Chukwujekwu Charles Onwuka Ph.D
Department of Sociology, Chukwuemeka Odume Ojukwu University, Igbariam Campus, Anambra State Nigeria

[1] Akpan, E.I. (2011). Effectiveness of safety and health management policy for improved performance of organization in Africa. International Journal of Business management, 6 (3) 159 – 165
[2] Alli, B.O. (2008). Fundamental principles of organizational health and safety. Geneva, International Labour Office.
[3] Aram, H.M.and, Samir S.A. (2017). The consequences of work environment on employee Productivity. Journal of Business and Management, 19 (1) 35 – 42
[4] Aswathappa, K. (2002). Human resources and personnel management, text and cases. New Delhi: McGraw-Hill publishing company Ltd.
[5] Armstrong, M. (1988). Handbook on personnel management practice (3rd edition). Kogan Page.
[6] Bravo (2020).five strategies to help you set and achieve your wellness goal. Accessed at http//www.bravowell.com
[7] Dugas, C. (2017). The four main causes of accident in a chemical plant. Accessed at https//www.claydugas.com.
[8] Encyclopedia of occupational health and safety. Accessed at https//www.Ilo.encyclopedia,org.
[9] Edem, M.J. Akpan, E.U. and Papple, N.M. (2017). Impact of workplace environment on health workers. Occupational Medicine and health Affair 5 (2), 261
[10] Nigeria Factories Act (1987)
[11] Grimaldi, J.V. and Simonds, R.H. (1991). Safety management (5th ed) Richard. Irwin
[12] Gbadago, P. Amedome, S, and Honyenuga, B (2017) .The impact of occupational health and safety measure on employee performance at south Tongu district hospital. Global Journal of medical research 17 (5)
[13] Health and Safety Committee (2006) Safety guidelines for mineral exploration in western Canada (4th edition). Association for mineral exploration and safety guidelines.
[14] Hamalainen, P, Takala, S., and Saarela, K (2006). Global estimate of occupational accident. Safety science 44, 137 – 156
[15] Heinrich, H.W. (1959). Industrial accident prevention. New York: McGraw-Hill.
[16] Institute for Imaginative Nutrition (2021) what is the difference between health and wellness. Accessed at https// www.immaginativenutrition.com
[17] International Labour Organization (2001). Guidelines on occupational safety and health management system. Geneva
[18] International Labour Organization (2003b). Safety in numbers: pointers for a global safety culture at work. Geneva.
[19] International Labour Organization(2006). promotional framework for occupational satety and health convention. Geneva
[20] International labour organization (2015). Report on World 2day for safety and health
[21] Jain, P. (2015) Types of industrial accident. Accessed at http//www.dotechs.com
[22] Jonathan, G.K. and Mbogo, R.W. (2016). Maintaining health and safety at workplace: Employee and employer’s roles in ensuring a safe working environment. Journal of Education and Practice, 17 (19), 1 – 7
[23] Markhbul, Z.M. (2012). Workplace environment: Towards health and performance. International Business management, 6 (6), 640 – 647
[24] Ross, H (2019). Implementing employee health improvement programme that work. Accessed at https//www.amanet.org.
[25] Safeopodia (2021).Meaning of accident. Accessed at https//www.safopodia.com
[26] Talentfly (2019). 8 key benefits of employee wellness programme. Accessed at https//www.talentfly.com.article
[27] Takele, T. and Mengesha, A. (2006) .Occupational safety and health. Ethiopia: University of Godar.
[28] William, P.A. et al (1993). Strategic human resources management, Dryden Press.

Asadu, Ikechukwu, Ph.D, Chukwujekwu Charles Onwuka Ph.D, “Work Place Environment: Implications of Workplace Accidents and the Necessity for Safety cum Health Programmes in Organizations” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.178-186 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/178-186.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Analysis of Spatial and Temporal Variation of Land Use/Land Cover and Impacts on Climate in Urban Areas, Sri Lanka with Special Reference to Hambantota Divisional Secretariat Division (2008-2019)

Edirisooriya K V U I, Senevirathna E M T K, Edirisooriya K V D, Dheerasinghe G W M M K, Dauglas D L P M- November 2021- Page No.: 187-195

The changes in air temperature with the land use / land cover (LU/LC) in the certain areas highly affect to the environment and its ecosystem. This study aims to evaluate LU/LC changes and their impacts on climate in Hambantota Divisional Secretariat Division from 2008 to 2019. Both LU/LC cover changes were determined by using supervised classification, particularly maximum likelihood classification and accuracy assessment in Remote Sensing and GIS techniques. Spatial distribution of air temperature is determined by Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW) method by assigning values to unknown points are calculated with a weighted average of the values available at the known points. The results found that the increment of built-up areas (27.66%), water bodies (2.39%) and agriculture (0.44%) and decrement of barren lands (11.61%) and forest cover (18.88%) having accuracy ranged from 86.7 percent to 83.3 percent with 0.888 to 0.912 Kappa statistics. These changes are further confirmed by the Normalized Different Vegetation Index (NDVI). Moreover, the increment of air temperature is detected during 11 years. This air temperature increment is proportional to the forest cover reduction and the buildup area increment due to vast developments in the area after 2009.

Page(s): 187-195                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 November 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51113

 Edirisooriya K V U I
Department of Oceanography and Marine Geology, University of Ruhuna, Sri Lanka

 Senevirathna E M T K
Department of Geography and Environmental Management, Sabaragamuwa University of Sri Lanka

 Edirisooriya K V D
Department of Geography and Environmental Management, Sabaragamuwa University of Sri Lanka

 Dheerasinghe G W M M K
Department of Oceanography and Marine Geology, University of Ruhuna, Sri Lanka

 Dauglas D L P M
Geological Survey and Mines Bureau, Sri Lanka

[1] R J M Uduporuwa.(2020). Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Land Use/Land Cover in Kandy City, Sri Lanka: An Analytical Invastigation with Geospatial Techniques. Ameriican Scientific Research Journal for Engineering, Technology, and Sciences, 149-166.
[2] I H Mohd, Z H Pakhriazad, F M Shahrin. (2009). Evaluating Supervised and Unsupervsed Techniques for Land Cover Mapping Using Remote Sensing Data. Malayasian Journal of Society and Space , 1-10.
[3] Ayyanna, B.S. Polisgowdar, M.S. Ayyanagowdar , Anilkumar T. Dandekar , G.S. Yadahalli and M.A. Bellakki. (2018). Accuracy Assessment of Supervised and Unsupervised Classification Using Landsat-8-Imagery of D-7 Shahapur Branch Canal of UKP Command Area Karnataka, India. International Journal of Current Microbiology and Applied Sciences, 205-216.
[4] R Vimala et. al. (2020). Unsupervised ISODATA algorithm classification used in the landsat image for predicting the expansion of Salem urban, Tamil Nadu. Indian Jouranal of Science and Technology, 1619-1629.
[5] A Zaitunah,Samsuri, A G Ahamd and R A Safitri. (2018). Normalized difference vegetation index (ndvi) analysis for land covertypes using landsat 8 oli in besitang watershed, Indonesia. IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science.
[6] P Nathalie et.al. (2011). The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index(NDVI): unforeseen successes in animal ecology. CLIMATE RESEARCH, 15-27.
[7] D M El-Shikha a, P Waller, D Hunsaker, T Clarke, E Barnes. (2007). Ground-based remote sensing for assessing water andnitrogen status of broccoli. Agricultural Water Management, 183-193.
[8] N Alahacoon and M Edirisinghe.(2021). Spatial Variability of Rainfall Trends in Sri Lanka from 1989 to2019 as an Indication of Climate Change. International Journal of Geo Infromation.
[9] B Sandra, J Kossin and S Donner.(2014). The Impact of Climate Change. In A. S. Zommers, Reducing Disaster: Early Warning Systems For Climate Change (pp. 21-49).
[10] S R Sophia, J M Ndambuki.(2017). Accuracy Assessment of Land Use/Land CoverClassification Using Remote Sensing and GIS. Internationa Journal of Geo Sciences, 611-622.
[11] M Kamel, M Youssef, M Hassan, F Bagash.(2016). Utilization of ETM+ Landsat data in geologic mapping of wadi Ghadir-Gabal Zabara area,Central Eastern Desert, Egypt. The Egyptian Journal of Remote Sensing and Space Sciences, 343-360.
[12] G G Meera, S Parthiban, N Thummalu, A Christy. (2012). Ndvi: Vegetation change detection using remote sensingand gis – A case study of Vellore District. 3rd International Conference on Recent Trends in Computing 2015 (ICRTC-2015) (pp. 1199-1210). Procedia Computer Science.
[13] A. K. Bhandaria, A Kumara, and G K Singh. (2012). Feature Extraction using Normalized Difference VegetationIndex (NDVI): a Case Study of Jabalpur City. 2nd International Conference on Communication, Computing & Security [ICCCS-2012] (pp. 612-621). Procedia Technology.
[14] V. Rangari et.al (2021). Flood-hazard risk classification and mapping for urban catchment under different climate change scenarios: A case study of Hyderabad city. The Journal of Urban Climate,Vol. 36, pp 100793.
[15] C.B. Field et.al (2014). Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability. Part A: Global and Sectoral Aspects. Contribution of Working Group II to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge, UK and New York, USA: Cambridge University Press. pp. 1-32.
[16] M. De Zoysa (2020). Urbanization, Climate Change and Environmental Resilience: Experiences in Sri Lanka. Urban studies and public administration, Vol. 4, No. 1(pp. 46-84).
[17] IPCC (2014) Climate change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part A: global and sectoral aspects. Contri-bution of working group II to the fifth assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change [Field,C.B., V.R. Barros, D.J. Dokken, K.J. Mach, M.D. Mas-trandrea, T.E. Bilir, M. Chatterjee, K.L. Ebi, Y.O. Estrada,R.C. Genova, B. Girma, E.S. Kissel, A.N. Levy, S. Mac-Cracken, P.R. Mastrandrea, and L.L. White (eds.)]. Cam-bridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA
[18] IPCC (2014) Climate change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part A: global and sectoral aspects. Contri-bution of working group II to the fifth assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change [Field, C.B., V.R. Barros, D.J. Dokken, K.J. Mach, M.D. Mas-trandrea, T.E. Bilir, M. Chatterjee, K.L. Ebi, Y.O. Estrada, R.C. Genova, B. Girma, E.S. Kissel, A.N. Levy, S. Mac-Cracken, P.R. Mastrandrea, and L.L. White (eds.)]. Cam-bridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA

Edirisooriya K V U I, Senevirathna E M T K, Edirisooriya K V D, Dheerasinghe G W M M K, Dauglas D L P M, “Analysis of Spatial and Temporal Variation of Land Use/Land Cover and Impacts on Climate in Urban Areas, Sri Lanka with Special Reference to Hambantota Divisional Secretariat Division (2008-2019)” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.187-195 November 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51113

Download PDF

pdf

An Analysis and Application of Charles Allen Prosser’s Theories for Functional and Quality Technical and Vocational Education in Nigeria

Prof. Titus I. Eze, Sylvester Chukwutem Onwusa (PhD) – November 2021- Page No.: 196-207

The development of any nation exclusively depends on effective participation of her indigenous skilled technical manpower accessible for enhancing the quality of life of her citizenry. This state of affairs can be attained by improvement on the infrastructures and facilities in institution of learning with the aim of exposing students’ for labour market. Thus this will enable students after graduation to participate and tackle the needs of the industries. This paper therefore was designed to look at an analysis and application of Charles Allen Prosser’s theories for functional and quality technical and vocational education in Nigeria. In accordance with the concept of lifelong education, one of the major roles of Technical and Vocational Education (TVE) is to develop individuals with high technical skills as desired in the industries in this present technological age. This paper discussed exhaustively the conceptual clarification of technical and vocational education, brief history of Charles Allen Prosser’s, Charles Prosser’s philosophy defined, an analysis of Charles Allen Prosser’s theories and implications in TVE, In addition, Charles Allen Prosser’s for functional and quality TVE, relevant of Prosser’s theories in TVE. Obviously, Prosser’s life was dedicated to the promotion of technical and vocational education programmes and inculcation of similar principles into the curriculum. Thus it was recommended that the government should build functionary workshops, laboratories and libraries to enhance the teaching and learning in technical and tertiary institutions in Nigeria. Also, the government should train qualified teachers and experts to operate the complex machines and equipment. Consequently, every technical and vocational educator responsible for programmes of instruction, should uphold the Prosser’s theories for functional and quality technical and vocational education. They should endeavour to make serious efforts to implement them in teaching and learning practical in the workshop(s). This could provide self-employment, job creation among the youths as well as promote sustainable technological development of the nation.

Page(s): 196-207                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 November 2021

 Prof. Titus I. Eze
Department of Technology and Vocational Education, Faculty of Education, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Nigeria

 Sylvester Chukwutem Onwusa (PhD)
Department of Technology and Vocational Education, Faculty of Education, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Nigeria

[1] Abdullahi, B .B. (2012). The role of web resources and technology as instructional and learning tool in vocational and technical education for national transformation. Journal of Vocational Studies 6(1), 56-75.
[2] Abu Bakar, N.N. Hamzah, R. & Udin, A. (2011). Cabaran-cabaran dalam pendidikan teknik dan vokasional dalam membangunkan sumber manusia. Journal of Education press, 7(1)159-164
[3] Akpan, J. C. (2014). Encouraging youth involvement in technical and vocational training. Journal. of Technology Education Research Institute and Policy, 13 (6), 205-274).
[4] Beako, T. Y. (2016). Problems and prospects of empowerment programmes for youth on technical and vocational training in Eleme Local Government Area, Rivers State. Conference Proceedings of Association of Business Educators of Nigeria held at Federal College of Education (technical) Omoku, Nigeria. October, 12 – 134.
[5] Bukley, J. M. (2012). Future business leaders of America partners for computer literacy certification standards in the national schools. Retrieved on 20thmay, 2009, form www.fbla-phl.org.
[6] Bwala, K. C (2012). Challenges of entrepreneurship education in Nigeria. Issues and challenges. International .Journal Business Management. 1(4), 201-212.
[7] Ekpenyong, L.E. (2011). Foundation of technical education: Evolution and practice for Nigerian students in technical and vocational education and adult education, policy makers and practitioners, Benin City: Ambix Press Ltd.
[8] Ene, E. O. (2014). Empowering women in Nigeria for national transforming through entrepreneurship education. .Abuja International .Journal of Education. Management. Science (ABLJEMS), 3 (2), 108 – 122.
[9] Eze, T. I. (2012). Skills development in science and technology education for millennium development goals. A key note address in Ogbaju, J. O. and Nwannaradi, A. T. (eds) skill development in science/technology education for the MDGS, Nsukka, Nigeria.
[10] Eze, T. I. & Okorafor, O. A. (2012). Trends in technical, vocational education and training for improving the Nigerian workforce. Ebonyi Vocational and Technology Education Journal. 1(1), 107-115
[11] Ezeani, N. S. (2016). Women empowerment: An Instrument for Sustainable National Development. Conference proceedings of Association of Business Educations of Nigeria, held at Federal College of Education (Technical), Omoku, Nigeria. October 12 – 14
[12] Ezenwafor, J. I. (2015). Rating of strategies for transforming technical vocational education and training for the 21st century by tertiary institutions lecturers in South-East Nigeria. International Journal of Education Policy Research and review, 2(7).
[13] Federal Republic of Nigeria, (2013). National policy on education. Lagos: NEDRC Press. Merriam-Webster Dictionary
[14] Ibezim, N. E. (2013). Technologies needed for sustainable e-learning in university education. Nigerian. Journal of Business. Education. 1(2), 300-306.
[15] Idowu, P.A. & Adagunodo, E. R. (2003). Computer literacy level and gender differences among Nigerian university staff. Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. Retrieved on 20thMay 2009 from www.ncsu.edu.ncsuaum.conlit.pg
[16] Miller, O, Nwaekete, J. O. & Akiti, N. (2016). Business education students’ assessment of utilization of e-learning software facilities for skill acquisition, in colleges of educational. Nigerian. Journal Business. Education. 3 (1), 71- 82.
[17] Musa, A. M, Muhammad, G., Musa, D. (2019). Prospects and challenges of industrial development in Nigeria through technical vocational education and training. Annals of technology education practitioners association of Nigeria, (ATEPAN), 2 (2), 135 – 139.
[18] Nwachukwu, C. E. (2011). Training improvement needs of students in technical college for employment in automobile industries. Nigeria Journal of Curriculum Studies 6 (1), 83-87.
[19] Nwachukwu, C. E. (2012). Designing appropriate methodology in vocational and technical education in Nigeria. Nsukka: Fulladu Publishing Company.
[20] Nwanneka, L F. Iwuanyawu, B. (2019). Achieving sustainable labour productivity through competency–based training (CBT) in technical and vocational education and training (TVET) programme in Nigeria. Proceedings of the school of vocational and technical education, Alvanlkoku Federal College of Education, Owerri, Nigeria.
[21] Okoro, P. E. (2016). Facilities for stimulating the teaching of new technologies in business education as perceived by lecturers in universities in South-South, Nigeria. Nigeria. Journal Business Education. 3(1), 53 – 60.
[22] Okwelle, P. C, Beako, T. Y. & Ojotule, I. D. (2019). Mechanical craft practice trade facilities and competencies required for soaring sustainable national productivity in Rivers State. European. Journal Education Development. Psychology. 7 (3), 46 – 55.
[23] Okwelle, P.C & Okeke, B.C. (2015). An over view of the role of technical and vocational education and training (TVET) in national development of Nigeria. A Paper presented at the 12th Annual conference of History of education society of Nigeria, Uniport
[24] Oviawe, J. I. (2018). Revamping technical, vocational education and training through public-private partnerships for skill development. Journal of Higher Education, 10(1), 73-91.
[25] Robert, S. (1991). An analysis of Charles Allen Prosser’s conception of secondary education in the United States. Dissertations. Loyola University Chicago. 2890. https://ecommons.luc.edu/luc_diss/2890
[26] Umah D. N, Nwokike, F. O. (2016). Utilization of modern communication technologies for effective teaching of account courses in colleges of education in Enugu State, Nigeria. Journal of Business. Education. 3 (1), 34-43.
[27] Usman, H.N. (2012). Techniques of vocational and technical education in human resources development and utilization. Journal of Vocational and Technical Education 7(1), 78-82.
[28] Uwaifo, V. O. (2010). Technical education and its challenges in Nigeria in the 21st Century. International .NGO Journal. 5(2), 40-51.

Prof. Titus I. Eze, Sylvester Chukwutem Onwusa (PhD), “An Analysis and Application of Charles Allen Prosser’s Theories for Functional and Quality Technical and Vocational Education in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.196-207 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/196-207.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Proficiency of Vocational Teacher Educators and Availability of Information and Communication Technology Resources for Effective Instruction in Colleges of Education, South-South, Nigeria

ALFRED, Sabastine Bamidele (PhD), EKHOVBIYE , Michael Osayame – November 2021- Page No.: 208-215

Teacher educators in Colleges of Education in Nigeria are expected to be proficient in using ICT resources available in their colleges to facilitate and enhance their students learning and creativity. However, there is no indication that vocational teacher educators (VTEs) are equipped with the necessary ICT competencies and resources for effective delivery of instruction to vocational teacher trainees. Therefore, the main purpose of this study was to determine the proficiency of Agriculture and Business teacher educators (ABTEs) on ICT competency standard of instruction and the availability of ICT resources for effective instruction delivery in Colleges of Education in South-South Nigeria. To achieve this goal, 2 research questions were generated and 1 null hypothesis was formulated. The study adopted a Descriptive design using the survey method. The population for the study was 298 made up of 145 agriculture and 153 Business teacher educators from Colleges of Education in South-South Nigeria. All the ABTEs were studied as no sampling was done. A 76-item structured questionnaire was used for data collection. A total of 268 (89.9%) copies of the questionnaire were correctly filled and analyzed, using mean to answer the research questions and t-test for testing the hypothesis. Results showed that the ABTEs expressed moderate proficiency (M=3.11; SD=0.98) in all the 54 ICT competency standards. ICT resources such as television, microcomputer and radio were available, while ICT resources such as interactive television, electronic drawing system and different software were unavailable for instruction delivery. This paper concluded that the moderate proficiency in ICT competency standards of instruction expressed by the ABTEs is indicative of their readiness and capability to use ICT resources for effective instruction if the resources are made generally available in the classrooms. This paper recommended that the management of the various Colleges of Education in South-South Nigeria and relevant agencies involved in teacher educators’ capacity building such as Tetfund, NCC should organize in-service training programmes and workshops for ABTEs to acquire the requisite proficiency on ICT competency standards of instruction based on the identified proficiency gaps.

Page(s): 208-215                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 November 2021

 ALFRED, Sabastine Bamidele (PhD)
Department of Agricultural Education, College of Education, Igueben, Edo State, Nigeria

 EKHOVBIYE , Michael Osayame
Department of Business Education, College of Education, Igueben, Edo State, Nigeria

[1] Adavbiele, J.A. (2016). The Use of ICT to enhance University Education in Nigeria. International Journal of Education, Learning and Development, 4(5), 1-11.
[2] Adeleke, M.A. (2018). Education in a digital era and future workforce in Nigeria. Keynote Address delivered at the 5th Annual National Conference on Education in a Digital Era and Future workforce in Nigeria organized by Faculty of Education, Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Edo State. 11th-14th June, 2018.
[3] Alfred, S.B. (2014). Use of new Information and Communication Technology Innovative methodologies for Vocational Agricultural Education delivery in Nigeria: Implications for Economic development. World Educators Forum, 4(1), 69-79.
[4] Buabeng-Andoh, C. (2012). Factors influencing teacher’s adoption and integration of information and communication technology into teaching: A review of the literature. International Journal of Education and Development using information and communication technology. (I JEDICT), 8 (1), 136-155.
[5] Collins, B. & Jung, I.S. (2003).Uses of information and communication technologies in teacher education. In B. Robinson & C. Latchem (Eds.), Teacher education throughopen and distance learning (pp.171-192) London: RoutledgeFalmer.
[6] Drent, M. &Meelissen, M. (2008). Which factors obstruct or stimulate teacher educators to use ICT innovatively?. Computers and Education, 51(1), 187-199.
[7] Egbule, P.E. (2012). The Centrality of vocational and technical education in a poor and skills- short economy.Nigeria Vocational Association Journal, 17(2), 1-8.
[8] Eyovwunu, D. (2016). Application of information and Communication Technology (ICT) in Secondary Schools in Warri Metropolis of Delta State, Nigeria. Journal of Vocational and Technical Education 2(1), 31-41
[9] Gulbahar, Y. (2008). ICT usage in higher education. A case study on pre-service teachers and instructors.The Turkish online Journal of Education Technology(TOJET), 7 (1), 32-37.
[10] IITE. (2003). The use of ICTs in technical and vocational education and training. UNESCO: Institute for Information Technologies in Education.
[11] Illomaki, L. &Lakkala, M. (2018). Digital technology and practices for school improvement: Innovative digital school model. Research and Practice in Technology Enhanced Learning from https://doi.org/10.1186/541039-018-0094-8.
[12] Jabaka, S.M. &Danbaba, N.M utilization in Basic Education in Nigeria. From https?//www.academia.edu/8520689/BARREIRS TO ICT UTILIZATION IN BASIC EDUCATION IN NIGERIA ON 31/07/018.
[13] Jude, W. I. &Dankaro, J.T. (2012).ICT resource utilization, availability and accessibility by teacher educators for instructional development in College of Education Katsina – Ala.New Media andMass Communication, 3.Retrieved on October 21, 2014 from www.iiste.org.
[14] Makgato, M. (2014).Challenges contributing to poor integration of educational technology at some schools in South Africa.Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences, 5 (20), 1285-1292.
[15] NCCE (2010a): Science and technology standards for teacher educators in Nigeria Colleges of Education. Abuja, Nigeria: Author.
[16] NCCE (2012).Curriculum implementation framework for Nigeria Certificate in Education. Abuja: National Commission for Colleges of Education.
[17] NCCE. (2010b). Science and technology standard for teacher educators in Nigeria Colleges of Education: Implementation Manual. Abuja, Nigeria: Author.
[18] Olafare, F. O.; Adeyanju, L.O. &Fakorede, S.O. A. (2017).Colleges of Education Lecturers attitude towards the use of Information and Communication Technology in Nigeria.Malaysian Online Journal of Education Sciences, 5(4), 1-12.
[19] Ololube, N.P. (2006). Appraising the relationship between ICT usage and integration and the standard teacher education programmes in a developing economy.International Journal of Education and Development Using Information and Communication Technology (IJEDICT) 2(3), 70-85
[20] Onasanya, S.A; Shehu, R.A.; Oduwaiye, R.O. &Shehu, L.A. (2010).Higher Institutions Lecturers’ attitude towards integration of ICT into teaching and research in Nigeria.Research Journal of Information Technology, 2(1), 1-10.
[21] Osawaru, F.N. &Okome, O.E. (2009). Integrating information and communication technology (ICT) into English as second language classroom. A tool for sustainable growth and self reliance.Journal of Academics , 4(1), 1-7
[22] Robinson, J.S. &Garton, B.L. (2008).An assessment of the employability skills needed by graduates in the College of Agriculture, food and natural resources at the university of Missouri. Journal of Agricultural Education, 49 (4), 96-105
[23] Tella, A. (2011). Availability and use of ICT in South Western Nigeria Colleges of Education.African Research Review.International Multidisciplinary Journal, Ethiopia. 5 (5), 315-331.
[24] UNESCO. (2008a). ICT competency standards for teacher: Policy framework. United Kingdom: Author Retrieved 23 January, 2009 from http://www.oei.es/tic/competencies-tic-docentee-marcos-politicas.pdf.
[25] Williams, D.L., Boone, R. & Kingsley, K.V. (2004). Teacher beliefs about educational software: A Delphi study. Journal of Research onTechnology in Education, 36 (3), 213-229
[26] Yusuf, M.O. &Balogun, M. R. (2011).Student-teachers competence and attitude towards information and communication technology: A case study in a Nigerian university. Contemporary Educational Technology, 2(1), 18-36.

ALFRED, Sabastine Bamidele (PhD), EKHOVBIYE , Michael Osayame “Proficiency of Vocational Teacher Educators and Availability of Information and Communication Technology Resources for Effective Instruction in Colleges of Education, South-South, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.208-215 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/208-215.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Application of Takaful Operational Guidelines 2013 and Insurance Act 2003 in Nigeria: Matters Arising and the Way Forward

Mohammed Babakano Aliyu, Ibrahim Muhammad Ahmad, Aishatu Kyari Sandabe- November 2021- Page No.: 216-221

The Nigerian insurance industry has a history of lack of penetration and patronage in some parts of the country. The persistent insurance gap has prospered in financially excluding and underserving the majority of the populace. In 2013, National Insurance Commission (NAICOM), the statutory body responsible for the regulation and supervision of insurance business in Nigeria introduced the Takaful (Islamic Insurance) Operational Guidelines which is adjudged as an avenue for increasing insurance penetration being a Shari‘ah compliant product thereby bridging the endemic insurance gap. However, some provisions of the Takaful Operational Guidelines are in conflicts with certain provisions of the Insurance Act which left a vacuum in simultaneous application of the laws, a situation that affects the operation of Takaful sector in the country. This paper analyses some grey areas of conflicts in the Takaful Operational Guidelines and the Insurance Act 2004 with a view to resolving and harmonizing the legal frameworks. The study adopted a qualitative methodology of legal research which involved analysis of existing literature and interviews. The study concludes that the Operational Guidelines 2013 issued by NAICOM for smooth operation of Takaful business and the Insurance Act 2003 are inadequate as they left certain regulatory gaps that need to be filled in. Thus, the study recommends, amongst other things, that a comprehensive and robust Takaful Act to be enacted; and a review of the operational guidelines to safeguard the nascent Takaful industry with a clear delineation of authority between the Takaful guidelines and the Insurance Act.

Page(s): 216-221                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 November 2021

 Mohammed Babakano Aliyu
LLB, LLM, Ph.D, BL, Senior Lecturer, Department of Shari’ah, Faculty of Law, University of Maiduguri, Nigeria

 Ibrahim Muhammad Ahmad
LLB, LLM, Ph.D, BL, Senior Lecturer, Department of Shari’ah, Faculty of Law, University of Maiduguri, Nigeria

 Aishatu Kyari Sandabe
LLB, LLM, Ph.D, BL, Senior Lecturer, Department of Shari’ah, Faculty of Law, University of Maiduguri, Nigeria

References are not available.

Mohammed Babakano Aliyu, Ibrahim Muhammad Ahmad, Aishatu Kyari Sandabe, “Application of Takaful Operational Guidelines 2013 and Insurance Act 2003 in Nigeria: Matters Arising and the Way Forward” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.216-221 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/216-221.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Book Review Title: Mobility and Migration in Asian Pacific Higher Education. Authors: Deane Neubauer and Kazuo Kuroda. Publisher: New York, United States: Palgrave Macmillan Publishers, 2012. Page: 240 pp. Price: Hardcover $110.00. ISBN: 978-1-137-01508-2

Polwasit Lhakard – November 2021- Page No.: 222-224

This book helps in a better understanding on the increasing mobility in Asian Pacific Higher Education and formats of migration through education exchange. It was written by long-time experts and researchers in the area, which makes readers can see examples clearly. There are three parts to the structure. The first part includes chapters 1-2, which are about creating a conceptual framework and theory. The second part includes chapters 3-12, which are about case studies in each country. The last part is in chapter 13, which is a knowledge summary in the overall picture. The detail of each chapter is as follow:

Page(s): 222-224                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 November 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51114

 Polwasit Lhakard
International Doctoral Program in Asia-Pacific Studies (IDAS), College of Social Science, National Chengchi University, Taipei, Taiwan

[1] Chuing Prudence Chou and Jonathan Spangler .(2018).Cultural and Educational Exchanges between Rival Societies Cooperation and Competition in an Interdependent World. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
[2] Chan, David and Pak Tee Ng. (2008). “Similar Agendas, Diverse Strategies: The Quest for a Regional Hub of Higher Education in Hong Kong and Singapore.”Higher Education Policy .
[3] Global University Network for Innovation. (2007). Higher Education in the World 2007: Accreditation for Quality Assurance: What is at Stake ?. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
[4] Kivowitz, E.(2007). November 15, “UCLA Rated in Top 10 in U.S. for Foreign Students, Students Studying Abroad.” UCLA Newsroom . Available online at: www.newsroom.ucla.edu (accessed July, 30 2021).
[5] Watanabe, Toshio, ed. (2004). Higashi Ajia Shijo Togo Heno Michi (The Path toward East Asia Market Integration). Tokyo: Keisoshobo.

Polwasit Lhakard, “Book Review Title: Mobility and Migration in Asian Pacific Higher Education. Authors: Deane Neubauer and Kazuo Kuroda. Publisher: New York, United States: Palgrave Macmillan Publishers, 2012. Page: 240 pp. Price: Hardcover $110.00. ISBN: 978-1-137-01508-2” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.222-224 November 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51114

Download PDF

pdf

Supervision of the Environmental Service of Central Sulawesi Province in Waste Management Undata Palu Hospital

Fatmasari Said, Muhammad Basir-Cyio, Nawawi Natsir – November 2021- Page No.: 225-233

This study aimed to determine the supervision of the Environmental Service of Central Sulawesi Province in managing waste at Undata Palu Hospital. This type of research is descriptive, with the number of informants as many as 13 people, which is determined using the purposive technique. The data analysis method uses three steps: data condensation, presenting data (data display) and drawing conclusions or verification (conclusion drawing and verification). Based on the results of the study, it was concluded that the supervision of hospital waste management by the Central Sulawesi Environmental Service had not run optimally, this was due to the limited number of human resources, and the competence of the supervisory officers from the Central Sulawesi Environmental Service was still limited. In terms of the equipment owned by the Central Sulawesi Environmental Service, the laboratory equipment for testing the validity of the data is still incomplete and operational vehicles are still limited in number and the lack of budget owned by the Central Sulawesi Environmental Service because each year the budget obtained is still minimal. Schedule The implementation of control carried out by the Central Sulawesi Environmental Service is still not optimal, where in the last three years, regular (scheduled) monitoring has no longer been carried out, only reports in the form of documents on the implementation of environmental management are used as a reference for the Environment Agency in monitoring The performance of hospitals in managing their waste, this happened because after the disaster that hit Palu City at the end of 2018 ago, the implementation of supervision could not be carried out maximally, because the activities of institutions, both hospitals and the Environmental Service, were still focused on improving the facilities and infrastructure of the agency.

Page(s): 225-233                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 November 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51115

 Fatmasari Said
Social Science Study Program Postgraduate Doctoral Program, Tadulako University, Palu-Central Sulawesi, Indonesia

 Muhammad Basir-Cyio
Faculty of Agriculture, Tadulako University, Palu-Central Sulawesi, Indonesia

 Nawawi Natsir
Faculty of Social and Political Sciences, Tadulako University, Palu-Central Sulawesi, Indonesia

[1] Asmadi. 2013. Pengelolaan Limbah Medis Rumah Sakit. Yogyakarta: Goysen Publishing.
[2] Chandra, B. 2012. Pengantar Kesehatan Lingkungan. Jakarta: EGC.
[3] Daft, Richard L. 2012. Manajemen, Edisi Kelima Jilid Satu. Jakarta: Erlangga.
[4] Departemen Kesehatan Republik Indonesia. 2006. Pedoman pencegahan dan pengendalian infeksi di rumah sakit dan fasilitas pelayanan kesehatan lainnya. Jakarta: Depkes RI.
[5] Erlis Milta Rin Sondole. 2016. Pengaruh Disiplin Kerja, Motivasi dan Pengawasan terhadap Kinerja Karyawan pada PT. Pertamina (Persero) Unit Pemasaran VII Pertamina BBM Bitung. Jurnal EMBA, Volume 3 Nomor 3.
[6] Hasibuan, Malayu S.P. 2012. Manajemen: Dasar, Pengertian, dan Masalah. Jakarta: PT. Bumi Aksara.
[7] Ihyaul, Ulum. 2009. Pengawasan Sektor Publik: Suatu Pengantar. Jakarta. PT. Bumi Aksara.
[8] Indonesian Center For Environmental Law. 2020. Penguatan Sistem Pengawasan Lingkungan Hidup.
[9] Keptusan Menteri Kesehatan Republik Indonesia Nomor 7 Tahun 2019 tentang Kesehatan Lingkungan Rumah Sakit.
[10] Miles, M.B, Huberman, A.M, dan Saldana, J. 2014. Qualitative Data Analysis, A Methods Sourcebook, Edition 3. USA: Sage Publications. Terjemahan Tjetjep Rohindi Rohidi. Jakarta: UI-Press.
[11] Murhaini, Suriansyah. 2014. Manajemen Pegawasan Pemerintahan Daerah. Yogyakarta: Pustaka Pelajar.
[12] Pedoman Pengelolaan Limbah Rumah Sakit Rujukan, Rumah Sakit Darurat Dan Puskesmas Yang Menangani Pasien Covid-19. 2020. Pengelolaan Air Limbah Pengelolaan Limbah Padat Domestik Pengelolaan Limbah B3 Medis Padat. Kementerian Kesehatan Republik Indonesia.
[13] Peraturan Pemerintah Republik Indonesia Nomor 101 Tahun 2014 tentang Pengelolaan Limbah Bahan Berbahaya dan Beracun.
[14] Peraturan Menteri Lingkungan Hidup Dan Kehutanan Republik Indonesia Nomor P.12 Tahun 2020 tentang Penyimpanan Limbah Bahan Berbahaya Dan Beracun.
[15] Peraturan Pemerintah Republik Indonesia Nomor 22 Tahun 2021 tentang Penyelenggaraan Perlindungan dan Pengelolaan Lingkungan Hidup.
[16] Pruss, A. dkk. 2005. Pengelolaan Aman Limbah Layanan Kesehatan. Jakarta: Penerbit Buku Kedokteran EGC.
[17] Safroni, Ladzi. 2012. Manajemen Dan Reformasi Pelayanan Publik Dalam Konteks Birokrasi Indonesia. Surabaya: Aditya Media Publishing.
[18] Samsul. 2016. Paradigma Administrasi Publik. Dalam https://samsulaldi.wordpress.com.
[19] Siagian, Sondang, P. 2014. Manajemen Sumber Daya Manusia. Jakarta: Bumi Aksara.
[20] Silalahi, Ulbert. 2005. Studi Tentang Ilmu Administrasi Konsep, Teori dan Dimensi. Bandung: Sinar Baru Algensindo.
[21] Soemirat J. 2014. Kesehatan Lingkungan. Yogyakarta: Gadjah Mada University Press.
[22] Surat Edaran Kementerian Lingkungan Hidup dan Kehutanan Nomor SE.3/MENLHK/PSLB.3/3/2021 tentang Pengelolaan Limbah B3 dan Sampah Dari Penanganan Corona Virus Disease (COVID-19)
[23] The Liang, Gie. 2009. Ensiklopedia Administrasi. Jakarta: Gunung Agung.
[24] Thoha, Miftah. 2008. Ilmu Administrasi Public Kontemporer. Jakarta: Kencana.
[25] Widodo, Joko. 2016. Analisis Kebijakan Publik. Malang: Mayumedia Publishing.

Fatmasari Said, Muhammad Basir-Cyio, Nawawi Natsir “Supervision of the Environmental Service of Central Sulawesi Province in Waste Management Undata Palu Hospital” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.225-233 November 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51115

Download PDF

pdf

Square Peg in a Round Hole: Stories of The Non-English Major Teachers Teaching English Subjects

Norhan C. Jalmaani- November 2021- Page No.: 234-241

The purpose of this phenomenological inquiry is to describe the lived experiences of the non-English major teachers teaching English subjects. In-depth interview and focused group discussion were employed in the study in data collection. Findings revealed that out-of-field teachers experience difficulties and burden while in the situation. To cope with the phenomenon, participants reported to use different mechanisms which include keeping a positive attitude and making efforts in self-improvement. In terms of the insights of the participants towards out-of-field teaching, three themes were generated involving seeing it as a positive experience, a challenging experience, and a human resource problem. Based on the generated themes, it is implied that the role of the school heads and administrators is of much importance in the welfare of the teachers. The number one goal of the school heads is to minimize, as much as possible, the instances of out-of-field teaching in the school. Should it be inevitable, the school heads must provide these teachers with the necessary support they needed to perform well in the subject loads assigned to them.

Page(s): 234-241                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 November 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51116

 Norhan C. Jalmaani
Department of Education, Schools Division of Davao de Oro, Philippines

[1] Alshenqeeti, H. (2014). Interviewing as a Data Collection Method: A Critical Review. English Linguistics Research Vol. 3, No. 1.
[2] Bandura, A. (1997). Self-efficacy: Toward a Unifying Theory of Behavioral Change. Psychological Review.
[3] Barlow, D. (2002). Putting the Right Teachers in the Right Places. The Education Digest.
[4] Bayani, R. T., & Guhao, E. S. (2017). Out-of-Field Teaching: Experiences of Non-Filipino Majors. The International Journal of Education, Development, Society and Technology.
[5] Cinkir, S., & Kurum, G. (2015). DISCREPANCY IN TEACHER EMPLOYMENT:THE PROBLEM OF OUT-OF-FIELD TEACHER EMPLOYMENT.
[6] Creswell, J. (1998). Qualitative Inquiry and Research Design: Choosing among Five Traditions. Sage Publications, Inc.
[7] Darling Hammond, L. (2006). Constructing 21st-Century Teacher Education. SAGE.
[8] Du Plessis, A. E. (2013). Understanding the Out-of-Field Teaching Experience.
[9] Gerritsen, A. (2011). Focus Group Discussion – A Step-By-Step Guide. University of Limpopo and VLIR Project.
[10] Gordon, B. (2007). U.S competitiveness: The education imperative. Issues in Science and Technology.
[11] Hobbs, L. (2015, April 13). Too many teachers teaching outside their area of expertise. Education.
[12] Ingersoll, R. (2003). Out-of-Field Teaching and the Limits of Teacher. GSE Publications.
[13] Kim, E.-g. (2011). Out-of-Field Secondary School Teachers in Korea: Their Realities and Implications. KEDI Journal of Educational Policy.
[14] Lester, S. (1999). An Introduction to Phenomenological Research. Stan Lester Developmets.
[15] Magdaraog, R. S., & Benavides, N. G. (2018). Profile, Challenges and Coping Mechanisms of Out-of-Field Teachers in the Second Congressional District of Sorsogon. International Journal of Science and Research (IJSR).
[16] Miles, M. B., & Huberman, A. (1994). Qualitative Data Analysis: An Expanded Sourcebook. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
[17] Mizzi, D. (2013). THE CHALLENGES FACED BY SCIENCE TEACHERS WHEN TEACHING OUTSIDE THEIR SPECIFIC SCIENCE SPECIALISM. Acta Didactica Napocensia.
[18] Olmos, F. (2010). Square Peg in a Round Hole: Out-of-Field Teaching and its Impact on Teacher Attrition. UMI Disertation Publishing.
[19] Olson, L. (2008, January 3). Human Resources a Weak Spot. Teaching and Learning.
[20] Pacaña, N. M., Ramos, C. D., Catarata, M., & Inocian, R. (2019). OUT-OF-FIELD SOCIAL STUDIES TEACHING THROUGH SUSTAINABLE CULTURE-BASED PEDAGOGY: A FILIPINO PERSPECTIVE. International Journal of Education and Practice.
[21] Ruaya, J. (2016). The effects and challenges among out-of-field teachers in St. Dominic College of Asia.
[22] University, V. P. (2017, August 04). Protecting Confidentiality & Anonymity. Retrieved from http://www.irb.vt.edu/pages/confidentiality.htm
[23] Zhou, Y. (2012). OUT-OF-FIELD TEACHING: A CROSS-NATIONAL STUDY ON TEACHER LABOR MARKET AND TEACHER QUALITY.

Norhan C. Jalmaani, “Square Peg in a Round Hole: Stories of The Non-English Major Teachers Teaching English Subjects” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.234-241 November 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51116

Download PDF

pdf

Teachers’ Awareness and Participation in the School-Based Teacher Development Programme in Mathugama Education Zone

Sandamali Tennakoon, F. M. Nawastheen – November 2021- Page No.: 242-245

Teacher professional development is directly related to student educational achievements. School-based teacher development programmes in Sri Lanka have been implemented at the school level recently. The study aimed to find out the status of awareness about SBTD and the participation of teachers in the SBTD programme. In addition, it also aimed to identify the nature of activities done in schools under the SBTD programme. The study employed a survey research design and the collected data from a sample of 48 teachers selected randomly from Mathugama Education Zone in Sri Lanka. Frequency and percentage used for analysis for data. Data analysis showed that teachers in the zone were aware of the school-based development and its various activities implemented at their schools. However, there was a lack of teacher participation in some activities where teachers might get hands-on experiences related to their profession. Therefore, the researchers recommended that school principals ensure teachers’ involvement in the SBTD activities by finding out the reasons behind the lack of participation.

Page(s): 242-245                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 November 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51117

 Sandamali Tennakoon
Bilingual Education Branch, Ministry of Education, Isurupaya, Battaramulla, Sri Lanka

 F. M. Nawastheen
Department of Secondary & Tertiary Education, Faculty of Education, The Open University of Sri Lanka.

[1] Arachchi. C. K. (2015) Key elements of school-based teacher development in Sri Lanka: A case study of Colombo district schools, paper presented at the international conference on social entrepreneurship and sustainable development, Tata
[2] Institute of Social Sciences (TISS), Mumbai, India, (Feb.04-07) 2015.
[3] Bandara, S. (2018 A). School-Based Teacher Development Programs in Secondary Schools in Sri Lanka. International Journal of Research- GRANTHAALAYAH, 6(5), 190–200.
[4] Bandara, S. (2018 B). “The Influences of Administration System and Policies to Development of School-Based Teacher
[5] Development Programs in Sri Lanka”, International Journal of Science and Research (IJSR), 7 (5), May 2018, 1128 – 1134.
[6] Fullan, M. (1995). Professional Development in Education: New Paradigms and Practices. (Guskey, T. & Huberman, M. Eds.) New York: Teachers College Press.
[7] Kugamoorthy, S. (2017). School-Based Teacher Development: Opportunities and Challenges for Teachers in Jaffna District. Open University Research sessions-2017. P 61-66.
[8] Linda, D. (2005). Preparing Our Teachers for Teaching as a profession. Education Digest. 71, p 22-27.
[9] Nawastheen, F.M., Wanasinghe, W.M.S. and Seneviratne, P., (2017). A Study on PGDE Student-Teacher Efficacy Beliefs in the Sri Lankan Context. OUSL Journal, 12(1), pp.27–44. DOI: http://doi.org/10.4038/ouslj.v12i1.7360
[10] Silva, K.T., Sethunga, P., Jayasuriya, J., and Sugathapala, R.D. (2007). The Study on School-Based Teacher Development Programmes.Retrievedfrom http://arts.pdn.ac.lk/education/images/SBTD%20FINAL%20REPORT.pdf
[11] Yoon, K. S., Duncan, T., Lee, S. W. Y., Scarloss, B., and Shapley, K. (2007). Reviewing the evidence on how teacher professional development affects student achievement. Issues and Answers Report, REL2007-No.033. Washington, DC: US Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Regional Educational Laboratory Southwest.

Sandamali Tennakoon, F. M. Nawastheen, “Teachers’ Awareness and Participation in the School-Based Teacher Development Programme in Mathugama Education Zone” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.242-245 November 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51117

Download PDF

pdf

Effects of Menstrual Hygiene Management on girls’ Academic Performance in selected secondary schools of Senanga District, Western Zambia

Mushinga Kapelwa Mooto – November 2021- Page No.: 246-251

This study defined academic performance as the ability of school going girls to execute class work and other related curricular tasks timely, exhaustively and satisfactorily after a successful learning and teaching experience.
It sought to bring out the difficulties that were faced by girls in Menstrual Hygiene Management through the effects Menstrual Hygiene Management has on girls’ participation in school and how supportive to Menstrual Hygiene Management the selected Secondary Schools were.
The study was a descriptive case study. It was qualitative in nature. Sample size was 48; 45 girls and 03 guidance and counseling teachers from 03 secondary schools. Simple random sampling was used with girls while extreme case sampling was used with Guidance and Counseling teachers. Data collection was done using questionnaires, interview guides and observation checklist.
From the point of view of the definition of academic performance used, the study concluded that MHM had negative effects on the academic performance of the girls. The difficulties brought about by inadequacies in facilities for MHM reduced attendance of the girls, impaired participation rendering the schools MHM unsupportive.
The study recommends that the schools access and adhere to the MHM National Guidelines to help reduce inequity arising from poor MHM and consequently improve the academic performance of the girls. Furthermore, the stakeholders are requested to explore the possibility of making the distribution of sanitary towels to school going girls a must. It further recommends that the making of reusable sanitary towels be taught to the learners as part of curricular and co-curricular engagement.

Page(s): 246-251                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 November 2021

 Mushinga Kapelwa Mooto
Department of Education & Professional Studies, Mongu College of Education, Mongu, Zambia

[1] UNESCO Puberty Education and Menstrual Hygiene Management, UNESCO: Paris, 2014
[2] WHO and BZgA. Standards for Sexuality Education Europe: a Framework for Policy makers, educational and health authorities and specialists, Cologne, 2010, http://www.bzga-whocc.de/?uid=072bde22237db64297daf76b7cb998f0&id=Seite4486 (accessed 07.01.14).
[3] K. Jothy and S. Kalaiselvl, “Is menstrual hygiene and management an issue for the rural adolescent school girls?” Elixir International Journal, Vol. 44, 2013., Pp. 7223 – 7228
[4] S. McMahon, P. Caruso, B. Obure, A. Ogutu, E. Ochari and R. Rheingans, “The girl with her period is the one to hang her head: Reflections on menstrual management among schoolgirls in rural Kenya,” BMC International Health and Human Rights, Vol. 11 (7), 2011, Pp. 1 – 10.
[5] J. Goldman, “Responding to parental objections to school sexuality education: A Selection of 12 Objections,” Sex Education, Vol. 8, 2008, Pp. 415 – 438
[6] World Bank, Toolkit on Hygiene Sanitation & Water in Schools: Gender Roles and Impact, 2005. http://www.wsp.org/wsp/hygiene-sanitation-water-toolkit/index.html accessed 12.04.14
[7] M. Sommer, “Where the Education System and Women’s bodies Collide: The Social and Health Impact of Girls Experiences of Menstruation and Schooling in Tanzania,” Journal of Adolescence, Vol. 33 (4), 2009, Pp. 521 – 529
[8] N. Kristof & S. WuDuwunn, Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide, Knopf, 2009
[9] E. Oster & R. Thornton, “Menstruation, Sanitary Products and School Attendance: Evidence from Randomized Evaluation,” American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 2010, Pp. 1 – 13
[10] G. Nanda, J. Lupele, and J. Theraldson, “Menstrual Hygiene Management among School girls in Eastern Province of Zambia: Qualitative Research Final Report,” USAID/WASHplus, Washington, DC, 2016,
[11] Curriculum Development Center, Zambia Education Curriculum Framework 2013, Lusaka, CDC, 2013
[12] T. Crofts, “Will they Cotton on? An Investigation into Schools Girls Use of Low-cost Sanitary Pads in Uganda,” Unpublished MSc Dissertation, WEDC, Loughborough University, UK, 2010
[13] P. Montgomery, CR. Ryus, SC. Dolan, S. Dopson and L. M. Scott, “Sanitary Pad Interventions for Girls’ Education in Ghana: A Pilot Study,” PLoS One, Vol. 7 (10), 2012, Pp. 1 – 10
[14] S. Cavill, T. Mahon & S. House, Menstrual hygiene matters; a resource for improving menstrual hygiene around the world, N/A: WaterAid, 2012
[15] C. L. Travers, No one cares we’re bleeding: the place of menstrual management in humanitarian response, Unpublished Master degree thesis in International Humanitarian Action, Uppsala University, 2015.
[16] S. House, T. Mahon, and S. Cavil, Menstrual Hygiene Management Matters: A Resource for improving Menstrual Hygiene Management Around the World, 2013.
[17] A. C. Neilson, Sanitation Protection: Every Women’s Health Right, Plan, India, 2010
[18] A. Fehr, Stress, Menstruation and School Attendance: Effects of Water Access among Adolescent Girls in South Gandar, Ethiopia, Care, 2010,
[19] Government of the Republic of Zambia (GRZ), Menstrual Hygiene Management National Guidelines 2016, Ministry of Education, Lusaka, 2016

Mushinga Kapelwa Mooto “Effects of Menstrual Hygiene Management on girls’ Academic Performance in selected secondary schools of Senanga District, Western Zambia” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.246-251 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/246-251.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Factors Associated with Adherence to Covid-19 Preventive Measures among Residents of Ojodu Local Council Development Area, Lagos State, Nigeria

Oduyoye, Omobola Oyebola, Chinenye-Julius, Augusta Ezinne, Oresegun, Adepeju Aderinsola, Adejumo, Oluwagbemiga Joshua- November 2021- Page No.: 252-258

Background: Considering the global spread of COVID-19 without a definite treatment, health authorities have designed non-pharmaceutical interventions to combat the spread of COVID-19. However, the community’s poor adherence towards the laid down COVID-19 preventive measures remain a major public health challenge. This study aimed to determine the factors associated with adherence to COVID-19 preventive measures among residents of Ojodu Local Council Development Area, Lagos State, Nigeria.
Methodology: This study was a descriptive cross-sectional study. The target population comprised of 422 apparently healthy male and female residents of Ojodu LCDA between 17 and 50 years. The research instrument used for this study was a structured, pretested questionnaire. Data collected were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics with the aid of SPSS version 23.
Results: More than half of the respondents (64.7%) had good adherence to COVID-19 preventive measures, 56.2% had good knowledge about COVID-19 pandemic and 52.8% had favorable attitude towards COVID-19 preventive measures. Residents who had poor knowledge were 0.04 times less likely to adhere to COVID-19 preventive measures (AOR: 0.041; 95%CI: 0.022, 0.0.074) than those who had good knowledge while those who had unfavorable attitude towards COVID-19 preventive measures were 0.318 times less likely to adhere to COVID-19 preventive measures (AOR: 0.318; 95%CI: 0.180, 0.0.563).
Conclusion: Ojodu residents demonstrated good knowledge, favorable attitude, and good adherence towards COVID-19 preventive measures. Significant predictors of adherence to COVID-19 preventive measures included knowledge and attitude towards COVID-19 preventive measures. There is the need to beef up cogent measures by the government to ensure that the general population comply with the COVID-19 preventive measures and increase their knowledge regarding the reality of COVID-19 and its prevention guidelines.

Page(s): 252-258                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 01 December 2021

 Oduyoye, Omobola Oyebola
Department of Public Health, School of Public and Allied Health, Babcock University, Ilisan Remo, Ogun State, Nigeria

 Chinenye-Julius, Augusta Ezinne
Department of Public Health, School of Public and Allied Health, Babcock University, Ilisan Remo, Ogun State, Nigeria

 Oresegun, Adepeju Aderinsola
Department of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Faculty of Public Health, University of Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria

 Adejumo, Oluwagbemiga Joshua
Department of Public Health, School of Public and Allied Health, Babcock University, Ilisan Remo, Ogun State, Nigeria

[1] Abate, H., & Mekonnen, C.K. (2020). Knowledge, Attitude, and Precautionary Measures Towards COVID-19 Among Medical Visitors at the University of Gondar Comprehensive Specialized Hospital Northwest Ethiopia. Infection and Drug Resistance, 13, 4355–4366
[2] Azene, Z.N., Merid, M.W., Muluneh, A.G., Geberu, D.M., Kassa, G.M., Yenit, M.K.., et al. (2020). Adherence towards COVID-19 mitigation measures and its associated factors among Gondar City residents: A community-based cross-sectional study in Northwest Ethiopia. PLoS ONE, 15(12): e0244265. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0244265
[3] Banik, R., Rahman, M., Sikder, M.T., Rahman, Q.M., Pranta, M.R. (2021). Knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to the COVID-19 pandemic among Bangladeshi youth: a web-based cross-sectional analysis. Zeitschrift fur Gesundheitswissenschaften Journal of Public Health. DOI: 10.1007/s10389-020-01432-7.
[4] Bante, A., Mersha, A., Tesfaye, A., Tsegaye, B., Shibiru, S., Ayele, G., & Girma, M. (2021). Adherence with COVID-19 Preventive Measures and Associated Factors among Residents of Dirashe District, Southern Ethiopia. Patient Preference and Adherence, 15, 237–249
[5] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2021) Different COVID-19 Vaccines. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/different-vaccines.html
[6] Dubé, E., Laberge, C., Guay, M., Bramadat, P., Roy, R., Bettinger, J. (2013). Vaccine hesitancy: An overview. Human Vaccine Immuotherapy, 9: 1763-1773
[7] Erfani, A., Shahriarirad, R., Ranjbar, K., Mirahmadizadeh, A. & Moghadami, M. (2020). Knowledge, Attitude and Practice toward the Novel Coronavirus (COVID 19) Outbreak: A Population-Based Survey in Iran. [Preprint]. Bulletin World Health Organization. E- pub. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.2471/BLT.20.256651
[8] Furukawa, N.W., Brooks, J.T., Sobel, J. (2020). Evidence supporting transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 while presymptomatic or asymptomatic. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 26.
[9] Kakemam, E., Ghoddoosi-Nejad, D., Chegini, Z., et al. (2020). Knowledge, attitudes, and practices among the general population during COVID-19 outbreak in Iran: a national cross-sectional online survey. Frontiers Public Health, 8:8. doi:10.3389/fpubh.2020. 585302
[10] Kayode, O.R., Babatunde, O.A., Adekunle, O., Igbalajobi, M., Abiodun, A.K. (2021). COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy: Maximising the Extending Roles of Community Pharmacists in Nigeria in Driving Behavioural Changes in Public Health Interventions. Infectious Disease Epidemiology, 7(4): 205
[11] Khadka, S., Hashmi, F.K., Usman, M. (2020). Preventing COVID-19 in low- and middle-income countries. Drugs and Therapy Perspectives, 13: 1-3
[12] Nigeria Center for Disease Control (2021). COVID-19: Taming the third wave amidst emergence of Delta variant in Nigeria, Weekly Epidemiological Report (Week 28: 12th – 18th July, 2021). NCDC, 12(28): 03/08/2021
[13] Nigeria Centre for Disease Control. IHR Implementation in Nigerian Law. Nigeria Centre for Disease Control; 2020. Available from: https://ncdc.gov.ng/themes/common/docs/protocols/116_1580654680.pdf
[14] Omoronyia, O., Ekpenyong, N., Ukweh, I., & Mpama, E. (2020). Knowledge and practice of COVID-19 prevention among community health workers in rural Cross River State, Nigeria: implications for disease control in Africa. Pan African Medical Journal, 37(50)
[15] Reuben, R.C., Danladi, M.M.A., Saleh, D.A., & Ejembi, P.E. (2020). Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices Towards COVID‑19: An Epidemiological Survey in North‑Central Nigeria. Journal of Community Health. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10900-020-00881-1
[16] Roy, S. (2020). Low-income countries are more immune to COVID-19: A misconception. Indian Journal of Medical Science, 72(1), 5-7
[17] Sharma, A., Tiwari, S., Deb, M.K., Marty, J.L. (2020). Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2): a global pandemic and treatment strategies. International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents, 56: 106054.
[18] World Health Organization (2020). COVID-19: Operational Guidance For Maintaining Essential Health Services During An Outbreak: Interim Guidance, 25 March 2020. World Health Organization, 2020
[19] World Health Organization (2021). Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic situation report. WHO, Geneva
[20] Zhong, B.L. (2020). Knowledge, attitudes, and practices towards COVID-19 among Chinese residents during the rapid rise period of the COVID-19 outbreak: A quick online cross-sectional survey. International Journal of Biological Sciences, 2020; 16:1745-1752.

Oduyoye, Omobola Oyebola, Chinenye-Julius, Augusta Ezinne, Oresegun, Adepeju Aderinsola, Adejumo, Oluwagbemiga Joshua, “Factors Associated with Adherence to Covid-19 Preventive Measures among Residents of Ojodu Local Council Development Area, Lagos State, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.252-258 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/252-258.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Status of Implementation of Physical Education in Primary Schools in Uasin Gishu County Kenya

Rose Atoni – November 2021- Page No.: 259-263

Physical education (PE) programs ensure that students continue to receive health and fitness and this can improve their academic proficiency. But, the implementation of PE is inhibited by many barriers key among them being teachers’ perception. Notably a PE teacher perception may play a role on how their attitudes, confidence and ultimately behavior towards PE implementation are shaped. This could result in regarding PE as a non-important activity that acts as a means of compensating for other academic work. This study sought to investigate the extent to which PE is being implemented in public primary schools,. The study was guided by the covariation model. The sample consisted of 13 public primary schools and 162 teachers. Cross-sectional descriptive survey design was employed to conduct the study. The research instruments used were questionnaire for the teachers, interview guide for the head teachers and PE panel chairperson and an observation checklist. Data collection was done by self administration of the questionnaire. Face to face Interviews for the head teachers and PE panel chairpersons were conducted at their convenient time and the researcher used the observation checklist to ascertain PE activities in schools. Quantitative data was coded and summarized into means, frequencies and percentages with the help of SPSS (Statistical package for social sciences). Qualitative data obtained from open-ended questions on the questionnaire, interview guide and observation checklist was summarized into themes as they emerged from the responses and presented in a narrative form. The study revealed that PE implementation is low in public primary schools, Recommendations made include: The Ministry of education through the QASO to device ways of visiting schools so as to advice and direct teachers on the methodologies to use so as to implement PE as prescribed in the syllabus, organize seminars and workshops for teachers at the county level so as to enable the teachers update their knowledge and skills on PE teaching. The Ministry of education and the curriculum developers should infuse in the primary school syllabus PE competitions and award the pupils who do well in these activities as well as promoting the teachers involved as this can influence the perception of teachers. The government should put up special schools meant to teach sports and other talents discovered in children.

Page(s): 259-263                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 01 December 2021

 Rose Atoni
Department of Education, The Catholic University of Eastern Africa , Kenya

[1] Hardman, K., & Marshall. J.J. (2001). World – wide survey on the state and status of physical education in school (pp 15-36).In G.Doll-Tapper and D.Scoretz (eds)World Summit on Physical Education. Berlin: International Council for Sport Science and Physical Education.l.
[2] Jinhee, K., & Taggart, A. (2004). Teachers’ perception of the culture of physical education .Issues in Educational Research 14.
[3] Kinyanjui, L. (1997). Availability and utilization of instructional media resources. Published M.e.d dissertation: Kenyatta University.
[4] Kipngetich.K.E.J., & Too.K.J.(2012). Teaching physical education as a fundamental right.PHD dissertation: Moi University.
[5] Mafuniko, F. M. S. &Pangani, N .I.(2008). Physical Education in Tanzania secondary schools: Perceptions towards physical education as an academic Discipline. Journal of Internal Education Coopperation, 3, 51-61.
[6] Morgan, D. & Hansen, V. (2008). Classroom teachers’ Perception of the impact of barriers to teaching physical education on the quality of physical education programs. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 79, 506 – 516.
[7] Mugenda, O. M. & Mugenda, A.G. (2003). Research Methods: Quantitative and qualitative approaches. Nairobi: Acts press.
[8] Nyakweba, O. (2012). Status of PE in secondary schools in Butere division Kenya. Med.Kenyatta university.
[9] Petrie, K., Jones, A., & McKim, A. (2007). Effective professional learning in physical activity. Wellington, New Zealand: Ministry of Education.
[10] Republic of Kenya (2002). Primary Education Syllabus Vol 2. Nairobi: Kenya Institute of Education.
[11] Sarah, A.W. (2007).The effect of professional development on physical education teachers ‘use of assessment in the classroom. PHD. dissertation Virginia polytechnic institute and state university; Blacksburg VA.
[12] Taylor, P. (2000). Physical education and sport in learning together: Directions for education in the Fiji Islands. Government printer Suva,Fiji.
[13] Tembo, J.M. (2002). A physical education curriculum plan for Malawi. PHD dissertation Viginia Polytechnic institute and state university, Malawi.
[14] Xiang, P., Lowy, S., & McBride, R. (2002). The impact of a field based elementary physical education methods course on pre-service classroom teachers’ belief. Journal of teaching in physical education, 21,145-161.

Rose Atoni, “Status of Implementation of Physical Education in Primary Schools in Uasin Gishu County Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.259-263 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/259-263.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Quality of Work-Life and Happiness at Work towards Job Satisfaction Mediated by Organizational Commitment at Pt. North Sumatra Plantations

Shania Nabila Br. Simamora, Winda Ardiani, Sopi Pentana- November 2021- Page No.: 264-269

The purpose of his research seeks to analyze the effect of quality of work life and happiness at work on job satisfaction mediated by organizational commitment at PT. Perkebunan Sumatera Utara. This associative research employed a quantitative approach method, using a questionnaire as a means of collecting data. The data were then analyzed with the help of SPSS version 26 software.
The research population consisted of the employees at PT. Perkebunan Sumatera Utara. totaling 180 people. The Slovin formula method was used sampling technique, obtaining 124 people as research samples. The data analysis techniques used to answer the research hypothesis included Sobel test. The research results revealed that the variables of quality of work life and happiness at work have a positive and significant effect towards job satisfaction. Quality of work life and happiness at work have a positive and significant effect towards job satisfaction mediated by organizational commitment at PT. Perkebunan Sumatera Utara.

Page(s): 264-269                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 December 2021

 Shania Nabila Br. Simamora
Faculty of Economic and Business, Universitas Harapan, Medan, Indonesia

 Winda Ardiani
Faculty of Economic and Business, Universitas Harapan, Medan, Indonesia

 Sopi Pentana
Faculty of Economic and Business, Universitas Harapan, Medan, Indonesia

[1] Anggraini, R. (2018). Hubungan kepuasan kerja terhadap kebahagiaan di tempat kerja pada karyawan PT pos indonesia pekanbaru. Psychopolytan (Jurnal Psikologi), 2(1), 28-35.
[2] Arifin, A. R. (2020). The mediating role of organizational commitment: A supply chain management for examining the effect of quality of work life and job satisfaction on employee performance. International Journal of Supply Chain Management, 9(4), 255-256.
[3] Bataineh, K. (2019). Impact of Work-Life Balance, Happiness at Work, on Employee Performance. International business research, 12(2), 99-112.
[4] Fitrio, T. A. (2019). The Effect of Job Satisfaction to Organizational Citizenship Behavior (OCB) Mediated by Organizational Commitment. International Journal of Scientific Research and Management, 7(09), 1300-1311.
[5] Hamidi, J. A. (2016). PENGARUH KUALITAS KEHIDUPAN KERJA DAN KINERJA GURU TERHADAP KEPUASAN KERJA GURU SMA NEGERI DI KOTA MATARAM. jurnal ilmiah profesi penddikan, 1, 186-197.
[6] Khoiri, M. (2017). PENGARUH KUALITAS KEHIDUPAN KERJA DAN SIKAP KERJA TERHADAP KEPUASAN KERJA GURU SMA NEGERI KECAMATAN JEKAN RAYA KOTA PALANGKA RAYA. JURNAL PENDIDIKAN, HUKUM, DAN BISNIS, 2(2), 74-86.
[7] Mustofa, A. P. (2020). Hubungan Antara Kebahagiaan Di Tempat Kerja Dengan Kepuasan Kerja Pada Perawat Bagian Rawat Inap Rumah Sakit Islam Sultan Agung Semarang. empati, 8(4), 11-17.
[8] Nurul, C. R. (2019). Pengaruh Kualitas Kehidupan Kerja, Motivasi Kerja, Dan Kepuasan Kerja Terhadap Kinerja Karyawan (Studi Pada PT. Djarum Kudus). Journal of Management, 8(3), 128-137.
[9] Pramudena, S. H. (2019). The effect of quality of worklife and job satisfaction on organizational commitment. The Management Journal of Binaniaga, 4(1), 23-36.
[10] Ramadhoan. (2015). KUALITAS KEHIDUPAN KERJA TERHADAP KINERJA KARYAWAN MELALUI KOMITMEN ORGANISASI DAN KEPUASAN KERJA SEBAGAI VARIABEL ANTARA (INTERVENING VARIABEL). ekonomi pembangunan, 13, 199-217.
[11] Robbie, R. (2020). Dampak Emotional Intelligent Dan Happiness At Work Dalam Membentuk Komitmen Organisasional. manajemen dan kewirausahaan, 5(2), 164-175.
[12] Sarianti, R. M. (2017). PENGARUH KEADILAN ORGANISASI TERHADAP KINERJA KARYAWAN YANG DIMEDIASI OLEH KOMITMEN ORGANISASI. Jurnal Kajian Manajemen Bisnis, 6(2), 105-117.
[13] Stankevičiūtė, Ž. S. (2021). The impact of job insecurity on employee happiness at work: A case of robotised production line operators in furniture industry in Lithuania. Sustainability (Switzerland), 13(3), 1-20.
[14] Swapma, M. (2015). Quality of work life metrics as a predictor of job satisfaction and organizational commitment: A study with special reference to information technology industry. Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences, 6(3), 170-176.
[15] Tjiabrata, W. L. (2021). KEBAHAGIAAN DI TEMPAT KERJA TERHADAP KETERIKATAN KARYAWAN PADA PT PLN ( PERSERO ) UP3 MANADO THE EFFECT OF EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE , QUALITY OF WORK LIFE AND WORK PLACE HAPPINESS ON EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT AT PT PLN ( PERSERO ) UP3 MANADO Oleh : Jurnal EMBA Vo. EMBA, 9(2), 458-468.
[16] Wahyuni S (2020). Pengaruh Kepemimpinan dan Komitmen Organisasi Terhadap Kepuasan Kerja Karyawan Pada PT Integra Trustindo Utama Pekanbaru.

Shania Nabila Br. Simamora, Winda Ardiani, Sopi Pentana, “Quality of Work-Life and Happiness at Work towards Job Satisfaction Mediated by Organizational Commitment at Pt. North Sumatra Plantations” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.264-269 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/264-269.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Laparoscopic myomectomy: A retrospective analysis of 432 cases

Madhuka Rajakaruna, Dhammike Silva, Supun Adeesha, Rukshani Edirisinghe- November 2021- Page No.: 270-274

Method: This is a retrospective study to analyzed data from 432 women who had undergone laparoscopic myomectomy at Colombo south teaching Hospital, Sri Lanka during the period of 10 years
Results: Mean age of the population was 35.5 years (SD 6.083) and majority were nulliparous (67%). Single fibroid found in 168 patients (38.9%) , fibroids 2-4 found in 199 patients (46.1%) and fibroids 5-10 found in 65 patients (15%). Mean blood loss was 159.4 +/- 68.03 ml while mean operative time was 124 +/- 49.6 minutes. Mean operative time is 92.23 minute for fibroid size less than 8cm vs 178.9 minute for fibroid more than 12cm. Mean blood is 115.25ml for fibroid less than 8cm vs 238.27ml for fibroid size more than 12cm. Mean operative time and blood loss are increased with posterior wall and broad ligament fibroids . However it is not statistically significant ( P Value 0.006 and 0.008 respectively) . Prolonged operative time did not impact on surgical out comes in terms of hospital stay and blood transfusion.
Conclusion: In experienced and expert hand, laparoscopic myomectomy is a safer procedure with good surgical out comes and low complication rate. Operative time and blood loss mainly associated with size of largest fibroid and number of fibroids. Open myomectomy may be benefit for number of fibroids > 10 when considering completeness of surgery. Hand morcellation through suprapubic port is a safe and effective method of specimen retrieval in laparoscopic myomectomy.

Page(s): 270-274                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 01 December 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51118

 Madhuka Rajakaruna
Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Colombo South Teaching Hospital, Sri Lanka

 Dhammike Silva
Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Colombo South Teaching Hospital, Sri Lanka

 Supun Adeesha
Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Colombo South Teaching Hospital, Sri Lanka

 Rukshani Edirisinghe
Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Colombo South Teaching Hospital, Sri Lanka

[1] Baird DD, Dunson DB, Hill MC, Cousins D, Schectman JM (2003) High cumulative incidence of uterine leiomyoma in black and white women: ultrasound evidence. Am J Obstet Gynecol 188(1):100–107.
[2] Walid MS, Heaton RL. Laparoscopic extirpation of a 3-kg uterus. Arch Gynecol Obstet 2009; 279:607–608.
[3] Paul GP, Naik SA, Madhu KN, Thomas T (2010) Complications of laparoscopic myomectomy: a single surgeon’s series of 1001 cases. Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol 50(4):385–390.
[4] Sami Walid M, Heaton RL (2011) The role of laparoscopic myomectomy in the management of uterine fibroids. Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol 23(4):273–277.
[5] Litta P, Fantinato S, Calonaci F, Cosmi E, Filippeschi M, Zerbetto I et al (2010) A randomized controlled study comparing harmonic versus electrosurgery in laparoscopic myomectomy. Fertil Steril 94(5):1882–1886.
[6] Dubuisso JB, Fauconnier A, Babaki-Fard K, Chapron C (2000) Laparoscopic myomectomy: a current view. Hum Reprod Update 6(6):588–594.
[7] Glasser MH (2005) Mini laparotomy myomectomy: a minimally invasive alternative for the large fibroid uterus. J Minim Invasive Gynecol 12(3):275–283.
[8] Dubuisson JB, Fauconnier A, Chapron C, Kreiker G, Nörgaard C (1998) Second look after laparoscopic myomectomy. Hum Reprod 13(8):2102–2106
[9] Bulletti C, Polli V, Negrini V, Giacomucci E, Flamigni C (1996) Adhesion formation after laparoscopic myomectomy. J Am Assoc Gynecol Laparosc 3(4):533–536
[10] Jin C, Hu Y, Chen XC, Zheng FY, Lin F, Zhou K et al (2009) Laparoscopic versus open myomectomy–a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol 145(1):14–21
[11] Sizzi O, Rossetti A, Malzoni M, Minelli L, La Grotta F, Soranna L et al (2007) Italian multicenter study on complications of laparoscopic myomectomy. J Minim Invasive Gynecol 14(4):453–462
[12] L andi S, Zaccoletti R, Ferrari L, Minelli L (2001) Laparoscopic myomectomy: technique, complications, and ultrasound scan evaluations. J Am Assoc Gynecol Laparosc 8(2):231–240
[13] Falcone T, Parker WH (2013) Surgical management of leiomyomas for fertility or uterine preservation. Obstet Gynecol 121(4):856–868
[14] Kho KA, Nezhat C (2009) Parasitic myomas. Obstet Gynecol 114(3):611–615
[15] Mais V, Ajossa S, Guerriero S, Mascia M, Solla E, Melis GB (1996) Laparoscopic versus abdominal myomectomy: a prospective, randomized trial to evaluate benefits in early outcome. Am J Obstet Gynecol 174(2):654–658
[16] Saccardi C, Conte L, Fabris A, De Marchi F, Borghero A, Gizzo S et al (2014) Hysteroscopic enucleation in toto of submucous type 2 myomas: long-term follow-up in women affected by menorrhagia.J Minim Invasive Gynecol 21(3):426–430
[17] L itta P, Conte L, De Marchi F, Saccardi C, Angioni S (2014) Pregnancy outcome after hysteroscopic myomectomy. Gynecol Endocrinol 30(2):149–152
[18] Dubuisson J-B, Chapron C, Levy L (1996) Difficulties and complications of laparoscopic myomectomy. J Gynecol Surg 12(3):159–165
[19] Bean EMR, Cutner A, Holland T, Vashisht A, Jurkovic D, Saridogan E (2017) Laparoscopic myomectomy: a single-center retrospective review of 514 patients. J Minim Invasive Gynecol 24(3):485–493
[20] Sinha R, Hegde A, Mahajan C, Dubey N, Sundaram M (2008) Laparoscopic myomectomy: do size, number, and location of the myomas form limiting factors for laparoscopic myomectomy? J Minim Invasive Gynecol 15(3):292–300
[21] Sandberg EM, Cohen SL, Jansen FW, Einarsson JI (2016) Analysis of risk factors for intraoperative conversion of laparoscopic myomectomy. J Minim Invasive Gynecol 23(3):352–357
[22] Ribeiro SC, Reich H, Rosenberg J, Guglielminetti E, Vidali A (1999) Laparoscopic myomectomy and pregnancy outcome in infertile patients. Fertil Steril 71(3):571–574
[23] Marret H, Chevillot M, Giraudeau B (2006) Factors influencing laparoconversions during the learning curve of laparoscopic myomectomy. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 85(3):324–329
[24] Seracchioli R, Rossi S, Govoni F, Rossi E, Venturoli S, Bulletti C et al (2000) Fertility and obstetric outcome after laparoscopic myomectomy of large myomata: a randomized comparison with abdominal myomectomy. Hum Reprod 15(12):2663–2668
[25] FDA. UPDATED Laparoscopic uterine power morcellation in hysterectomy and myomectomy: FDA safety communication (https://wayback.archive-it.org/7993/ 20161023125535/, http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/ PressAnnouncements/ucm393689.htm). Accessed 1 Jan 2017

Madhuka Rajakaruna, Dhammike Silva, Supun Adeesha, Rukshani Edirisinghe, “Laparoscopic myomectomy: A retrospective analysis of 432 cases” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.270-274 November 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51118

Download PDF

pdf

A Pilot Study on the Mediating Effect of Job Embeddednesss on the Relationship between Quality of Work Life and Organizational Commitment

Musa, Leah, Garba, Bala Bello, Aliyu, Muktar Daneji – November 2021- Page No.: 275-281

The purpose of this paper is to examine a few sample data on the impact of quality of work life on organizational commitment with the mediating effect of job embeddedness in higher institutions of learning in Taraba State, Nigeria. A survey research was conducted with some questionnaire distributed. Thus, content and face validity, reliability and data normality are considered, after analyzing the data some items that correlated low with other items were deleted, in whichthe reliability of the scale is improved. The result showed that the Cronbach’s Alpha is above the minimum threshold,It is therefore concluded that the items are reliable for future research and it is recommended that the items can be used for future studies.

Page(s): 275-281                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 01 December 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51119

 Musa, Leah
Department of Business Administration Federal University, Wukari, Nigeria

 Garba, Bala Bello
Department of Business Administration and Entrepreneurship Bayero University Kano, Nigeria

 Aliyu, Muktar Daneji
Department of Business Administration and Entrepreneurship Bayero University Kano, Nigeria

[1] Allen, N. J., & Meyer, J. P. (1990).The measurement and antecedents of affective, continuance and normative commitment to the organization.Journal of Occupational Psychology, 63(1), 1–18. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.2044-8325.1990.tb00506.x
[2] Babalola, M. T., Stouten, J., &Euwema, M. (2016). Frequent change and turnover intention: The moderating role of ethical leadership. Journal of Business Ethics, 134(2), 311–322. doi:10.1007/s10551-014-2433-z
[3] Barlett M.S. (1954). A note on the multiplying factors for various Chi Square Approximations. Journal of the royal statistical society, 16 (1) 296-298
[4] Cadete, L. (2017). What is a pilot study? Tutorials and Fundamentals.https://s4be.cochrane.org/blog/2017/07/31/pilot-studies/
[5] Cesario, F., & Chambel, M. J. (2017). Linking organizational commitment and work engagement to employee performance. Knowledge and Process Management, 24(2), 152-158. doi:10.1002/kpm.1542.
[6] Da Silva, L. P., Castro, M. A. R., Dos-Santos, M., &Neto, P. J. d. L. (2018).Commitment to work and its relationship with organizational culture mediated by satisfaction.RevistaBrasileira De Gestão De Negócios, 20(3), 401-420. doi:10.7819/rbgn.v20i3.3947
[7] Dechawatanapaisal, D. (2018). Examining the relationships between HR practices, organizational job embeddedness, job satisfaction, and quit intention. Asia – Pacific Journal of Business Administration, 10(2), 130-148. doi:10.1108/APJBA-11-2017-0114
[8] Eberman, L., Mazerolle, S. M., Eason, C. M. (2019). Formal and informal work-life balance practices of athletic trainers in collegiate and university settings. Journal of Athletic Training, 54(5), 556–561.
[9] Faloye, D. O. (2014). Organizational Commitment And Turnover Intentions: Evidence From Nigerian Paramilitary Organization. International Journal Of Business & Economic Development, 2(3), 23-34.
[10] Fontinha, R., Easton, S., Van Laar, D. (2019). Overtime and quality of working life in academics and nonacademics: The role of perceived work-life balance. International Journal of Stress Management, 26(2), 173.
[11] Gorondutse, A. H.(2012) The Influence of Business Social Responsibility (BSR) on Organizational Performances: A Pilot Study. International Journal of Business and Management Tomorrow Vol. 2 No. 12
[12] Hair, J. F., Hult, G. T. M., Ringle, C. M., &Sarstedt, M. (2014). A Primer on Partial Least squares Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM). Los Angeles: USA: SAGE
[13] Heymann, M. (2010).The impact of demographics on voluntary labour turnover in South
Africa.Unpublished MBA dissertation, University of Pretoria, Pretoria.
[14] Holtom, B. C., Mitchell, T. R., & Lee, T. W. (2006).Increasing human and social capital by applying job embeddednesstheory.Organizational Dynamics, 35(4), 316-331.
[15] Igbaekemen, G. O. &Idowu, O. A. (2014). Impact Of Organizational Commitment On mployees Productivity: A Case Study Of Nigeria Brewery, Plc. International Journal Of Research In Business Management. 2 (9) 107- 122
[16] Jonathan, P. (2019). Effective Strategies to Increase Employee Commitment and Reduce Employee Turnover.Walden Dissertations and Doctoral Studies Collection. Walden University Scholar Works.
[17] Kaiser, H. F. (1974). An index of factorial simplicity.Psychometrika, 39 (1) 31 -36.
[18] Kwahar, N., &Iyortsuun, A.S. (2018).Determining the Underlying Dimensions of Quality of Work Life (QWL) in the Nigerian Hotel Industry.Entrepreneurial Business and Economics Review, 6(1), 53-70. https://doi.org/10.15678/EBER.2018.060103
[19] Latham, G. P., Borgogni, L., &Petitta, L. 2018. Goal setting and performance management in the public sector.Interna-tional Public Management Journal 11(4): 385-403.
[20] Lee, T. W., Mitchell, T. R., Sablynski, C. J., Burton, J. P., &Holtom, B. C. (2004). The effects of job embeddedness on organizational citizenship, job performance, volitional absences, and voluntary turnover.Academy of Management Journal, 47(5), 711-722.
[21] Lowe, K. N. (2019). What is a pilot study? Editorial.AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.
Published by Elsevier Inc.JOGNN, 48, 117–118; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jogn.2019.01.005
[22] Malhotra, N.K. (2008). Essentials of marketing: An applied orientation (2nd ed.). Australia: Pearson Education
[23] Mallol, C.M., Holtom, B.C., & Lee, T.W. (2007). Job Embeddedness in a Culturally Diverse Environment, Journal of Business Psychology 22 (1) 35–44 DOI 10.1007/s10869- 007-9045
[24] March, J. G., & Simon, H. A. (1958).Organizations: John Wiley & Sons Inc.
[25] Mehdi, J. A. Z.,Sharif, M. T., & Khan I. A. (2021). Increasing Employee Organizational Commitment by Correlating Goal Setting, Employee Engagement and Optimism at Workplace.European Journal of Business and Management. 4 (2) 71-77
[26] Mitchell, T. R., Holtom, B. C., & Lee, T. W. (2001). How to keep your best employees: Developing an effective retention policy. Academy of Management Executive, 15(4), 96-109.
[27] Mitchell, T. R., Holtom, B. C., Lee, T. W., Sablynski, C. J., &Erez, M. (2001). Why people stay: Using job embeddedness to predict voluntary turnover. The Academy of Management Journal, 44(6), 1102-1121.
[28] Nunnally, J. C. (1978). Psychometric theory. New York: McGraw-Hill Inc
[29] Oludayo, O.A., Falola, H.O., Ahaka, O. &Fatogun, D. (2018).Work-life balance initiative as a predictorof employees’ behavioural outcomes. Academic of Strategic Management Journal, 17(1), 1-17
[30] Owolabi, A. B. (2018). Impact of Organisational Culture and Leadership Style on Quality of Work-Life among Employees in Nigeria.African Journal for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, 18(1), 109-121.
[31] Polit, D. F., & Beck, C. T. (2017). Nursing research: Generating and assessing evidence for nursing practice (10th ed.). Philadel-
phia, PA: Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
[32] Rusdiyanto, J. (2020). Gaining Leader–Employee Commitment: Linking to Organization Performance in Women Cooperative.Advances in Economics, Business and Management Research, 115 (1) 266-268
[33] Singh, A., & Gupta, B. (2015). Job Involvement, Organizational Commitment, Professional Commitment, And Team Commitment. Benchmarking: An International Journal, 22(6), 1192-1211. Doi:10.1108/BIJ-01-2014-0007
[34] Sirgy, J.M., Efraty, D., Siegel, P., & Lee, D. (2001). A new Measure of Quality of Work Life (QWL) Based on Need Satisfaction and Spillover Theories. Social Indicators Research, 55(3), 241-302.
[35] Tabachnick, B.G. &Fidell, L.S. (2007). Using multivariate statistics (5th ed.). Boston: Pearson Education Inc
[36] Thurstone, L. L. (1947). Multiple-factor analysis; a development and expansion of The Vectors mind. University of Chicago Press
[37] Yousef, D.A. (2017) Organizational Commitment, Job Satisfaction and Attitudes toward Organizational Change: A Study in the Local Government, International Journal of Public Administration, 40:1, 77-88, DOI: 10.1080/01900692.2015.1072217
[38] Zhang, M., Fried, D. D., &Griffeth, R. W. (2012). A review of job embeddedness: Conceptual, measurement issues, and directions for future research. Human Resource Management Review, 22(3), 220–231. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.hrmr.2012.02.004

Musa, Leah, Garba, Bala Bello, Aliyu, Muktar Daneji, “A Pilot Study on the Mediating Effect of Job Embeddednesss on the Relationship between Quality of Work Life and Organizational Commitment” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.275-281 November 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51119

Download PDF

pdf

Effect of Control Environment on the Management of Public Funds in Busia County, Kenya

Oluoch Mariwa Francis, Dr. Ng’ang’a – November 2021- Page No.: 282-287

Organizations establish systems of internal control to help them achieve performance and organizational goals, prevent loss of resources, enable production of reliable reports and ensure compliance with laws and regulations. Despite the commendable progress, limited funding from the national government is constraining the ability of the County governments to fulfill their mandate. According to annual County Government Budget report of 2019 lack of proper accounting systems and poor county-level oversight has consistently encouraged abuse of the allocated public funds, delaying the quality of service and the county governments’ overall performance. This study investigated the effect of control environment on the management of public funds in Busia County, Kenya. This study employed a descriptive research design. The target population for this study was the County government of Busia. A total of 54 respondents participated in the study comprising of 10 finance officers and 44 support staff from the department of accounting and finance of the County. A census of 54 respondents was carried out. The study used primary data that was collected using questionnaires. Questionnaires were piloted to 5 respondents to assess the validity and reliability of the research instruments. In addition to that these respondents were not included in the final data collection process. Quantitative data was analyzed using descriptive statistics such as mean and standard deviation and presented in form of tables and figures where applicable. The study further carried out inferential statistics that included correlation analysis and multiple regressions to determine the relationship between variables. The study found that control environment, control activities, internal audit and risk assessment had a positive and significant relationship with the management of public funds in Busia County, Kenya. The study concludes that the degree to which people know that they will be held accountable has a big impact on the control environment and control environment in the County are carried out with the help of accountability. The study recommends that the County should create effective control environment so that it may improve its efficiency in delivering value and meeting its strategic goals.

Page(s): 282-287                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 01 December 2021

 Oluoch Mariwa Francis
Department of Accounting and Finance, School of Business, Kenyatta University, Kenya

 Dr. Ng’ang’a
Department of Accounting and Finance, School of Business, Kenyatta University, Kenya

Books:
[1] Ahmed, S. O., & Nganga, P. (2019). Internal Control Practices and Financial Performance of County Governments in the Coastal Region of Kenya. International Journal of Current Aspects, 3(V), 28-41.
[2] Al-Hawatmeh, O. M., & Al-Hawatmeh, Z. M. (2016). Evaluation of Internal Control Units for the Effectiveness of Financial Control in Administrative Government Units: A Field Study in Jordan. European Scientific Journal, 12(13), 123 – 131
[3] Aramide, S. F., & Bashir, M. M. (2015). The effectiveness of internal control system and financial accountability at Local Government level in Nigeria. International Journal of Research in Business Management, 3(8), 1 – 6.
[4] Aziz, M., Said, J., & Alam, M. (2015). Assessment of the practices of internal control system in the public sectors of Malaysia. Aziz, MAA, Said, J., and Alam, MM, 4(1), 43 – 62.
[5] Babatunde, M. A., & Olaniran, O. (2017). The effects of internal and external mechanism on governance and performance of corporate firms in Nigeria. Corporate ownership & control, 7(2), 330 – 344
[6] Berger, T. L., & Luckmann, T. (2011). The social construction of reality: A treatise on the sociology of knowledge. Harmondsworth, UK: Pengui
[7] Cheruiyot, M. P., Namusonge, G. S., & Sakwa, M. (2018). Influence of Internal Control Practices on Performance of County Governments in Kenya. International Journal of Social Sciences and Information Technology, 4(8), 224-234.
[8] Cheruiyot, P. M., Oketch, J. R., Namusonge, G.S. & Sakwa, M. (2017). Effects of Public Financial Management Practices on Performance in Kericho County Government, Kenya: A critical Review. International Journal of Education and Research, 5 (12), 211-224
[9] Dumicic, M. (2016). Financial Stability Indicators–The Case of Croatia. Journal of central banking theory and practice, 5(1), 113-140
[10] Edmonds, C. T., Edmonds, J. E., Vermeer, B. Y., & Vermeer, T. E. (2017). Does timeliness of financial information matter in the governmental sector? Journal of Accounting and Public Policy, 36(2), 163 – 176
[11] Eton, M., Murezi, C., Fabian, M., & Benard, P. O. (2018). Internal control systems and financial accountability in Uganda: A case of selected districts in western Uganda. (Master’s Project, Kabale University)
[12] Feiveson, L. (2015). General revenue sharing and public sector unions. Journal of Public Economics, 125, 28-45
[13] Ghneimat, E. K. (2017). Factors affecting the effectiveness of internal control systems in the Jordanian ministries. The magazine of Jordan in Business Administration, 7(4), 414 – 423
[14] Ishola, S. A., Abikoye, O. A., & Olajide, R. A. (2015). Effect of Internal Control System in Nigeria Public Sectors: A Case Study of Nigeria National Petroleum Corporation. International Journal of Economics, Commerce and Management, 3(6), 1093 – 1105
[15] Kinyua, J. B. (2016). Determinants of Capital Structure of Agricultural Firms in Kenya (Doctoral dissertation, University of Nairobi)
[16] Kromidha, E., & Cordoba-Pachon, J. R. (2017). Discursive Institutionalism for reconciling change and stability in digital innovation public sector projects for development. Government Information Quarterly, 34(1), 16-25
[17] Lerno, D. L. (2016). Relationship between internal controls and performance of county government in Kenya (Doctoral dissertation, University of Nairobi).
[18] Makgatho, K. E. (2013). Effectiveness of internal control mechanisms in monitoring financial resources at the Gauteng Department of Education (Doctoral dissertation, North-West University).
[19] Mawanda, S. P. (2018). Effects of internal control systems on financial performance in an institution of higher learning in Uganda, (Master’s Project, Kampala University)
[20] Meyer, H. D., & Rowan, B. (1977). Institutional analysis and the study of education. The new institutionalism in education, 1(2), 1-13
[21] Muhunyo, B. M., & Jagongo, A. O. (2018). Effect of internal control systems on financial performance of public institutions of higher learning in Nairobi City County, Kenya (Doctoral dissertation, Doctoral dissertation, Kenyatta University).
[22] Omar, F. S., & Yussuf, S. (2020). Effect of Control Environment on the Financial Performance of Higher Learning Public Institutions in Zanzibar. International Journal of Scientific and Technical Research in Engineering (IJSTRE), 6(3), 18 – 25
[23] Oppong, S., Arora, R., Sachs, P., & Seidu, M. (2016). Appraisal of corporate governance in a lower middle income country: The case of Ghana. Accounting, 2(1), 37 – 44.
[24] Othman, R., Aris, N. A., Mardziyah, A., Zainan, N., & Amin, N. M. (2015). Fraud Detection and Prevention Methods in the Malaysian Public Sector: Accountants’ and Internal Auditors’ Perceptions. Procedia Economics and Finance, 28, 59 – 67
[25] Oyaro, O., & Angwenyi, O. (2016). Internal Control and Revenue Fund management among County governments in Kenya. International journal of Accounting, 1(3), 5 – 12
[26] Piper J. A. (2015). Determinant of Financial Control Systems, for Multiple, Retailers – some Case Study Evidence. Managerial Finance, 6(1), 53 – 63
[27] Rizaldi, A. (2015). Control environment analysis at government internal control system: Indonesia case. Procedia-Social and Behavioral Sciences, 211, 844-850.
[28] Said, J., Alam, M., Ramli, M., & Rafidi, M. (2017). Integrating ethical values into fraud triangle theory in assessing employee fraud: Evidence from the Malaysian banking industry. Journal of International Studies, 10(2), 23 – 36
[29] Tarmuji, I., Maelah, R., & Tarmuji, N. H. (2016). The impact of environmental, social and governance practices (ESG) on economic performance: Evidence from ESG score. International Journal of Trade, Economics and Finance, 7(3), 67 – 76
[30] Wabwire, M. I., & Bogonko, J. B. (2019). Effect of Internal Controls on Public Finance Management of Busia County Government, Kenya. International Journal of Economics, Commerce and Management, 6(6), 65 – 81

Oluoch Mariwa Francis, Dr. Ng’ang’a “Effect of Control Environment on the Management of Public Funds in Busia County, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.282-287 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/282-287.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Knowledge, Attitude and Perception of Pregnant Women Attending a Selected Ante-Natal Care Clinic towards Gestational Hypertension in Lagos State, Nigeria

Oduyoye, Omobola Oyebola, Chukwura, Arinze Michael, Chinenye-Julius, Augusta Ezinne, Oresegun, Adepeju Aderinsola – November 2021- Page No.: 288-294

Introduction
Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) is one of the leading causes of maternal and perinatal mortality. PIH affects about 6 – 10% of pregnancies around the world, however, hypertension and proteinuria which exist in preeclampsia are present in 2-8% of all pregnancies. High maternal mortality rate can be linked to inadequate knowledge, negative attitude and poor perception on gestational hypertension in pregnancy among pregnant women. This study determined the knowledge, attitudes and perception of pregnant women towards gestational hypertension in Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos state.
Methodology
This study employed a descriptive cross sectional study design. A total sampling technique was used to select 160 pregnant women attending antenatal clinic in Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos State. The Instrument for this study was a structured researcher administered questionnaire which was divided into 5 sections. Data were coded and analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS version 22). Data was analyzed to give descriptive statistics (percentage and frequencies) and inferential statistics (correlation analysis). The level of significance used was 0.05.
Result
About (50.6%) of the respondents were between the ages of 21-25 years, 63.1% had secondary education while 75.6% were married. Almost half (48.8%) were civil servants while majority (75.6%) earned more than ₦20,000. Most (75.0%) of the respondents had good level of knowledge on gestational hypertension and (54.4%) had poor attitude towards prevention of gestational hypertension. More also, more than half of the respondents (55.0%) had good perception towards prevention of gestational hypertension. Furthermore, hypothesis result showed a significant correlation between history of gestational hypertension and predisposing factors (Knowledge r = 0.963, p = 0.000), (Attitude r = 0.327, p = 0.000). and (perception r = -0.199, p = 0.012).
Conclusion
Gestational hypertension in pregnancy has remained as one of the world’s most important health problem. Pregnancy is one of the most important periods of a woman, a family and a society. However, complications during pregnancy especially hypertension have negative effect on the woman and child birth which is the leading cause of death among women of reproductive age.

Page(s): 288-294                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 December 2021

 Oduyoye, Omobola Oyebola
Department of Public Health, School of Public and Allied Health, Babcock University, Ilisan Remo, Ogun State, Nigeria

 Chukwura, Arinze Michael
Department of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Faculty of Public Health, University of Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria

 Chinenye-Julius, Augusta Ezinne
Department of Public Health, School of Public and Allied Health, Babcock University, Ilisan Remo, Ogun State, Nigeria

 Oresegun, Adepeju Aderinsola
Department of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Faculty of Public Health, University of Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria

[1] Abou Zahr C, Guilotti R.(1998) Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy: In health dimension of sex and reproduction, the global burden of sexually transmitted diseases, maternal conditions, perinatal disorder and congenital anomalies. Geneva: WHO.
[2] Centre for Maternal and Child Enquiries (2011). Saving mothers’lives: Reviewing maternal deaths to make motherhood safer: 2006–2008. The Eighth Report on Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths in the United Kingdom. International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 118(1): 1–203
[3] Department of Health (2007). Guidelines for Maternity Care in South Africa. A Manual for Clinics, Community Health Centres and District Hospitals. Pretoria: Government Printer
[4] Ebeigbe PN, Aziken M E. Early onset pregnancy-induced hypertension/eclampsia in Benin City, Nigeria J Clin Pract 2010;13:388-93
[5] Finlayson, K., & Downe, S. (2013). Why Do Women Not Use Antenatal Services in Lowand Middle-Income Countries? A Meta-Synthesis of Qualitative Studies. PLoS Med, 10(1), e1001373
[6] Kintiraki E, Papakatsika S, Kotronis G, Goulis DG, Kotsis V (2015). Pregnancy-Induced hypertension. Hormones 14(2):211-223.
[7] Leeman L, Dresang LT, Fontaine P. (2016). Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. American Family Physician.;93:121-12.
[8] Moodley J, Molefe N (2007). Saving Mothers, Fourth Report on Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths in South Africa. Pretoria: Government Printers
[9] Olusanya BO, Solanke OA. (2012). Perinatal outcomes associated maternal hypertensive disorders of pregnancy in a developing country. Hypertension Pregnancy J.;31:120-30
[10] Osungbade KO, Ige OK (2011). Public health perspectives of preeclampsia in developing countries: implication for health system strengthening. Journal of Pregnancy 481095.
[11] Oyira EJ, Mgbekun MA, Edem OA. (2009) Knowledge, attitude and preventive practices towards pregnancy induced hypertension among pregnant women in Nigeria. Pakistan J of Social Science.;6:1-5
[12] Poon LC, Kametas NA, Chemelen T, Leal A, Nicolaides KA (2010). Maternal risk factors for hypertensive disorders in pregnancy: A multivariate approach. Journal of Human Hypertension, 24: 104-110.
[13] Rehana R, Tanveer S, Nasreen RF (2006). An analysis of direct causes of maternal mortality. Journal of Postgraduate Medical Institute, 2(1): 86-91
[14] Sellers P (2010). Midwifery Volume 2. Lansdowne: Juta & Co.
[15] Singh V, Srivastava M (2015). Associated risk factors with pregnancy-induced hypertension: A hospitalbased KAP study. International Journal of Medicine and Public Health, 5: 59-62.
[16] Solomon CG, Seely EW (2011). Hypertension in pregnancy. Endocrinol. Metab. Clin. North Am. 10(8):120-125.
[17] Steegers EA, von Dadelszen P, Duvekot JJ, Pijnenborg R (2010). Preeclampsia. Lancet 376(9741):631-644.
[18] Suzuki Y, Matsuura A, Yamamoto T (2015). Management of pregnancy induced hypertension. Nihon Rinsho. Japanese J. Clin. Med. 73(11):1897-1903.

Oduyoye, Omobola Oyebola, Chukwura, Arinze Michael, Chinenye-Julius, Augusta Ezinne, Oresegun, Adepeju Aderinsola, “Knowledge, Attitude and Perception of Pregnant Women Attending a Selected Ante-Natal Care Clinic towards Gestational Hypertension in Lagos State, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.288-294 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/288-294.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Peer Reviewing of Electronic Examinations In Tertiary Institutions: Is It Being Done? A Case Study of Selected Three Higher Education Institutions- Lusaka, Zambia

Patricia Mambwe, Jordan Tembo – November 2021- Page No.: 295-299

Peer reviewing of examinations at assessment design stage is a sustainable approach for quality. The objective of peer reviewing is to identify deficiencies which can potentially adulterate the validity, reliability and integrity of assessments. Before COVID-19 pandemic, higher learning institutions in Zambia, using the traditional paper-based examinations, provided flowing evidence of peer reviewing of examinations. The objective of this study was to find out whether universities peer reviewed electronic examinations. This study was conducted between May and August, 2021. 15 participants were purposively sampled from 2 private universities and 1 public university in Zambia. Using the single- interview per participant data collection method, this study found that peer reviewing of electronic examinations was not being done in all the 3 institutions of higher learning- no independent review for spelling deficiencies, poor wording, unclear verbs, confusing sentence structure, unbalanced number of questions testing students’ level of cognition, repetitions and other deficiencies that compromise reliability, validity and integrity of assessments was done before examinations were administered to students. This study recommends that Higher Education Authority (HEA) develop assessment standard guidelines for setting and moderating examinations for universities and other tertiary institutions. The study also recommends mandatory Professional Development conferences and seminars on peer review techniques of online exams for all academic staff in universities and other learning institutions.

Page(s): 295-299                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 December 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51120

 Patricia Mambwe
Department of Nursing, School of Health Sciences, Rusangu University, Monze, Zambia

 Jordan Tembo
Kalindawalo General Hospitals, P.O.Box 560008, Petauke, Zambia

[1] Australian Learning and Teaching Council (2012a). Assessment Moderation Toolkit. Melbourne, Australia. Retrieved from http://resource.unisa.edu.au/course/view.php?id=285&topic=1.
[2] Australian Learning and Teaching Council (2021). Good practices in moderation of assessment in transnational education. Melbourne, Australia: Retrieved from http://resource.unisa.edu.au/course/view.php?id=285&topic=1.
[3] Adedoyin, O. (2013). Public examinations and its influence on the Botswana educational system: Views of undergraduate education students at the University of Botswana. Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences, 1(2).
[4] Bunyi, G. W. (2013). The quest for quality education: the case of curriculum innovations in Kenya. European Journal of Training and Development 37 (7).
[5] Chalchisa, D. (2014). Practices of Assessing Graduate Students’ Learning Outcomes in Selected Ethiopian Higher Education Institutions . Journal of International Co-operation in Education DOI: 10:15027/36172 https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Practices-of-Assessing-Graduate-Students%27-Learning-Chalchisa/1798a17de4622ef887acdaf9ea42fdbb40d497ca.
[6] Clements, M. D., & Cord, B. A. (2013). Assessment guiding learning: developing graduate qualities in an experiential learning programme. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 38(1), 114–124. Accessed from https://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=https://www.google.com/&httpsredir=1&article=1001&context=buspapers@ 15:43 hours on 5/8/2021
[7] Dancik, B (1991) Importance of Peer Review, The Serials Librarian, 19:3-4, 91-94, DOI: 10.1300/J123v19n03_11
[8] Domeniter, N. K., Adhiambo, J. M., Mwalw’a, S. M., & Waweru, J. C.(2018). EFFECT OF INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL MODERATION ON THE QUALITY OF EXAMINATIONS IN PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES IN KENYA. The Strategic Journal of Business & Change Management. ISSN 2312-9492(Online) 2414-8970(Print).Vol. 5, Iss. 3, pp 475 – 496, August 12, 2018. www.strategicjournals.com
[9] Gabriele Frank and Sofie Bitter (2014) Online Exams: Practical Implications and Future Directions accessed from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/234153336_Online_Exams_Practical_Implications_and_Future_Directions on 05/8/2021 @ 11:20 hours
[10] Henderson and Crawford (2020). Exams and assessments in COVID-19 crisis: Fairness at the centre. The Fourth UNESCO COVID-19 Education Webinar organized on 9 April 2020. Accessed from https://en.unesco.org/news/exams-and-assessments-covid-19-crisis-fairness-centre on 15/8/2021 @15:16 hours
[11] Henderson,. and Crawford (2021) Learners’ Perspective towards E-Exams during COVID-19 Outbreak: Evidence from Higher Educational Institutions of India and Saudi Arabia Mohammed accessed from https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/18/12/6534
[12] Jankowski, N. A., Timmer, J. D., Kinzie, J., & Kuh, G. D. (2018, January). Assessment that matters: Trending toward practices that document authentic student learning. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois and Indiana University, National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment (NILOA)
[13] Maheshwari, V.K. (2011). Malpractice in examinations – The Termites Destroying the Educational Setup in Higher Education institutions in India. K.L.D.A.V (P.G) College, Roorkee, India accessed from http://www.vkmaheshwari.com/WP/?p=310 on 15/8/2021 @ 16:32 hours
[14] Menon, G. (2014). Maintaining Quality of Education in Management Institutes–Reforms Required. Procedia Social and Behavioral Sciences, 133, 122-129.
[15] https://www.qaa.ac.uk/docs/qaa/guidance/assessing-with-integrity-in-digital-delivery.pdf
[16] Munene, I.I.(2013). New Higher Education Reforms in Kenya. INTERNATIONAL HIGHER EDUCATION, Number 73 Fall 2013 Pages 14- 16.https://ejournals.bc.edu/index.php/ihe/article/view/6110/5353
[17] Ntema. E. et al., Assessment standards (2006), Affiliated Health Training Institutions. Botswana
[18] Smith. C. (2021) Why should we bother with assessment moderation? Nurse Education today, Volume 32, issue 6 accessed from https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0260691711002723?via%3Dihub#! On 4/09/2021 @ 19:42 hours.
[19] University of South Australia (2020). How do you peer review online examinations? https://i.unisa.edu.au/siteassets/staff/tiu/documents/covid-19/peer-reviewing-your-online-examination.pdf

Patricia Mambwe, Jordan Tembo “Peer Reviewing of Electronic Examinations In Tertiary Institutions: Is It Being Done? A Case Study of Selected Three Higher Education Institutions- Lusaka, Zambia” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.295-299 November 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51120

Download PDF

pdf

Analysis of Theft and Allied Offences under the English Laws: The Many “Whys” That Make the Nigeria Jurisprudence Preferable?

Peter A. Ocheme- November 2021- Page No.: 300-311

By way of breaking away from the traditional convention of legal validity even without codification, more particularly with respect to criminal justice administration, the English Parliament has evolved a trend to continually review their laws relating to theft and allied offences alongside the speed by which the offences/crimes are technologically carried out. The research undertakes a doctrinal review of the genealogical improvements associated with the legal regimes vis-a-vis the technological appliances being employed by those who engage in these criminal activities, which includes the Internet… The discoveries are not only in respect of the changes interrelating between law and practical realities, but also in respect of the variety of properties – visible and invisible; tangible and intangible, and including Land, that are now capable of being stolen. The research also reveals that unlike the situations in England — not even Wales, let alone the United Kingdom as a whole — the Nigerian laws in respect of Theft and allied offences have remain as static as they were first drafted before Independence, whereas the technologies which aid and abet the commission of these offences are all put in use in Nigeria as in England. The contributions to knowledge to be derived from this study are in the sphere of the current scope of proprietary criminal laws in England which inversely mirrors their Nigerian contemporaries as rather lame ducks; while absurdly, they all seemingly are operating within the same Common Law and also the Commonwealth league of Nations.

Page(s): 300-311                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 December 2021

 Peter A. Ocheme
Professor, School of Law, American University of Nigeria, Yola, Adamawa State, Nigeria

References are not available

Peter A. Ocheme, “Analysis of Theft and Allied Offences under the English Laws: The Many “Whys” That Make the Nigeria Jurisprudence Preferable?” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.300-311 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/300-311.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Influence of Flood Risk Awareness Information on the Adaptive Behaviour of Residents in Flood Prone Areas in Southeast Nigeria

Gideon Uchechukwu Nwafor PhD- November 2021- Page No.: 312-324

Within the past decade, flood disaster had had a devastating effect on Nigerian communities destroying lives and property and displacing thousands of people. The aftermath of every flood disaster left marks to show that Nigeria has not put adequate mechanism in place to prevent and manage flood disaster occurrences especially in the flood prone areas. One major approach that can enhance proper mitigation of flood disasters is risk and behavioural change communication. This study, therefore, evaluated the influence of flood risk awareness information on the adaptive behavior of people living in flood prone areas in southeastern Nigeria. The main objective of the study was to ascertain if there is availability of flood risk awareness information, major source of information, influence of accessibility on diffusion, relationship between awareness, adoption, and adaptive behavior. Anchored on Reasoned Action Approach, Habermas’ Theory of Communicative Action and Media Synchronicity Theory, the researcher adopted the survey design in carrying out the study with a projected population of 21,298,033 and a sample size of 384 drawn using Krejcie and Morgan sample size determination table. Findings revealed that there is availability of flood risk awareness information which majority access mainly through radio/TV in form of early warning but limited or uneasy access to sources of flood risk awareness information hampers its diffusion which results to low adoption and affect their adaptive behavior. The researcher, therefore, recommended that community-based communication process using communication forms such as interpersonal, seminar; town hall meeting should be maximally utilized in creating disaster awareness and to complement effort of the TV and radio stations being used presently.

Page(s): 312-324                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 03 December 2021

 Gideon Uchechukwu Nwafor PhD
Department of Mass Communication, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University Igbariam, Anambra State, Nigeria

[1] Adelekan, I. O. and Asiyanbi, A. P. (2016). Flood risk perception in flood-affected communities in Lagos, Nigeria. Nat Hazards 80(1):445–469
[2] Aderogba, K.A (2012). Qualitative Studies of Recent Floods and Sustainable Growth and Development of Cities and Towns in Nigeria. International Journal of Academic Research in Economics and Management Sciences. 1(3), 1-25.
[3] Ahmad, F., Kazmi, S. F, and Pervez, T. (2011). Human response to hydro-meteorological disasters: A case study of the 2010 flash floods in Pakistan. Journal of Geography and Regional Planning, 4 (9), 518-524
[4] Albarracín, D., Johnson, B.T., Fishbein, M., & Muellerleile, P.A. (2001). Theories of reasoned action and planned behaviour as models of condom use: A meta-analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 127, 142-161.
[5] Dennis, A.R., Fuller, R.M. & Valacich, J.S., (2008). Media, tasks, and communication processes: A theory of media synchronicity. MIS Quarterly, 32(3), 575–600.
[6] Etuonovbe, A.K. (2011).The Devastating Effect of Flooding in Nigeria.” Hydrography and the Environment. A paper presented at the FIG Working Week. Marrakech, Morocco. 18-22
[7] Environment Agency (2015). Public dialogues on flood risk communication. Bristol: Environment Agency.
[8] Fishbein, M., and Ajzen, I. (2010). Predicting and changing behaviour: the reasoned action approach. New York, NY: Psychology Press.
[9] Green, C., & Penning-Rowsell, E. C., (2010). Stakeholder Engagement in Flood Risk Management. Flood Risk Science and Management, 372. Wiley.com
[10] Hagger, M.S., Chatzisarantis, N.L.D., & Biddle, S.J.H. (2002). A meta-analytic review of the theories of reasoned action and planned behaviour in physical activity: Predictive validity and the contribution of additional variables. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 24, 3-32.
[11] Habermas, J., (1984). The Theory of Communicative Action, Volume I. Boston: Beacon
[12] Höppner, C., Buchecker, M. and Bründl, M., (2010). Risk communication and natural hazards. CapHaz-Net WP5 report. Birmensdorf, Switzerland: Swiss Federal Research Institute
[13] Kievik, M., and Guttelin, J.M. (2011). Yes, we can: motivate Dutch citizens to engage in self- protective behaviour with regard to flood risks Natural Hazards 59(3):1475-90.
[14] Kittipongvises S. and Mino T. (2015). Perception and communication of flood risk: lessons learned about Thailand’s flood crisis of 2011. Applied Environmental Research, 37: 57-70.
[15] Laughery, K.R and Hammond, A. (1999). Overview of Warnings and Risk Communication. In Wogalter, M.S., DeJoy, D., & Laughery, K.R. (Eds.) (2005). Warnings and Risk Communication (pp 2-12). London: Taylor & Francis.
[16] McEachan, R. R. C., Conner, M., Taylor, N. J., and Lawton, R. J. (2011). Prospective prediction of health-related behaviours with the theory of planned behaviour: A meta-analysis. Health Psychology Review, 5(2), 97-144
[17] Mileti, D.S., Bandy, R., Bourque, L.B., Johnson, A., Kano, M., Peek, L., Sutton, J. and Wood, M. (2006). Annotated Bibliography for Public Risk Communication on Warnings for Public Protective Actions Response and Public Education (Revision 4). Natural Hazards Centre: University of Colorado at Boulder.
[18] Molinari, D. and Handmer, J. (2011). A behavioural model for quantifying flood warning effectiveness. Journal of Flood Risk Management, Vol. 4, No. 1 pp. 23-32
[19] Oke, M.O. Adeyinka, A.T. and Oluseyi, O.G. (2018). Media and disaster management: Analysing communication trends in flood-ravaged communities in Benue State, North Central Nigeria. Journal of Media and Communication Studies, Vol. 10(9), pp. 106-112,
[20] Okonkwo, A. U. and Onyeizugbe, R. U. (2017). Disaster Vulnerability, Severity of Flood Losses and Information Dissemination in Ogbaru Local Government Area of Anambra State, Nigeria. Int’l Journal of Advances in Agricultural & Environmental Engg. (IJAAEE) Vol. 4, Issue 1, pp. 194 – 198
[21] Olajuyigbe, A.E., Rotowa, O.O., and Durojaye, E. (2012). An Assessment of Flood Hazard in Nigeria: The Case of Mile 12, Lagos. Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences. 3(2), 367-375
[22] Olanrewaju, A. T. and Ahmad, R. (2016). Examining the information dissemination process on social media during the Malaysia 2014 floods using Social Network Analysis (SNA). Jurnal Teknologi (Sciences &Engineering) 78: 9–3, pp. 49–55
[23] Olawuyi, E. A and Adiamoh, A. G. (2015). Influence of Flood Risk Information on Perceived Risk Severity and Vulnerability among Inhabitants of Ibadan, South-West Nigeria. Journal of Communication and Media Research, Vol. 7 No. 1, pp 106-123
[24] Onwuka, S.U., Ikekpeazu, F.O. and Onuoha, D.C. (2015). Assessment of the Causes of 2012 floods in Aguleri and Umuleri, Anambra East Local Government Area of Anambra State. British Journal of Environmental Sciences Vol. 3 No. 1, pp. 44-57.
[25] O’sullivan, J., Bradford, R., Bonaiuto, M. S., Rotko, P., Aaltonen, et al., (2012). Enhancing flood resilience through improved risk communications. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences,12 (7), 2271-2282.
[26] Ottah, G. A., (2017). Impact of Radio Kogi’s Flood Disaster Awareness Campaign on Residents of Ibaji Local Government Area of Kogi State, Nigeria. International Journal of Arts and Humanities (IJAH) Ethiopia, Vol. 6(3), S/No 22, PP. 80-97
[27] Renn, O., (2008). Risk governance: coping with uncertainty in a complex world. Earthscan.
[28] Speller, G., (2005). Improving community and citizen engagement in FRM decision- making, delivery and flood response. Joint Defra/Environment Agency Flood and Coastal Erosion Risk Management R&D Programme, R&D Technical Report SC040033/SR3. Bristol: Environment Agency
[29] Waylen, K., Aaltonen, J., Bonaiuto, M., Booth, P, Bradford, R., Carrus, G., et al., (2011). URFlood – Understanding uncertainty and risk in communicating about floods. CRUE Final report II-7. 2nd CRUE Funding Initiative on Flood Resilient Communities.
[30] Woods, M.M., Mileti, D.S., Kano, M., Kelley, M.M., Regan, R. and Bourques, L.B., (2012). Communicating actionable risk for terrorism and other hazards. Risk Analysis, 32 (4), 601-615

Gideon Uchechukwu Nwafor PhD, “Influence of Flood Risk Awareness Information on the Adaptive Behaviour of Residents in Flood Prone Areas in Southeast Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.312-324 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/312-324.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

School Closure during Covid-19 and Likely Impact on Dropout Behavior in Bangladesh: A Theoretical Analysis

S.M. Shahidul – November 2021- Page No.: 325-330

Among the countries, with the highest number of days of full school closures, Bangladesh is in third position in worldwide and first in the Asian countries caused by Covid-19. And Bangladesh is in the 28th position where children are at moderate or high risk of drop out from education. Therefore, the foremost purpose of this study is to explore the theories of school dropout to find out the underlying factors of drop out for the children during prolonged school closer due to outbreak of Covid-19 in Bangladesh. Based on the study of BRAC, this study exhibits the current scenario of education during Covid-19, Students’ spending time during lockdown, rate and causes not for participating in distance learning in Bangladesh. This study also explores the dropout theories which are Finn’s developmental theory of high school dropout, structural strains theory, Tinto’s theory of institutional departure, academic mediation theory. This study observed that some of the factors which are particularly relevant to school dropout in online/distance education system.

Page(s): 325-330                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 03 December 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51121

 S.M. Shahidul
Department of Education, Pundra University of Science & Technology, Bogura, Bangladesh

[1] Battin-Pearson, S. & Newcomb, Michael D. & Abbott, Robert D. & Hill, Karl G. & Catalano, Richard F. & Hawkins, J. David & Pressley (2000). Predictors of early high school dropout: A test of five theories. Journal of Educational Psychology, Vol.92(3), pp.568-582.
[2] Bean, J.P., & Metzner, B.S. (1985). A conceptual model of nontraditional undergraduate student attrition. Review of Educational Research, 55(4), 485-540.
[3] Brown, K.M. (1996). The role of internal and external factors in the discontinuation of off-campus students. Distance Education, 17(1), 44-71
[4] Cole, R.A. (Ed.) (2000). Issues in web-based pedagogy: A critical primer. London: Greenwood Press.
[5] Coe, R., Weidmann, B., Coleman, R., & Kay, J. (2020). Impact of school closures on the attainment gap: Rapid evidence assessment. London: Education Endowment Foundation (EEF). Retrieved 8 August 2020 from https://dera.ioe.ac.uk/35707/1/EEF_%282020%29_
[6] Farmer, T.W., Estell, D.B., Leung, M.C., Trott, H., Bishop, J., & Cairns, B.D. (2003). Individual characteristics, early adolescent peer affiliations, and school dropout: An examination of aggressive and popular group types. Journal of School Psychology, 41, 217-232.
[7] Finn, J. D. (1989). Withdrawing from school. Review of Educational Research, 59 , 117–142.
[8] Giordano, P. C. (2003). Relationships in adolescence. Annual Review of Sociology, 29, 257–281. http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev.soc.29 .010202.100047
[9] Goodman, Joshua, Michael Hurwitz, and Jonathan Smith. 2017. Access to four-year public colleges and degree completion. Journal of Labor Economics 35(3):829–867.
[10] Jun, J. (2005). Understanding dropout of adult learners in e-learning.(Doctoral dissertation, University of Georgia, 2005)
[11] Kay, J., Ellis-Thompson, A., Higgins, S., Stevenson, J., & Zaman, M. (2020). Remote learning: Rapid evidence assessment. London/Cambridge: Education Endowment Foundation (EEF)/EdTechHub. Retrieved 8 August 2020 from https://edtechhub.org
[12] Kuhfeld, Megan, James Soland, Beth Tarasawa, Angela Johnson, Erik Ruzek, Jing Liu (2020), “Projecting the Potential Impacts of Covid-19 School Closures on Academic Achievement”, EdWorkingPapers No. 20-226, Annenberg (May), Brown University.
[13] Packham, G., Jones, G., Miller, C., & Thomas, B. (2004). E-learning and retention: Key factors influencing student withdrawal. Education & Training, 46(6/7), 335-342.
[14] Rovai, A.P. (2003). In search of higher persistence rates in distance education online programs. Internet and Higher Education, 6, 1-16
[15] Rowntree, D. (1995). Teaching and learning online: A correspondence education for the 21st century? British Journal of Educational Technology, 26(3), 205-215.
[16] Suh, S., Suh, J., & Houston, I. (2007). Predictors of categorical at-risk high school dropouts. Journal of Counseling and Development, 85, 196-203.
[17] Tinto, V. (1993). Leaving college: Rethinking the causes and cures of student attrition (2nd ed.). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
[18] Willging, P.A., & Johnson, S. D. (2004). Factors that influence students’ decision to dropout of online courses. Journal of Asynchronous Learning Network, 8(4), 105-118.

S.M. Shahidul, “School Closure during Covid-19 and Likely Impact on Dropout Behavior in Bangladesh: A Theoretical Analysis” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.325-330 November 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51121

Download PDF

pdf

Finance Act 2020 and Stability of Nigerian Banks

Clement Adewole, PhD, John Damak, Victor Odumu – November 2021- Page No.: 331-341

The health of financial institutions in Nigeria at any point in time revolves around the policies enacted by regulatory authorities. Furthermore, other factors that militate against ability of the regulatory authorities are political interference, instability, corruption and inconsistent monetary and fiscal policies. Interestingly, Nigeria introduced the Tax and Fiscal Law amendments bill (The Finance Act 2020) to address obsolete tax laws and align these laws with global best practices. This study did an appraisal of the implication of the Finance Act 2020 on the stability of banks in Nigeria. The study adopted a descriptive research design, a nonprobability judgment sample of 127 participants who are employees of 5 deposit money banks in Jos, the Plateau state capital. These bank employees responded to a re-validated 5 points Likert scale questionnaire. Data were analysed using quantitative techniques of spearman ranking correlation with aid of SPSSv25 to test the hypotheses. Results of statistical data analyses showed that CGTA Reform has significant effect on bank stability; CITA Reform has significant effect bank stability; and VATA Reform has significant effect on bank stability. The study concluded that a probable cause of the statistically significant positive relationships among the variables is the enormous potential benefits that comes with the reformed tax laws. The study recommended that some provisions of the Finance Act should be clear enough for individuals to understand tax laws, corporate taxes should be reduced to encourage corporate investment and then lastly it recommended that fiscal authorities should expand its VAT exempt list to include some services provided by banks in Nigeria which would ensure bank stability in Nigeria.

Page(s): 331-341                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 03 December 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51122

 Clement Adewole, PhD
Department of Banking and Finance University of Jos, Nigeria

 John Damak
Department of Banking and Finance University of Jos, Nigeria

 Victor Odumu
Department of Banking and Finance University of Jos, Nigeria

[1] Adegbie et al (2011). Company income tax and Nigerian economic development. European journal of social sciences, 22(2).
[2] Akpan, E.S. (2017). Banking System Stability and Return on Assets Relationship: Evidence from Nigeria. The Macrotheme Review. 6(1), pp. 46-55.
[3] Borio, C. (2014). Monetary policy and financial Stability: What role in prevention and recovery? Bank for International Settlement Working Papers, 440(1). https://doi.org/10.24149/gwp203
[4] CBN (2010): Financial Stability Report
[5] Chigbu, E. E. (2014); “A Cointegration of Value Added Tax and Economic Growth in Nigeria: 1994-2012”. International Journal of Management Sciences and Business Research.3(2); 95-103
[6] Fasina, H.T and Adegbite, T.A (2016) The Assessment of the Impact of Capital Gains Tax on Economic Growth in Nigeria, International Journal in Management and Social Science 4(8)
[7] Obayomi, W., & Salami, A. (2021). Finance Act 2020: Impact analysis. KPMG, 2-26. https://doi.org/kpmg.ng
[8] Ozili, P.K. (2019). Determinants of Banking Stability in Nigeria. CBN Bullion, 43(2), 2nd Quarter.
[9] The Nigerian Federal Government. (2021). Federal Republic of Nigeria official Gazette. Finance Act 2020, 108, pp. 1-81.
[10] Obayomi, W., & Salami, A. (2021). Finance Act 2020: Impact analysis. KPMG, 2-26. https://doi.org/kpmg.ng
[11] The Nigerian Federal Government. (2021). Federal Republic of Nigeria official Gazette. Finance Act 2020, 108, pp. 1-81.
[12] Ushie, V. (2010). Implementing the Fiscal Responsibilty Act at the state level in Nigeria . Centre for the Study of the Economies of Africa,10, 3-8.

Clement Adewole, PhD, John Damak, Victor Odumu “Finance Act 2020 and Stability of Nigerian Banks” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.331-341 November 2021 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51122

Download PDF

pdf

States’ Compliance to International Environmental Law Obligations: Study Based on Multilateral Environmental Agreements’ Performance in Kenya

Rose Nyangeri, Dr. Xavier Ichani- November 2021- Page No.: 342-345

States within the international system have always cooperated to attain a common good. The most common tool used to attain their goals is often treaties that make up International Laws. Environmental conservation has emerged as a key concern in the recent years with regard to sustainable development. States that ratify these treaties have to fulfil their obligations to ensure success of their goals. This can only be done through effective compliance. This study sought to gauge the performance of two key multilateral environmental Agreements (MEAs); Montreal Protocol and United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) within the domestic setup of a state party (Kenya). The study population consisted of 22 officials within the environmental sector selected through purposive and snowballing methods. Data was collected through one-on-one interviews and review of official documents and analysed through the use of computer software Nvivo. Effective Compliance in Kenya’s International law obligations was found to be reliant on the existing toolswithin the treaties, cooperation between the two government tiers and grassroot support framework.

Page(s): 342-345                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 03 December 2021

 Rose Nyangeri
Department of International Relations Conflict and Strategic Studies, Kenyatta University, Kenya

 RDr. Xavier Ichani
Department of International Relations Conflict and Strategic Studies, Kenyatta University, Kenya

[1] Bafundo NE. (2006). Compliance with the ozone treaty: weak states and the principle of common but differentiated responsibility. Am U Int L Rev. 21:461–495.
[2] Barrett. S., (2003). Environment and Statecraft: The Strategy of Environment Treaty-making. Oxford University Press
[3] Chayes, A, & Chayes, A. H. (1995). The new sovereignty: Compliance with international regulatory agreements. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press
[4] Declaration of the United Nations on the Human Environment, (Stockholm, 1972), U.N. Doc. A.CONF/48/14/REV.1; reprinted in 11 ILM 1417 (1972)
[5] Epstein, G., Pérez, I., Schoon, M., & Meek, C. L. (2014). Governing the invisible commons: Ozone regulation and the Montreal Protocol. International Journal of the Commons, 8(2), 337–360. DOI: http://doi.org/10.18352/ijc.407
[6] Goodman, R., & Jinks, D (2003). Toward an Institutional Theory of Sovereignty. Stanford Law Review, 55(5), 1749-1788. Retrieved June 2, 2020, from www.jstor.org/stable/1229563
[7] Government of Kenya (2018). State of the Environment Report 2015-2018. National Environment Management Authority, NEMA – Nairobi
[8] Handbook for the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer. (n.d.). 918.
[9] Henkin L., & Council on Foreign Relations (1968). How Nations Behave: Law and Foreign Policy. New York: Published for the Council on Foreign Relations [by] F.A. Praeger.
[10] Keohane, R & Martin, L. (1995). The Promise of Institutionalist Theory. International Security, 20(1), 39-51. doi:10.2307/2539214
[11] Kubai, E. (2019). Reliability and Validity of Research Instruments. UNICAF University-Zambia.
[12] Leedy, P. D., & Ormrod, J. E. (2013). Practical research: Planning and design. Boston: Pearson.
[13] Malgosia, F. (2009). Compliance with Multilateral Environmental Agreements. National Law School of India Review, 21(2), 1-38. Retrieved June 2, 2020, from www.jstor.org/stable/44283801
[14] McCombes, S. (2019). Sampling Methods | Types and Techniques Explained. Retrieved January 20, 2021, from https://www.scribbr.com/methodology/sampling-methods/
[15] Meyer, T. (2014). How Compliance Understates Effectiveness. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting (American Society of International Law), 108, 168-172. doi:10.5305/procannmeetsil.108.0168
[16] Sands, P., Peel, J., Fabra, A., & Mackenzie, R. (2012). Principles of international environmental law. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
[17] The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer. (n.d.). [UN Environmental Programme]. Retrieved May 25, 2020, from https://ozone.unep.org/treaties/montreal-protocol/amendments/london-amendment-1990-amendment-montreal-protocol-agreed

Rose Nyangeri, Dr. Xavier Ichani, “States’ Compliance to International Environmental Law Obligations: Study Based on Multilateral Environmental Agreements’ Performance in Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.342-345 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/342-345.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Customer Retention Determinants in Hospitality Industry in Nigeria; A Study of Customer Relationship Marketing

Anyionu, Samuel Chukwu PhD, Mmamel, Uchenna Zita PhD, Obasiabara, Beatrice Orieoma PhD – November 2021- Page No.: 346-353

The objective of the study was to determine the effects of customer relationship marketing on customer retention in some selected hotels in Enugu State, Nigeria. The study drew the population from the customers of the selected hotels in Enugu Metropolis to understand the factors that makes them to be retained in the industry. Data was generated from 200 customers out of which 173 copies of the structured questionnaire were returned and qualified for use. The analytical tools used for the study comprises of; simple tables, percentages, simple regression and statistical package for social sciences (SPSS version 20). The results obtained from the study revealed that customer care, affordable service, quality services, and customer satisfaction used as sub-variables for customer relationship marketing have positive and significant effects on customer retention in the hospitality industry in Enugu metropolis. Based on the findings, the study recommended to the management of the selected hotels in the industry to deliver consistent, reliable and dependable services to their customers to gain customers trust, understanding, confidence, patronage and willingness to ensure that customers’ needs are met during and after the services are delivered. The ability to retain customers depend on the past experience gained by customers after using the firm’s services. Also, the firms should provide adequate and better communication networks that will enable them to collect and handle all complaints arising from product use, develop and maintain effective and efficient after sale services to ensure periodic calls, and visit to keep customers informed of new offers and benefits, and consistently re-evaluate performance against standard to ensure that all promises made during the transaction are fulfilled. Customers are assets to every business organization and getting them satisfied after service use makes them to be retained and loyal to the organization.

Page(s): 346-353                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 03 December 2021

 Anyionu, Samuel Chukwu PhD
Marketing Department, Caritas University Amorji Nike Enugu, Nigeria

 Mmamel, Uchenna Zita PhD
Marketing Department, Institute of Management and Technology (IMT) Enugu, Nigeria

 Obasiabara, Beatrice Orieoma PhD
Marketing Department, Ebonyi State University Abakaliki, Nigeria

[1] Adeleke, A & Aminus, S.A (2012) The Determinants of Customer Loyalty in Nigeria’s G S M market, U S A, International Journal for Business and Social Science, 3. 14.www.ijbssnet.com
[2] Agbonifoh, B.A, Ogwo, E.O & Nnolim (2004). Marketing in Nigeria: Concepts, principles and Decisions; Aba: Afri-towers publishers limited
[3] Andaleeb, S. (1988) “determinants of customer satisfaction with hospitals: a managerial model”, international Journal of health care quality Assurance, Vol 11,6, 181-187.
[4] Aminu, A & Hartini, A (2008). Marketing Mix Drives of Clients Satisfaction in Technology enabled Service. Study of Nigerian GSM subscribers, communications of the IBIM 1,84-90
[5] Allred, T. A.,& Addams, H. L.(2000) Service quality at banks and credit unions; . What do their customers say?. Manage. Serv, Quality., 10(1),52-60.
[6] Berry, L.L (1996) Big Deals in Service Marketing, Journal of Consumer Marketing, Spring, 47-51
[7] Brassington, & Pettit, S. (2000 ) Principles of Marketing, 10th ed. London, prentice Hall 23(3),589-600
[8] Donabedian, A (1986) “criteria and standards for quality assessment and monitoring”, quality research bulletin, vol.12, no. 3, pp 99-108.
[9] Gerpott,T. J., Rams, w.& Schinder(2001) Customer Retention, Loyalty & Satisfaction in the German Mobile Cellular telecommunication Market. Telecommunication Policy., 25, 249-269
[10] Hansemark, O. C.& Albinson, M.(2004) Customer Satisfaction and retention; The experiences of Individual employees. Managing Service quality 14 (1), 40-57.
[11] Hoyer, E. D.,& MacInnis, D. J (2001) Consumer behavior, second edition Boston; Houghton Mifflin company.
[12] Isiaku, S.B. (2010). Subscribers Complaints and Response of the Global Satellite Mobile (GSM) Network Operators in Nigeria. An international Multi-Disciplinary Journal, Ethiopia. Vol.4(1).
[13] Kim, M. K., Park, M.C. and Jeong, D. M. (2004) “ The effects of customer satisfaction and switching barrier on customer loyalty in Korean Mobile telecommunication services” Electronics & telecommunications Research institute School of Business, Information and Communications University, Jusong-gu, Hwaam-doong, Taejon 305-348, South Koera.
[14] Kotler, P.& Keller, K,(2012) Marketing Management, 14th edition, Prentice Hall, Harlow, ISBN 10; 0273755021
[15] Kotler, P & Armstrong, G. (2010) Principles of Marketing, 13thed. Pearson education, Upper Saddle River New Jersey, USA.
[16] Lovelock, C.H (1996). Service Marketing (3rded ), Englewood Cliffs. N.J Prentice Hall.
[17] Martin, R, Oliver, S & Jacquelyn, S.T (2010) Customer Relationship Management and Firm’s Performance. The Mediating Role of Business Strategy” Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science. 38 ,326-346.
[18] Mellory, A & Barnett, S (2000). Building Customer Relationships: Discount Cards Work? Managing Service Quality, 10(6) , 347-355
[19] Melody, W.H.(2001) Policy objectives and models of regulation. Den private Ingeniorford (Ed). Telecom Reform Principles, Policies and Regulatory Practices, Technical University of Denmark,Lyngby.
[20] Lovelock, C.H (1996). Service Marketing (3rded ), Englewood Cliffs. N.J Prentice Hall.
[21] Mellory, A & Barnett, S (2000). Building Customer Relationships: Discount Cards Work? Managing Service Quality, 10(6) , 347-355
[22] Melody, W.H.(2001) Policy objectives and models of regulation. Den private Ingeniorford (Ed). Telecom Reform Principles, Policies and Regulatory Practices, Technical University of Denmark,
[23] Oyeniyi, O. and Joachim, A.A. (2008) “Customer Service in the retention of mobile phone user in Nigeria”. African Journal of Business Management 2(2): 26-31..
[24] Oyeniyi, O & Abiodun .A J (2008) Consumer service in the retention of mobile phone users in Nigeria’ African journal of business management, 2(2),26-31
[25] Ramphal, R.R. (2016). A complaint handling System for the hospitality industry. African Journal of hospitality, Tourism and Leisure, 5(2).
[26] Schiffman, L. & Kanuk, l (2007). Consumer behavior, New jersey; Pearson Education Inc
[27] Zeithaml, V. A., Bitner, M. & Gremler, D. D (2006) Service Marketing; Integrating Customer Focus across the firm. Singapore; Mc- Graw hill. 4th edition.

Anyionu, Samuel Chukwu PhD, Mmamel, Uchenna Zita PhD, Obasiabara, Beatrice Orieoma PhD, “Customer Retention Determinants in Hospitality Industry in Nigeria; A Study of Customer Relationship Marketing” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.346-353 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/346-353.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Access to and Diffusion of Climate Change Adaptation Information among Rice Farmers in Southeast Nigeria

Ijeoma Obi PhD & Gideon Uchechukwu Nwafor PhD- November 2021- Page No.: 354-365

This study investigated how access to and diffusion of agricultural information contributed to rice farmers’ adaptation to climate change and variability in Southeastern Nigeria. The major research problem this study sought to address was how information on adaptation to climate change and variability is accessed and diffused among rice farmers to enhance their adaptation to climate change. This problem was borne out of the fact that a lot of rice farmers keep lamenting about how their crops were washed away by floods and the effects of other climatic conditions which they do not have the solution to except finding a way to adapt and mitigate this global phenomenon known as climate change. Specifically, the study was designed to find out the extent of access to information which rice farmers in southeast Nigeria have on climate change adaptation and to know the channels of communication that is the major source of information on climate change adaptation. It also aimed at determining the relationship that exists between variables like access, diffusion, adoption of innovation and adaptation to climate change as well as as certain the factors that influence the adoption or non-adoption of innovation of climate change adaptation rice farmers in southeast Nigeria. The study was underpinned by Rogers’ Diffusion of Innovations theory. Survey method was adopted for the study with the questionnaire used to collect data. The study population was made up of rice farmers in Anambra, Enugu and Ebonyi states. A multistage sampling procedure was employed to select 900 respondents for the study involving both probability and nonprobability sampling methods. The key findings showed that rice farmers’ access to information on climate change adaptation was high and they identified periodical seminars and workshops organized by government extension workers and Non-Governmental organizations as their major sources of information on climate change adaptation. Apart from Radio which was found to be one of the major sources of information among the rice farmers, TV and newspaper were found not be effective in disseminating information on climate change adaptation to rice farmers in southeast Nigeria as most of them do not have access to the channels. The study, therefore, recommended that various channels of communication, especially radio, should be employed to disseminate information on climate change adaptation strategies to reach a broader audience.

Page(s): 354-365                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 December 2021

 Ijeoma Obi PhD
Department of Mass Communication, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Igbariam, Anambra State, Nigeria

 Gideon Uchechukwu Nwafor PhD
Department of Mass Communication, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Igbariam, Anambra State, Nigeria

[1] Abiodun. B.J, Lawal. K.A. Salami. A.T. & Abatan. A.A. (2013). Potential influences of global warming on future climate and extreme events in Nigeria. Regional Environmental Change, 13(31477-491.
[2] Agwu A.E., Ekwueme, J.N. and Anyanwu A.C. (2008). Adoption of improved agricultural technologies disseminated via radio farmer programme by farmers in Enugu State, Nigeria. African Journal of Biotechnology 7(9), pp. 1277-1286.
[3] ApataT.G., Samuel, K.D. & Adeola, A.O. (2009). Analysis of climate change perception and adaptation among arable food crop farmers in South-Western Nigeria. Contributed paper prepared for presentation at the International Association of Agricultural Economists’ 2009 Conference, Beijing, China.
[4] Chikozho, C. (2010). Applied social research and action priorities for adaptation to climate change and rainfall variability in the rain-fed agricultural sector of Zimbabwe. Physics and Chemistry of the Earth 35(13-14) pp. 780-790.
[5] Deressa, T. T., Hassan, R. M., Ringler, C. Alemu,T., & Yesuf, M. (2009). Determinants of farmers’ choice of adaptation methods to climate change in the Nile Basin of Ethiopia. Global Environmental Change, 19(2), 248-255.
[6] Elia, E. F. (2013). Information dissemination for adaptation to climate change and variability in the agriculture sector: the case of Maluga and Chibelela villages, Central Tanzania. Doctor of Philosophy Thesis. University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa.
[7] Gunasekera, D. (2011). Reducing impediments to adaptation. Paper presented at 40th Australian Conference of Economics, 11-13 Canberra, Australia. http://ace2011.org.au/ACE2011f Accessed 2 July 2019.
[8] Gwambene, B. (2007). Climate change and variability adaptation strategies and its implication on land resources in Rungwe District, Tanzania. Dar es Salaam: Dar es Salaam University Press.
[9] Ingram, K., Roncoli, C. and Kirshen. (2002). Reading the rains: local knowledge and rainfall forecasting in Burkina Faso. Society and Natural Resources: An International Journal 15(5) pp. 409-427.
[10] Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (2007). Working group II fourth assessment report: climate change impacts, adaptation and vulnerability. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
[11] Jones, L. (2010). Overcoming Social Barriers to Adaptation. Overseas Development Institute, (ODI) Background Note, www.odi.org.uk/50 years. Accessed January 2019.
[12] Kadi, M., Njau, L.N., Mwikya, J. and Kamga, A. (2011). The state of climate information services for agriculture and food security in East African countries. Climate Change Agriculture and Food Security Working paper 5. Copenhagen: Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIR).
[13] Kandji, S. and Verchot, L. (2007). Impacts of and adaptation to climate variability and climate change in the East African community: a focus on the agricultural sector. Word Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF)
[14] Kroemker, D., Mosler, H.J. (2002). Human vulnerability—factors influencing the implementation of prevention and protection measures: an agent based approach. In: Steininger, K.& Week Hannemann, H. (eds.), Global Environmental Change in Alpine Regions. Impact, Recognition, Adaptation, and Mitigation. Edward Elgar, Cheltenham 95-114.
[15] Maddison, D. (2006). The perception of and adaptation to climate change in Africa. CEEPA discussion paper No. 10. Centre for Environmental Economics and Policy in Africa, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
[16] Manda, P. (2002). Information and Agricultural development in Tanzania: a critique. Information Development 18 pp. 181-189.
[17] Mattews-Njoku, C.E, Adesope, O.M. and Iruba, C. (2009). Acceptability of improved crop production practices among rural women in Aguata agricultural zone of Anambra State, Nigeria. African Journal of Biotechnology 8(3) pp. 405-411.
[18] Mbah E.N. and Ezeano C.I, (2016). Climate Change Adaptation Measures Practiced by Rice Farmers in Benue State, Nigeria. International Journal of Trend in Research and Development, Volume 3(1), pp 382 – 385
[19] Mengistu, D. (2011). Farmers’ perception and knowledge of climate change and their coping strategies to the related hazards: case study from Adiha, Central Ethiopia. Journal of Agricultural Sciences 2(2) pp. 138-145.
[20] Mutekwa, V.T. (2009). Climate change impacts and adaptation in the agricultural sector: the case of smallholder farmers in Zimbabwe. Journal of Sustainable Development in Africa 11(2): 237-256.
[21] Munyua, H. and Stilwell, C. (2009). A mixed qualitative-quantitative participatory methodology: A study of the agricultural knowledge and information system (AKIS) of small-scale farmers in Kirinyaga district, Kenya. Library Management 31(1/2) pp. 5-18.
[22] Ngigi, S.N., Savenije, H.G., Rockstrom, J. and Gachene, C.K. (2005). Hydro-economic evaluation of rainwater harvesting and management technologies: Farmers’ investment options and risks in semi-arid Laikipia district of Kenya. Physics and Chemistry of the Earth 30, pp. 772-782.
[23] Nwammuo A. N. & Nwafor, G. U., (2019). Evaluation of Level of Awareness and Information Diffusion of Climate Change Adaptation Strategies among farmers. International Journal of Informatics, Technology & Computers. Volume 5, Issue 1, page 11 – 22
[24] Ogbozor, N. (2002), Alternative measures for coping with soi! erosion and poverty in Udi Communities, South-Eastern Nigeria. Retrieved from http://ogbozor2002.org.
[25] Olori, T. (2006). “Nigeria: Villages flee landslides.” Inter Press, Rodo, X,, “ENSO an Cholera: A Nonstationary Link Related to Climate Change?” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 99 (20), 1290-12906.
[26] Rogers, E.M. (2003). Diffusion of innovations. 5th ed. New York: Free Press.
[27] Roncoli, C. (2006). Ethnographic and participatory approaches to research on farmers’ responses to climate predictions. Climate Research 33:81-99.
[28] Roncoli, C., Orlove, B.S., Kabugo, M.R. and Waiswa, M.M. (2011). Cultural styles of participation in farmers’ discussions of seasonal climate forecasts in Uganda. Agriculture and Human Values 28(1) pp. 123-138.
[29] Salinger, J.M., Sivakumar, M.V.K. and Motha, R. (2005). Reducing vulnerability of agriculture and forestry to climate variability and change: workshop summary and recommendations. Climate Change 70, pp. 341-362.
[30] Smith, B. and Skinner, M. W. (2002). Adaptation options in agriculture to climate change: A typology. Mitigation and adaptation strategies for global change? pp.85-114.
[31] Smith, J. B. and Lenhart, S. (1996). Climate change adaptation policy options in vulnerability and adaptation of African ecosystem to global climate change, CR Special, vol. 6 (2), pp.23-34.
[32] Tarhule, A. A. (2007). Climate information for development: an integrated dissemination model. Africa Development 32(4) pp. 127-138.
[33] Umeje, E. (2010). Climate change: Nigerian media sleeping on duty. Retrieved from emeka umeje. WordPress.com/2012/01/.

Ijeoma Obi PhD & Gideon Uchechukwu Nwafor PhD, “Access to and Diffusion of Climate Change Adaptation Information among Rice Farmers in Southeast Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.354-365 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/354-365.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

An Assessment of Africa’s Philosophy of Local Electoral Democracy and its Ideology of Centralism

Ikemefuna Taire Paul Okudolo – November 2021- Page No.: 366-375

This study promotes the belief that Africa’s local electoral democracy is rooted more in an ideology of centralism and hegemonic desires of the higher tiers’ political elites over local administration. In this study, we contend that the local electoral democracy across Africa is in a state of crisis, producing practices at variance with the philosophy of Western liberal democracy which the continent pretends to imitate. Utilizing the political culture theory, the study’s argument is anchored on the evidence that the process of local electoral democracy across Africa rather emanates from an espoused political culture dictated by a desired centralizing ethos and inclinations of dominance of the local government by the higher political authorities, especially the state/provincial level. Its methodological construct is akin to the descriptive phenomenological qualitative research design. By analyzing observed experiences and documentary data using the qualitative content analysis approach, we contemplate the ingrained philosophy behind local electoral democracy in Africa as different from the idealistic sense of the democratic theory. The study’s findings accentuate the thesis that the actual African philosophy of local electoral democracy is not rooted in the ethos of Western liberal democracy, and thus democracy is largely lacking in African local government areas.

Page(s): 366-375                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 December 2021

 Ikemefuna Taire Paul Okudolo
Postdoctoral Research Fellow in African Studies in ILMA Entity
North West University (NWU), Mafikeng, South Africa

[1] Ajayi, A. F. A. (1982). Expectations of independence” in Daedalus, 111(2), p. 5.
[2] Ake, C. (1995). Democracy and development in Africa. Washington D.C.: Brookings Institute.
[3] Almond, G. A. (1993). Forward: The return to political culture. In L. Diamond (Ed.) Political culture and democracy in developing countries. Boulder, CO: Lynne Reinner.
[4] Apter, D. E. (1961). The political kingdom in Uganda: A study in bureaucratic nationalism. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
[5] Ayittey, G. B. N. (2010). Traditional institutions and the state of accountability in Africa. Social Research: An International Quarterly, 77(4), p. 1183-1210. Retrieved from https://philpapers.org/rec/AYITIA
[6] Braton, M., Mattes, R., & Boadi, G. (2005). Public opinion, democracy and market reform in Africa. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
[7] Broich, T., Szirmai, A., & Thomsson, K. (2015). Precolonial centralization, foreign aid and modern state capacity in Africa. UN Working Paper. Retrieved from https://www.merit.unu.edu/publications/working-papers/abstract/?id=5760
[8] Chemhuru, M. (2019). An African communitarian view of epistemic responsibility. Politikon: South African Journal of Political Studies, 46(1): 71-81.
[9] Chilton, S. (1988). Defining political culture. The Western Political Quarterly, 41 (3), pp. 419-445.
[10] Cypress, B. (2018). Qualitative research methods: A phenomenological focus. Dimensions of Critical Care Nursing, 37(6), pp. 302-309. Access from doi: 10.1097/DCC.0000000000000322
[11] Diamond, L. (1997). Is the third wave of democratization over? An empirical assessment. Working Paper 236, Publication of the Helen Kellogg Institute for International Studies. Access from https://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu › viewdoc › download
[12] Diamond, L., Linz, J. J., & Lipset, S. M. (1995). Introduction: What makes for democracy. In L. Diamond, J. J. Linz & S. M. Lipset (Eds.) Politics in developing countries: Comparing experiences with democracy (second edition). Boulder, London: Lynne Rienner Publishers.
[13] Ebinger, F., Grohs, S., Reiter, R., & Kuhlmann, S. (2011). Institutional decentralization polices as multi-level governance strategies: Evaluating the impacts of decentralization in Western Europe. In E. Ongaro, A. Massey, M. Holzer & E. Wayenberg (Eds.) Policy, performance and management in governance and intergovernmental relations: Transatlantic perspective. Cheltendown, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing Limited.
[14] Ekeh, P. P. (1989). Nigeria’s emergent political culture. In P. Ekeh, P. Dele-Cole & GO. Olusanya (Eds.) Nigeria since independence: The first 25 years, vol. v: Politics and constitutions. Nigeria: Heinemann Educational Books.
[15] Enemuo, F. C. (1999). Democracy, human rights and the rule of law. In R. Anifowose & F. Enemuo (Eds.) Elements of politics. Lagos: Sam Iroanusi Publications.
[16] Fombad, C. M. (2017). Some perspective on durability and change under modern African constitutions. In E. N. Sahle (Ed.) Democracy, constitutionalism and politics in Africa: Historical contexts, developments and dilemmas. London: Palgrave Macmillan.
[17] Hartmann, C. (2004). Local elections and local government in Southern Africa. Africa Spectrum, 39(2), pp. 223-248.
[18] Huntington, S. (1991). The third wave: Democratization in the late twentieth century. University of Oklahoma Press.
[19] Huntington, S. (1993). Political development in Ethiopia: A peasant-based dominant-party democracy? The Report to USAID/Ethiopia on Constitutions with the Constitutional Commission, 28 March – 1 April. Access from https://hollisarchives.lib.harvard.edu › object
[20] Himmelstrand, U., Kinyanjui, K., & Mburugu, E. (1994). In search of new paradigms. In U. Himmelstrand, K. Kinyanjui & E. Mburugu (Eds.) African perspectives on development: Controversies, dilemmas and openings. London: James Curry Ltd.
[21] Ihonvbere, J. O. (2003). Constitutions without constitutionalism? Towards a new doctrine of democratization in Africa. In J. M. Mbaku & J. O. Ihonvbere (Eds.) The transition to democratic governance in Africa: The continuing struggle. Westport, Connecticut: Praeger.
[22] International Crisis Group (commentary, 30 June, 2010). The dilemma of electoral assistance in Central Africa. Accessed from https://www.crisisgroup.org/africa/central-africa/burundi/dilemma-electoral-assistance-central-africa.
[23] Kanyinga, K., Kiondo, S. Z., & Tidemand, P. (1994). The new local level politics in East Africa: Studies on Uganda, Tanzania and Kenya. A Research Report No. 95 of the Scandinavian Institute of African Studies.
[24] Karl, T. L. (1995). The hybrid regimes of Central America. Journal of Democracy, 6(3), p. 72-86.
[25] Lauer, H. (2007). Depreciating African political culture. Journal of Black Studies, 38(2), p. 288-307.
[26] Linz, J., & Alfred, S. (1996). Towards consolidated democracies. Journal of Democracy, 7(2), p. 34-51.
[27] Mazrui, A. (1990). Eastern European revolutions: Africa origins? Trans Africa Forum, Issue 7, p. 3-11.
[28] Mbaku, J. M. (2003). Constitutionalism and the transition to democratic governance in Africa. In J. M. Mbaku & J. O. Ihonvbere (Eds.) The transition to democratic governance in Africa: The continuing struggle. Westport, Connecticut: Praeger.
[29] Mbaku, J. M. (1997). Institutions and reform in Africa: The public choice perspective. Westport, CT: Praeger.
[30] Mbaku, J. M., & Ihonvbere, J. O. (2003). Introduction: Issues in Africa’s political adjustment in the “new” global era. In J. M. Mbaku & J. O. Ihonvbere (Eds.) The transition to democratic governance in Africa: The continuing struggle. Westport, Connecticut: Praeger.
[31] Nohlen, D. (1996) Elections and electoral systems (2nd edition). India: Macmillan India Limited.
[32] Nyong’o, P. A. (2017). Electoral democracy and election coalitions in former settler colonies in Africa: Is democracy on trial or in reverse gear in Kenya, Cote d’Ivoire and Zimbabwe? In E. N. Sahle (Ed.) Democracy, constitutionalism, and politics in Africa: Historical contexts, developments and dilemmas. London: Palgrave Macmillan.
[33] Ntalaja, G. N. (2017). Major challenges of governance in Africa today. In E. N. Sahle (Ed.) Democracy, constitutionalism, and politics in Africa: Historical contexts, developments and dilemmas. London: Palgrave Macmillan.
[34] Obasanjo, O. (1989). Remarks to the conference on the democratic revolution. Paper presented as Proceedings of a Conference Sponsored by the National Endowment for Democracy, May 1-2, Washington D.C.
[35] Okonjo, I. M. (1974). British administration in Nigeria 1900-1950: A Nigerian view. New York: NOK Publishers.
[36] Okudolo, P. T. I. (2018). Credible local elections as an imperative for Nigeria’s democratization: Post-1999 diagnosis with prescriptions. EBSU Research Insight: Multidisciplinary Journal of Contemporary Issues,1(2): 1-15.
[37] Olowu, D., & Wunsch, J. S. (2004). Local governance in Africa: The challenges of democratic decentralization. Boulder, London: Lynne Rienner Publishers.
[38] Olson, M. (1993). Dictatorship, democracy and development. American Political Science Review, 87(3), p. 567-576. Doi:10.2307/2938736.
[39] Onuoha, B. (2004). Footnote on the military and democratic consolidation in Nigeria. In L. Olurode & R. Anifowose (Eds.) Democratization and the military in Nigeria. Publication of the Friedrich Ebert Stiftung. Lagos: Frankad Publishers.
[40] Pie, M. (1998). Is China democratizing? Foreign Affairs, 77(1), p. 68-82.
[41] Powell, B. G. Jr. (1982). Contemporary democracies: Participation, stability, and violence. Massachusetts: Harvard University Press.
[42] Reddy, P. S. (1999). Local government democratisation and decentralisation: Theoretical considerations, and recent trends and developments. In P. S. Reddy (Ed.) Local government democratisation and decentralisation: A review of the Southern African Region. South Africa: Juta & Co Ltd.
[43] Schmitter, P. C., & Terry, L. K. (1991). What democracy is and is not. Journal of Democracy, 2(3), p. 75-88.
[44] Schumpeter, J. (1947). Capitalism, socialism and democracy (2nd Edition). New York: Harper and Row.
[45] Schwarzmantel, J. (2008). Ideology and politics. Los Angeles: Sage Publication.
[46] Sekgoma, G. A. (1998). The nature and functions of chieftainship in contemporary Botswana: Possibilities for democratization. Gaborone: Pula Press.
[47] Spinrad, W. (1976). Ideology and opinion research in the context of sociology of knowledge. In B. N. Varma (Ed.) The new social sciences. Westport, Connecticut & London, England: Greenwood Press.
[48] Sundler, A. J., Lindberg, E., Nilsson, C. & Palmer, L. (2019). Qualitative thematic analysis based on descriptive phenomenology. Nursing Open, 6(3), pp. 733-739. Open Access: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/nop2.275
[49] Teshome, B. W. (2008). Democracy and elections in Africa: Critical analysis. International Journal of Human Sciences, 5(2), p. 1-14.
[50] Vaismoradi1, M., Jones, J., Turunen, H., & Snelgrove, S. (2016). Theme development in qualitative content analysis and thematic analysis. Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, 6(5), pp. 100-110.
[51] Vanhanen, T. (1990). The process of democratization: A comparative study of 147 states, 1980-1988. New York: Crane Russak.
[52] Vanhanen, T. (1997). Prospects of democracy: A study of 172 countries. London: Routledge.
[53] Vilakazi, H. E. (2002). African indigenous knowledge and development policy. Indilinga: African Journal of Indigenous Knowledge System, Vol 1, p. 1-5.
[54] Wamba-Dia-Wamba, E. (1994). Africa in search of a new mode of politics. In U. Himmelstrand, K. Kinyanjui & E. Mburugu (Eds.) African perspectives on development: Controversies, dilemmas and openings. London: James Curry Ltd.
[55] Welch, S. (2013). The theory of political culture. United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.
[56] Wekwete, K. (2007). Strengthening state performance through decentralized governance. In African Governance Forum (AGF VII) (Ed.) Building the capable state in Africa. Regional Bureau for Africa Publication. New York: U.N. Development Programme.
[57] Wilson, D., & Game, C. (2006). Local government in the United Kingdom. Basingstoke: Macmillan.
[58] World Bank (1996). African development report.. Washington D.C.: A World Bank Publication.

Ikemefuna Taire Paul Okudolo, “An Assessment of Africa’s Philosophy of Local Electoral Democracy and its Ideology of Centralism” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.366-375 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/366-375.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Adaption of Reduce, Reuse, Recycle (3RS) among market vendors in municipality of Santa Cruz, Davao del Sur

Mierabelle T. Esguerra, Roel Jr. D. Apas – November 2021- Page No.: 376-388

Waste generation in public markets have built up rapidly due to economic and population development which have resulted to harm the environment. This study was undertaken to determine the socio-demographic profile of market vendors specifically in terms of age, gender, civil status and ethnic origin, the adaption of reduce, reuse, and recycle of respondent’s base on socio-demographic profile, the problems encountered in solid waste management and the significant relationship between demographic profiles of the respondents.
The study was accomplished through the use of quantitative method in a correlational research design. A sample of 150 respondents in Santa Cruz Public Market, Davao del Sur were identified as the primary source of information through the use of total enumeration sampling technique. A self-administered structured questionnaire was used to collect the data which was developed by constructing a three part form, (1) demographic profile, (2) adaption of reduce, reuse, recycle (3R’s), (3) problems encountered in solid waste management. Data gathered from the survey were analyzed by the use of the following statistical tools mainly; mean, relative frequency, standard deviation, and analysis of variance (ANOVA).
Result showed that most of the respondents were female, 38-47 years of age, single, Cebuano in nature and been actively engaged in business operation for 5-15 years. Most of the respondents prefer to adapt the reduce practice followed by recycle and least was reuse. Furthermore, data showed that adaption to 3R practice varies on the demographic profile of the respondents. Highest age group who often adapt the 3R practices were from 48-57 years old (4.23), least were from the ages 28-37 years old (3.37) who tend to adapt sometimes. Based on the data, highest gender who often adapt the 3R practices were male (4.17) over female (3.64). In terms of civil status, separated (4.50) respondents denotes the highest to adapt the 3R practices and least were widow (3.28). Results also revealed that in terms of ethnic origin highest to adapt the 3R practices were the Tagalog (4.55) and least were Chinese (1). Highest to adapt the 3R practice in terms of number of years in business operation were 1-4 years (4.15) and least were 16-25 years (3.40). Accordingly, most common problems encountered involved in the storage facility sanitation, improper segregation, storing and disposal and inadequacy of storage facility as well as segregation. Most common solid waste respondents chose to reduce, reuse, and recycle were plastics and least were metals.
Hence, the study revealed that there is no significant relationship between demographic profile and its solid waste management. On the basis of these findings, the researcher suggested that the Local Government of Santa Cruz must develop an effective and efficient policy that can aid local implementation of waste minimization and conforms to the national law. Utilization of funds for public market maintenance, trainings, seminars and sanitation projects must be prioritize.

Page(s): 376-388                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 December 2021

 Mierabelle T. Esguerra
Master of Public Administration, Davao del Sur State College, Philippines

 Roel Jr. D. Apas
Master of Public Administration, Davao del Sur State College, Philippines

[1] Abarca, L, Maas G, Hogland W. (2013). Solid waste management challenges for cities in developing countries. Waste Manag. 2013;33:220–32.
[2] Andersson, C., Stage, J., (2018) . Direct and indirect effects of waste management policies on household waste behaviour: the case of Sweden. Waste Manage. 76,19–27.
[3] Ankitagarwal, Ashishsinghmar, Mukulkulshrestha, Atul K. Mittal, (2005). Municipal Solid Waste Recycling and Associated Markets in Delhi, Resources Conservation and Recycling, Vol: 44, No: 1, PP: 73-90.
[4] Aquino, A. P., Deriquito, J. A. P., &Festejo, M. A.(2013).Ecological solid waste management act: Environmental protection through proper solid waste practices.
[5] Babyebonela, T. W. (2013).Local resources management towards sustainable solid waste management: A case of Kinondoni municipality, Dar Es Salaam city.
[6] Beaty, C.(2013). An Introduction to the Three R’s of Sustainability
[7] Bolaane, B. (2006). Constraints to promoting people centred approaches in recycling. Habitat International, 30(4), 731-740.
[8] Clements, J. (2018).What are the 3R’s of Waste Management
[9] Conrad Luttropp, Jan Johanson, (2010).Improved Recycling with Life Cycle Information Tagged to the Product, Journal of Cleaner Production, Vol: 18, No: 4, PP: 346- 354
[10] Dangulla, M., and Kasimu, M. Y. (2016). A Systematic Analysis of Urban Sokid Waste Management in Nigeria. A Case Study o Sokoto Metropolis, Sokoto Journal of the Social Sciences 6(2) December, ISSN: Print 1595-2738, Online 2384-7654.
[11] Daniel K. Benjamin, (2003). Eight Great Myths of Recycling, Jane S. Shaw (Ed), PERC Policy Series, Issue Number Ps-28, the Center for Free Market Environmentalism, P: 1- 26, Available Online On PERC’s Website
[12] Davis, M. W. (2014). Examining the efficiency and equity of solid waste service production at the City level.
[13] Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA), (2012).South African Environment Outlook: Waste Management – Chapter 13. Pretoria: DEA.
[14] Godfrey, L. (2016).“Honouring Waste Management: Recycling Roadmap.” ReSource 18 (1):17-25.
[15] Greencape(2017).Waste Economy – (2017): Market Intelligence Report. Cape Town:Greencape.
[16] Guerrero L.A; Maas G. and Hogland W., (2013).Solid Waste Management Challenges for cities in developing countries Waste management Vol 33. pp220 – 232.
[17] Ibáñez-Forés, V., Bovea, M.D., Coutinho-Nóbrega, C., de Medeiros-García, H.R.,Barreto-Lins, R., (2018) . Temporal evolution of the environmental performance of implementing selective collection in municipal waste management systems in developing countries: a Brazilian case study. Waste Manage. (Oxford) 72, 65–77.
[18] International Solid Waste Association (ISWA)., (2015).Global Waste Management Outlook.Vienna: ISWA.
[19] Kun Yue, (2012).Comparative Analysis of Scrap Car Recycling Management Policies, The 7th International Conference on Waste Management and Technology, Procedia Environmental Sciences, Vol: 16, PP: 44- 50
[20] Lino F. A. M, and Ismail K. A. R, (2012). Analysis of Potential of Municipal Solid Waste in Brazil, Environmental Development, Vol: 4, PP: 105- 113
[21] Mawis, S. M. (2019). Solid Waste Mismanagement in the Philippines.Inquirer.Net.
[22] Mohan Yellishetty, Gavin M. Mudd, P. G. Ranjith, and a. Tharumarajah,(2011). Environmental Life Cycle Comparisons of Steel Production and Recycling: Sustainability Issues, Problems and Prospects, Environmental Science & Policy, Vol: 14, No: 6, PP: 650- 663.
[23] Nafiz, E.K., Cevat, Y., Yusuf, K., Megan, K.J., Ibrahim, D., (2017).Greenhouse gas contribution of municipal solid waste collection: a case study in the city of Istanbul, Turkey. Waste Manage. Res. 36, 131–139.
[24] National Statistics Office (NSO). (2011). “The official website of the NSO,” (accessed 8 March 2011).
[25] N.O. Adedipe, M.K.C. Sridhar, and Joe Baker, (2005).Ecosystems and Human Well-Being Policy Responses, Chapter 10: Waste Management, Processing and Detoxification, Millennium Ecosystem Assessment Series, Edition 1, Island Press, PP.313-334
[26] NSWMC (2015). National Solid Waste Management Status Report, Philippines.
[27] Oliveira, J.P., Doll, C., Kurniawan, T.A., Yong, G., Kapshe, M., Huisingh, D (2013). Promoting win-win situations in climate change mitigation, local environmental quality and development in Asian cities through co-benefits, Journal of Cleaner Production 58, 1–6.
[28] Oyoo, R. R. Leemans and A.P.J. Mol,. (2014). Comparison of Environmental performance for different waste management Scenarios in East Africa: The case of Kampala city Uganda, Habitat International Vol, 44, pp.349–357
[29] Pandey, A. (2013). Waste Processing.Waste Processing Techniques.
[30] Philippines-Canada Local Government Support Program(2003). Solid Waste Management: Options and Solutions at the Local Level, Volume 5 of Service Delivery with Impact: Resource Books for Local Government, Philippines-Canada Local Government Support Program, Philippines
[31] Poswa, T.T. (2001). A comparison of attitudes towards and practices of waste management in three different socio-economic residential areas of Umtata. Published Master’s Thesis, Durban University of Technology, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.
[32] Premakumara, D.G.J, Abe, M, Maeda, T., (2011).Reducing Municipal Waste Through Promoting Integrated Sustainable Waste Management (ISWM) Practices in Surabaya City, Indonesia, in Villacampa, Y, Brebbia, C.A (eds.): Eco System and Sustainable Development VIII, WIT Press, UK, pp. 457-470.
[33] World Bank, (2005)., Waste Management in China: Issues and Recommendations, East Asia Infrastructure Department Working
[34] United Nations Environment Programme“UNEP”, (2003).A Manual for Water and Waste Management: What the Tourism Industry Can Do to Improve its Performance, United Nations Publication, (ISBN: 92-807-2343-x), PP: 3-13.
[35] Taiwo, A. M., (2011). Composting as a sustainable waste management technique in developing countries. J Environ Sci Technol. 2011;4(2):93–102.

Mierabelle T. Esguerra, Roel Jr. D. Apas “Adaption of Reduce, Reuse, Recycle (3RS) among market vendors in municipality of Santa Cruz, Davao del Sur” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.376-388 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/376-388.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Influence of Reward System on Teacher Retention in Public Secondary Schools in Kamukunji Sub-County, Nairobi County, Kenya

Peter Kiio Manundu, Dr. Rose Mwanza and Dr. Janet Mulwa- November 2021- Page No.: 389-396

The study investigated the influence of reward system on teacher retention in public secondary schools in Kamukunji Sub-County, Nairobi County, Kenya. A descriptive research design was used. The study targeted 243 respondents consisting of 8 secondary school principals and 235 teachers. A census of 8 school principals was done and stratified sampling method was used. The sample size was 71 teachers. A pilot study was carried out in 1 public secondary school within Starehe Sub-County schools. involving 8 respondents who were purposively selected. Content validity was used to ensure validity. Reliability was measured using Pearson moment correlation formula. Quantitative data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and presented using bar graphs, pie charts and cross tabulation tables. Qualitative data was analysed thematically based on study objectives and presented in narrative form. The study found that there is a significant influence of reward system on teacher retention in Kamukunji Sub-County, Nairobi County, Kenya. According to the findings, 71.5% of principals firmly believe that reward system builds a positive school culture which makes teachers to be more willing to put forth extra effort on important tasks. The study concluded that reward systems are critical for motivating teachers and increasing retention. Furthermore, the study concluded that reward systems foster a positive school culture by putting teachers in a position to do more and improve their work performance. The study recommends that the school management should take stock of current reward practices and take corrective and preventive actions to reduce teacher turnover. The school should consider proving more creative financial and non-financial rewards to attract and retain teachers.

Page(s): 389-396                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 December 2021

 Peter Kiio Manundu
Master of Education Student, South Eastern Kenya University

 Dr. Rose Mwanza
Lecturer, South Eastern Kenya University

 Dr. Janet Mulwa
Lecturer, South Eastern Kenya University

[1] Armstrong M. & Murlis H. (2017). Rewards Management: A Hand book of Remuneration Strategy and Practice Clays Ltd, St Ives plc. Fifth edition
[2] Armstrong, M. (2010). Armstrong’s essential human resource management practice: A guide to people management. Journal of accounting and economics, 50(2-3), 179 – 234
[3] Baumeister, R. F. S., & Voh, K. D. (2014). Handbook of Self regulation: Research, theory and applications. New York: Guilford Press
[4] Bhattacharya, M. (2009). Role of intrinsic and extrinsic factors in user social media acceptance within workspace: Assessing unobserved heterogeneity. International Journal of Information Management, 37(2), 1-13.
[5] Boyd, D., Lankford, H., Loeb, S., Ronfeldt, M., & Wyckoff, J. (2011). The effect of school neighborhoods on teacher retention decisions (Working paper). Retrieved July 10, 2010, from http://www.stanford.edu/~sloeb/papers/ Neighborhoods%2006Jan2010.pdf
[6] Chandler, J. (2015). The role of location in the recruitment and retention of teachers in international schools. Journal of Research in International Education, 9(3), 214-226.
[7] Chiang, F. & Birtch, T. (2013). Appraising performance across borders: An empirical examination of the purposes and practices of performance appraisal in a multi-country context. Journal of Management Studies, 47(7), 1365-1393
[8] Chitimwango, M. (2016). Effects of Reward System on Teacher Performance: A Case of Three Secondary Schools in Kasama District, Zambia. Master’s of Education , Zambia University
[9] Dewhurst, M., Guthridge, M. & Mohr, E. (2010). Motivating people: getting beyond money. McK- insey Quarterly, (1), 12-15
[10] Dworkin, A., Saha, L., & Hill, A. (2017). Teacher burnout and perceptions of a democratic school environment. International Education Journal, 4(2), 108-120
[11] Elfers, A. M., Plecki, M. L., & Knapp, M. S. (2016). Teacher mobility: Looking more closely at” the movers” within a state system. Peabody Journal of Education, 81(3), 94-127
[12] Fuhrmann, T. D. (2016). Motivating Employees. Advances in Diary Technology, 1(8), 67 – 84
[13] Gatere, M. S. (2015). Teachers’ perception of the performance based rewards and commitment in public secondary schools In kikuyu sub-county (Doctoral dissertation, University of Nairobi).
[14] Gerritsen, S., Kuijpers, S., & Vandersteeg, M. (2019). The effects of higher teacher pay on teacher retention (No. 316. rdf). CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
[15] Government of Kenya (2008). Ministry of Education report on Teacher Retention rate
[16] Harpaz, I. (1990). The importance of work goals: An international perspective. Journal of international business studies, 21(1), 75-93.
[17] Harris, D. N. & Adams, S. J. (2018). Understanding the level and causes of teacher turnover: A comparison with other professions. Economics of Education Review, 26(3), 325-337
[18] Herzberg, F. (1964). The Motivation-Hygiene Concept and Problems of Manpower. Personnel Administrator, (27), 3-7
[19] Hughes, G. D. (2017). Teacher retention: Teacher characteristics, school characteristics, organizational characteristics, and teacher efficacy. The Journal of Educational Research, 105(4), 245-255
[20] Iddah, K. Nicholas, M. M., & Thinguri, R. (2014). An evaluation of the effectiveness of school based reward systems in enhancing teacher performance in secondary schools in Kenya. International Journal of Education and Research, 2(4), 463 – 474
[21] Ingersoll, R. M., Merrill, L., & May, H. (2017). Retaining teachers: How preparation matters. Educational Leadership, 69(8), 30-34.
[22] Kituyi, I., Musau, N. M., & Thinguri, R. (2014). An evaluation of the effectiveness of school based reward systems in enhancing teacher retention in secondary schools in Kenya. International Journal of Education and Research, 2(4), 463 – 474
[23] Makhuzeni, B., & Barkhuizen, E. N. (2015). The effect of a total rewards strategy on school teachers’ retention. Journal of Human Resource Management, 13(1), 12 – 23
[24] Misra, P., & Dixit, V. (2013). Compensation: Impact of Rewards, Organizational Justice on Job Satisfaction and Turnover Intentions in Retail Store Operations–A Study of Delhi and NCR. In Proceedings of the Inter-national Conference on Business Management and Information Systems, 4(1), 213 – 225
[25] Muralidharan, K., & Sundararaman, V. (2011). Teacher performance pay: Experimental evidence from India. Journal of political Economy, 119(1), 39-77.
[26] Naveda, H. (2016). The impact of reward on teachers’ retention at secondary level in Malaysia. Educational International Journal, 1(2), 45 – 56
[27] Ohba, A. (2011). The abolition of secondary school fees in Kenya: Responses by the poor. International Journal of Educational Development, 31(4), 402-408
[28] Robbins, S. P., & Judge, T. (2007). Organizational Behavior, 13th edition
[29] Shakir, N., & Zamir, S. (2013). Impact of Reward on Teachers’ Performance at Secondary Level. Journal of Education and Practice, 5(4), 107 – 112
[30] Sichari, M., Odera, F., & Okello, L. M. (2017). Impact of reward system on retention of secondary school teachers’ in Homa Bay County of Kenya. International Journal of Academic Scientific Research, 5(1), 227-236
[31] Sunday, D. A. F. (2018). Salary Structure and Teacher Retention in Secondary Schools in Oyo State, Nigeria. Journal of Education, 2(1), 23 – 39
[32] TSC Strategic Plan, 2015-2019: www.tsc.go.ke
[33] Tumaini, M. (2015). The contribution of non-monetary incentives to Teachers Retention in Public Secondary Schools in Korogwe Urban (Doctoral dissertation, The Open University of Tanzania).
[34] Wilson, N. J. (2010). New Zealand highrisk offenders: Who are they and what are the issues in their management and treatment? New Zealand. Department of Corrections Psychological Service
[35] Zingheim, M., & Schuster, N. (2015). Total rewards and retention: Case study of higher education institutions in Pakistan. Procedia-Social and Behavioral Sciences, 2(1), 251 – 259.

Peter Kiio Manundu, Dr. Rose Mwanza and Dr. Janet Mulwa, “Influence of Reward System on Teacher Retention in Public Secondary Schools in Kamukunji Sub-County, Nairobi County, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.389-396 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/389-396.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Nile-Horn Nexus: Is a New Shatter Belt in the Making?

Aklilu Gebretinsae Andemikael – November 2021- Page No.: 397-403

By using a Shatter Belt Theory as a conceptual framework and a qualitative analysis, this research attempts to answer the question if a new shatter-belt region is in the making as a result of the growing connection between the Nile water politics, the geo politics of the Horn of Africa and presence of foreign powers in the Nile-Horn Region.
A Shatter Belt Theory provides the opportunity to critically expound various patterns of interactions within a certain region that is endowed with plentiful natural resources, has geostrategic importance, gulped in interstate and intrastate conflicts and when these fundamental reasons cumulatively make the region prone to a number of interventions by both regional, extra-regional and global powers.
This research concludes that the Nile-Horn region has all the core elements that all Shatter Belt regions have. The abundant water resources and other natural resources it has; its strategic importance; the multi-dimensional conflicts among states and within the states; as well as the pervasiveness of intervention from regional and extra-regional states all make this Region quite similar with its neighboring shatter belt regions of Sub-Saharan Africa and the Middle East. Hence, the Nile-Horn fits to be called a shatter belt region.

Page(s): 397-403                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 December 2021

 Aklilu Gebretinsae Andemikael
PhD Candidate, Department of International Relations, School of International and Public Affairs, Jilin University, People’s Republic of China

[1] Abdi, R. (2017). A Dangerous Gulf in the Horn: How the Inter-Arab Crisis Is Fuelling Regional Tensions. International Crisis Group. August 3. 2017https://www.crisisgroup.org/middle-east-north-africa/gulf-andarabian-peninsula/dangerous-gulf-horn-how-inter-arab-crisis-fuelling-regional-tensions.
[2] Al Taweel, A. ( 2020). Sudan -Red Sea basin: Four ways to make or break stability. The Red Sea Dynamics Part 8: The Africa Report. Wednesday, December, 2 2020 10:02. Accessed on 22 April, 2021 2GMT. https://www.theafricareport.com/51998/sudan-red-sea-basin-four-ways-to-make-or-break-stability/
[3] Beyene, A. D.(2020). The Horn of Africa and the Gulf: Shifting power plays in the Red Sea. The Red Sea Dynamics Part 4: The Africa Report. Wednesday, 2 December 2020. Accessed on 22 April 2021 2 GMT. https://www.theafricareport.com/50499/the-horn-of-africa-and-the-gulf-shifting-power-plays-in-the-red-sea
[4] Bruton, Bronwyn (2021). Eritrea: Coming In from the Cold. Atlantic Council. December 2016: downloaded from 222.27.72.49 on Tue, 02 Mar 2021 15:17:09 UTC;
[5] Clapham, C. (2017) . The Horn of Africa. State Formation and Decay. Oxford University Press, 2017
[6] Cohen, S. B. (2015). Geopolitics: The Geography of International Relations. Maryland, Rowman and Littlefield, 3rd ed.
[7] De Waal, A. ( 2020). The Red Sea: A vital artery for the world economy. The Red Sea Dynamics. Part 3. The Africa Report. Wednesday, 2 December 2020 09:58. Accessed on 22 April, 2021 2GMT. https://www.theafricareport.com/50046/the-red-sea-a-vital-artery-for-the-world-economy/
[8] Elhance, A.P. (1997). Conflict and Cooperation over Water in the Aral Sea Basin. Studies in Conflict and Terrorism. Vol. 20, No. 2. 1997:
[9] Elmi, A., and Mohammed, S. (2016). The Role of the GCC Countries in Ending Piracy in the Horn of Africa. Arab Center for Research & Policy Studies . Sep 2016 downloaded from 222.27.72.49 on Tue, 02 Mar 2021 15:33:58 UTC
[10] Estelle, E. (2018). Ethiopia’s Strategic Importance: US National Security Interests at Risk in the Horn of Africa. American Enterprise Institute (AEI). September 12, 2018
[11] White, G.W. (2009). Irredentism: Frostburg State University, Frostburg, MD, USA.
[12] Kameri-Mbote, P. (2007). Water, Conflict and Cooperation: Lessons from the Nile River Basin, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Navigating Peace no. 4. 2007 p: 24
[13] Li, A., et al (2016). African Studies in China in the 21st Century: A Historiographical Survey. Brazilian Journal of African Studies, 1, no. 2. 2016. pp:48–88.
[14] Mahmood, S. O. (2019). Competition, Cooperation and Security in the Red Sea. Institute for Security Studies. East Africa Report 24, August. 2019.
[15] Markakis, J. (2003). The Horn of Conflict. Review of African Political Economy. Sep. 2003. pp: 359-362
[16] Maru, M.T. (2017). A Regional Power in the Making: Ethiopian Diplomacy in the Horn of Africa. South African Institute of International Affairs. June 2017. Downloaded from 222.27.72.49 on Tue, 02 Mar 2021 15:18:10 UTC
[17] Mourad, H. (2019). Bab Al-Mandeb Strait: Sino-American duel in the Red Sea. Thursday 3 Jan 2019 ahramonline https://english.ahram.org.eg/News/321123.aspx
[18] Servant, J. C. ( 2009). China’s Trade Safari in Africa. Le Monde Diplomatique. http://mondediplo.com/2005/05/11chinafrica: 2009, accessed 18 March 2021
[19] Shinn, D. (2018). Red Sea Region, Competing Outside Powers Complicate U.S. Interests. The United States Institute of Peace. Wednesday, December 19, 2018 https://www.usip.org/publications?publication_type%5B0%5D=12
[20] Shinn, D. (2020). The Red Sea: A magnet for outside powers vying for its control. The Red Sea Dynamics Part 9: The Africa Report. 27 November 2020 11:52. Accessed on 22 April, 2021 2GMT https://www.theafricareport.com/52152/the-red-sea-a-magnet-for-outside-powers-vying-for-its-control/
[21] Sola-Martin, A. (2020). Ports, military bases and treaties: Who’s who in the Red Sea? The Red Sea Dynamics Part 2. The Africa Report. 2 December 2020 09:56. Accessed on 22 April, 2021 2GMT https://www.theafricareport.com/49957/ports-military-bases-and-treaties-whos-who-in-the-red-sea/.
[22] Wolf, A. (1996). Middle East Water Conflicts and Directions for Conflict Resolution. Food, Agriculture, and the Environment Discussion Paper 12. International Food Policy Research Institute. March, 1996. P: 3
[23] World Population Review (2021). www.wpr.org visited on April 10, 2021
[24] Zeitoun, M. and Warner, J. (2006). Hydro-hegemony: A Framework for Analysis of Transboundary Water Conflicts. Water Policy. vol 8, no 5, 2006 pp:435–460
[25] Zulfqar, S. (2018). Competing Interests of Major Powers in the Middle East: The Case Study of Syria and Its Implications for Regional Stability. Journal of International Affairs: Spring, 2018 Vol XXIII- no 1.Centre for Strategic Research

Aklilu Gebretinsae Andemikael , “The Nile-Horn Nexus: Is a New Shatter Belt in the Making?” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.397-403 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/397-403.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Utilization of Field Trips in the Teaching of Social Studies in Colleges of Education in the Volta Region, Ghana

Comfort Adjoa Addo- November 2021- Page No.: 404-412

The aim of the study was to examine how field trips could be utilized in the teaching of Social Studies in Colleges of Education in the Volta Region of Ghana. In this regard, four research questions were formulated to guide the study. To answer these research questions, the researcher adopted the descriptive survey approach for the study. Thus, the researcher collected and analysed data quantitatively. The population of the study included Social Studies tutors and students of Social Studies department in the Colleges of Education in the Volta Region. The purposive sampling technique was employed to select 35 tutors while the simple random sampling method was used to select 316 students. Data were collected using two sets of questionnaires. The data were analysed using frequency counts and percentages and presented using tables and charts. The findings of the study revealed that the main methods of integrating field trips is to embark on field trips as stated by about 91.4% of the tutors and 91.2% of the students. The findings also revealed the use of virtual reality animations and models. In addition, the study revealed that majority of the students have positive perception about field trips since 73.7% of them prefer field trips that are more educational than fun. However, 65.7% of tutors stated otherwise. Further, 94.3% of the tutors and 79.5% of the students indicated that organising field trips is stressful. It has been recommended that appropriate procedures are adopted for students and tutors in order to facilitate the organisation of field trips.

Page(s): 404-412                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 06 December 2021

 Comfort Adjoa Addo
Department of Social Sciences, Accra College of Education, Ghana

[1] Ahmed, S. (2011). Improving cognitive development in secondary chemistry through Gagne’s Events of Instruction. Journal of Education and Practice, 2(4), 140-148.
[2] Amineh, R. J., & Davatgari, H. (2015). Review of Constructivism and Social Constructivism. Journal of Social Sciences, Literature and Languages, 1(1), 9-16,
[3] Anderson, L. H. (1999). Speak. New York, NY: Viking/Penguin.
[4] Ary, D., Jacobs, L., & Razavieh, A. (2006). Introduction to Research in Education. Fort Worth, TX: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc.
[5] Ayaaba, D. A., & Odumah, L. K. (2007). Skills and Techniques of Teaching Social Studies. Cape Coast, Ghana: Yaci Publication.
[6] Bamberger, Y., & Tal, T. (2007). Learning in a personal context: Levels of choice in a free choice learning environment in science and natural history museums. Science Education, 91(1), 75-95.
[7] Beaudoin, M. N., & Taylor, M. (2004). Breaking the Culture of Bullying and Disrespect, Grades K-8: Best practices and successful strategies. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
[8] Bitgood, S. (1989). School field trips: An overview. Visitor Behavior, 4(2), 3-6.
[9] Boyle, M. P., Schmierbach, M., Armstrong, C. L., McLeod, D. M., Shah, D. V., & Pan, Z. (2004). Information seeking and emotional reactions to the September 11 terrorist attacks. Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, 81(1), 155-167.
[10] Csikszentmihalyi, M., & Hermanson, K. (1995). What makes visitors want to learn? Intrinsic motivation in museums. Museum News, 74(3), 34-37.
[11] Derry, S. (1996). Cognitive schema theory in the constructivist debate. Educational Psychologist, 31(3) 163–74.
[12] Dewey, J. (1938). The pattern of inquiry. The Essential Dewey, 2, 169-179.
[13] Dubey, D. L., & Berth, J. C. (1980). Social Studies: The enquiry method approach. Lagos, Nigeria: Thomas Nelson (Nig.) Ltd.
[14] Falk, J. H., & Dierking, L. D. (1997). School field trips: Assessing their long‐term impact. Curator: The Museum Journal, 40(3), 211-218.
[15] Falk, J., & Balling, J. (1980). The school fieldtrip: Where you go makes a difference. Science and Children, 17(6), 6-8.
[16] Ferry, B. (1995). Enhancing environmental experiences through effective partnerships among teacher educators, field study centers, and schools. The Journal of Experiential Education, 18(3), 133-137.
[17] Gagne, R. M., Wager, W. W., Golas, K. C. & Keller, J. M (2005). Principles of Instructional Design (5th ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.
[18] Gilbert, J., & Priest, M. (1997). Models and discourse: A primary school science class visit to a museum. Science Education, 81(6), 749-762.
[19] Good, T. L., & Brophy, J. E. (1990). Educational Psychology: A realistic Approach, (4th ed.) White Plains, NY: Longman.
[20] Gross, R. E; Messick, R.; Chaplin, J. R. & Sutherland, G. (1981). Social Studies for our times. Toronto, Canada: John Wiley.
[21] Hanson, R., & Asante, J. N. (2014). An exploration of experiences in using the hybrid MOODLE Approach in the delivery and learning situations at the University of Education, Winneba, Ghana. Journal of Education and Practice, 5(12), 18-24.
[22] Hug, J. W., & Wilson, P. J. (1965). Curriculum Enrichment Outdoors. Evanston, IL: Harper & Row.
[23] Kern, E., & Carpenter, J. (1984). Enhancement of student values, interests, and attitudes in earth science through a field-oriented approach. Journal of Geological Education, 32, 299-305.
[24] Krepel, W. J., & Duvall, C. R. (1981). Field trips: A guide for planning and conducting educational experiences. Washington, DC: National Education Association.
[25] Lahey, B. B. (2004). Psychology: An introduction (8th ed.). Boston, MA: McGraw Hill.
[26] Lei, S.A. (2010a). Assessment practices of advanced field ecology courses. Education, 130(3), 404-415.
[27] Lei, S.A. (2010b). Field trips in college biology and ecology courses: Revisiting benefits and drawbacks. Journal of Instructional Psychology, 37(1), 42-48
[28] Mackenzie, A., & White, R. (1981). Fieldwork in geography and long-term memory structures. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association, Los Angeles, CA.
[29] Martorella, P. (1985). Elementary Social Studies: Development reflective, competent and concerned citizens. Boston, MA: Little Brown Company.
[30] Meredith, J. E., Fortner, R. W., & Mullins, G. W. (1997). Model of affective learning for nonformal science education facilities. Journal of Research in Science Teaching: The Official Journal of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching, 34(8), 805-818.
[31] Michie, M. (1998). Factors influencing secondary science teachers to organize and conduct fieldtrips. Australian Science Teacher’s Journal, 44(4), 43-50.
[32] Miglietta, A. M., Belmonte, G., & Boero, F. (2008). A summative evaluation of science learning: A case study of the Marine Biology Museum “Pietro Parenzan” (South East Italy). Visitor Studies, 11(2), 213-219.
[33] National Council for Social Studies (1992). National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies: Executive Summary. Retrieved from https://www.socialstudies.org/standards /execsummary.
[34] Ngussa, B. M. (2014). Gagne’s Nine Events of Instruction in Teaching-Learning Transaction: Evaluation of Teachers by High School Students in Musoma-Tanzania. International Journal of Education and Research, 2(7), 1-11.
[35] Okunloye, R. W. (1988). Teachers Perception of the Concept and purpose of Social Studies in Secondary Schools in Ilorin LGA of Kwara State. University of Ilorin, (Unpublished Master’s Dissertation), Ilorin, Nigeria.
[36] Orion, N. (1993). A model for the development and implementation of field trips as an integral part of the science curriculum. School Science and Mathematics, 93(6), 325-331.
[37] Orion, N., & Hofstein, A. (1994). Factors that influence learning during a scientific field trip in a natural environment. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 31(10), 1097-1119.
[38] Piaget, J. (1937). La construction du réel chez l’enfant. Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net.
[39] Quartey, S. M. (1984). Methods book for Social Studies. Lagos, Nigeria: Orit Egwa Ltd.F
[40] Quashigah, A. Y., Kankam, B., Bekoe, S. O., Eshun, I., & Bordoh, A. (2015). Teacher-trainees’ varying curriculum conceptions of Social Studies in the Colleges of Education (CoE) in Ghana. American Journal of Social Science Research, 1(3), 125-135.
[41] Reiser, R. A & Dempsey, J. V. (2007). Trends and issues in instructional design and technology (2nd ed.). New Jersey: Pearson Education, Inc.
[42] Rennie, L. (2007). Values of science portrayed in out-of-school contexts. In The re-emergence of values in science education (pp. 197-212). Brill Sense.
[43] Rix, C., & McSorley, J. (1999). An investigation into the role that school-based interactive science centres may play in the education of primary-aged children. International Journal of Science Education, 21(6), 577-593.
[44] Salmi, H. (2003). Science centres as learning laboratories. International Journal of Technology Management, 25(5), 460-475.
[45] Simon, H. A. (2001). Learning to research about learning. In Cognitionand instruction, S. M. Carver & D. Klahr (Eds), (pp. 205–26). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
[46] Spiro, R. J., Feltovich, P. J., Jacobson, M. J., & Coulson, R. L. (1992). Cognitive flexibility, constructivism, and hypertext: Random access instruction for advanced knowledge acquisition in ill-structured domains. In L. P. Steffe & J. E. Gale (Eds.), Constructivism in education, (pp. 121–128). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
[47] Storksdieck, M., Robbins, D., & Kreisman, S. (2007). Results from the quality field trip study: Assessing the LEAD program in Cleveland, Ohio. Cleveland, OH: Summit Proceedings.
[48] Suhendi, A., & Purwarno, P. (2018), “Constructivist learning theory: the contribution to foreign language learning and teaching” in The 1st Annual International Conference on Language and Literature, KnE Social Sciences & Humanities, pp. 87–95. DOI 10.18502/kss.v3i4.1921
[49] Tal, R. T., & Morag, O. (2009). Reflective practice as a means for preparing to teach outdoors in an ecological garden. Journal of Science Teacher Education, 20(3), 245-262.
[50] Tal, T., & Steiner, L. (2006). Patterns of teacher–museum staff relationships: School visits to the educational center of a science museum. Canadian Journal of Science, Mathematics and Technology Education, 6, 25–46.
[51] Tschannen-Moran, M., & Gareis, C. (2015). Principals, trust, and cultivating vibrant schools. Societies, 5(2), 256-276.
[52] Wellington, J. (1990). Formal and informal learning in science: The role of the interactive science centres. Physics Education, 25, 247-252.

Comfort Adjoa Addo, “Utilization of Field Trips in the Teaching of Social Studies in Colleges of Education in the Volta Region, Ghana” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.404-412 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/404-412.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Tracer Study of STAs and Scholars of UM Panabo College

Amelie L. Chico, DM, FRIM – November 2021- Page No.: 413-421

Every academic institution’s goal is to produce competent and highly qualified graduates that can eventually be competitive in a local and global arena. A graduate tracer study is a very powerful tool that can provide valuable information for evaluating the whereabouts and performance of the graduates in the workplace. This study aimed to keep track of all the scholars who were graduates of the UM Panabo College by utilizing the GTS (Graduate Tracer Study) of Commission on Higher Education. Results revealed that most of the graduates were in their early 20s and have just recently graduated from the university. Furthermore, they were able to find a job through someone they knew. Most of the graduates have jobs related to their respective degree programs of which their courses are readily available in the host institution. All of them are currently employed in the Philippines with regular/permanent status. Majority of them stays in the job because of its relevance to their field of specialization. It is notable that almost of the competencies were useful in their first job. Thus, there should be career enhancement for the graduates of the institution.

Page(s): 413-421                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 06 December 2021

 Amelie L. Chico, DM, FRIM
Research Coordinator -University of Mindanao, Philippines

[1] Archer, W., & Davison, J. (2008). Graduate employability. The council for industry and Higher Education
[2] Buenviaje, M. G., del Mundo, G. V., Añonuevo, F., & Martinez, M. (2015). Employability of Business and Computer Management Graduates of one Higher Education Institution in the Philippines. Asia Pacific Journal of Multidisciplinary Research, 3(5).
[3] Calma, R. R. (2020). A Tracer Study of the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (BSBA) Graduates from 2016-2018. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/341342842_A_Tracer_Study_of_the_Bachelor_of_Science_in_Business_Administration_BSBA_Graduates_of_an_Academic_Institution_from_2016_to_2018
[4] Calma, R. R. (2020). A Tracer Study of the Bachelor of Science in Accountancy Graduates from 2013-2015. https://researchgate.net/publication/341276111
[5] Celis, M. I. Festijo, B., and Cueto, A. (2013). A Tracer Study for Bachelor of Science in Hotel and Restaurant Management. Asian Academic Research Journal of Multidisciplinary. Vol. 1, Issue 11. July 2013
[6] Dacre Pool, L., & Sewell, P. (2007). The key to employability: developing a practical model of graduate employability. Education+ Training, 49(4), 277-289.
[7] Evangelista, D. C. (2015). An Undergraduate Thesis. A Tracer Study of the Graduates of Bachelor of Arts Major in Political Science of the University of Rizal System Pililla, Academic Year 2008-2013.
[8] Gagalang, J., Francisco, L., Regalado, B. A Tracers Study on the Graduates of Bachelor of Science in Psychology of URS PILILLA AY’s 2010-2013. http://dx.doi.or/10.21474/IJAR01/5969
[9] Gino, F., Wilmuth, C. A and Wood, B. A., (2015) Compared to men, women view professional advancement as equally attainable but less desirable. PNAS (Proceedings of the National Academy of Science of the United States of America. https://www.pnas.org/content/112/40/12354#ref-list-1
[10] Lindsay, A. (1992). Concepts of quality in higher education.Journal of Tertiary Educational Administration, 14(2), 153-163.
[11] Mason, G., Williams, G., & Cranmer, S. (2009). Employability skills initiatives in higher education: what effects do they have on graduate labour market outcomes?.Education Economics, 17(1), 1-30.
[12] Plessis, Susan du (2021) Five Reasons why grades are important: https://www.edubloxtutor.com/5-reasons-grades-important/
[13] Rowley, J. (1996). Measuring quality in higher education.Quality in Higher Education, 2(3), 237-255.
[14] Schomburg, H. (2003). Handbook for Tracer Studies. Centre for Research on Higher Education and Work, University of Kassel, Moenchebergstrasse, 17, 34109.
[15] Stahl, A. (2016). Employers, take note: Here’s What Employees Really Want. Retrieved from https:///www.forbes.com/sites/ashleystahl/2016/10/12/employers-take-note-heres-what-employees-really-want/#7c637351c83d
[16] Zhang, L. (2005). Do measures of college quality matter? The effect of college quality on graduates’ earnings.The Review of Higher Education, 28(4), 571-596.

Amelie L. Chico, DM, FRIM , “Tracer Study of STAs and Scholars of UM Panabo College” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.413-421 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/413-421.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Determinants of Help-Seeking behavior of schizophrenia Caregiver in Indonesia

Dahniar, Marty Mawarpury, Suryane Sulistiana Susanti, Hermansyah, Marthoenis – November 2021- Page No.: 422-424

In low and middle-income countries, family-caregivers of patients with schizophrenia are usually the ones who seek aid for schizophrenic patients. Caregivers of individuals with schizophrenia may seek assistance from health facilities for a variety of reasons. The goal of this study was to find out what factors influence family-caregivers of schizophrenia patients requesting treatment.
Methods: Quantitative cross-sectional research with family caregivers of schizophrenia patients was conducted. As many as 162 respondents were chosen using a systematic random selection procedure. Face-to-face interviews were used to collect data on respondents’ characteristics and their help-seeking behavior.
Findings: The range of age was between 40 to 65 years old. More than half were female (54.3%), married (61.1%), lower education level (66.7%), unemployed (64.2%), lower income (59.9%), and lived in the rural area (58%). Statistical analysis found several variables associated with help-seeking behavior, including gender, education, income, previous treatment, and residence (p<0.05).

Page(s): 422-424                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 06 December 2021

 Dahniar
Universitas Syiah Kuala, Indonesia

 Marty Mawarpury
Universitas Syiah Kuala, Indonesia

 Suryane Sulistiana Susanti
Universitas Syiah Kuala, Indonesia

 Hermansyah
Universitas Syiah Kuala, Indonesia

 Marthoenis
Universitas Syiah Kuala, Indonesia

[1] Girma, E., & Tesfaye, M. (2011). Patterns of treatment seeking behavior for mental illnesses in Southwest Ethiopia: A hospital based study. BMC Psychiatry, 11, 1–7. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-244X-11-138
[2] Henderson, C., Evans-Lacko, S., & Thornicroft, G. (2013). Mental illness stigma, help seeking, and public health programs. American Journal of Public Health, 103(5), 777–780. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2012.301056
[3] Hyland, P., Boduszek, D., Dhingra, K., Shevlin, M., Maguire, R., & Morley, K. (2014). British Journal of Guidance & A test of the inventory of attitudes towards seeking mental health services. (December). https://doi.org/10.1080/03069885.2014.963510
[4] Mackenzie, C. S., Knox, V. J., Gekoski, W. L., & Macaulay, H. L. (2004). An adaptation and extension of the attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help scale. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 34(11), 2410–2433. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-1816.2004.tb01984.x
[5] Manumba, R., & Achir Yani Syuhaimi Hamid. (2020). Faktor-faktor yang berhubungan dengan pencarian bantuan pada orang dengan gangguan jiwa 1. Jurnal Ilmu Keperawatan Jiwa, 3(4), 391–402.
[6] Marthoenis, M., Aichberger, M. C., & Schouler-Ocak, M. (2016). Patterns and Determinants of Treatment Seeking among Previously Untreated Psychotic Patients in Aceh Province, Indonesia: A Qualitative Study. Scientifica, 2016. https://doi.org/10.1155/2016/9136079
[7] Poreddi, V., Birudu, R., Thimmaiah, R., & Math, S. B. (2015). Mental health literacy among caregivers of persons with mental illness: A descriptive survey. Journal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice, 6(3), 355–360. https://doi.org/10.4103/0976-3147.154571
[8] Umubyeyi, A., Mogren, I., Ntaganira, J., & Krantz, G. (2016). Help-seeking behaviours, barriers to care and self-efficacy for seeking mental health care: a population-based study in Rwanda. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 51(1), 81–92. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00127-015-1130-2
[9] Yalvaç Elif, Dilek, HayriyeMutlu, A., Kotan, Z., & Özer, İ. (2016). Explanatory Models of Illness , Help Seeking Behaviours and Related Factors in Patients with Schizophrenia : A Comparative Study from Two Diferent Provinces of Turkey. Community Mental Health Journal, 0(0), 0. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10597-016-0074-7
[10] Yeshanew, B., Belete, A., & Necho, M. (2020). Help-seeking intention and associated factors towards mental illness among residents of Mertule Mariam town, East Gojam Zone, Amhara Region, Ethiopia: A mixed-method study. Annals of General Psychiatry, 19(1), 1–11. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12991-020-00261-y
[11] Yin, H., Wardenaar, K. J., Xu, G., Tian, H., & Schoevers, R. A. (2020). Mental health stigma and mental health knowledge in Chinese population: A cross-sectional study. BMC Psychiatry, 20(1), 1–10. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12888-020-02705-x

Dahniar, Marty Mawarpury, Suryane Sulistiana Susanti, Hermansyah, Marthoenis “Determinants of Help-Seeking behavior of schizophrenia Caregiver in Indonesia” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.422-424 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/422-424.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Nexus between the Establishment of an Enabling Environment and Local Economic Development in the City of Harare

Anesu Mironga- November 2021- Page No.: 425-431

The ways in which local governments advance and put into operation their policies on the establishment of a conducive environment for businesses to thrive and flourish has great effect and impact on the development of an area. The main actor in Local Economic Development (LED) is local government and it should support the establishment of a conducive and enabling environment that is developmental and facilitates local businesses to grow and succeed. There should be mutual symbiotic relationships between communities, business and local government for Local Economic Development to take place. The study examined the nexus between the establishment of a conducive and enabling environment and local economic development in the City of Harare. Results from this study should assist local authorities in their quest to provide the best for citizens in terms of service delivery and good governance. The study’s major goal was to see if the creation of an enabling environment could help people succeed. The study’s major goal was to examine the notion that creating an enabling environment leads to local economic development. The study focused on business operators in Machipisa, Mbare Musika and the Central Business District of Harare. The perceptions of these operators and business owners were investigated. A total of 65 business operators were interviewed in the three areas using a structured questionnaire based on Enabling Developmental Environment Scale (EDES). Statistical analysis of data was done through Statistical Package for Social Sciences using descriptive analysis. The results revealed that there is a strong positive correlation (correlation coefficient above 0) between an enabling environment and economic growth. This implies that the more the local governments invest in creating an enabling environment the more economic development is achieved.

Page(s): 425-431                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 06 December 2021

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51124

 Anesu Mironga
College of Business, Peace, Leadership and Governance, Africa University, Mutare, Zimbabwe

[1] Apuke, O. D. (2017). Quantitative Research Methods: A Synopsis approach. Kuwait Chapter of Arabian Journal of Business and Management Review, 6(11), 40-47.
[2] Aronoff, S., (1989). Geographic Information Systems: A
Management Perspective. Ottawa: WDL Publications
[3] Awal, M., & Hassan, S. (2019, October 28). High taxes choking small businesses to the grave. The Standard, p. 1.
[4] CCC. (2012). Enabling Environment for local development actors. Cambodia: Cooperation Committee for Cambodia .
[5] Closs, D. J., & Bolumole, Y. A. (2015). Transportation’s Role in Economic Development and Regional Supply Chain Hubs. Transportation Journal, 54(1), 33-54. doi:10.5325/transportationj.54.1.0033.
[6] Collins, H. (2011). Creative Research: The Theory and Practice of Research for the Creative Industries. AVA Publications.
[7] Creswell, J. W. (2014). Research design- qualitative, quantitative & mixed methods approaches (4th Ed). Thousand Oaks: Sage.
[8] Dallago, B., & Tortia, E. (2019). Entrepreneurship and Local Economic Development: A Comparative Perspective on Entrepreneurs, Universities and Governments. London: Routledge, ISBN 9780367586188.
[9] Dangra, A. (2016, August 2). The Missing Piece in India’s Economic Growth Story: Robust Infrastructure. Retrieved from S & P Global: https://www.spglobal.com/en/research-insights/articles/the-missing-piece-in-indias-economic-growth-story-robust-infrastructure
[10] Denzin, N. K., & Lincoln, Y. S. (2011). The Sage Handbook of Qualitative Research. USA: Sage Publications.
[11] Dewa, D., Dziva, C., & Mukwashi, K. (2014). Exploring local governance challenges in Zimbabwe under the government of National unity era 2(8). International Journal of Political Science Development, 188-196, https://DOI: 10.14662/IJPSD2014.038.
[12] Dube, C. (2019). Main bottlenecks at the local authority level that could pose challenges for growth and sustainability. Harare: Zimbabwe Economic Policy Analysis and Research Unit.
[13] EDA. (2018, 18 July). How Local Government can create a business enabling environment. Retrieved from Economic Development Australia: https://www.edaustralia.com.au/event/creating-a-more-enabling-local-business-environment/
[14] FAO. (2020). Analyzing food security using household survey data. Retrieved from FAO: http://www.fao.org/fileadmin/templates/ess/foodsecurity/Analyzing_Food_Security_Using_Household_Survey_Data.pdf
[15] Gaal, H. O., & Afrah, N. A. (2017). Lack of Infrastructure: The Impact on Economic Development as a case of Benadir region and Hir-shabelle, Somalia. Developing Country Studies, 7(1), 49-55.
[16] Gentry, P. M. (2013). Developing Whole Communities: Community Economic Development and Locally Based Sustainable Agriculture. Duke: Duke Law Community Enterprise Clinic.
[17] Hofisi, C., Mbeba, R., Maredza, A., & Choga. (2013). Scoring local economic development goals in South Africa: why local government is failing to score. 591-595.
[18] Joshi, A., Kale, S., & Pal, D. K. (2015). Likert Scale: Explored and Explained. British Journal of Applied Science & Technology, 7(4), 396-403.
[19] Khambule, I. (2018). The role of local economic development agencies in developmental state ambitions. Local economy, 33(3), 287-306.
[20] King, B., & Osei, E. (2018). Human Resources Development for Economic Development ‐ examples and lessons from ACP countries. Brussels: ACP‐EU Economic and Social Unit.
[21] Kline, P., & Moretti, E. (2016). People, Places, and Public Policy: Some Simple Welfare Economics of Local Economic Development Programs. Annual Review of Economics, 6(1), 629-662.
[22] Konig, G., Da Silva, C. A., & Mhlanga, N. (2013). Enabling Environments for Agri-business and Agro-industries Development. Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.
[23] Lechissa, M. (2017). Qualitative Research Methods – Training. Bahir Dar: Bahir Dar University.
[24] Leigh, N. G., & Blakely, E. J. (2013). Planning local economic development: Theory & economic development: Theory & practice (5th edition). New-York: SAGE Publications.
[25] Mandisvika, G. (2015). The Role and Importance of Local Economic Development in Urban Development: A Case of Harare. Journal of Advocacy, Research and Education, 2015, 4(3), 198-209.
[26] Masuku, M., Jili, N., & Selepe, B. (2016). The implementation of Local Economic Development initiatives towards poverty alleviation in Big 5 False Bay Local Municipality. African Journal of Hospitality, Tourism and Leisure, 5(4), 1-11.
[27] McKague, K., & Siddiquee, M. (2014). Improving the Enabling Environment. In K. McKague, & M. Siddiquee, Making Markets More Inclusive (pp. 125-132). New York: Palgrave Macmillan, https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137373755_9.
[28] McQuaid, R. (2013). The Theory of Partnerships Why have Partnerships. In S. Osborne, Managing public-private partnerships for public services: an international perspective (pp. 9-35). London: Routledge.
[29] Meyer, D. F. (2014). Local Government’s Role in the Creation of an Enabling Developmental Environment. Administration Publica, 22(1), 24-46.
[30] Meyer, D. F., & Keyser, E. (2017). Formulation and validation of an Enabling Developmental Environment Scale (EDES) for local economic development (LED). Journal of Economics and Behavioral Studies, 9(6), 57-66, ISSN: 2220-6140.
[31] Meyer, N., & Meyer, D. F. (2016). The relationship between the creation of an enabling environment and economic development: A comparative analysis of management at local government sphere. Polish Journal of Management Studies, 14(2), 150-160.
[32] Musavengane, R. (2018). Toward Pro-Poor Local Economic Development in Zimbabwe: the role of pro-poor tourism. African Journal of Hospitality, Tourism and Leisure, Volume 7 (1), 1-14.
[33] Nkomo, D. (2017, February 17). Challenges of local governance in Zimbabwe. Retrieved from Zimbabwe Today: http://zimbabwe-today
[34] Oden, C. (2021, April 23). Effect of taxation on the economic development of Edo State. Retrieved from Project Topics: https://www.projecttopics.org/effect-of-taxation-on-the-economic-development.html
[35] Oduro-Ofori, E. (2011). The Role of Local Government in Local Economic Development Promotion at the District (Doctoral Thesis). Dortmund, Germany: Technical University of Dortmund.
[36] Oxford Dictionary. (2021, March 2). Oxford Dictionary. Retrieved from https://www.oed.com/
[37] Prabakaran, M. (2011, March 20). What is Good Governance? Retrieved from Researchgate: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/228123335_What_is_Good_Governance
[38] PWC. (2019). Achieving safety and security in an age of disruption and distrust. PWC.
[39] Quium, A. S. (2019). Transport Corridors for Wider Socio–Economic. Sustainability, 11, 1-24.
[40] Reddy, P. S. (2016). From National to Local Economic Development (LED): The South African Case. In S. E.D, M. J., & G. S, Developmental Local Governance. International Political Economy Series. London: Palgrave Macmillan.
[41] Rodrigue, D. J.-P., & Notteboom, D. T. (2020). Transportation and Economic Development. In D. J.-P. Rodrigue, The Geography of Transport Systems. New York: Routledge.
[42] Saleh, H., Surya, B., Ahmad, D. N., & Manda, D. (2020). The Role of Natural and Human Resources on Economic Growth and Regional Development: With Discussion of Open Innovation Dynamics. Journal of Open Innovation, 1-24.
[43] Sharpa, J. S., Jackson-Smith, D., & Smith, L. (2011). Agricultural economic development at the rural-urban interface: Community organization, policy, and agricultural change. Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development, 1(4), 189-204.
[44] Shilangu, L. (2019). Enhancing Local Economic Development Through Effective Leadership and Service Delivery in South African Municipalities. The 4th Annual International Conference on Public Administration and Development Alternatives (pp. 632-638). 03 - 05 July 2019, Southern Sun Hotel, OR Tambo International Airport, Johannesburg, South Africa: ICPADA.
[45] Sifile, O. (2015). Towards improving service delivery in local authorities. A case of Chegutu Municipality. IOSR Journal of Humanities And Social Science, 20(11), 55-63.
[46] Simba, A., Nyandoro, Z. F., Munyoro, G., & Chimhande, D. (2015). The local economic development processes in low-income countries: The case of the metropolis of Chegutu in Zimbabwe. Local Economy: The Journal of Local Policy Unit.
[47] Singh, P. K., & Chudasama, H. (2020). Evaluating poverty alleviation strategies in a developing country. PLoS ONE 15(1): e0227176. , https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0227176.
[48] Stead, D. (2021). Conceptualizing the Policy Tools of Spatial Planning. Journal of Planning Literature, https://doi.org/10.1177/0885412221992283.
[49] Topxhiu, R. (2012). The role of entrepreneurship and enterprises for local economic development. Academicus International Scientific Journal, 5, 96-107.
[50] Turkoglu, H., Ocakçı, M., Ataöv, A., Uşun, M., Işık, A., & Güvener, U. (2012). A Participatory Spatial Planning Process: The Case of Bursa, Turkey. 48th ISOCARP Congress 2012. Bursa: ISOCARP.
[51] UCLG. (2014). The Role of Local Governments in Economic Development. United Cities and Local Governments: The Federation of Canadian Municipalities.
[52] UCLGA. (2016). State of Local Economic Development in Zimbabwe. Rabat, Morocco: United Cities and Local Governments of Africa.
[53] UN. (2008). Spatial Planning: Key Instrument for Development and Effective Governance with Special Reference to Countries in Transition. New York and Geneva: United Nations.
[54] UNIDO. (2008). United Nations Industrial Development Organization: Creating an enabling environment for private sector development in sub-Saharan Africa. Vienna: Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (FMECD).
[55] WEF. (2011). The Future of Government: Lessons Learned from Around the World. Cologne, Switzerland www.weforum.org: World Economic Forum (WEF).
[56] Wekwete, K. (2014). Local Government and Local Economic Development in Southern Africa. Lilongwe, Malawi: Commonwealth Local Government Forum

Anesu Mironga, “The Nexus between the Establishment of an Enabling Environment and Local Economic Development in the City of Harare” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.425-431 November 2021 DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51124

Download PDF

pdf

Improving Problem Solving Skills in Calculus among the Grade 12 Learners’ in Selected Public Secondary Schools in Lusaka District, Zambia

Julius Zulu, Kabunga Nachiyunde (PhD), Patricia Phiri Nalube (PhD), Prof Gift Masaiti – November 2021- Page No.: 432-438

The study sought to establish problem solving strategies that can improve problem solving skills in Calculus among the Grade 12 Learners’ in Selected Secondary Schools in Zambia. The study employed a qualitative study approach, which followed a case study design. Hundred teachers (n=100) and two-hundred and fifty (n=250) Grade 12 learners from ten (n=10) public secondary schools making a total sample size of three-hundred and fifty (n=350) of Lusaka province, Zambia, participated. The sampling techniques employed were purposive sampling and simple random sampling. Data was collected using semi-structured interview schedule. Interviews are said to be the best way to collect data because it helps the researcher to have feelings, opinions, gestures, tone of voice, reactions, attitudes, views, and are useful in gathering in-depth data. Audio recordings were used to capture interviews, respectively, in their totality. The collected data was analyzed using qualitative techniques. Qualitative data was organized into themes and analyzed using narratives and direct quotations of the respondents’ views, experiences and information. The study established that having pre-requisite knowledge in appropriate mathematics topics like Indices, Functions, Coordinate Geometry, Algebra (fractions, factorisation of quadratic expressions and equations), understanding the language of Calculus questions, understanding the development of Calculus formulas, and introducing Calculus symbols in early grades can improve Grade 12 learner’s problem solving skills in Calculus. The study therefore, recommended that applications of basic concepts in earlier grades should be consolidated and revised on an on-going basis. Teachers should focus on the development of the formulas and introducing calculus symbols in early grades. The study further recommended that teachers should also be carrying out a diagnostic assessment to determine what learners know about pre-calculus topics such as Indices, Factorization, and Algebraic Fractions before learners are taught Calculus.

Page(s): 432-438                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 06 December 2021

 Julius Zulu
Department of Mathematics and Science Education, The University of Zambia, School of Education, Lusaka, Zambia

 Kabunga Nachiyunde (PhD)
Department of Mathematics and Science Education, The University of Zambia, School of Education, Lusaka, Zambia

 Patricia Phiri Nalube (PhD)
Department of Mathematics and Science Education, The University of Zambia, School of Education, Lusaka, Zambia

 Prof Gift Masaiti
Department of Mathematics and Science Education, The University of Zambia, School of Education, Lusaka, Zambia

[1] Ball, D. L., & Bass, H. (2003). Interweaving content and pedagogy in teaching and learning to teach: knowing and using mathematics. In J. Boaler (Ed.), Multiple Perspectives on Mathematics Teaching and Learning (pp. 83-104). Wesport: Ablex Publishing.
[2] Examinations Council of Zambia. (2014). Examinations Performance Review Report 2014, Examinations Council of Zambia. Lusaka: ECZ.
[3] Examinations Council of Zambia. (2015). Examinations Performance Review Report 2015, Examinations Council of Zambia. Lusaka: ECZ.
[4] Examinations Council of Zambia. (2015). Examinations Performance Review Report 2015, Examinations Council of Zambia. Lusaka: ECZ.
[5] Examinations Council of Zambia. (2016). Examinations Performance Review Report 2016, Examinations Council of Zambia. Lusaka: ECZ.
[6] Examinations Council of Zambia. (2017). Examinations Performance Review Report 2016, Examinations Council of Zambia. Lusaka: ECZ.
[7] Examinations Council of Zambia. (2018). Examinations Performance Review Report 2015, Examinations Council of Zambia. Lusaka: ECZ.
[8] Examinations Council of Zambia. (2019). Examinations Performance Review Report 2016, Examinations Council of Zambia. Lusaka: ECZ.
[9] Examinations Council of Zambia. (2020). Examinations Performance Review Report 2016, Examinations Council of Zambia. Lusaka: ECZ.
[10] Herbert, S. (2011). Challenging traditional sequence of teaching introductory calculus. Mathematics: Traditions and [New] Practice.d@AAMT & MERGA, 358-365.
[11] Kilpatrick, J., Swafford, J., & Findell, B. (2001). Adding it up: Helping children learn mathematics. Washington: National Academy Press.
[12] Lam, T. T. (2009). On in-service mathematics teachers’ content knowledge of calculus and related concepts. The Mathematics Educator, volume-12-issue-1, pp. 69-86.
[13] Makonye, P.J. (2011). Learner Mathematical Errors In Introductory Differential Calculus Tasks: A Study Of Misconceptions In The Senior School Certificate Examinations (Dissertation). Johannesburg: University of Johannesburg.
[14] MESVTEE (2013). “O” Level Mathematics Syllabus Grades 10 to 12. Lusaka: Curriculum Development Centre.
[15] MESVTEE (2013). Zambia Education Curriculum Framework, Ministry of Education. Lusaka: Curriculum Development Centre.
[16] National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, (1989). An agenda for action: Recommendations for school mathematics of the 1980s. Reston, VA: Author.
[17] Ministry of Education (1997). Educational Reforms. Lusaka: Ministry of Education.
[18] Ministry of Education (1996). Educating Our Future. Lusaka: Ministry of Education.
[19] National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (2000). Commission on standards for school mathematics: Curriculum and evaluation standards for school mathematics. Reston, VA: Author.
[20] National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, (2014). Principles to actions: Ensuring mathematical success for all. Reston, VA: NCTM.
[21] Pape, S. (2004). Middle school children’s problem-solving behavior: A cognitive analysis from a reading comprehension perspective. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 35, 187-219.
[22] Patton, M. Q. (1990). Qualitative evaluation and research methods (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.
[23] Pólya, G. (1945). How to solve it. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
[24] Rickard, A. (2005). Evolution of a teacher’s problem solving instruction: A case study of aligning teaching practice with reform in middle school mathematics. RMLE Online: Research in Middle Level Education, 29(1), 1-15.
[25] Schoenfeld, A. H. (2013). Reflections on problem solving theory and practice. The Mathematics Enthusiast, 10(1/2), 9.
[26] Verschaffel, L., Greer, B., & De Corte, E. (1999). Making sense of word problems. Lisse, Netherlands: Swets & Zeitlinger.
[27] Wertheimer, M. (1959). Gestalt Theory on Problem Solving. German: Hugo Books Publications.
[28] Zulu, J., Nalube, P.P., Changwe, R., & Mbewe, S. (2021). The Challenges and Opportunities of Using ZOOM App in the Teaching and Learning of Mathematics in Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) During COVID-19 Pandemic: Lecturers’ and Students’ Perspective .International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-6-issue-7, pp.92-101 July 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijrias/DigitalLibrary/volume-6-issue-7/92-101.pdf
[29] Zulu, J. Nyimbili, F. Fumbani, M, Chisowa, D, Mulenga, G, &, Changwe, R. (2021). et.al. “Exploring Students’ Difficulties in Solving Application of Integral Problems in Selected Zambian Colleges of Education. International Journal of Humanities Social Sciences and Education (IJHSSE), volume-8-issue-9, pp. 11-18 September 2021, doi: https://doi.org/10.20431/2349- 0381.0809002
[30] Zulu, J. & Nalube, P.P. ‘Learners’ Problem Solving Processes in Calculus at Grade 12 Level: A case study of Selected Secondary Schools in Lusaka District of Zambia. Zambia Journal of Teacher Professional Growth (ZJTPG), Vol, 5, 2, 2019, pp.77-98, ISSN 2308-2178.

Julius Zulu, Kabunga Nachiyunde (PhD), Patricia Phiri Nalube (PhD), Prof Gift Masaiti , “Improving Problem Solving Skills in Calculus among the Grade 12 Learners’ in Selected Public Secondary Schools in Lusaka District, Zambia” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-5-issue-11, pp.432-438 November 2021 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-5-issue-11/432-438.pdf

Download PDF

pdf