Assessing the effectiveness of Government Policy of compulsory learning of familiar Local Languages at Early Primary School Level on learners’ linguistic skills achievement: A Case of Grade 4 learners in four Primary Schools in Lusaka District of Lusaka Province

Lufeyo Chitondo – January 2022- Page No.: 01-07

The study aimed at assessing the effectiveness of Government policy of compulsory learning of local languages at early primary school level among the selected teachers in four Primary schools of Lusaka district in Zambia. The policy is based on teaching learners in their familiar local language. The study employed a mixed paradigm and descriptive survey design that sampled two primary schools, Head teachers, teachers, PTA executive members and Grade 4 learners. Data was obtained from respondents by means of interviews, questionnaires and classroom observation schedules. Frequency, percentages, tables, graphs and pie-charts were used to analyze the quantitative and qualitative data obtained. Data was then analyzed by the use of software MS Access and MS Excel. The findings revealed that learning in the mother tongue at early grade level helps in language development of the child as well in comprehending concepts easily enhancing early literacy attainment helps children to grasp literacy and learn how to read and write faster and that it even becomes easier for learners in later grades to learn other languages and subjects in the curriculum as they would have the foundations.

Page(s): 01-07                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 22 January 2022

 Lufeyo Chitondo
Rockview University, Lusaka, Zambia

[1] Akinnaso, F.N. (1993). Policy and Experiment in Mother-Tongue Literacy. Nigeria. International Review of Education.
[2] Appel, R.et al (1987). Language contact and bilingualism. London. Edward Arnold.
[3] Armstrong, R. G. (1968). Language policies and language practices in West Africa. New York. John Wiley and sons.
[4] Banda D. (2002). Disabling or Abling? The quick transition of the Language of Instruction (LOI) for initial literacy from Mother tongue (L1) to English (2). The case of Zambia. MPhil thesis, The University of Oslo. Norway.
[5] Banda, F. (1998). The classification of Languages in Zambia and Malawi. The Centre for advanced studies of African society.
[6] Benzies, D. (1940). Learning Our Language. New York. Longman, Green and Co. LTD.
[7] Bickel, R. (2007). Multilevel analysis for applied research. It’s just regression. The Guilford Press.
[8] Bray, M, et al (1986). Education and Society in Africa. London: Edward Amold.
[9] Brock-Utne, Birgit (1993). Education in Africa. Rapport No. 3 Oslo: Institute for Educational Research.
[10] MoE (1996). Educating Our Future. National Policy on Education. Lusaka. Government Printers.
[11] MoE (1998). Zambia Primary Reading Programme (Draft). Lusaka: DID.
[12] Muyebaa, K. C. (2000). Achieving Equitable Education through Zambian Languages. A paper Presentation at Voices of Change Conference. Cambridge University.
[13] Mwanakatwe, J. M. (1974). The Growth of Education since Independence. Lusaka. Oxford: University Press.
[14] Mundende, M. (1997). Teaching of Local Languages. How related to Second Language Teaching. Paper presentation at the English Teachers Association (ETAZ)
[15] Mytton, Graham (1974). Listening, Looking and Learning. Lusaka. Institute for African Studies, University of Zambia.
[16] Myers-Scotton, C. (1993). Social Motivations for Code-switching. New York. Oxford University Press.
[17] Mkandawire, S. B. (2015). The State of Affairs of Cultural Literacy in Zambia’s Multicultural
[18] Tembo, L. (1975). The Medium of Instruction. The Bulletin of the Zambian Language Group 22.
[19] UNESCO (1953). The use of the vernacular languages in education monographs on fundamental education V111. Paris: NESCO.
[20] UNESCO (1961). Final Report. Conference of African States on the Development of Education in Africa. Paris: UNESCO.
[21] UNESCO (1964). Education in Northern Rhodesia. Paris. UNESCO
[22] Williams, E. (1995). Report on Reading in English in Primary Schools in Zambia. London, Overseas Development Administration.
[23] Zambia Daily Mail (2015). Chief appeals to the President to intervene in resolving the problem of teaching of Luvale and Lunda in schools, 29 August

Lufeyo Chitondo, “Assessing the effectiveness of Government Policy of compulsory learning of familiar Local Languages at Early Primary School Level on learners’ linguistic skills achievement: A Case of Grade 4 learners in four Primary Schools in Lusaka District of Lusaka Province” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.01-07 January 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-1/01-07.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Critical Success Factors in Implementing E-Rural Development Projects: A Case Study Kegalle, Sri Lanka

H. A. Seneviratne, W.M.G.K. Wijerathne, M. Thenabadu – January 2022- Page No.: 08-11

Well-adapted information and communication technologies (ICTs) help rural communities improve their standard of living and increase their income levels, facilitating the abolition of poverty. The study was conducted to investigate the factors influencing the success of the implementation of an e-rural development project in the Kegalle district of Sri Lanka.
The population consists of project implementation team members who have worked full-time in Kegalle District as project managers, technical leads, project team members, or consultants on at least one e-rural development project implementation. The total population was 38 people. Questionnaires for interviews were distributed to all members and there were 22 responses received.
The relevance of critical success factors (CSF) identified in the literature survey was validated through personal interviews with selected 22 project implementation team members who work in rural e-projects. The top ten critical success factors identified in the investigation were: clear project goals/objectives, top management support, end user commitment, involvement & training, and selecting appropriate technology. Effective communication and information sharing, vendor support and commitment, leadership style (effective decision making), and a focus on demand-driven needs, technological infrastructure and realistic Schedule
The study’s significance would be to identify the factors that could affect the successful implementation of e-rural development projects in Sri Lanka in order to reduce project failure, allowing for the development of strategies to ensure the success of e-rural development projects in Sri Lanka.

Page(s): 08-11                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 22 January 2022

 H. A. Seneviratne
Department of Multimedia and Web Technology, Faculty of Information Technology, University of Vocational Technology, Sri Lanka

 W.M.G.K. Wijerathne
TECH- CERT, Pvt Ltd.,1st Floor Bernard Business Park, N0106, Dutugemunu St, Dehiwala Sri Lanka.

 M. Thenabadu
Department of Agriculture and Food Technology, Faculty of Industrial Technology, University of Vocational Technology, Sri Lanka

[1] Gunasekera, J. (2008, June). Enhancing the Livelihoods of The Rural Poor Through ICT: AKnowledge Map. infoDev’s working papers series.
[2] MOVEMENT, S.S., 2005. DEVELOPING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY, INFORMING TECHNOLOGY FOR DEVELOPMENT: A study of ICT and rural development in Sri Lanka REPORT FOR TIER GROUP, UC BERKELEY
[3] Komasaru, U.I.W. and Abeysekera, R., 2011. Success of e-Sri Lanka in rural ICT development: A study of e-nenasala telecenters in Rathnapura district. In Proceedings of International Conference on Business Management (Vol. 8).
[4] Pade, C., Mallinson, B. and Sewry, D., 2009. An exploration of the critical success factors for the sustainability of rural ICT projects–The Dwesa case study. In Information systems development (pp. 339-352). Springer, Boston, MA
[5] Vimalenthirarajah, K.A., 2006. Success criteria and critical success factors for e-government projects (Doctoral dissertation).
[6] Davidrajuh, R., 2004. Planning e-government start-up: a case study on e-Sri Lanka. Electronic Government, an International Journal, 1(1), pp.92-106.
[7] Dep of Census & Statistics, Sri Lanka (2019): Statistics.gov.lk. 2019. Department of Census and Statistics. [online] Available at: http://www.statistics.gov.lk/Population/StaticalInformation/CPH2011 [Accessed 29 September 2021].
[8] Hossan, C.G., Habib, M.W. and Kushchu, I., 2006. Success and Failure Factors for e-Government projects implementation in developing countries: A study on the perception of government officials of Bangladesh. In Proceedings of the 2nd European Conference on Mobile Government, Mobile Government Consortium International (pp. 136-151).
[9] Kumar, A. and Singh, K.M., 2012. Role of ICTs in rural development with reference to changing climatic conditions. ICT FOR AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT UNDER CHANGING CLIMATE, Krishna M. Singh, MS Meena, eds., Narenda Publishing House.
[10] Lim, C.S. and Mohamed, M.Z., 1999. Criteria of project success: an exploratory re-examination. International journal of project management, 17(4), pp.243-248

H. A. Seneviratne, W.M.G.K. Wijerathne, M. Thenabadu, “Critical Success Factors in Implementing E-Rural Development Projects: A Case Study Kegalle, Sri Lanka” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.08-11 January 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-1/08-11.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Attitudes of Homicide Victims on their victimization

Prof. M.W. Jayasundara – January 2022- Page No.: 12-18

In Sri Lanka, the death penalty had been in place since the times of the ancient kings and under the colonial rulers to prevent grave crimes, including murder. From 1956 to 1959 and after June 1976, the death penalty was not carried out in Sri Lanka. However, the homicide rate has declined from 7.6 in 1976 to 2.1 in 2020 even in the absence of the death penalty. It is assumed that rather than capital punishment for homicide, some other significant factors have contributed to a decline in homicides in the country. This study was conducted in 2019 to identify the characteristics of homicide victims in Sri Lanka. Moreover, the background of the offenders and their relationship to the victims were also solicited. The data were collected concerning the 59 homicide victims selected from a random sample drawn from police stations located in nine districts in Sri Lanka. For data collection, a semi-structured interview schedule was utilized.
The study has revealed that low-income earners and less educated individuals mostly tend to become victims of homicide over minor matters in their daily life. Among them a considerable number of people engaged in blue-collar jobs happen to become victims of homicide over issues that might appear relatively trivial to other people. Previous enmity, family disputes, land disputes and drunkenness have been the precipitating motives for these offenders. This study suggests that creating awareness and disseminating knowledge among the less educated and low-income categories of people can cause a positive change in their conduct towards a peaceful and law-abiding life free from homicide.

Page(s): 12-18                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 22 January 2022

 Prof. M.W. Jayasundara
Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Sri Lanka

[1] Adler, F., Muller, G.O.W., Laufer, W.S. (1995) Criminology. 2nd edition. New York: McGraw-Hill, Inc.
[2] Administration Reports of Inspector General of Police (1974-2020) Sri Lanka.
[3] Hood, R. (1989) The Death Penalty. Oxford: Oxford University of Press.
[4] Hornby, A.S. (1989) Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
[5] Penal Code of Sri Lanka 1833
[6] Walsh, A., Hemmens, C. (2011) Introduction to Criminology. USA: Sage Publication In cooperation.
[7] White, R., Perrone, S. (1997) Crime and Social Control: An Introduction. Melbourne: Oxford University Press.
[8] En.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homicide Retrived 05.12.2021

Prof. M.W. Jayasundara “The Attitudes of Homicide Victims on their victimization” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.12-18 January 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-1/12-18.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Critically Assess How Transactional and Transformational Leadership Affects Workforce Behaviour

Christopher Banura Ruyooka – January 2022- Page No.: 19-22

I. INTRODUCTION

Leadership is possibly one of the most significant facets of organizations (Weihrich et al., 2008). Since leadership is an important factor that contributes significantly to the general wellbeing of the organization, it is equally important to the realization of the vision and mission of the organization (Bans Akutei, 2021). At the same time, Bass (1985) points out a number of theories (e.g., delegative, authoritative, intercultural, freelance, transactional, charismatic, transformational, visionary, and coaching) that have been anticipated to explain the efficacy of leadership. But, only two of these theories (transformational and transactional leaderships) are well known to be the most famous leadership styles in organizations (Awamleh and Gardner, 1999, Bass, 1985, Conger and Kanungo, 1987). In addition, a number of important organizational outcomes are associated with these two leadership styles, to name but a few; contentment, managerial success, solidarity, and responsibility (Kirkpatrick and Locke, 1996).

Page(s): 19-22                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 22 January 2022

 Christopher Banura Ruyooka
Doctoral Student, UNICAF University – Zambia

[1] Awamleh, R. A., & Gardner, W. L. 1999. Perceptions of Leader Charisma and Effectiveness: The Effects of Vision Content, Delivery, and Organizational Performance. Leadership Quarterly, 10(3), pp. 345-373. Retrieved from:https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1048984399000223
[2] Bans-Akutey, A. (2021). The Path-Goal Theory of Leadership. Academia Letters, Article 748. Retrieved from: https://doi.org/10.20935/AL748
[3] Bass, B. M. (1985). Leadership and Performance Beyond Expectations. Retrieved from:https://www.amazon.com/LEADERSHIP-PERFORMANCE-BEYOND-EXPECTATIONSBernard/dp/0029018102
[4] Bass, B. M., & Avolio, B. J. (1990). The implications of transactional and transformational leadership for individual, team, and organizational development. Research in Organizational Change and Development, 4, pp. 231–272. Retrieved from: https://www.coursehero.com/file/p2hc0ch/Bass-BM-Avolio-BJ-1990-The-implications-oftransactional-and-transformational/
[5] Bass, B. M., & Avolio, B. J. (1994). Improving organizational effectiveness through transformational leadership. Retrieved from:https://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED387944
[6] Bryman, A. (1992). Charisma and leadership in organizations. Retrieved from:https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/017084069301400309
[7] Burns, J. M. (1978). Leadership cited in Hartog, D. N., Van Muijen, J. J and Koopman, P. L (1997). Transactional versus Transformational leadership. An analysis of the MLQ, Journal of Occupational & Organizational Psychology, Vol. 70, pp. 19 – 34. Retrieved from:https://bpspsychub.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/j.2044-8325.1997.tb00628.x
[8] Conger, J. A., & Kanungo, R. N. (1988). Charismatic leadership: the Elusive Factor in Organizational Effectiveness. Retrieved from:https://psycnet.apa.org/record/1988-98415-000
[9] Hater, J. J. & Bass, B. M. (1988). Superiors’ evaluations and subordinates’ perceptions of transformational and transactional leadership. Journal of Applied Psychology, 73, pp. 695-702. Retrieved from:https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Superiors%27-evaluations-and-subordinates%27-ofand-Hater-Bass/aebff501cd4472342a0ace6d3ae29edd11cfd9b2
[10] Hartog, D., Deanne, N. Van, M., Jaap, J. & Koopman, P. L. (1997). Transactional versus transformational leadership: An analysis of the MLQ. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology; 70 (3), pp. 19-34. Retrieved from: https://search.proquest.com/central/docview/199340442/7B41B83DDCDD4481PQ/1?accoun tid=188730
[11] House, R. J., Woycke, J. & Fodor, E. M. (1988). Charismatic and noncharismatic leaders: Differences in behavior and effectiveness cited in Hartog, D. N., Van Muijen, J. J and
[12] Koopman, P. L (1997). Transactional versus Transformational leadership. An analysis of the MLQ. Journal of Occupational & Organizational Psychology, Vol. 70, pp. 19 – 34. Retrieved from:https://bpspsychub.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/j.2044-8325.1997.tb00628.x
[13] Howell, J. M., & Avolio, B. J. (1993). Transformational leadership, transactional leadership, locus of control and support for innovation: Key predictors of consolidated-business unit performance. Journal of Applied Psychology, 78, pp. 891-902. Retrieved from: https://psycnet.apa.org/doiLanding?doi=10.1037/0021-9010.78.6.891
[14] Jung, D. I. (2001). Transformational and transactional leadership and their effects on creativity in groups. Creativity Research Journal, 13 (2), pp. 185–197. Retrieved from:https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1207/S15326934CRJ1302_6
[15] Joseph, C. (2015). Transactional Leadership Style Examples. Joseph Chris Partners, 14, pp.
[16] 281, 359-2175. Retrieved from: http://www.josephchris.com/14-transactional-leadership-style-examples
[17] Katz, L. F., and Krueger, A. B. (2019). “Understanding Trends in Alternative WorkArrangements in the United States.” RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences, Vol. 5, No. 5, pp. 132 – 146. Retrieved from: https://doi.org/10.7758/rsf.2019.5.5.07
[18] Khalil, U., Iqbal, J. & Khan, A. (2016). Exploring Leadership Styles of School Administrators in Pakistan cited in Nsom, N. K., Teih, M. M., and Sundjo, F. (2019). “The effects of transactional and transformational leadership on personnel conduct.” International Journal of Research – Granthaalayah, 7(6), pp. 155-164. Retrieved from: https://doi.org/10.29121/granthaalayah.v7.i6.2019.784
[19] Kim, J. G. & Lee S. Y. (2011). Effects of transformational and transactional leadership on employees’ creative behaviour: mediating effects of work motivation and job satisfaction. Asian Journal of Technology Innovation, 19 (2), pp. 233-247. Retrieved from:https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/19761597.2011.632590
[20] Kirkpatrick, S. A & Locke, E. A. (1996). Direct and indirect effects of three core charismatic leadership components on performance and attitudes. Journal of Applied Psychology, 81 (1), 36-51. Retrieved from:https://psycnet.apa.org/journals/apl/81/1/36.html?uid=1996-00227004
[21] Messick, D. M & Kramer, R, M. (2004). The Psychology of Leadership: New Perspectives and Research. Psychology Press, Amazon France. Retrieved from:https://books.google.cm/books/about/The_Psychology_of_Leadership.html?id=6Sh5AgAAQ BAJ&redir_esc=y
[22] Pieterse, A. N., Knippenberg, D.V., Schippers, M., & Stam, D. (2010). Transformational and transactional leadership and innovative behaviour: the moderating role of psychological empowerment. Journal of Organizational Behaviour, 31, pp, 609–623. Retrieved from:https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdfdirect/10.1002/job.650
[23] Ronald, J. D. (1998). Relationship of Transformational and Transactional Leadership with Employee Influencing Strategies. Group and Organizational Journal. Retrieved from:https://doi.org/10.1177/105960118801300404
[24] Weihrich, H., Cannice, M.V. and Koontz, H. (2008) Management: A global and entrepreneurship perspective (12th ed.). Retrieved from:https://www.worldcat.org/oclc/216995898

Christopher Banura Ruyooka , “Critically Assess How Transactional and Transformational Leadership Affects Workforce Behaviour” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.19-22 January 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-1/19-22.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Service Quality of an Educational Institution Office Employees: Basis For A Proposed Training Design

Libh Anthony L. Limama, Fatma M. Idris, Roderick C. Rodriguez, Gladys B. Ave, & Alberto N. Bandiola- January 2022- Page No.: 23-45

This study aimed to determine the Service Quality of an Educational Institution Office Employees and to propose a training design based on the findings of the study. Convenient sampling technique was used in identifying the 226 respondents. Non-experimental quantitative single-variable research design was used through SERVQUAL model. Google form questionnaires were used in collecting the data. Also, mean and ANOVA techniques were used for statistical tools. Results showed very high level of service quality of Pag-IBIG Fund office employees. Accordingly, the results on service quality such as tangibles, reliability, responsiveness, assurance, and empathy were on a very high level yet still need for further enhancement as recommended in the study. Moreover, there was significant difference in the service quality of an Educational Institution office employees when analyzed by office divisions in tangibles specifically

Page(s): 23-45                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 22 January 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6101

 Libh Anthony L. Limama
The University of Mindanao, Davao Del Norte, Philippines

 Fatma M. Idris
The University of Mindanao, Davao Del Norte, Philippines

 Roderick C. Rodriguez
The University of Mindanao, Davao Del Norte, Philippines

 Gladys B. Ave
The University of Mindanao, Davao Del Norte, Philippines

 Alberto N. Bandiola
The University of Mindanao, Davao Del Norte, Philippines

[1] Agus, A., Barker, S. & Kandampully, J. (2007). An exploratory study of service quality in the Malaysian public service sector. International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, 24(2), 177-190.
[2] Ahmed, I. & Islam, T. (2011). Decoding the relationship between employee’s jobs related behaviors: A study of telecom sector of Pakistan. International Journal of Business and Social Science, 2(8).
[3] Akhtar, Z. & Udham, S. (2010). Job involvement: A theoretical interpretation in different work settings. Retrieved from Indian MBA. com.
[4] Albdour, A. A. & Altarawneh, I. I. (2014). Employee engagement and organizational commitment: Evidence from Jordan. International Journal of Business, 19(2), 192.
[5] Allen, N. J. & Meyer, J. P. (1996). Affective, continuance, and normative commitment to the organization: An examination of construct validity. Journal of vocational behavior, 49(3), 252-276.
[6] Hollon, D., Miller, I. J., & Robinson, E. (2002). Criteria for evaluating treatment guidelines. American Psychologist, 57(12), 1052-1059.
[7] Ananth, A., Ramesh, R. & Prabaharan, B. (2010). Service quality gap analysis in private sector bank-a customer perspective. Retrieved from https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/29505/1/Paper_24.pdf
[8] Anderson, E. A. (1995). Measuring service quality at a university health clinic. International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, 8(2), 32-37.
[9] Appleton, K., House, A. & Dowell, A. (1998). A survey of job satisfaction, sources of stress and psychological symptoms among general practitioners in Leeds. Br J Gen Pract, 48(428), 1059-1063.
[10] Avila, J. (2014). Report on the administration of the report card survey in the Cities of Batangas, Iloilo and Cagayan de Oro. Retrieved from https://www.google.com.ph/#q=Report+on+the+Administration+of+the+Report+Card+Survey+in+the+Cities+of+Batangas%2C+Iloilo+and+Cagayan+de+Oro
[11] Azar, S. & Khan, S. (2012). Service Quality of Higher Education in Pakistan. Asian Journal of University Education, 8(1), 107-122.
[12] Babakus, E. & Boller, G. W. (1992). An empirical assessment of the SERVQUAL scale. Journal of Business research, 24(3), 253-268.
[13] Babakus, E. & Mangold, W. G. (1992). Adapting the SERVQUAL scale to hospital services: an empirical investigation. Health services research, 26(6), 767.
[14] Bakar, C., Seval Akgün, H. & Al Assaf, A. F. (2008). The role of expectations in patient assessments of hospital care: an example from a university hospital network, Turkey. International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, 21(4), 343-355.
[15] Ballesteros, M. M. & Egana, J. V. (2013). Efficiency and effectiveness review of the National Housing Authority (NHA) resettlement program (No. 2013-28). Retrieved from https://www.econstor.eu/handle/10419/126958
[16] Barney, J. (1991). Firm resources and sustained competitive advantage. Journal of management, 17(1), 99-120.
[17] Brislin, R. W. & Yoshida, T. (Eds.). (1993). Improving intercultural interactions: Modules for cross-cultural training programs. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications Inc.
[18] Bashir, S. & Ramay, M. I. (2008). Determinants of organizational commitment: a study of information technology professionals in Pakistan. Journal of Behavioral and Applied Management, 9(2), 226.
[19] Berry, L. L., Parasuraman, A. & Zeithaml, V. A. (1994). Improving service quality in America: lessons learned. The Academy of Management Executive, 8(2), 32-45.
[20] Beatson, A., Lings, I. & Gudergan, S. (2008). Employee behaviour and relationship quality: impact on customers. The Service Industries Journal, 28(2), 211-223.
[21] Bettencourt, L. A. & Gwinner, K. (1996). Customization of the service experience: the role of the frontline employee. International journal of service industry management, 7(2), 3-20.
[22] Bitner, M. J., Booms, B. H. & Mohr, L. A. (1994). Critical service encounters: The employee’s viewpoint. The journal of marketing, 95-106.
[23] Bowen, D. E. (1986). Managing customers as human resources in service organizations. Human resource management, 25(3), 371-383.
[24] Bowie, V. (1996). Coping with violence: A guide for the human services. London: Whiting and Burch Limited.
[25] Brown, T. J., Churchill Jr, G. A. & Peter, J. P. (1993). Research note: improving the measurement of service quality. Journal of retailing, 69(1), 127.
[26] Brysland, A. & Curry, A. (2001). Service improvements in public services using SERVQUAL. Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, 11(6), 389-401.
[27] Cable, D. M. & DeRue, D. S. (2002). The convergent and discriminant validity of subjective fit perceptions. Journal of applied psychology, 87(5), 875.
[28] Carman, J. M. (1990). Consumer perceptions of service quality: an assessment of the SERVQUAL dimensions. Journal of retailing, 66(1), 33.

[29] Caron, D. J. & Giauque, D. (2006). Civil servant identity at the crossroads: new challenges for public administrations. International Journal of Public Sector Management, 19(6), 543-555.
[30] Çeliköz, N. (2009). Basic factors that affect general academic motivation levels of candidate preschool teachers. Procedia-Social and Behavioral Sciences, 1(1), 1357-1365.
[31] Challenger, J. A. (2000). 24 trends reshaping the workplace. The Futurist, 34(5), 35.
[32] Check, J. & Schutt, R. K. (2011). Research methods in education. Boston, USA: Sage Publications Inc.
[33] Chen, J. & Wang, L. (2007). Locus of control and the three components of commitment to change. Personality and individual differences, 42(3), 503-512.
[34] Chow-Chua, C. & Komaran, R. (2002). Managing service quality by combining voice of the service provider and voice of their customers. Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, 12(2), 77-86.
[35] Chrisman, N. J. (2007). Extending cultural competence through systems change: Academic, hospital, and community partnerships. Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 18(1), 68-76.
[36] Chughtai, A. A. (2008). Impact of job involvement on in-role job performance and organizational citizenship behaviour. Journal of Behavioral and Applied Management, 9(2), 169.
[37] Costello, A. B. & Osborne, J. W. (2005). Best practices in exploratory factor analysis: Four recommendations for getting the most from your analysis. Practical assessment, research & evaluation, 10(7), 1-9.
[38] Creswell, J. W. & Garrett, A. L. (2008). The movement of mixed methods research and the role of educators. South African journal of education, 28(3), 321-333.
[39] Cook, C. T., Kosoko-Lasaki, O. & O’Brien, R. (2005). Satisfaction with and perceived cultural competency of healthcare providers: the minority experience. Journal of the National Medical Association, 97(8), 1078.
[40] Cronin Jr, J. J. & Taylor, S. A. (1992). Measuring service quality: a reexamination and extension. The journal of marketing, 55-68.
[41] Czepiel, J. A. (1990). Service encounters and service relationships: implications for research. Journal of business research, 20(1), 13-21.
[42] Dabholkar, P. A. (1994). Technology-based service delivery: a classification scheme for developing marketing strategies. Advances in services marketing and management, 3(1), 241-271.
[43] De Venecia, J. A. (2015, July 06). Members’ concerns are our priority – Pag-Ibig. Retrieve from http://opinion.inquirer.net/86438/members-concerns-are-our-priority-pag-ibig#ixzz53IhjurTy on January 05, 2018.
[44] DeLeon, P. (1999). The stages approach to the policy process: What has it done? Where is it going. Theories of the policy process, 1(19), 19-32.
[45] Dedeke, A. (2003). Service quality: a fulfilment-oriented and interactions-centred approach. Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, 13(4), 276-289.
[46] Deolalikar, A. B., & Jha, S. (2013). Empowerment and public service delivery in developing Asia and the Pacific (36). Manila: Asian Development Bank. Retrieved from http://mts.asu.lt/mtsrbid/article/view/966
[47] Donnelly, M., Wisniewski, M., Dalrymple, J. F., & Curry, A. C. (1995). Measuring service quality in local government: the SERVQUAL approach. International Journal of Public Sector Management, 8(7), 15-20.
[48] Donnelly, M. (1999). Making the difference: quality strategy in the public sector. Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, 9(1), 47-52.
[49] Donnelly, M., Kerr, N. J., Rimmer, R. & Shiu, E. M. (2006). Assessing the quality of police services using SERVQUAL. Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, 29(1), 92-105.
[50] Ekmekçi, A. K. (2011). A study on involvement and commitment of employees in Turkey. Journal of Public Administration and Policy Research, 3(3), 68.
[51] Fabrigar, L. R., Wegener, D. T., MacCallum, R. C. & Strahan, E. J. (1999). Evaluating the use of exploratory factor analysis in psychological research. Psychological methods, 4(3), 272.
[52] Field, A. (2000). Discovering statistics using SPSS for windows, edited. Wright D. London. Thousand Oaks. New.
[53] Fountain, J. E. & Osorio-Urzua, C. (2001). The economic impact of the Internet on the government sector. The Economic Payoff from the Internet Revolution, 2(4), 354.
[54] Freund, A. & Carmeli, A. (2003). An empirical assessment: reconstructed model for five universal forms of work commitment. Journal of Managerial Psychology, 18(7), 708-725.
[55] Galloway, L. (1998). Quality perceptions of internal and external customers: A case study in educational administration. The TQM Magazine, 10(1), 20-26.
[56] Galais, N. & Moser, K. (2009). Organizational commitment and the well-being of temporary agency workers: A longitudinal study. Human Relations, 62(4), 589-620.
[57] Garcia-Zamor, J. C. (2015). Quality of governance and ethical public service delivery (PSD) in developing countries. Journal of management and strategy, 6(3), 28.
[58] Gay, L. R., Mills, G. E. & Airasian, P. W. (1996). Educational research: Competencies for analysis and application.
[59] Gilbert, M. J. (Ed.). (2003). Principles and recommended standards for cultural competence education of health care professionals. Retrieved from https://www.mghihp.edu/sites/default/files/about-us/diversity/principles_standards_cultural_competence.pdf
[60] Gore, A. (1993). From red tape to results: creating a government that works better & costs less: executive summary: the national performance review. US: Diane Publishing.
[61] Govender, S. & Parumasur, S. B. (2010). The relationship between employee motivation and job involvement. South African Journal of Economic and Management Sciences, 13(3), 237-253.
[62] Gowan, M., Seymour, J., Ibarreche, S. & Lackey, C. (2001). Service quality in a public agency: same expectations but different perceptions by employees, managers, and customers. Journal of quality management, 6(2), 275-291.
[63] Gronroos, C. (1988). Service quality: The six criteria of good perceived service. Review of business, 9(3), 10.
[64] Guerrier, Y. & Deery, M. (1998). Research in hospitality human resource management and organizational behaviour. International Journal of Hospitality Management, 17(2), 145-160.
[65] Greene, M. (1995). Releasing the imagination: Essays on education, the arts, and social change. Jossey-Bass.
[66] Head, B. & McCoy, E. (Eds.). (1991). Deregulation Or Better Regulation?: Issues for the Public Sector. South Melbourne: Macmillan Education AU.
[67] Hull, J. (2007). Consumer’s guide to education research. Center for Public Education. Retrieved from http://www. centerforpubliceducation. org/Main-Menu/Policies/Consumers-guide-to-education-research/default. aspx.

[68] Ilhaamie, A. G. A. (2010). Service quality in Malaysian public service: some findings. International Journal of Trade, Economics and Finance, 1(1), 40.
[69] Jalalian, M., Sayadi, V. & Shabankareh, N. (2014). Investigation and identification of Factors Affecting Reduction of the Motive of Keshavarzi Bank Employees in Tehran Province Branches. International Journal of Academic Research in Accounting, Finance and Management Sciences, 4(3), 173-181.
[70] Jalonen, P., Virtanen, M., Vahtera, J., Elovainio, M. & Kivimaki, M. (2006). Predictors of sustained organizational commitment among nurses with temporary job contracts. Journal of Nursing Administration, 36(5), 268-276.
[71] Johnson, C. (2007). The sorrows of empire: Militarism, secrecy, and the end of the republic. New York: Metropolitan Books.
[72] Joseph, M., McClure, C. & Joseph, B. (1999). Service quality in the banking sector: the impact of technology on service delivery. International journal of bank marketing, 17(4), 182-193.
[73] Kangis, P. & Passa, V. (1997). Awareness of service charges and its influence on customer expectations and perceptions of quality in banking. Journal of Services Marketing, 11(2), 105-117.
[74] Khan, K. & Nemati, A. R. (2011). Impact of job involvement on employee satisfaction: A study based on medical doctors working at Riphah International University Teaching Hospitals in Pakistan. African Journal of Business Management, 5(6), 2241.
[75] Khan, T. I., Jam, F. A., Akbar, A., Khan, M. B. & Hijazi, S. T. (2011). Job involvement as predictor of employee commitment: Evidence from Pakistan. International Journal of Business and Management, 6(4), 252.
[76] Kiyani, A., Haroon, M., Khattak, M. A., Liaqat, A. S., Bukhari, S. J. A. & Asad, R. (2011). Impact of career salience on universities teachers’ job involvement: A study on public and private universities in Pakistan. African Journal of Business Management, 5(5), 1795.
[77] Kumar, M., Tat Kee, F. & Taap Manshor, A. (2009). Determining the relative importance of critical factors in delivering service quality of banks: an application of dominance analysis in SERVQUAL model. Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, 19(2), 211-228.
[78] Langford, J. & Roy, J. (2006). E-government and public-private partnerships in Canada: when failure is no longer an option. International Journal of Electronic Business, 4(2), 118-135.
[79] Lassar, W. M., Manolis, C. & Winsor, R. D. (2000). Service quality perspectives and satisfaction in private banking. Journal of services marketing, 14(3), 244-271.
[80] Locke, E. (1976). The nature and causes of job satisfaction. In M.D Dunnette (1st ed), Handbook of industrial and organizational psychology. (pp. 1297-1349). Chicago, IL: Rand Mcnally.
[81] Lewis, B. R. & Mitchell, V. W. (1990). Defining and measuring the quality of customer service. Marketing intelligence & planning, 8(6), 11-17.
[82] Luk, S. T. (1997). An examination of the role of marketing culture in service quality. International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, 9(1), 13-20.
[83] Mahal, A., Srivastava, V. & Sanan, D. (2000). Decentralization and public sector delivery of health and education services: The Indian experience (No. 20). ZEF discussion papers on development policy.
[84] Malik, M. E., Nawab, S., Naeem, B. & Danish, R. Q. (2010). Job satisfaction and organizational commitment of university teachers in public sector of Pakistan. International journal of business and management, 5(6), 17.
[85] Manasan, R. G. (2007). Decentralization and the financing of regional development. The Dynamics of Regional Development: The Philippines in East Asia. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, Inc, 275-315.
[86] Mendoza, M. L. (2011). Legislating Citizen’s Charters. Development Academy of the Philippines.
[87] Metters, R. & Vargas, V. (2000). A typology of de-coupling strategies in mixed services. Journal of Operations Management, 18(6), 663-682.
[88] Mittal, S., Gandhi, S. & Tripathi, G. (2010). Socio-economic impact of mobile phones on Indian agriculture (p. 53). New Delhi: Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations.
[89] Moynihan, D. P. & Pandey, S. K. (2007). Finding workable levers over work motivation: Comparing job satisfaction, job involvement, and organizational commitment. Administration & Society, 39(7), 803-832.
[90] Matzler, K., Fuchs, M. & Schubert, A. (2004). Employee satisfaction: does Kano’s model apply? Total Quality Management & Business Excellence, 15(9-10), 1179-1198.
[91] Nor, M. N., Khalid, S. A., Razali, M. F. M. & Ramli, N. A. (2010). Service quality and customer satisfaction: The public sector perspective. Faculty of Business and Management, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Perlis.
[92] Nunnally, J.C. (1994), Psychometric Methods, New York, N.Y: McGraw-Hill Book Company.
[93] Ooesterom,W., Ratan, N.,Varma, N.,de Montfort, R., Pierre, P. & Lloyd, C. (2007). The Road Ahead for Public Service Delivery. Retrieved from https://www.pwc.com/gx/en/psrc/pdf/the_road_ahead_for_public_service_delivery.pdf
[94] Parasuraman, A., Zeithaml, V. A. & Berry, L. L. (1985). A conceptual model of service quality and its implications for future research. The Journal of Marketing, 63(1), 41-50.
[95] Parasuraman, A., Zeithaml, V. A. & Berry, L. L. (1988). Servqual: A multiple-item scale for measuring consumer perc. Journal of retailing, 64(1), 12.
[96] Parasuraman, A., Berry, L. & Zeithaml, V. (2002). Refinement and reassessment of the SERVQUAL scale. Journal of retailing, 67(4), 114.
[97] Parasuraman, A., Berry, L. L. & Zeithaml, V. A. (1993). More on improving service quality measurement. Journal of retailing, 69(1), 140-147.
[98] Parasuraman, A., Zeithaml, V. A. & Berry, L. L. (1994). Reassessment of expectations as a comparison standard in measuring service quality: implications for further research. The Journal of Marketing, 111-124.
[99] Parasuraman, A., Zeithaml, V. A. & Malhotra, A. (2005). ES-QUAL: A multiple-item scale for assessing electronic service quality. Journal of service research, 7(3), 213-233.
[100] Paulrajan, R. & Rajkumar, H. (2011). Service quality and customers preference of cellular mobile service providers. Journal of technology management & innovation, 6(1), 38-45.
[101] Pretorius, D. & Schurink, W. (2007). Enhancing service delivery in local government: the case of a district municipality. SA Journal of Human Resource Management, 5(3), 19-29.
[102] Randall, L. & Senior, M. (1994). A model for achieving quality in hospital hotel services. International Journal of contemporary hospitality management, 6(1/2), 68-74.
[103] Reichheld, F. F. & Sasser, J. W. (1990). Zero defections: Quality comes to services. Harvard business review, 68(5), 105-111.
[104] Robinson, L. (1999). Following the quality strategy: the reasons for the use of quality management in UK public leisure facilities. Managing leisure, 4(4), 201-217.
[105] Robinson, L. (2003). Committed to quality: the use of quality schemes in UK public leisure services. Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, 13(3), 247-255.
[106] Rowley, J. (1998). Quality measurement in the public sector: Some perspectives from the service quality literature. Total Quality Management, 9(2-3), 321-333.

[107] Turner, J. C. & Oakes, P. J. (1986). The significance of the social identity concept for social psychology with reference to individualism, interactionism and social influence. British Journal of Social Psychology, 25(3), 237-252.
[108] Sabri, P. S. U., Ilyas, M. & Amjad, Z. (2011). Organizational culture and its impact on the job satisfaction of the University teachers of Lahore. International Journal of Business and Social Science, 2(24).
[109] Sadek, D. M., Zainal, N. S., Taher, M. S. I. M., Yahya, A. F., Shaharudin, M. R., Noordin, N. & Jusoff, K. (2010). Service quality perceptions between cooperative and Islamic banks of Britain. American Journal of Economics and Business Administration, 2(1), 1.
[110] Samad, S. & Hassan, Z. (2007, July). Assessing the effects of job satisfaction and psychological contract on organizational commitment among employees in Malaysian SMEs. In The 4th SMEs IN A Global Economy Conference 2007.
[111] Schneider, B. & Bowen, D. E. (1985). Employee and customer perceptions of service in banks: Replication and extension. Journal of applied Psychology, 70(3), 423.
[112] Shah, S. & Jalees, T. (2004). An analysis of job satisfaction level of faculty members at the University of Sindh. Journal of Independent studies and Research (JISR), 2(1), 26.
[113] Shammot, M. M. (2011). Quality management practices and their impact on organizational performance, and customer behavior. European Journal of Economics, Finance and Administrative Sciences, 34(2), 21-33.
[114] Sharma, J. P. & Bajpai, N. (2010). Organizational commitment and its impact on job satisfaction of employees: A comparative study in public and private sector in India. International Bulletin of Business Administration, 9(1), 7-19.
[115] Silverthorne, C. (2004). The impact of organizational culture and person-organization fit on organizational commitment and job satisfaction in Taiwan. Leadership & Organization Development Journal, 25(7), 592-599.
[116] Social Security System, (2011). Annual Report of Membership. Retrieved from http://www.sss.gov.ph/sss/DownloadContent?fileName=GCG_SSS_AR11.pdf
[117] Solomon, M. R., Surprenant, C., Czepiel, J. A. & Gutman, E. G. (1985). A role theory perspective on dyadic interactions: the service encounter. The Journal of Marketing, 99-111.
[118] Sonnentag, S. & Kruel, U. (2006). Psychological detachment from work during off-job time: The role of job stressors, job involvement, and recovery-related self-efficacy. European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, 15(2), 197-217.
[119] Strong, R. & Harder, A. (2009). Implications of maintenance and motivation factors on Extension agent turnover. Journal of extension, 47(1), 1-8.
[120] Surprenant, C. F. & Solomon, M. R. (1987). Predictability and personalization in the service encounter. The Journal of Marketing, 45(4), 86-96.
[121] Svensson, G. (2004). A customized construct of sequential service quality in service encounter chains: time, context, and performance threshold. Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, 14(6), 468-475.
[122] Svensson, G. (2006). New aspects of research into service encounters and service quality. International Journal of Service Industry Management, 17(3), 245-257.
[123] Tam, J. L. & Wong, Y. H. (2001). Interactive selling: a dynamic framework for services. Journal of Services Marketing, 15(5), 379-396.
[124] Tamrakar, R. (2010). Impact of citizen charter in service deliver: a case of district administration office, Kathmandu.
[125] Teicher, J., Hughes, O. & Dow, N. (2002). E-government: a new route to public sector quality. Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, 12(6), 384-393.
[126] Tjiptono, F. (2008). Service management mewujudkan layanan prima. Yogyakarta: Andi.
[127] Torres, S. A. (2017, Jan. 12). SSS, LTO, BIR, Pag-IBIG get most flak in 8888 hotlines. Retrieved from http://news.abs-cbn.com/news/01/12/17/sss-lto-bir-pag-ibig-get-most-flak-in-8888-hotline on August 2017
[128] Uygur, A. (2009). A study into organizational commitment and job involvement: An application towards the personnel in the central organization for Ministry of Health in Turkey. Ozean Journal of Applied Science, 2(1).
[129] van Graan, J. & Ukpere, W. I. (2012). The role of impact evaluation on service delivery within the public sector organizations. African Journal of Business Management, 6(39), 10458-10463.
[130] Wagner, C. M. (2007). Organizational commitment as a predictor variable in nursing turnover research: literature review. Journal of advanced nursing, 60(3), 235-247.
[131] Wisniewski, M. (1996). Measuring service quality in the public sector: the potential for SERVQUAL. Total Quality Management, 7(4), 357-366.
[132] Wisniewski, M. (2001). Using SERVQUAL to assess customer satisfaction with public sector services. Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, 11(6), 380-388.
[133] Yang, Z. & Fang, X. (2004). Online service quality dimensions and their relationships with satisfaction: A content analysis of customer reviews of securities brokerage services. International Journal of Service Industry Management, 15(3), 302-326.
[134] Zamil, A. M. & Shammot, M. M. (2011). Role of measuring customer satisfaction in improving the performance in the public sector organization. Journal of Business Studies Quarterly, 2(3), 32.
[135] Zammuto, R. F., Keaveney, S. M. & O’Connor, E. J. (1996). Rethinking student services: assessing and improving service quality. Journal of Marketing for Higher Education, 7(1), 45-70.
[136] Zeithaml, G. (2007). Organizational citizenship behavior: Construct redefinition, operationalization and validation. Academy of Management Journal, 5(8) 37-52.
[137] Zeithaml, V. A., Parasuraman, A., Berry, L. L. & Berry, L. L. (1990). Delivering quality service: Balancing customer perceptions and expectations. The Free Press, New York.
[138] Zeithaml, V. A., Berry, L. L. & Parasuraman, A. (1996). The behavioral consequences of service quality. The Journal of Marketing, 31-46.
[139] Zeithaml, V. A., Bitner, M. J. & Gremler, D. D. (1996). Services Marketing McGraw Hill. New York.

Libh Anthony L. Limama, Fatma M. Idris, Roderick C. Rodriguez, Gladys B. Ave, & Alberto N. Bandiola, “Service Quality of an Educational Institution Office Employees: Basis For A Proposed Training Design” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.23-45 January 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6101

Download PDF

pdf

Enhancing the quality of decisions by administrators: A framework for identifying, classifying and engaging primary school stakeholders in Harare, Zimbabwe

Sharon Kwaramba and Stanley Murairwa- December 2021 Page No.: 46-56

The article identified and classified the primary school stakeholders in Harare, Zimbabwe. The research used a case study and literature analysis results to develop a framework for analysing and classifying primary school stakeholders for enhancing the quality of the decisions by the administrators. The research collected both primary and secondary data from WhatsApp groups of Harare primary school instructors/teachers and parents/guardian sand the literature for analysis. The Voluntary sampling design was used to select the respondents. The research used data that was gathered from forty-five journal articles and sixty primary schoolteachers/instructors and parents/guardians. The research found that a successful implementation of the primary school stakeholder analysis makes the stakeholder identification and classification processes very simple and easy. There was significant a relationship between the primary school and its stakeholders but there was also challenges. This research developed the Stakeholder Identification, classification and Engagement (SICE) framework for identifying, classifying and engaging primary school stakeholders.

Page(s): 46-56                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 24 January 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6102

 Sharon Kwaramba
College of Business, Peace, Leadership and Governance, Africa University, Zimbabwe

 Stanley Murairwa
College of Business, Peace, Leadership and Governance, Africa University, Zimbabwe

[1] Aapaoja, A., & Haapasalo, H. (2014). A Framework for Stakeholder Identification and Classification in Construction Projects. Open Journal of Business and Management, 2, 43 – 55. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/ojbm.2014.21007
[2] Abubakari, A., & Al-hassan, S. (2016). Assessing the contribution of stakeholders to basic education service in Zongo communities in Brong Ahafo Region, Ghana. UDS International Journal of Development, 3(1), 51 – 65. doi:https://doi.org/10.47740/99.UDSIJD6i
[3] Alves, H., Mainardes, W. E., & Raposo, M. (2010). A Relationship Approach to Higher Education Institution Stakeholders Management. Tertiary Education and Management, 16, 159 – 181.
[4] Baker, D. (2018, November 9). 14 Signs of a solid relationship. Retrieved June 13, 2020, from https://brightfreak.com/signs-of-a-solid-relationship/
[5] Benneworth, P., & Osborne, M. (2015). Understanding universities and entrepreneurship education. CHEPS-CRADALL Working Paper CHEPS 08/2015 (pp. 1 – 26). Glasgow: CHEPS: Enschede(NL) and CR&DALL.
[6] BeWater. (2017, March). Stakeholder Selection. Retrieved from BeWater: Sociaty Adapting to Global Change: http://www.bewaterproject.eu/bewater-approach/stakeholder-selection
[7] Boyce, P. (2020, September 20). Stakeholder Definition. Retrieved from Boyce Wire: https://boycewire.com/stakeholder-definition/
[8] Byerengo, V. P., & Onyango, D. O. (2021). chool-Family-Community Partnerships and Their Influence on Student Achievement in Public Secondary Schools in Ilemela Municipality, Tanzania. In F. Nafukho, & A. B. Makulilo (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Nurturing Industrial Economy for Africa’s Development (pp. 357 – 379). IGI Global. doi:10.4018/978-1-7998-6471-4.ch019
[9] Christenson, H. (2005). Community involvement for school development. New York, USA: Thousand Oaks.
[10] CIPS. (2020). Internal, External and Connected Stakeholders. Chartered Institute of Procurement & Supply. Retrieved May 7, 2021, from https://www.cips.org/PageFiles/156828/Internal%20external%20and%20connected%20stakeholders.pdf
[11] Clarkson, M. (1995). A stakeholder framework for analyzing and evaluating corporate social performance. Academy of Management Review, 20(1), 92 – 117. doi:10.2307/258888
[12] Compliance Prime. (2019, October 17). Role of Stakeholders in Business Organization. Retrieved from Compliance Prime: Role of Stakeholders in Business Organization
[13] Deloitte & Touche. (2014). Stakeholder Engagement. Johannesburg: Creative Services at Deloitte .
[14] Donaldson, T., & Preston, E. L. (1995). The Stakeholder Theory of the Corporation: Concepts, Evidence, and Implications. The Academy of Management Review, 20(1), 65 – 91. doi:doi.org/10.2307/258887
[15] Epstein, J., Sanders, G. M., Salinas, C. K., Jansorn, R. N., & Van Voorhis, L. F. (2002). School, Family and Community Partnerships (2nd ed.). California: Corwin Press, Inc. Retrieved from https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/ERIC-ED467082/pdf/ERIC-ED467082.pdf
[16] Fasan, M., & Mio, C. (2017). Fostering stakeholder engagement: The role of materiality disclosure in integrated reporting. Business Strategy and the Environment, 26(3), 288 – 305. doi:10.1002/bse.1917
[17] Fassin, Y. (2012). The stakeholder model refined. Business Ethics, 84(1), 13 – 135. doi:10.1007/s10551-012-1381-8
[18] Fernandes, G., Ward, S., Araújo, M., Loureiro, I., & Braga, A. (2014). Perceptions of Different Stakeholders on Improving and Embedding Project Management Practice in Organisations. Procedia Technology, 16, 957 – 966. doi:10.1016/j.protcy.2014.10.049
[19] Franzén, F., Hammer, M., & Balfors, B. (2015). Institutional development for stakeholder participation in local watermanagement—An analysis of two Swedish catchments. Land Use Policy, 43, 217 – 227. doi:10.1016/j.landusepol.2014.11.013
[20] Freeman, E. R. (1984). Strategic management: A stakeholder approach. Marshfield, MA: Pitman Publishing Inc.
[21] Freeman, K. (2010). The importance of stakeholders in school development. New York, England: Sage.
[22] Green, B. N., Johnson, C. D., & Adams, A. (2006). Writing narrative literature reviews for peer-reviewed journals: secrets of the trade . Journal of chiropractic medicine, 5(3), 101 – 117. doi:10.1016/S0899-3467(07)60142-6
[23] Gudavajhala, S. (2017, February 12). Top 5 Stakeholder Analysis Techniques in Projects | Stakeholder Analysis in Project Management. Retrieved May 7, 2021, from Master of Project Academy:https://masterofproject.com/blog/7514/top-5-stakeholders-analysis-techniques-in-projects-stakeholder-analysis-in-project-management
[24] Hawrysz, L., & Maj, J. (2017). Identification of Stakeholders of Public Interest Organisations. Sustainability, 1 – 13. doi:10.3390/su9091609
[25] Hujainah, F., Bakar, R., Al-haimi, B., & Abdulgabber, A. M. (2018). Stakeholder quantification and prioritisation research: A systematic literature review. Information and Software Technology, 102, 85 – 99. doi:10.1016/j.infsof.2018.05.008
[26] Huntley, J. (2021). Stakeholder Engagement and the Recruitment Process. Retrieved from Optimum Talent: https://optimumtalent.com/how-stakeholder-engagement-can-impact-improve-and-enrich-the-recruitment-process/
[27] Jones, T. M., & Wicks, A. C. (1999). Convergent Stakeholder Theory. The Academy of Management Review, 24(2), 206 – 221.
[28] Khanyile, M., & Green, P. (2016). Application of Stakeholder Management for Business Sustainability in the Higher Education Sector. International Journal of Education Science, 15(3), 328 – 337.
[29] Kladifko, E. R. (2013). Practical School Community Partnerships Leading to Successful Educational Leaders. Educational Leadership and Administration: Teaching and Program Development, 24, 54 – 61.
[30] Land, M., Macura, B., Bernes, C., & Johansson, S. (2017). A fve-step approach for stakeholder engagement in prioritisation and planning of environmental evidence syntheses. Environmental Evidence, 6(25), 1 – 7. doi:10.1186/s13750-017-0104-0
[31] Liang, X., Yu, T., & Guo, L. (2017). Understanding Stakeholders’ Influence on Project Success with a New SNA Method: A Case Study of the Green Retrofit in China. Sustainability, 9(1927), 1 – 19. doi:10.3390/su9101927
[32] Lienert, J. (2020). Explore Perspectives. Retrieved 2020, from SSWM.
[33] Lim, J. S., & Greenwood, C. A. (2017). Communicating corporate social responsibility: Stakeholder responsiveness and engagement strategy to achieve CSR goals. Public Relations Review, 4, 768 – 776. doi:10.1016/j.pubrev.2017.06.007
[34] Magassouba, S. M., Tambi, A. M., Alkhlaifat, B. I., & Abdullah, A. A. (2019). Influence of Stakeholders Involvement on Development Project Performance in Guinea. International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, 9(1), 1111 – 1120.
[35] Mainardes, W. E., Alves, H., & Raposo, M. (2010). An Exploratory Research on the Stakeholders of University. Journal of Management and Strategy, 10(1), 76 – 88.
[36] Mainardes, W. E., Alves, H., & Raposo, M. (2012). A model for stakeholder classification and stakeholder relationships. Management Decision, 50(10), 1861 – 1879. doi:10.1108/00251741211279648
[37] Mainardes, W. E., Alves, H., & Raposo, M. (2013). Identifying Stakeholders in a Portuguese university: a case study. Revista de Educación, 2013(362), 429 – 457. doi:10.4438/1988-592X-RE-2012-362-167
[38] Mainardes, W. E., Raposo, M., & Alves, H. (2012). Public university students’ expectations: an empirical study based on the stakeholders theory. Transylvanian Re-view of Administrative Science , 2012(35), 173 – 196.
[39] Maric, I. (2013). Stakeholder analysis of higher education institutions. Interdiscipli-nary Description of Complex Systems, 11(2), 217 – 226.
[40] McDonald, J. (2016). Business & Finance – Strategy. Retrieved 2020, from Business2Community: https://www.business2community.com/strategy/stakeholder-identification-analysis-made-easy-project-managers-01440041
[41] MedCalc Software Ltd. (2021, December 28). Comparison of proportions calculator. Retrieved from MedCalc: https://www.medcalc.org/calc/comparison_of_proportions.php
[42] Mendelow, A. L. (1981). Environmental Scanning – The Impact of the Stakeholder Concept. Internaioonal Conference on Information Systems 1981 Proceedings.20, pp. 407 – 418. AIS eLibrary.
[43] Milosevic, D., Donaldson, T., & Preston, E. L. (2019). The stakeholder theory of the corporation: Concepts, evidence, and implications. The Academy of Management Review, 65 – 68.
[44] Miroiu, A., & Andreescu, L. (2010). Goals and Instruments of Diversification in Higher Education. Quality Assurance Review, 2(2), 89 – 101.
[45] Mishra, A., & Mishra, D. (2013). Descriptive , Instrumental , and Normative Views of Stakeholder Theory. Retrieved from Semantic Scholar: https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Descriptive-%2C-Instrumental-%2C-and-Normative-Views-of-Mishra-Mishra/c25f506a9af9ffb00f5b66cf2e8565f74e4687ce
[46] Murairwa, S. (2010). A Hybrid Heuristic Research Framework: The Travelling Salesperson Problem. PhD Thesis, Universiti Utara Malaysia (UUM), Kedah.
[47] Murairwa, S. (2015). Voluntary Sampling Design. International Journal of Advanced Research in Management and Social Sciences, 4(2), 185 – 200. Retrieved from http://www.garph.co.uk/IJARMSS/Feb2015/18.pdf
[48] Murairwa, S. (2018). Re-engineering the Education Systems: A Continuous Education Quality Improvement Framework. Mauritius: LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing. Retrieved from https://www.morebooks.de/store/gb/book/re-engineering-the-education-systems/isbn/978-613-9-91916-1
[49] Nyatuka, B. O. (2020). Family-Community-Higher Education Partnership: A Critical Pillar in Realizing Social Justice. In J. Keengwe (Ed.), Handbook of Research on Diversity and Social Justice in Higher Education (pp. 129 – 148). IGI Global. doi:10.4018/978-1-7998-5268-1.ch008
[50] OECD. (2017). In-Depth Analysis of the Labour Market Relevance and Outcomes of Higher Education Systems: Analytical Framework and Country Practices Report, Enhancing Higher Education System Performance. Paris: OECD. Retrieved December 29, 2021, from https://www.oecd.org/education/skills-beyond-school/LMRO%20Report.pdf
[51] Oleksiv, I., & Shpak, N. (2012). Method for Selection of Company Stakeholders. ECONTECHMOD. An international quarterly journal, 1(3), 65 – 74. Retrieved from https://yadda.icm.edu.pl/baztech/element/bwmeta1.element.baztech-b6f31088-5b6b-4940-a312-b07383cd925a/c/Oleksiv.pdf
[52] Paine, S. (2009). Engaging Stakeholders. Sustainability Series. Retrieved October 11, 2021, from https://www2.ed.gov/programs/readingfirst/support/stakeholderlores.pdf
[53] Parmar, L. B., Freeman, E. R., Harrison, S. J., Wicks, C. A., de Colle, S., & Purnell, L. (2010). Stakeholder Theory: The State of the Art. The Academy of Management Annals, 1 – 62. doi:10.1080/19416520.2010.495581
[54] PHAST. (2020). Identifying and managing internal and external stakeholder interests. Retrieved from Health Knowledge: Education, CPD and Revalidation from PHAST: https://www.healthknowledge.org.uk/public-health-textbook/organisation-management/5b-understanding-ofs/managing-internal-external-stakeholders
[55] Pinheiro, R. (2015). The Role of Internal and External Stakeholders. doi:10.1007/978-94-017-9570-8_3
[56] Product Plan. (2020). https://www.productplan.com/. Retrieved 2020, from https://www.productplan.com/.
[57] Rawley, D. (1997). The school and community relations. MA, Needham Heights: Allyn & Bacon.
[58] Schmeer, K. (2016). Stakeholder Analysis Guidelines. Retrieved October 14, 2021, from https://www.who.int/workforcealliance/knowledge/toolkit/33.pdf
[59] Schwartzman, S., ‎Pinheiro, R., & Pillay, P. (2015). Higher Education in the BRICS Countries: Investigating the Pact between Higher Education and Society. New York: Springer.
[60] Seres, L., Tumbas, P., Maric, M., & Pavlicevic, V. (2019). University Stakeholder Mapping. Research Gate.
[61] Sheridan, S. M. (2013). Families and Schools in Partnership: Creating Connections for Student Success. Educational (School) Psychology & Nebraska Research Alliance on Children, Youth, Families and Schools. Lincoln.
[62] Singh, H. (2021, August 5). The Salience Model for Stakeholder Classification. Retrieved from Deep Fried Brain: https://www.deepfriedbrainproject.com/2017/09/salience-model-for-stakeholder-classification.html
[63] Slaba, M. (2015). Stakeholder Groups of Public and Private Universities in the Czech Republic – Identification, Categorization and Prioritization. Review of Economic Perspectives, 15(3), 305 – 326. doi:10.1515/revecp-2015-0022
[64] Strand, R., & Freeman, R. E. (2015). Scandinavian cooperative advantage: The theory and practice of stakeholder engagement in Scandinavia. Business Ethic, 127(1), 65 – 85. doi:10.1007/s10551-013-1792-1
[65] Sulemana, M., Musah, B. A., & Simon, K. K. (2018). Evaluation of District Assembly Projects and Programmes in the Savelugu-Nanton Municipality Assembly, Ghana. Ghana Journal of Development Studies, 15(1), 173 – 195. doi:10.4314/gjds.v15i1.9
[66] Surbhi, S. (2017, April 28). Difference Between Internal and External Stakeholders. Retrieved from Key Differences: https://keydifferences.com/difference-between-internal-and-external-stakeholders.html
[67] UNESCO. (2016). Community Participation in School Development Programmes. UNESCO.
[68] UNESCO. (2017). Definitions and classifications of the OECD international education statistics. UNESCO. Retrieved October 12, 2021, from https://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/definitions-and-classificationsof-the-oecd-international-education-statistics_5jfnt22410xw.pdf
[69] UpCounsel. (2021). Advantages and Disadvantages of Stakeholder Theory. Retrieved from UpCounsel : https://www.upcounsel.com/advantages-and-disadvantages-of-stakeholder-theory
[70] Venturelli, A., Cosma, S., & Leopizzi, R. (2018). Stakeholder engagement: An evaluation of European banks. Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, 25(4), 690 – 703. doi:10.1002/csr.1486
[71] Williams, A. S. (2017). Effective Stakeholder Management Strategies for. Walden University.
[72] Wojewnik-Filipkowska, A., & Wegrzyn, J. (2019). Understanding of Public–Private Partnership Stakeholders as a Condition of Sustainable Development. Sustainability, 11(1194), 1 – 16.

Sharon Kwaramba and Stanley Murairwa “Enhancing the quality of decisions by administrators: A framework for identifying, classifying and engaging primary school stakeholders in Harare, Zimbabwe” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.46-56 January 2022  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6102

Download PDF

pdf

The Attitude of the Continuous Education of School Dropouts; Study Done in Modara and Mattakkuliya Areas of Sri Lanka

Solangaarachchi T. G. K- January 2022- Page No.: 57-64

This sociological study is done based on Children who are considered to be the School Dropouts of Adolescents in Urban area of Colombo, Sri Lanka. These Children live under the care of their Parents, grandparents, and with other care givers. The school dropouts in the Urban area of Colombo are found to be the victims of a society which is corrupted strongly due to Socio-Economic factors. The main objective of this Research article is to look into the main causes for students to dropout halfway of their schooling. The primary and secondary data were collected by providing questioners, interviews, and observations using accepted data collecting methods. The collected data are presented using most suited methods to analyze data by charts, tables and descriptive methods. The Parents, Teachers and Key Informants are being questioned as to why the percentage of School dropouts in this area is high and vulnerable. In order to achieve this objective, the questionners have been used particularly with School Dropouts and with their Parents further conduct interviews with Teachers and Key-Informants.

Page(s): 57-64                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 24 January 2022

\

 Solangaarachchi T. G. K
Faculty of Graduate Studies, University of Kelaniya, Dalugama, Sri Lanka

[1] Haralambos, M., with Heald, R. M. (2011). Sociology Themes and Perspectives, Oxford University Press, New Delhi.
[2] Brunt Land Report., (1972).
[3] National Dangerous drugs control Board., (2006). RESEARCH MONOGRAPH, P.146
[4] Perera., (2012). Department of Census and Statistics, DCS Statistics Data Base, Household Income and Expenditure Survey – 2009-10, Colombo: DCS.
[5] Ministry of Education (MOE)., (2017). Survival Rates, Colombo: Statistics Division, MOE.
[6] Sminatharatnam and Chandra., (2004). Social Research Methods and Techniques, Authors, India, Tiruchirappalli, 262p.
[7] Uyangoda, U., (2011). Social Scientists’ Association, Sri Lanka, Colombo, p135.
[8] UNESCO report., (2016). (https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000246230)

Solangaarachchi T. G. K, “The Attitude of the Continuous Education of School Dropouts; Study Done in Modara and Mattakkuliya Areas of Sri Lanka” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.57-64 January 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-1/57-64.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Perceptions of the Usage of WhatsApp for Instruction: A Study of Teachers in Senior High Schools in Ghana

Frederick Owusu-Boakye; Abednego Kofi Bansah; Justice Armah – January 2022- Page No.: 65-75

The free education policy at the senior high school levels in Ghana resulted in an increase in enrollment numbers which subsequently lead to the adoption of the double track system which necessitated the need to divide students into two tracks. This meant that while one track was in school, the other was on vacation. As such, an innovative way is needed to keep students’ engage especially a track that is on vacation. The purpose of this research was to determine the perception of teachers on the usage of WhatsApp messenger for teaching and learning. A cross-sectional design was employed in this study among 125 senior high school teachers within Tema Metropolis of Ghana. The research revealed that, perceived cost had an effect on teachers perceive usefulness, perceived convenience, perceived effectiveness, perceived trust and perceived intension to use WhatsApp Messenger for teaching and learning. Perceived convenience had a more pronounced effect on perceived usefulness. Implications of the results for scaling up or developing reforms on regular stakeholder’s consultations to understand the concept of using WhatsApp messenger for teaching and learning in high schools with similar context are discussed.

Page(s): 65-75                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 25 January 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6105

 Frederick Owusu-Boakye
University of Cape Coast, Central Region, Ghana

 Abednego Kofi Bansah
University of Cape Coast, Central Region, Ghana

 Justice Armah
University of Cape Coast, Central Region, Ghana

Frederick Owusu-Boakye; Abednego Kofi Bansah; Justice Armah, “Perceptions of the Usage of WhatsApp for Instruction: A Study of Teachers in Senior High Schools in Ghana” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.65-75 January 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6105

Download PDF

pdf

Kigiryama Phonology

Dr. Elizabeth Jumwa Munyaya – January 2022- Page No.: 76-83

This paper provides an in-depth introduction to the Phonology of Kigiryama language. Phonetics is the study of how the sounds of the world’s languages are produced and perceived. Phonology is the study of how these sounds are categorized, contrasted, and organized into larger structures in each language. In this paper, we will begin with a description of the phonotactics of Kigiryama language and Kigiryama syllable structure. Finally, this paper will analyze the phonological processes involved with both vowels and consonants in the language in question. The aim of the study is to give a phonological description of Kigiryama vowels and consonants with a special reference to the phonological processes that occur in these phonemes. Data will be collected through interview schedules and focus group discussions. Analysis of the data will involve first translating the data into English, then classifying and describing the words into the phonological processes of the vowels and consonants. The findings will show that the processes of glide formation, vowel deletion, vowel insertion and vowel height assimilation occur mainly with vowels while the processes of palatalization, labialization and assibilation occur mainly with consonants. Throughout the paper, we will work with real data from a diverse sample of the Kigiryama language. This information is fundamental to any linguistic study since it forms a foundation upon which various levels of linguistic analysis of Kigiyama is based.

Page(s): 76-83                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 25 January 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6106

 Dr. Elizabeth Jumwa Munyaya
Pwani University, Kilifi, Kenya

[1] Abdulmajid, M.A (2000) LuwangaMorphophonemics. Unpublished M.A Dissertation, University of Nairobi.
[2] Archangeli, Diana & Terence Langendoen. (1997). Optimality Theory: An Overview. Wiley Blackwell
[3] Bauer, L. (2003). Introducing Linguistic Morphology.
[4] Gick, Bryan, Ian Wilson & Donald Derrick. (2013). Articulatory Phonetics. Wiley Blackwell.
[5] Hyman L.M. (2008) Issues in African languages phonology. UC Berkeley Lab Annual Report.
[6] Johnson, Keith. (2011). Acoustic & Auditory Phonetics. Blackwell.
[7] Kumbatha, G. M. (1998) KigiryamaMorphophonemicsin a Natural Generative Framework. Unpublished M.A Dessertation: University of Nairobi
[8] Ladefoged, Peter & Ian Maddieson. (1996). The Sounds of the World’s Languages. Blackwell.
[9] Ladefoged, Peter & Keith Johnson. (2014). A Course in Phonetics. Peter Ladefoged& Keith Johnson. Cengage Press. 5th edition or later
[10] Mweri, G. (1991) NP Movement. A Government and Binding approach. Unpublished M.A. Dissertation. University of Nairobi.
[11] Odden, David. (2005). Introducing Phonology. Cambridge University Press.
[12] Rialland, Annie. (2007). ‘Question prosody: an African perspective. In Tomas Riad& Carlos Gussenhoven (eds.), Tones and tunes: Studies in word and sentence prosody, vol. 1, 35-62.Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.
[13] Sirya, M. (1993) Verbal Morphology of Kigiryama. Nairobi: Bible Translation and Literacy

Dr. Elizabeth Jumwa Munyaya “Kigiryama Phonology” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.76-83 January 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6106

Download PDF

pdf

Impact of Computer Literacy on Secondary School Students Achievement in Computer Science in Makurdi Local Government Area

Abari M. T., Ukoh J. O., and Kareem, M.A.- January 2022- Page No.: 84-87

This Study investigates the impact of computer literacy on Secondary School students achievement in computer science.Three research questions were asked in the study and 2 research hypotheses were formulated and tested at 0.05 level of significance. This study used causal comparative design. The area of study is Makurdi Local Government Area of Benue State, Nigeria. Makurdi is the capital of Benue State. The target population for this study consisted of final year senior secondary school 3 students in Makurdi, Benue state. The sample of 60 students was randomly selected from the population of 1, 200 students. The sample size for the study is 60 Senior Secondary School 3 students. The sample was determined using random sampling techniques.The questionnaire titled Impact of Computer Literacy on Academic Achievement of Secondary School Students in Computer Science Questionnaire is made up of two sections. Section A and section B. Section A is concerned with bio data of the student while section B is made up of six (6) items. The instrument was validated and a pilot test was carried out in a school outside the target schools for the study and the reliability of the instrument was determined. The research questions were answered using mean and standard deviation while the hypothesis was tested using T-test. The study shows that there is significant impact of computer literacy on secondary school students achievement in computer science and also that there is a significant impact of computer literacy on male and female secondary school students achievement in computer science.

Page(s): 84-87                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 25 January 2022

 Abari M. T.
Department of Mathematics Education, Joseph Sarwuan Tarka University, Makurdi, Benue State, Nigeria

 Ukoh J. O.
Department of Mathematics Education, Joseph Sarwuan Tarka University, Makurdi, Benue State, Nigeria

 Kareem, M.A.
Federal Capital Territory, Secondary Education Board, Area3 Garki Abuja, Nigeria

[1] Ameh N, Kene TS, Ameh EA 2008. Computer knowl- edge amongst clinical year medical students in a re- source poor setting. Africa Health Science, 8(1): 40- 43.
[2] Björklund Larsen, L. (2018). A fair share of tax: a fiscal anthropology of contemporary Sweden (p. 136). Springer Nature.
[3] Islam MS, Fouji MH 2010. The impact of ICT on stu- dents’ performance: A case study of ASA University Bangladesh. ASA University Review, 4(2): 101-106.
[4] Isma’Ila, Y. S., Enemali, J. D., Muhammad, M. H., & Nordin, M. S. (2012). Development and Validation of Automobile Technology Learning Environment Inventory in Tertiary Institutions of Nigeria. IAMURE International Journal of Mathematics, Engineering & Technology, 2, 12.
[5] Karamti C 2016. Measuring the impact of ICTs on aca- demic performance: Evidence from higher education in Tunisia. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 48(4):322-337.
[6] Kareem AA 2015. Effects of computer assisted instruc- tion on students’ academic achievement and attitude in biology in Osun State, Nigeria. Journal of Emerg- ing Trends in Educational Research and Policy Stud- ies, 6(1):69-73.
[7] Kasonde Ng’andu, F. H., Haambokoma, N., & Tomaida, M. (2013). The Contribution of Behaviourism Theory to Education. Journal: Zambia Journal of Education, 4(1), 58-74.
[8] Kpoliview, J. P. Obiori, I. E. (2015).Adequacy-inadequacy educational funding in Nigeria.Universal Journal of Education and General Studies, 2 (8), 239-245.
[9] Odusanya OO, Bamgbala OA 2002. Computing and in- formation technology skills of final year medical and dental students at the College of Medicine University of Lagos. The Nigerian Postgraduate Medical Jour- nal, 9(4):189-193.
[10] Okebukola PA, Woda AB 1993. The gender factor in computer anxiety and interest among some Austra- lian high school students. Educational Research, 35(2): 181-189.
[11] Oketunji, I. (2002) 40 years information and communication Technologies (ICT) library services to the nation. Paper delivered at the Nigeria library association 40th anniversary meeting hel dat ASCON, Topo, Badagry, lagos state, 16th-21st June.
[12] Okpe, V. O. (2018). Effect of instructional material on academic achievement of physics students in secondary schools in udi local government area of enugu state. Effect of instructional material on academic achievement of physics students in secondary schools in Udi Local Government area of Enugu State.
[13] Osman LM, Muir AL 1994. Computer skills and atti- tudes to computer-aided learning among medical stu- dents. Medical Education, 28(5): 381-385.
[14] Oviawe, R. Oshio, E. (2011). The impact of information and communication technologies on teaching and learning ability of education students. Journal of Library and Information Studies. 6: 3 – 6.
[15] Prensky M 2001. Digital natives, digital immigrants (Part II). On the Horizon, 9(6): 1-6.
[16] Ranasinghe P, Wickramasinghe SA, Pieris WAR, Karu- nathilake I, Constantine GR 2012. Computer literacy among first-year medical students in a developing country: A cross-sectional study. BMC Research Notes, 5(1): 504.
[17] Richardson, J. S., Morgan, R. F., & Fleener, C. (2012). Reading to learn in the content areas. Cengage Learning.
[18] Rintaningrum, R. (2009). Literacy: its importance and changes in the concept and definition. Teflin, 20(1), 1-7.
[19] Tella A, Mutula SM 2008. Gender differences in com- puter literacy among undergraduate students at the University of Botswana: Implications for library use. Malaysian Journal of Library and Information Science, 13(1): 59-76.

Abari M. T., Ukoh J. O., and Kareem, M.A., “Impact of Computer Literacy on Secondary School Students Achievement in Computer Science in Makurdi Local Government Area” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.84-87 January 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-1/84-87.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Untold Stories of Working Students: Failures, Successes, and Prospects

Glenda C. Magno, Eugenio S. Magno – January 2022- Page No.: 88-97

TQuality education is the prime dream of every student. However, for the poor and underprivileged students, the burden of acquiring a college degree required a lot of perseverance and hardship. Therefore, this study revealed the experiences of working students’ failures, successes, and prospects. It applied a phenomenological qualitative research design where the twenty (20) identified working students, their select classmates, and teachers served as the population of the study. The data gathered through an in-depth- one-on-one interview with the participants and analyzed with the use of the MAXQDA software. The study revealed the situation of working students is really tough and very stressful. They have difficulty complying with school requirements. The advantages of being a working student help them learn how to prioritize and manage their time and boost their self-confidence. The disadvantages include incurring school tardiness leading to poor academic performance. The strength of working students includes being optimistic and managing setting priorities in life. On the other hand, the weaknesses of having difficulty fixing conflicting schedules and mental exhaustion

Page(s): 88-97                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 25 January 2022

 Glenda C. Magno
Faculty of Bataan Peninsula State University, San Ramon, Dinalupihan, Bataan, Philippines

 Eugenio S. Magno
Faculty of Bataan Peninsula State University, San Ramon, Dinalupihan, Bataan, Philippines

[1] Abdul, H. F. (2016). The life of a working student. Retrieved from. https://blog.han.nl/abs/2016/05/14/the-life-of-a-working-student/
[2] Curambao, L. S. et. Al. (2015). Problems encountered by working Students Retrieved: https://www.academia.edu/38231750/Problems_encountered_by_workingstudents
[3] Creswell, J. W. (2013). Qualitative Inquiry and Research Design. Choosing Among Five Approaches. USA: SAGE Publication, Inc.
[4] Dante, M. (2016). Daily problems working students face every day. Retrieved: https://essayrepublic.net/blog/daily-problems-working- students-face-every-day
[5] Del Rosario, K. (2020). Unfolding of Filipino School Leadership Experiences in Doha, Qatar. Retrieved from:
https://education.uitm.edu.my/ajue/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/9.- Ancho-Manuscript-Unfolding-of-Filipino-School-Leadersip.pdf
[6] Ermac D. et.al. (2017). Life of working students: opportunities and challenges cebu normal university. Retrieved from.
https://www.academia.edu/35758555/LIFE_OF_WORKING_STUDEN TS_OPPORTUNITIES_AND_CHALLENGES
[7] Faizuddin A. (2018). The experiences of working while studying: a case study of Postgraduate students at international Islamic. Malaysia University Tumin. Retrieved
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/328379557_ _
[8] Frigillano S. D. et.al. (2015). Lived Experiences of On-Campus Working Students. Open Science Journal of Education. Vol. 3, No. 6, 2015, pp. 38-42.
[9] Gutierrez, J. F. (2019, March). TWO IN ONE: STRUGGLES OF A WORKING STUDENT Retrieved://www.researchgate.net/publication/331815496_2in1struggles of working students
[10] Jewell*, S. (2014). The Impact of Working While Studying on Educational and Labour Market. Business and Economics Journal.
[11] Kwadzo M. (2014). International students’ experience of studying and working at a Northeastern public university in the US. Journal of International Students Online Volume 4, Issue 3 (2014), pp. 279-291 Retrieved from. http://jistudents.org/
[12] Matano, A. D. (2016). The Impact of Working while Studying on the. Retrieved from https://www.aiel.it/cms/cms-files/submission/all20160608164320.pdf
[13] Montemayor, M. (2018). Free college education in full swing in 2018. Retrieved from. https://www.pna.gov.ph/articles/1057514.
[14] Raykov, C. S. (2018, July 04). Studying and Working—Hurdle or Springboard? Widening Access to Higher Education for Working Students in Malta.
[15] Schoffstall D. G. & Arendt S. W. (2014). Benefits and challenges encountered by working students. Pages 10-20 | published online: 14 Mar 2014.Retrieved.https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10963758.2014.880614
[16] Villahermosa, M.E., et.al. (2015). working scholars: life as a worker and an academic performer. Retrieved from. https://ejournals.ph/article.php?id=11767

Glenda C. Magno, Eugenio S. Magno, “The Untold Stories of Working Students: Failures, Successes, and Prospects” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.88-97 January 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-1/88-97.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Private Sector Credit Provision in Periods of Fluctuating Capital Inflows in Nigeria: Does each Regime Change Influence Credit Provision Differently?

Nzeh, Innocent Chile, Benedict I. Uzoechina, Millicent Adanne Eze, Chika P. Imoagwu and Ozoh Joan Nwamaka – January 2022- Page No.: 98-113

Our study aims to find the link between capital inflows and credit to private sector over a period of 2010M01-2021M08 and to identify if the behavior of banks’ credit in each regime differ. Under the framework of ARDL, in the first sub-sample, findings show that capital inflows negatively impacts on credit to private sector in the short-run, while in the long-run, the impact is positive though not significant. The study also finds that the interaction of capital inflows with the dummy variable leads to a positivesignificant impact of capital inflows on credit to private sectorin the short-run. In the second sub-sample, findings show that the impact of capital inflows on credit to private sector is positive but not significant both in the short-run and in the long-run. However, when capital inflows interact with the dummy variable, the impact on credit to private sector is negative and significant in both the short and long-run. Consequently, we recommend that different policy measures should be adopted to suit different shocks to the macroeconomic environment.

Page(s): 98-113                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 26 January 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6112

 Nzeh, Innocent Chile
Department of Economics, Renaissance University, Ugbawka, Enugu State, Nigeria

 Benedict I. Uzoechina
Department of Economics, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria

 Millicent Adanne Eze
School of Business and Social Sciences, Abertay University, Dundee, United Kingdom

 Chika P. Imoagwu
Department of Economics, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria

 Ozoh Joan Nwamaka
Department of Economics, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria

[1] Acheampong, K. (2019).The interaction effect of foreign capitalinflows and financial development oneconomic welfare in sub-Saharan Africa.Financial Innovation, 5(25), 2-33.
[2] Akinci, O.,& Queralto, A. (2014).Banks, capital flows and financial crises. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System International Finance Discussion Papers Number 1121
[3] Bailliu, J. N. (2000). Private capital flows, financial development,and economic growth in developing countries. Bank of Canada Working Paper 2000-15
[4] Barbosa, L., Bilan, A.,& Celerier, C. (2020). Capital inflows, credit growth and skill allocation Retrieved from: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2981127
[5] Baskayaa, Y. S., Giovanni¸ J., Kalemli-Özcanc, S., Peydrob, J. & Ulu, M. (2017). Capital flows and the international credit channel. Journal of International Economics, 108, 15–22.
[6] Cesar, C. & Megumi, K. (2021). Gross inflows gone wild: Gross capital inflows, credit booms and crises.Policy Research Working Papers 08.
[7] Gabriel, M. T. (2016).Leveraging Nigeria’s economic development: Foreigncapital inflow or financial system?Account and Financial Management Journal, 1(3), 183-196.
[8] Ghilardi, M. F. & Peiris, S. J. (2014). Capital flows, financial intermediation and macroprudential policies. Asia Pacific Department, Research Department and Strategy, Policy and Review Department. IMF Working Paper WP/14/157
[9] Kaat, D. M. (2017). International capital flows and the allocation of credit across Firms. Conference participants at the University of Osnabrück, at the Deutsche Bundesbank, at the 10th Conference for Macroeconomics (ifo Dresden and University of Hamburg), at the German Economic Association and at the German Finance Association.
[10] Kolapo, T., Funso,A. R., Oke, K.,&Ojo, M. (2012). Credit risk and commercial banks’ performance in Nigeria: A panel model approach. Australian Journal of Business and Management Research, 2(02), 31-38.
[11] Leybourne, S.J. & Newbold, P. (2003). Spurious rejections by cointegration tests induced by structural breaks. Applied Economics, 35(9), 1117-1121
[12] Lucas, R. (1976). Econometric policy evaluation: A critique, Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, 1, New York: American Elsevier.
[13] Perron, P. (1997). Further evidence on breaking trend functions in macroeconomic variables. Journal of Econometrics, 80(2), 355-385.
[14] Pesaran, M., & Shin, Y. (1999). An autoregressive distributed-lag modelling approach to co- integration analysis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
[15] Pesaran, M., Shin, Y., & Smith, R. (2001). Bounds testing approaches to the analysis of level relationships.Journal of Applied Econometrics, 16(3), 289-326.
[16] Rummel, O. (2015). Economic modelling and forecasting.Centre for Central Banking Studies, Bank of England, 1-5.
[17] Steffen, C. G. (2011). Business cycles and financial intermediation in emerging economies. German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin) Seminar on Macro and International Economics
[18] Tong, H.,& Wei, S. (2008). The composition matters: capital inflows and liquidity crunch during a global economic crisis. The Review of Financial Studies, 24(6), 2023-2052.
[19] Vinayagathasan, T. (2013). Monetary policy and the real economy: A Structural VAR Approach for Sri Lanka.National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies.

Nzeh, Innocent Chile, Benedict I. Uzoechina, Millicent Adanne Eze, Chika P. Imoagwu and Ozoh Joan Nwamaka, “Private Sector Credit Provision in Periods of Fluctuating Capital Inflows in Nigeria: Does each Regime Change Influence Credit Provision Differently?” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.98-113 January 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6112

Download PDF

pdf

Integrating the Information Systems: Proposal to develop a Library LMS

D.N.T. Gunawardhana – January 2022- Page No.: 114-117

Library is not limited to offering resources for learning and teaching. Traditional library services are rapidly changing and library professionals are going beyond their limits of the duty list to provide maximum contribution to their users. They are coming out of the library and serve as resource persons, instructors, lecturers, research helpers, mentors, counselors and play many roles in the academic environment. They are giving their contribution to enhance learning and teaching by conducting lectures, seminars and workshops on research based sessions such as literature searching, plagiarism, referencing, thesis writing, abstract writing, research publishing, data analysis, research methodology etc. These works (content and knowledge) should be stored in an information system such as the University Learning Management System (LMS). With the COVID pandemic situation the need for such a system is very high due to the importance of online learning environment. That is why Library Learning Management System (Library LMS) is subjected to discussion. The duty list of library professionals is being redefined accordingly. Library professionals consist of the multidisciplinary subject streams. They contribute to teaching by conducting online lectures, creating online learning materials, providing new tools and techniques, conducting consultancy for research support using their subject knowledge. Then students will get many benefits such as download available learning materials, video lectures, make an appointment for online tutors, get “ask help” service and meet subject specialists when they have a “Library LMS”. It may have two tasks when establish a “Library LMS”. The first task is to develop a “Library LMS” as a sub system of the existing Library Management System. The second task is to integrate it with the University LMS.

Page(s): 114-117                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 January 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6107

 D.N.T. Gunawardhana
University of Moratuwa, Sri Lanka

[1] Ajibade, P., & Mutula, S. M. (2020). Virtual learning: a disruptive service in academic libraries. Library Hi Tech News.
[2] Farkas, M. G. (2015). Libraries in the learning management system. Instructional technologies tips and trends. https://acrl. ala. org/IS/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/summer2015. pdf.
[3] Gunawardhana, D. N. T. (2018). Improving the Service Quality of Higher Education Institutions: Special reference to Information Systems. International Journal of Advanced Studies in Computers, Science and Engineering, 7(11), 13-17.
[4] Kampa, R.K. (2017), “Bridging the gap: integrating the library into Moodle learning management system a study”, Library Hi Tech News, Vol. 34 No. 4, pp. 16-21. https://doi.org/10.1108/LHTN-11-2016-0055
[5] Krier, L. (2021). Library curriculum outside the classroom: Connecting library services to student learning. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 47(2), 102303.
[6] Landis, C. (2016). Librarians in Learning Management Systems: Strategies and Suggestions. Got a minute? Instruction tune-up for time pressed librarians.
[7] Lockhart, J. (2021), “Embedding an information literacy course into a learning management system: a case study”, Library Management, Vol. 42 No. 6/7, pp. 376-394. https://doi.org/10.1108/LM-09-2020-0129
[8] Papic, A., & Stricevic, I. (2012). Integration of academic libraries’ e-services into learning management system: students’ perception. In Management, Knowledge and Learning International Conference (pp. 239-246).

D.N.T. Gunawardhana “Integrating the Information Systems: Proposal to develop a Library LMS” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.114-117 January 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6107

Download PDF

pdf

Enhancement of the knowledge on the drop in levels in Benin’s high schools and colleges: Case of Fonkpamè College

AITCHEDJI Magloire Fortuné Landry, HOUEHA Noukpo Saturnin, KELANI R.Raphael- January 2022- Page No.: 118-123

The gradual decline in the level of learners is one of the main difficulties currently facing education in Benin. While numerous efforts are being made by socio-political stakeholders, there is limited scientific documentation on the real causes of this scourge. This study aims at identifying the main causes of the drop in level of trainees in Benin’s high schools and Colleges. The study was carried out at the “Collège d’Enseignement Général” (CEG) of Fonkpamè in Benin. The research methodology was based on the analysis of trainees’ academic results over a period of three years and on semi-structured interviews with a sample of 50 teachers and 120 trainees. The outcomes was a drop in academic performance between 2012-2013 and 2014-2015 at both level 1 and level 2 with increasingly high dropout rates. Highlighting the associated parameters to this drop in level revealed that 74% of learners with a home away from their school, 66% of learners with an illiterate parent, 72% of learners having no access to school books and reinforcement, 91% of learners paying their own school fees, 84% of learners who admit to having regular and uncontrolled access to social networks and 68% of learners without any follow-up from their parents, 70% of learners aged 15-17 in 5th form did not obtain the average. Hence, these factors have an impact on the academic performance of trainees. It would be important to extend this study to other high schools and colleges in Benin in order to take general measures of pedagogical, didactic, technical and social reforms to improve the performance of the Beninese educational system.

Page(s): 118-123                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 January 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6108

 AITCHEDJI Magloire Fortuné Landry
Ecole Normale Supérieure de Natitingou, UNSTIM (Bénin)

 HOUEHA Noukpo Saturnin
Ecole Normale Supérieure de Natitingou, UNSTIM (Bénin)

 KELANI R.Raphael
Ecole Normale Supérieure de Natitingou, UNSTIM (Bénin)

[1] Rapport d’État sur le Système Éducatif National. (2005). Eléments de synthèse de l’étude : Le système béninois ; Performance et espaces d’amélioration pour la politique éducative.https://dakar.iiep.unesco.org/sites/default/files/fields/publication_files/synthese_resen_benin_0.pdf
[2] Agbodjogbé, B., Amade-Escot, C. et Attiklèmè, K. (2013). La réforme des curriculums par compétences au Bénin: Le point de vue des acteurs en éducation physique et sportive et en Sciences de la Vie et de la Terre.Éducation et socialisation, 34.
[3] Napporn, C. et Baba-Moussa A. (2013). Accompagnement et soutien scolaires : l’expérience béninoise.Revue internationale d’éducation de Sèvres, 62(1), 79‑88.
[4] Affo, M. A. (2004). Promotion de la scolarisation des enfants au Bénin : le département du Mono, un exemple de réussite.https://www.yumpu.com/fr/document/view/16854499/promotion-de-la-scolarisation-des-enfants-au-benin-colloque-
[5] Revue du secteur de l’éducation. (2008), Memorandum.
[6] Karsenti, T. Mieux former les enseignants dans la Francophonie. Principaux enjeux actuels et futurs, Montréal.file:///C:/Users/ASSOGBA%20Ph%C3%A9nix/Downloads/Improving_teacher_training_in_Francophone_contexts_insights_for_education_planners.pdf
[7] LM. (2013). Baisse de niveau des écoliers dans le Zou: Les Directeurs d’école accusent les Normaliens. http://news.acotonou.com/h/11988.html.
[8] Sorgho, R. (2008). Origine sociale et performances scolaires : analyse de l’influence des facteurs socio- économiques sur les résultats scolaires. Etude de cas du lycée Rialé et du collège Naaba Zoungrana de Tenkodogo.Mémoire de Maitrise, Université de Ouagadougou, UFR- SH, Département de sociologie.
[9] Djallo, A. (2009). Impact de l’action parentale sur la performance scolaire au Bénin : relation communicationnelle, suivi des études et incitation à l’excellence, Mémoire de fin de formation pour l’obtention du Master en Économie Publique et Statistique Appliquée.
[10] Yuang, 2003.
[11] Schiller, S.,Khmelkov, T. et Wang, X. (2002). Economic Development and the Effects of Family Characteristics on Mathematics Achievement.Journal of Marriage and Family, 64(3), 730‑742.
[12] A. MAIGA, 1990.
[13] Sharif, I. et Sargent, J. D. (2006). Association Between Television, Movie, and Video Game Exposure and School Performance.Pediatrics, 118(4), e1061‑e1070.
[14] Dehmler, K. (2009). Adolescent technology usage during sleep-time: does it influence their quality of sleep, attention difficulties and academic performance?. PhD Thesis, https://scholarworks.rit.edu/theses/6829/.
[15] Paik, H. (2000). Television Viewing and High School Mathematics Achievement: A Neural Network Analysis. Quality&Quantity, 34(1), 1‑15.
[16] Pombeni, M. L.,Zappal, S. et Guglielmi, D. (2002). Expérience scolaire et développement psychosocial : une recherche sur les adolescents. L’orientation scolaire et professionnelle, 31(3).
[17] Scharmann, G.(2011). Rejets d’école à l’adolescence.Enfances& Psy,52, 78‑88.
Une éducation de qualité nécessite des enseignants qualifiés », UNESCO, 03-oct-2014.Availableon:https://fr.unesco.org/news/%C3%A9ducation-qualit%C3%A9-n%C3%A9cessite-enseignants-qualifi%C3%A9s. [Consulté le: 07-nov-2018].
[18] Bellarbre, E. Caractéristiques des enseignants et réussite scolaire. 59 p

AITCHEDJI Magloire Fortuné Landry, HOUEHA Noukpo Saturnin, KELANI R.Raphael, “Enhancement of the knowledge on the drop in levels in Benin’s high schools and colleges: Case of Fonkpamè College” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.118-123 January 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6108

Download PDF

pdf

In vitro Regeneration protocol for Mulberry Morus alba L. through Tissue Culture Techniques

Md. Sohel Rana, Muhammad Nurul Amin and Mustafa Abul Kalam Azad – January 2022- Page No.: 124-128

This research work was taken for enormous production of white mulberry (Morus alba L.) through micropropagation techniques. Surface sterilization of the explants collected from the field grown mature plants was important and it was done with 0.1% HgCl₂ (Mercuric chloride) solution at different durations. Result showed that duration of the treatment was the best at 12 minutes for both shoot tips and nodal segments. Axillary shoot proliferation of nodal explants was better than that of (terminal) shoot tips. Data analysis showed that cytokinin BAP (6-Benzyl aminopurine) was more effective than Kn (Kinetin) for axillary shoot proliferation. The MS medium supplemented with 6.0 µM was the best to grow 100% shoot proliferation of the explants where the average length was 5.57cm ± 0.05. On the other hand, different concentration and type of auxin affected greatly to induce number and percentage of roots per shoot. In this case, half MS medium supplemented with 6.0 µM IBA (Indole-3-butyric acid) was showed the highest percentage (100%) of root regeneration where the average length was 4.21cm ± 0.07.

Page(s): 124-128                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 January 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6109

 Md. Sohel Rana
Regional Bamboo Research and Training Centre, Bangladesh Forest Research Institute, Domar, Nilphamari-5340, Bangladesh

 Muhammad Nurul Amin
Professor, Department of Botany, University of Rajshahi-6205, Bangladesh

 Mustafa Abul Kalam Azad
Professor, Department of Botany, University of Rajshahi-6205, Bangladesh

[1] Ahmed, H. and Ammen, B. Z. (2019). Atropa belladonna L. By Tissue Culture and Determination of Some Alkaloids in Callus. Horticulture Science and Landscape Design (Plant Tissue Culture), University of Mosul, College of Agriculture and Forestry.
[2] Al-Joboury, Kh. R. (2012). In Vitro Propagation of Groundnut (Arachis hypogea L.). Iraq Natural History Research Center and Museum, University of Baghdad.
[3] Amiri, S., Kazemitabar, S. K., Ranjbar, G. A. and Azadbakht, M. (2010). In vitro propagation and whole plant regeneration from callus in Datura (Datura stramonium. L). African Journal of Biotechnology, 10(3), 442-448.
[4] Anis, M. and Faisal, M. (2005). In vitro regeneration and mass multiplication of Psoraleacorylifolia-an endangered medicinal plant. Indian Journal of Biotechnology, 4 (2), 261-264.
[5] Anjum, S., Haider Abbasi, B. (2016). Biomimetic synthesis of antimicrobial silver nanoparticles using in vitro-propagated plantlets of a medicinally important endangered species (Phlomisbracteosa). International Journal OfNanomedicine, 11, 1663-1675.
[6] Butt, M. S., Nazir, A., Sultan, M. T. &Schoёn, K. (2008). Morus alba L. nature’s functional tonic, Trends in Food Science & Technology, 19, 505–512.
[7] Cano-castillo, M., Serrano-Martinez, F., and Casas, J.L. (2009). In-vitro propagation of Astragalus nitidiflorus (Leguminosae), an endemic and endangered species from South-East of Spain. Acta Horticulturae, 812, 545-550.
[8] Datwyler, S. L. and Weiblen, G. D. (2004). On the origin of the fig: Phylogenetic relationships of Moraceae from NDHF sequences, pp. 767-777.
[9] Durak, D., Kalender, S., Gokce, F., Demyr, F. and Kalender, Y. (2010). Mercury chloride- induced oxidative stress in human erythrocytes and the effect of vitamins C and E in vitro. African Journal of Biotechnology, 9(4), 488-495.
[10] Gulzar, B., Mujib, A., Malik, M. Q. J., Rukaya, S. and Zafar, N. (2020). Transgenic Technology Based Value Addition in Plant Biotechnology, pp. 25-49.
[11] Hussain, A., Qarshi, I. A., Nazir, H. and Ikram, U. I. (2012). Plant Tissue Culture: Current Status and Opportunities, Intech Open Limited, London, United Kingdom, pp. 1-28.
[12] Jamal, M. A. H. M., Sharif, I. H., Shakil, M. M., Rahman, A. N. M. R-B., Banu, N. A., Islam, M. R. and Nazmuzzaman, M. (2016). In vitro regeneration of a common medicinal plant, Ocimum sanctum. L. for mass propagation, 15 (24), pp. 1269 -1275.
[13] Karuppusamy, S., Kiranmai, C., Aruna, V., and Pullaiah, T. (2006). Micropropagation of Vanasushavapetada- anendangered medicinal plant of South India. Plant Tissue Culture of Biotechnology, 16(2), 85-94.
[14] Leelavathi, D. and Kuppan, N. (2013). In vitro regeneration from apical bud of Rosmarinus officinalis L. An important medicinal Plant. Banat’s Journal of Biotechnology, 4(8), 14-19.
[15] Lochynska, M. and Oleszak, G. (2011). Multi-use of the white mulberry (Morus alba L.). Department of Silkworms Breeding and Mulberry Cultivation, Institute of Natural Fibres and Medicinal Plants, WojskaPolskiego, Poznan, Poland. Journal of Ecological Questions, 15, 91 – 95.
[16] Loyola-Vargas, V.M. and Ochoa-Alejo, N. (2018). An Introduction to Plant Tissue Culture: Advances and Perspectives. Humana Press, New York, pp. 3-13.
[17] Machii, H., Koyama, A. and Yamanouchi, H. (2002). Mulberry Breeding, Cultivation and Utilization in Japan, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, Japan.
[18] Manjkhola, S., Dhar, U. and Joshi, M. (2005). Organogenesis, embryogenesis and synthetic seed production in Arnebiaeuchroma- a critically endangered medicinal plant of the Himalaya. In-vitrocelluler and Developmental Biology-Plant, 41(3), 244-248.
[19] Mekonnen, T., Diro, M. and Sharma, M. (2013). An alternative safer and cost effective surface sterilization method for sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) explants. African Journal of Biotechnology, 12(44), 6282-6286.
[20] Nalawade, S. M. and Sagare, A. (2003). Studies on tissue culture of Chinese medicinal plant resources in Taiwan and their sustainable utilization. Botanical Bulletin Academia Sinica Taipei, 44 (2), 79-98.
[21] Prabhuling, G. and Huchesh, H. (2018). In Vitro Regeneration in Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) cv. Bhagwa using Double Nodal Segments. Centre for Horticulture Biotechnology, Directorate of Research, University of Horticulture Sciences, Bagalkot, Karnataka, India. Research Journal of Biotechnology, 13 (8), 1-8.
[22] Rahman, M. M., Amin, M. N., Ishiguri, F., Yokota, S., Sultana, R. S., Takashima, Y., Lizuka, K. and Yoshizawa, N. (2009). In vitro plantlet regeneration of “dwarf” Indian olive (Elaeocarpus robustus Roxb.): A fruit plant of Bangladesh. Plant Biotechnology reports, 3 (3), 259-266.
[23] Rahmathulla, V.K. (2012). Management of Climatic Factors for Successful Silkworm (Bombax mori L.) Crop and Higher Silk Production. A Review, Psyche: A Journal of Entomology, 1-12. https://doi.org/10.1155/2012/121234
[24] Risher, J.F. and Amler, S.N. (2005). Mercury exposure: evalution and intervention, the inappropriate use of chelating agents in diagnosis and treatment of putative mercury poisoning. Neuro Toxicology, 26(4), 691-699. .
[25] Sharma, M.K., Sharma, A., Kumar, A. and Kumar, M. (2007). Spirulina fusiformis provides protection against mercuric choride induced oxidatives stress in Swiss albino mice. Food chemical Toxicology, 45, 2412-2419.
[26] WHO, (2005). Mercury in drinking water.

Md. Sohel Rana, Muhammad Nurul Amin and Mustafa Abul Kalam Azad, “In vitro Regeneration protocol for Mulberry Morus alba L. through Tissue Culture Techniques” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.124-128 January 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6109

Download PDF

pdf

The relationship between internal control system and business survival in the COVID-19 pandemic era

ALASHE, Abdulganiyy Kayode, ADEFOLURIN, Festus Adesegun, BELLO, Abass Oyeshola – January 2022- Page No.: 129-135

The necessity for survival has grown increasingly prominent as an overriding goal of every corporate organization in this COVID-19 pandemic period. The purpose of this paper was to investigate the relationship between internal control systems and business survival in the face of the current pandemic. A descriptive survey research design was used for the investigation. Primary data were obtained from a sample of 382 SMEs’ owners chosen at random from a population of 8,395 registered SMEs in Lagos State using a simple random sampling technique. The data gathering instrument was a five-item Likert scale questionnaire. Two hundred and thirty copies of the scale were returned and used in the study, representing a 60.20 percent survey response rate. Pearson correlation was used to test the hypotheses. The study’s findings revealed a positive relationship between internal control systems and business survival in the pandemic era. It was determined that internal control systems were a successful instrument for organizational control and commercial survival during the pandemic era. Accordingly, the study recommended that business owners should ensure that a vibrant internal control system is put in place to aid management in effective control of the organization especially in pandemic era to ensure business survival.

Page(s): 129-135                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 January 2022

 ALASHE, Abdulganiyy Kayode
Department of Accountancy, School of Management and Business Studies, Lagos State Polytechnic, Ikorodu,
Lagos State, Nigeria

 ADEFOLURIN, Festus Adesegun
Department of Accountancy, School of Management and Business Studies, Lagos State Polytechnic, Ikorodu,
Lagos State, Nigeria

 BELLO, Abass Oyeshola
Department of Accountancy, School of Management and Business Studies, Lagos State Polytechnic, Ikorodu,
Lagos State, Nigeria

[1] Abbas, Q., & Iqbal, J. (2012). Internal control system: Analyzing theoretical perspective and practices. Middle East Journal of Scientific Research, 12(4), 530-538.
[2] Agbenyo, W., Jiang, Y., & Cobblah, P. K. (2018). Assessment of government internal control system on financial reporting quality in Ghana: A case study of Ghana Revenue Authority. International Journal of Economics and Finance, 10(11), 39-51.
[3] Al-Hazmi, M. H. (2013). Internal control and accounting policies and procedures practices: An institutional perspective. African Journal of Business Management, 7(4), 285-295.
[4] Bartik, A. W., Bertrand, M., Cullen, Z. B., Glaeser, E. L., Luca, M., & Stanton, C. T. (2020). How are small businesses adjusting to COVID-19? Early evidence from a survey. NBER Working Paper No. w26989.
[5] Carausu, D. (2015). Monitor and control in companies: An agency theory approach. Journal of Public Administration, Finance and Law, 2(special issue), 46-60.
[6] Cetin, H., & Yetis, Z. (2017). Evaluation of the effectiveness of the internal control system in hotel business. Proceedings of the Annual Vietnam. Academic Research Conference on Global Business, Economics, Finance & Management Science (AP17 Vietnam Conference) Hai Phong – Hanoi, Vietnam. 18-19.
[7] COSO (2019). COSO internal control-integrated framework: An implementation guide for the healthcare provider industry. COSO.
[8] Davidson, R., Goodwin-Stewart, J., & Kent, P. (2005). Internal Governance Structures and Earnings Management, Journal Accounting and Finance, 45 (2).
[9] Davis J. H., Schoorman F.D., Donaldson L. (1997). Towards a Stewardship Theory of Management. Academy of Management Review. 22.
[10] Donnellan, J. T., & Rutledge W. (2016). Agency theory in banking -Lessons from the 2007-2010 Financial Crisis. International Journal of Business and Applied Social Science,
[11] Eke, G. O. (2018). Internal control and financial performance of hospital organisations in Rivers State. European Journal of Accounting, Auditing and Finance Research, 6(3), 32-52.
[12] Emerson, W.M., Alves, H. & Raposo, M. (2011). Stakeholder theory: Issues to resolve. Management Decision, 49(2), 226-252.
[13] Fairlie, R. (2020a). The impact of COVID-19 on small business owners: Evidence of early-stage losses from April 2020 current population survey. IZA Discussion Paper No. 13311.
[14] Fairlie, R. (2020b). The impact of COVID-19 on small business owners: Evidence of early-stage losses from the first months after widespread social-distancing restrictions. Journal of Economics and Management Strategy, 29(9), Doi.10.1111/jems.12400.
[15] Ibrahim, S., Diibuzie, G., & Abubakari, M. (2017). The impact of internal control systems on financial performance: The case of Health Institutions in Upper West Region of Ghana. International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, 7(4), 684-697.
[16] Iin, A., Siti, A., & Nur K. I. (2016). The Role of Risk and Sustainability Management in the Effects of Corporate Governance on Firm Value. Journal of Research in Business and Management, 4(6), 14-32.
[17] Ilias, N., Abdulatiff, N. K., & Mohamed, N. (2016). Management control system and performance: Accountability attributes in local authorities. International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, 6(4), 26-35.
[18] Jensen M.& Meckling W. (1976). Theory of the Firm, Managerial Behaviour, Agency Cost and Capital Structure. Journal of Financial Economics. 4.
[19] Kumuthinidevi, S. (2016). A study on effectiveness of the internal control system in the private banks of Trincomalee, International Journal of Scientific and research Publications, 6(6), 600-612.
[20] Muhunyo, B. M., & Jagongo, A. O. (2018). Effect of internal control systems on financial performance of public institutions of higher learning in Nairobi City County, Kenya. International Academic Journal of Human Resource and Business Administration, 3(2), 273-287.
[21] Najah, E. A., & Omar, T. (2018). The contribution of internal audit to the improvement of internal control system. European Scientific Journal, 14(7), 200-230.
[22] Ngugi K. (2011). A survey of internal control systems among the listed private companies and the public sector companies in Kenya. Unpublished Research Thesis. University of Nairobi.
[23] Nunally, J. (1978). Psychometric theory (2nd ed.). New York, NY:McGraw-Hill.
[24] Olughor, R. J., & Oke, M. A. (2014). The relationship between organizational survival and employee mental ability. International Journal of Business and Social Science, 5(6), 205-213.
[25] Paul, J. O., & Eketu, C. A. (2018). Workforce diversity and organizational survival of manufacturing firms in Rivers State. International Journal of Business Systems and Economics, 12(2), 59-79.

ALASHE, Abdulganiyy Kayode, ADEFOLURIN, Festus Adesegun, BELLO, Abass Oyeshola, “The relationship between internal control system and business survival in the COVID-19 pandemic era” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.129-135 January 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-1/129-135.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Increasing Business Value for Stability in the Need Private Schools amidst Pandemic

Edgardo S. Delmo & Sheryl R. Morales – January 2022- Page No.: 136-139

In 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic struck every part of the world, disrupting every government economic mantle and not sparing the private or non-state education sector. In the Philippines, the Department of Education (DepEd) announced in September 2020 that 864 private schools were closed for the S.Y. 2020-2021 due to declining family income along with a 107-year-old Catholic school. With the current government policy of free Basic and Higher Education, the business value of the private education sector has declined over time. As a way forward, this theoretical research paper aims to provide a possible approach for the private education sector to modify its business value creation in this increasingly demanding valuation environment. The recommendation is that the private-own or non-state education sector must forge partnerships with organizations providing free and open-source platforms. Reevaluate to migrate from face-to-face classroom to online learning institution on a post-COVID world. Finally, seek government support made available for the private or non-state education sector enacting legislation that would allow funding for a blended learning system.

Page(s): 136-139                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 January 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6110

 Edgardo S. Delmo
Polytechnic University of the Philippines – Quezon City Branch

 Sheryl R. Morales
Polytechnic University of the Philippines – Quezon City Branch

[1] Alam, A., & Tiwari, P. (2021). (issue brief). Implications of COVID-19 for Low-cost Private Schools. Retrieved June 14, 2021, from https://www.unicef.org/globalinsight/media/1581/file/UNICEF_Global_Insight_Implications_covid-19_Low-cost_Private_Schools_2021.pdf.
[2] Argadoña, A. (2011, April 11). Https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y7H5t8qWAqg [Working paper]. IESE Business School University of Navarra, Barcelona, Spain.
[3] Asian Development Bank (2017). Innovate Strategies for Accelerated Human Resource Development in South Asia Public-Private Partnerships for Education and Training. 6 ADB Avenue, Mandaluyong City, 1550 Metro Manila, Philippines; Asian Development Bank. Retrieved.
[4] B2U. (2018, October 23). Value Disciplines: Customer Intimacy, Product Leadership and Operational Excellence. Retrieved February 21, 2021, from https://www.business-to-you.com/value-disciplines-customer-intimacy/
[5] Calleja, J. (2020, November 23). Century-old Catholic school to close in the Philippines. Union of Catholic Asian News. Retrieved from https://www.ucanews.com/news/century-old- catholic-school-to-close-in-the-philippines/90411#
[6] Esani, M. (2010). Moving from face-to-face to online teaching. American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science, 23(3), 187–190. https://doi.org/10.29074/ascls.23.3.187
[7] Global Education Monitoring Report Team. (2019). Concept note for the 2021 Global education monitoring report on non-state actors. Retrieved February 21, 2021, from http://data.uis.unesco.org/
[8] Hodges, C., Moore, S., Lockee, B., Trust, T., & Bond, A. (2020, March 27). The difference between emergency remote teaching and online learning. EDUCAUSE Review. Retrieved October 15, 2021, from https://er.educause.edu/articles/2020/3/the-difference- between-emergency-remote-teaching-and-online-learning.
[9] Huy, Q. (2020, May 18). Four strategic priorities for the post-covid-19 world. INSEAD Knowledge. Retrieved June 17, 2021, from https://knowledge.insead.edu/blog/insead- blog/four-strategic-priorities-for-the-post-covid-19-world-14086
[10] International Business School of Barcelona. (2021, May 13). 5 business strategies for surviving the pandemic. ESEI Business School in Barcelona. Retrieved July 3, 2021, from https://www.eseibusinessschool.com/5-business-strategies-for-surviving-the-pandemic/
[11] International Commission on the Futures of Education. (2020). Education in a post-COVID world: Nine Ideas for Public Action. Retrieved from https://en.unesco.org/sites/default/files/education_in_a_post-covid_world nine_ideas_for_public_action.pdf
[12] Lakhan, S. E., &Jhunjhunwala, K. (2008, May 5). Open-source software in education. Retrieved February 21, 2021, from https://er.educause.edu/articles/2008/5/open-source-software-in- education.
[13] The Manila Times. (2021, March 8). Private Schools hit hard by Pandemic. The Manila Times. other, Manila. Retrieved April 8, 2021, from https://www.manilatimes.net/2021/03/08/news/private-schools-hit-hard-by pandemic/848204.
[14] Mapa, D. S. (2021, January 28). Census of Philippine Business and Industry-Philippine Statistics Authority. Retrieved February 21, 2021, from https://psa.gov.ph/content/2018-census- philippine-business-and-industry-education
[15] Philippine Statistics Authority. (2021, January 28). 2018 Census of Philippine Business and Industry: Education. Census of Philippine Business and Industry. Retrieved March 6, 2021, from https://psa.gov.ph/content/2018-census-philippine-business-and-industry- education.
[16] Rubio, B. P. (2020, September 14). Low enrollment, PANDEMIC shutter 865 private schools FOR 2020-2021 academic year. Retrieved February 21, 2021, from https://www.philstar.com/headlines/2020/09/14/2042374/low-enrollment-pandemic- shutter-865-private-schools-2020-2021-academic-year
[17] Sufi, S. (2017, October 23). Understanding Value Creation in 10 Minutes for CFOs. Retrieved February 21, 2021, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y7H5t8qWAqg
[18] Taherina, M., Nawaser, K., Sharianetjad, A., Saedi, A., & Moshtaghi, M. (2021). The Evolution of the E-Business Value Cycle Through Value Co-Creation during the COVID-19 Pandemic: An Empirical Study from Iran. The Journal of Asian Finance, Economics and Business, 8(10), 19–28. https://doi.org/10.13106/jafeb.2021
[19] Tapaninaho, R., &Kujala, J. (2019). Reviewing the stakeholder value creation literature: Towards a sustainability approach. World Sustainability Series, 3–36. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-03562-4_1
[20] UNESCO Office Bangkok and Regional Bureau for Education in Asia and the Pacific, & Asia-Pacific Centre of Education for International Understanding. (2020). GCED learning and assessment: An analysis of four case studies in Asia. Retrieved February 21, 2021, from https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000375112

Edgardo S. Delmo & Sheryl R. Morales, “Increasing Business Value for Stability in the Need Private Schools amidst Pandemic” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.136-139 January 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6110

Download PDF

pdf

An Empirical Analysis of the Relationship between Net Migration and Macroeconomic Condition of Nigeria

Oluwaseun Temidayo Okikiola – January 2022- Page No.: 140-144

Nigeria is an important migration destination within the West African sub-region. However, over the past two (2) decades, the country has consistently recorded a negative net migration rate, implying a higher number of emigration than immigration. Drawing from the neoclassical and modern theories of migration, which highlight economic condition as a major factor in the decision to migrate, this paper seeks to empirically assess the relationship between the net migration pattern in Nigeria and the macroeconomic condition of the country over the past three (3) decades (from 1991 to 2020). Using the OLS regression analysis, the findings show a regression value (R2) of 0.847, which implies that the variables of macroeconomic condition (economic growth, real GDP per capita, unemployment rate, inflation rate, and current account balance) account for 85% of the variation in the net migration rate of the country. Among these variables, real GDP per capita and the unemployment rate were found to have a significant impact on net migration. However, the negative relationship between real GDP per capita and net migration rate shows that an increase in the prosperity of residents in Nigeria reduces the net migration rate.This suggests the existence and the need to deal with unequal distribution of income in the country, which limits the trickledown effect of an improved economy. Also, the positive relationship between the unemployment rate and net migration suggests the existence of other factors other than economic factors (as suggested by the modern theory of migration), which play a critical role in the decision to immigrate to or emigrate from Nigeria.

Page(s): 140-144                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 January 2022

 Oluwaseun Temidayo Okikiola
Axion Research, Lagos, Nigeria

[1] Abdu, M., Jibir, A., &Abdullahi, S. (2017). Patterns and Micro-Drivers of International Emigration in Nigeria. Journal of Economics and Political Economy, 4(2), 178-191.
[2] Adedokun, O., &Karzanova, I. (2019). Impact of Migration on the Economy of Nigeria: Recent Trends. Vestnik NSUEM, (2), 204-211. DOI: 10.34020/2073-6495-2019-2-204-211
[3] Anetor, F. (2019). Remittance and Economic Growth Nexus in Nigeria: Does Financial Sector Development Play a Critical Role?. International Journal Of Management, Economics And Social Sciences, 8(2). DOI: 10.32327/ijmess/8.2.2019.8
[4] Angner, E., & Loewenstein, G. (2012). Philosophy of Economics. doi: 10.1016/c2009-0-16477-2
[5] Castelli, F. (2018). Drivers of migration: why do people move? Journal of Travel Medicine, 25(1). DOI: 10.1093/jtm/tay040
[6] Castles, S. (2000). International migration at the beginning of the twenty-first century: global trends and issues. International Social Science Journal, 52, 269–281.
[7] Flahaux, M., & De Haas, H. (2016). African migration: trends, patterns, drivers. Comparative Migration Studies, 4(1). DOI: 10.1186/s40878-015-0015-6
[8] Haas, H. (2021). A theory of migration: the aspirations-capabilities framework. Comparative Migration Studies, 9(1). DOI: 10.1186/s40878-020-00210-4
[9] Haas, H., Czaika, M., Flahaux, M., Mahendra, E., Natter, K., Vezzoli, S., &Villares‐Varela, M. (2019). International Migration: Trends, Determinants, and Policy Effects. Population and Development Review, 45(4), 885-922. DOI: 10.1111/padr.12291
[10] IOM. (2011). Glossary of Migration. Geneva, Switzerland: International Organisation for Migration.
[11] Kok, P. (1999). The Definition of Migration and its Application; Making Sense of Recent South African Census and Survey Data. Southern African Journal of Demography, 7(1), 19–30.
[12] Kuhnt, J. (2019). Literature Review: Drivers of Migration. Bonn, Germany: DeutschesInstitutfürEntwicklungspolitikgGmbH.
[13] Lilleør, H., & Van den Broeck, K. (2011). Economic drivers of migration and climate change in LDCs. Global Environmental Change, 21, S70-S81. DOI: 10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2011.09.002
[14] Macro Trends. (2021). Nigeria Net Migration Rate 1950-2021. Retrieved from https://www.macrotrends.net/countries/NGA/nigeria/net-migration
[15] Massey, D. (1988). Economic Development and International Migration in Comparative Perspective. Population And Development Review, 14(3), 383. DOI: 10.2307/1972195
[16] Mügge, D. (2015). Studying Macroeconomic Indicators as Powerful Ideas. SSRN. Retrieved from https://ssrn.com/abstract=2660124
[17] Nevin, A., &Omosomi, O. (2019). Strength from Abroad. PricewaterhouseCoopers Limited.
[18] OECD. (2002). Main Economic Indicators. Paris, France: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.
[19] Oli, N., Ibekwe, C., & Jack, J. (2018). Economic Recession and Migration: The Case of Nigeria. Awka Journal Of Sociology, 6(1), 1-12.
[20] Olubiyi, E. (2019). Labor Market Effects of Emigration in Nigeria: Skill-level Analysis. Iranian Economic Review, 25(1), 137-166.
[21] Popogbe, O., & Adeosun, O. (2020). Empirical analysis of the push factors of human capital flight in Nigeria. Journal Of Humanities And Applied Social Sciences, ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print). DOI: 10.1108/jhass-07-2020-0093
[22] Simpson, N. (2017). Demographic and economic determinants of migration. IZA World Of Labor. DOI: 10.15185/izawol.373
[23] World Bank. (2021). Glossary | DataBank. Retrieved from https://databank.worldbank.org/metadataglossary/population-estimates-and-projections/series/SM.POP.NETM

Oluwaseun Temidayo Okikiola “An Empirical Analysis of the Relationship between Net Migration and Macroeconomic Condition of Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.140-144 January 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-1/140-144.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Educational Challenges of Pupils with Orthopaedic and Visual Impairment in Sokoto State, Nigeria

Asiyatu Abubakar Bagudo, Yinusa Abdulrafiu Yinka- January 2022- Page No.: 145-153

This study investigated the educational challenges of pupils with orthopaedic and visual impairment in primary schools in Sokoto Central Educational Zone of Sokoto State, Nigeria. A quantitative survey study design was employed for the study. The purposive sampling technique was used to select 72 pupils with orthopaedic impairment and 89 pupils with visual impairment, making it 161 respondents at one special school and 20 inclusive primary schools within Sokoto Central Educational Zone. An adapted structured questionnaire was used for data collection, while a simple percentage was used in analyzing the data. The studyꞌs findings revealed that there were insufficient learning materials for the pupils with orthopaedic and visual impairment, lack of specially trained teachers, inaccessible infrastructures among others. The Study recommended that a module on special need conditions and inclusive education should be made compulsory for that all teacher training programmes. The government and Universal Basic Education should colloborate with development partners to provide adequate structures, infrastructures and all other facilites to meet the educational need of pupils with orthopeadic and visual challenges.

Page(s): 145-153                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 January 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6111

 Asiyatu Abubakar Bagudo
Department of Adult Education and Extension Services, Usmanu Danfodiyo University ,Sokoto, Nigeria

 Yinusa Abdulrafiu Yinka
Department of Adult Education and Extension Services, Usmanu Danfodiyo University ,Sokoto, Nigeria

[1] Awetash, F. (2015). Psychosocial and Educational Challenges and Opportunities of Students with Visual Impairment: The case of Adimahleka primary School in Adwa Town. Unpublished Thesis. College of Education and Behavioral Studies. Addis Ababa University.http://etd.aau.edu.et/123456789/11114
[2] Beena, K. (2007). Influence of Certain Socio-Psychological Factors on the Vocational Skill Attainment of Orthopedically Handicapped Adolescents. Unpublished Thesis. School of Pedagogical Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi University.
[3] Buthelezi, M. (2014). Exploring Challenges Experienced by Physically Challenged Students at a Further Education and Training College in Kwazulu-Natal Province. Journal of Educational and Social Research. 4(3); 421-427.
[4] Daniel, N. (2008). Challenges Faced by Pupils with Disabilities in Accessing Education Inclusive Schools in Zambia. University of Zambia.
[5] Gindis, B. (1999). Vygotsky’s Vision Reshaping the Practice of Special Education for the 21st Century. Remedial and Special Education, 20(6), 333-340 .
[6] Hussain, I.; Bashir,M.;Naseerudin ,M.;Naeem,M.; Akhter,S. and Inamullah,A. (2011). Problems Faced by Physically Handicapped Students in Educational Institutes in District Kohat. Contemporary Issues in Education Research 4 (2): 23-26
[7] Igune, G. W. (2009). Inclusion of Blind Children in Primary Schools: a case study of teachers opinion in Moroto District-Uganda. Oslo .https://www.duo.uio.no>
[8] Katsiyannis, A., Yell, M.L. and Bradley, R. (2001). Reflection on the 25th anniversary of the individual with Disabilities Educational Act. Remedial and Special Education, 22(6), 324-334.
[9] Kiomoka, D. (2014). Children with Visual Impairment in Tanzania. An investigation of the challenges which children with Impairment Face in Learning and Participation in Inclusive Primary Schools. Unpublished thesis. Faculty of Education and Natural Sciences Hedmark University College.
[10] Lydia, A. (2014). Challenges Faced by Learners with Visual Impairment in Inclusive Setting in Trans-Nzoia Country, Kenya. Journal of Education and Practice, 5 (9), 16203-18529
[11] Mpofu J. & Almon S. (2012). Challenges Faced by Students with Special Educational Needs in Early Childhood Development Centers in Zimbabwe as Perceived by ECD Trainers and Parents. Anthropologist 14 (4): 327-338
[12] Oladejo, M. & Oladejo, S. (2011). Educating Students with Disabilities in Nigeria: Some Challenges and Policy Implications. Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences. 3 (1), 2220-9525
[13] Rosalia, W. (2014). School-Based Factors Influencing Participation of Physically Challenged Learners in Public Schools in Kiambu Municipality, Kenya. Unpublished Thesis. Curriculum Studies, University of Nairobi.
[14] Samir, K.L & Kant, R. (2013). Problems of Orthopedically Impaired Students in Relation to their Gender, Achievement and Locality. Journal of Education and Social Research. 3 (2); 20-31.
[15] State Strategic Education Sector Plan (2010) Situation Analysis of Education in Sokoto State.
[16] Zaib, N. & Alia, S. (2011) Problems Faced by Physically Handicapped Students at Secondary School Level in District Kohat, M. Ed Thesis, Institute of Education and Research, Kohat University of Science & Technology, Kohat, Pakistan.

Asiyatu Abubakar Bagudo, Yinusa Abdulrafiu Yinka, “Educational Challenges of Pupils with Orthopaedic and Visual Impairment in Sokoto State, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.145-153 January 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6111

Download PDF

pdf

Socio-demographic factors as correlate of post-traumatic stress disorder and social adjustment among amputees receiving treatment at the Federal Medical Centre, Keffi, Nasarawa State, Nigeria

Hussaini Yusuf ONAWO, Emmanuel Onu ALHASSAN, Oluwabunmi Hezekiah AJAYI – January 2022- Page No.: 154-159

The study investigated socio-demographic variables (age and gender) as correlates of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and social adjustment among amputees at the Federal Medical Centre, Keffi. Adopting an ex- post factor research design, 50 amputee patients (M=33; F=17)- aged 17-72 years with a mean age of 40.02 and standard deviation of 14.213 – were recruited by means of purposive sampling technique to participate in the study. Data was collected using the PTSD scale and the Social Adjustment Scale. Four hypotheses were formulated and tested in the study. Findings indicated that there was a positive relationship between age and PTSD (r (48) = 0.327, P < 0.05). This implies that age has an influence on individual responses to traumatic events with an indication that the event of amputation tends to be more traumatic among younger age than older age individuals. The finding further indicated that there was a statistically significant relationship between older age and social adjustment (r (48) = 0.289, P < 0.05). The analysis further revealed a statistically significant difference between Males and Females (t (48) = -4.200, P < 0.05) on PTSD. Finally, results indicated that Males and Femalessocially adjust differently to traumatic situations (t (48) = -2.018, P < 0.05). The findings suggest that age and gender significantly predict post-traumatic stress disorder and social adjustment. The study therefore recommends that Government and NGOs as well as other care providers shouldmanage the mental health of amputees and individuals with similar conditions based on their demographic factors in addition to presenting signs and symptoms.

Page(s): 154-159                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 January 2022

 Hussaini Yusuf ONAWO
Dalhatu Araf Specialist Hospital, Lafia, Nasarawa State, Nigeria

 Emmanuel Onu ALHASSAN
Department of Psychology Nasarawa State University, Keffi, Nigeria

 Oluwabunmi Hezekiah AJAYI
Brains Specialist Hospital, Abuja, Nigeria

[1] Akca, A.T., &Cinar, S. (2010). Comparison of psychosocial adjustment in people with diabetes with and without diabetic foot ulceration. Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing, 25(4), 87-96.
[2] Alhassan, E.O., Akuki, & Ajayi B.H. (2019). Intensity of Event, Distress Disclosure and Resilience in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) among Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) in Durumi Camp, Abuja. African journal for the psychological study of social issues.
[3] Amnesty International (2019). Harvest of death three years of bloody clashes between farmers and herders in Nigeria. https://www.amnesty.org/en/documents/afr44/9503/2018/en/.
[4] Breslau N. The epidemiology of posttraumatic stress disorder: what is the extent of the problem? Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 62(17), 16–22. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
[5] Brewin, C.R. (2005). Systematic review of screening instruments for adults at risk of PTSD. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 18:53–62.
[6] Davidson, J.R.T., Malik, M.A. & Travers. J. (1997). Structured interview for PTSD (SIP): psychometric validation for DSM-IV criteria. Depression & Anxiety (1091–4269);5:127–129.
[7] Desmond, D. M. (2007). Coping, affective distress, and psychosocial adjustment among people with traumatic upper limb amputations. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 62(1), 15-21.
[8] Ejikeme, T., Ejikeme, G., Badru, F. &Akwash, F. (2014). Social Support and the Welfare of Older Adults in Conflict Situations in Nigeria. The Nigerian Journal of Sociology and Anthropology, 12. 10.36108/NJSA/4102/12(0161).
[9] Fitzpatrick, R., Newman, S., Archer, R., & Shipley, M. (1991). Social support, disability and depression: A longitudinal study of rheumatoid arthritis. Social Science & Medicine, 33, 605-611.
[10] Foa, E.B., Cashman, L., Jaycox, L. & Perry, K. (1997). The validation of a self-report measure of post-traumatic stress disorder: The Post-traumatic Diagnostic Scale. Psychological Assessment, 9:445–451.
[11] Gallagher, P., Allen, D., &MacLachian, M. (2001). Phantom limb pain and residual pain following lower limb amputation: a descriptive analysis. Disability and Rehabilitation, 23(12), 522-530.
[12] Johnson, H. & Thompson, A. (2007). The development and maintenance of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in civilian adult survivors of war trauma and torture: a review. Clinical Psychology Review, 28(1):36-47. doi: 10.1016/j.cpr.01.017. PMID: 17383783.
[13] Joseph, N.M., Benedick, A. Flanagan, C.D., Breslin, M.A. &Vallier, H.A. (2021). Risk Factors for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Acute Trauma Patients. Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma; Volume 35 – Issue 6 – p e209-e215.
[14] Khodadadi-Hassankiadeh N., Nayeri, D.N., Shahsavari, H., Yousefzadeh-Chabok, S.h., &Haghani, H. (2017). Predictors of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among Victims of Serious Motor Vehicle Accidents. International Journal of Community Based Nursing & Midwifery, 5(4):355-364.
[15] Kingdon, D & Pearce, T. (1982). Psychosocial assessment and management of amputee. In: Banarjee SN, editor. Rehabilitation of Management of the Amputees. Baltimore, MD: Williams Wilkins; pp. 350–71. [Google Scholar]
[16] Lazaratou, H., Paparrigopoulos, T., Galanos, G., Psarros, C., Dikeos, D. &Soldatos, C.R. (2008). The psychological impact of a catastrophic earthquake. A retrospective study 50 years after the event. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 196:340- 344.
[17] Lewin, T. J., Carr, V. J., & Webster, R. A. (1998). Recovery from post-earthquake psychological morbidity: Who suffers and who recovers? Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 32(1), 15–20. https://doi.org/10.3109/00048679809062701.
[18] Luka A. Ogu (2017) Influence of Demographic Factors on Post-Traumatic, Stress Disorder and Social Adjustment Among Amputees in Lafia. Unpublished research project, Benue State University Nigeria.
[19] Michael, S. (1996). Integrating chronic illness into one’s life: a phenomenological inquiry. Journal of Holistic Nurse, 14(3), 251-267.
[20] Phelps, L F., Williams, R. M., Raichle, K. A., Turner, A. P., & Ehde, D. M. (2008). The importance of cognitive processing to adjustment in the 1st year following amputation. Rehabilitation Psychology, 53(1), 28-38.
[21] Poisky, D., Doshi, J. A., Marcus, S., Oslin, D., Rothbard, A., Thomas, N. & Thompson, C. L. (2005). Long-term risk for depressive symptoms after a medical diagnosis. Archives of Internal Medicine, 165(11), 1260-1266.
[22] Sahu A, Sagar R, Sarkar S, & Sagar S. (2016). Psychological effects of amputation: A review of studies from India. Individual Psychiatry Journal, 25:4–10. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
[23] Sahu, A., Gupta, R., Sagar, S., Kumar, M. & Sagar, R. (2017). A study of psychiatric comorbidity after traumatic limb amputation: A neglected entity. Individual Psychiatry Journal, 26(2):228-232. doi:10.4103/ipj.ipj_80_16
[24] Şimsek, N., Öztürk, G. K., &Nahya, Z. N. (2020). The Mental Health of Individuals with Post-Traumatic Lower Limb Amputation: A Qualitative Study. Journal of Patient Experience, 1665–1670. https://doi.org/10.1177/2374373520932451.
[25] Sinha, R. & Van Den Heuvel, W.J. (2011). A systematic literature review of quality of life in lower limb amputees. Journal of Disability and Rehabilitation, 33:883–99. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
[26] Sinha, R. (2013). Adjustments to amputation and artificial limb, and quality of life in lower limb amputees. Unpublished thesis submitted to the University of Groningen, the Netherlands,Vol.22, No.2, pg. 146-156.
[27] Yohannes, K., Gebeyehu, A., Adera, T., Ayano, G., &Fekadu, W. (2018). Prevalence and correlates of post-traumatic stress disorder among survivors of road traffic accidents in Ethiopia. International Journal of Mental Health Systems, 12:50.
[28] Zweig, R.A. &Turkel, E. (2007). The Social Adjustment Scale-Self-Report: Psychometric Properties for Older Adults. Psychological Reports, 101(3):920-926. doi:10.2466/pr0.101.3.920-926

Hussaini Yusuf ONAWO, Emmanuel Onu ALHASSAN, Oluwabunmi Hezekiah AJAYI, “Socio-demographic factors as correlate of post-traumatic stress disorder and social adjustment among amputees receiving treatment at the Federal Medical Centre, Keffi, Nasarawa State, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.154-159 January 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-1/154-159.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Work Engagement and Organizational Commitment among Catholic Religious Men and Women Working In Rural Areas: A Case of Lodwar Diocese in Turkana County, Kenya

Wambua Pius Muasa (PhD) – January 2022- Page No.: 160-165

Globally studies have shown work engagement to play a critical role on organizational commitment. However, there are limited studies when it comes to Catholic religious men and women working in rural areas. Due to this gap, the study aimed to examine the relationship between work engagement and organizational commitment among the Catholic religious men and women working in Lodwar Diocese, Kenya. The study adopted correlational design. Using census sampling, a sample size of 131 Catholic religious men and women were included in the study. The data was collected using the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale and Organizational Commitment Scale. Pre-testing of standardized instruments was carried out before the actual data collection to ensure its reliability and validity. The data was analyzed using correlational analysis using SPSS Version 32. The study found a weak negative association between vigour and continuance commitment (r=-0.07) and normative commitment (r=-0.07; p>0.05) in the study. However, energy and affective commitment had a weak positive connection (r=0.09; p>0.05). A weak positive association was found between dedication and affective commitment (r= 0.15; p>0.05), continuance commitment (r= 0.03), and normative commitment (r= 0.008; p<0.05), according to the study. Absorption and emotional commitment (r=0.04; p<0.05) and continuance commitment (r=0.08; p>0.05) had a weak positive connection. Finally, absorption and normative commitment had a weak negative connection (r=-0.02; p>0.05).

Page(s): 160-165                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 January 2022

 Wambua Pius Muasa (PhD)
Institute of Youth Studies, Tangaza University College, Catholic University of Eastern Africa

[1] Abay, G. A., & Chia-Chia, C. (2019). The Association between Job Insecurity and Engagement of Employees at Work, Journal of Workplace Behavioural Health, 34(2), 96-110.
[2] Abdullah, A. (2011). Evaluation of Allen and Meyer’s Organizational Commitment Scale: A Cross- Cultural Application in Pakistan, Journal of Education and Vocational Research, 3, 80-86.
[3] Ahmed, M. & Dajani, Z. (2015). “The Impact of Employee Engagement on Job Performance and Organisational Commitment in the Egyptian Banking Sector.” Journal of Business and Management Sciences, 3 (5), 138-147.
[4] Ahuja, S. & Gupta, S. (2018). Organizational Commitment and Work Engagement as a Facilitator for Sustaining Higher Education Professionals. International Journal of Recent Technology and Engineering (IJRTE), 7 (6); 1846-1851.
[5] Anjali, M. & Satishchandra, K. (2020). Organisational and Personal Predictors of Work Engagement in India, British, Journal of Guidance & Counselling, DOI: 10.1080/03069885.2020.1785392.
[6] Artyom, S., & Nicola, K. (2017). An Evaluation of the Effects of Corporate Reputation on Employee Engagement: The Case of a Major Bank in South Africa, International Studies of Management & Organization, 47(3), 276-292, DOI: 10.1080/00208825.2017.1318023.
[7] Creswell, J. W., & Creswell, J. D. (2017). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches. Sage publications.
[8] Deirdre, L., José, M., & Koressa, C. (2020). Language is not Enough: Institutional Supports for Spanish Speaking Client-Worker Engagement in Child Welfare, Journal of Public Child Welfare, 14(4), 435-457, DOI: 10.1080/15548732.2019.1621235.
[9] Gbadamosi, G. (2006). Predictors and Correlates of Charlatan Behavior in a Non-Western Consent. Journal of Global Business and Technology, 2(1), 23-32.
[10] Lodwar Catholic Diocese Office Directory, 2021
[11] Manish, G., Musarrat, S., & Manoj, D. (2019). Engaging Employees for Quality of Life: Mediation by Psychological Capital, The Service Industries Journal, 39(5), 403-419, DOI: 10.1080/02642069.2018.1462799.
[12] McLeod, S. A. (2019). Sampling methods. Simply Psychology. https://www.simplypsychology.org/sampling.html
[13] Molefe Maleka, Mthokozisi Mpofu, Clifford Kendrick Hlatywayo, Ines Meyer, Stuart Carr & Jane Parker (2019) Employee engagement, organisational commitment, and job satisfaction in Namibia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe: An exploratory study, Journal of Psychology in Africa, 29:4, 393-400, DOI: 10.1080/14330237.2019.1647964.
[14] Naude, J. L. P., & Rothmann, S. (2004). The Validation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory – Human Services Survey for Emergency Medical Technicians in Gauteng. SA Journal of Industrial Psychology, 30 (3), 21-28.
[15] Prerana, A. (2017). “Effect of Employee Engagement on Organizational Commitment”. Educational Research Multimedia & Publications, India, 8(2), 101-108.
[16] Rameshkumar, M. (2020). Employee engagement as an antecedent of organizational commitment – A study on Indian seafaring officers. The Asian Journal of Shipping and Logistics, 36 (3), 105-112.
[17] Schaufeli, W.B., & Bakker, A.B. (2004). Job Demands, Job Resources and Their Relationship with Burnout and Engagement: A Multi-Sample Study, Journal of Organizational Behavior, 25(1), 293-315.
[18] Storm, K. & Rothmann, S. (2003). A psychometric analysis of the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale in the South African Police Service. South African Journal of Industrial Psychology, 29 (4), 62-70.
[19] Vukani, J. P. (2017). Association between Work Engagement and Dimensions of Burnout among Catholic Priests in Durban Metro, South Africa. http://repository.tangaza.ac.ke/

Wambua Pius Muasa (PhD) “Work Engagement and Organizational Commitment among Catholic Religious Men and Women Working In Rural Areas: A Case of Lodwar Diocese in Turkana County, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.160-165 January 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51211

Download PDF

pdf

A Study Between the Association of Financial Management Practices and Performance of Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) Background: A Working Paper

L. Sooriyakumaran, Dr. S. S. Thrikawala, C. Pathirawasam – January 2022- Page No.: 166-179

The purpose of the study was to identify the factors of financial management practices in SMEs background and to examine whether they impact on business performance of SMEs. A literature survey was carried out, and expert consultation was employed to develop this working paper. With the help of the literature survey and experts’ consultation, the association between financial management practices (FMP) and business performance (BP) was investigated. Accordingly, there were six indicators of financial management practices were identified in the literature namely; maintaining accounting records (MAR), financial reporting preparation and analysis (FRPA), accounting information system (AIS), working capital management (WCM), investment decision (ID) and financing (FIN). In addition, dependent variable of business performance. The literature evidenced that there are associations between FMP and BP in the SMEs. This includes positive, negative and no significant correlations or impact among variables of SMEs contributors. Accordingly, this study suggested a conceptual model for testing six hypotheses to examine the association between FMP and BP. Further, this study recommends an empirical study through explorative factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis to develop valid and reliable instruments to measure the FMP in the SMEs context. A path model was suggested to examine whether FMP influences BP in the SMEs background and further identify the moderating effect of demographic factors of gender and education level of financial management practitioners and business age of SMEs.

Page(s): 166-179                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 January 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6113

 L. Sooriyakumaran
Advanced Technological Institute, SLIATE, 320, T B Jayah Mawatha, Colombo, Sri Lanka

 Dr. S. S. Thrikawala
Waikato Institute of Technology, New Zealand

 C. Pathirawasam
Professor, Department of Commerce & FM3, University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka

[1] Abanis, T., Sunday, A., Burani, A., &Eliabu, B. (2013). Financial management practices in Small and Medium enterprises in selected districts in Western Uganda.Research Journal of Finance and Accounting, 4(2), 29-42.
[2] Abdul-Rahamon, O. A., &Adejare, A. T. (2014). The analysis of the impact of accounting records keeping on the performance of the small scale enterprises. International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, 4(1), 1-17.
[3] Abe, M., Troilo, M., &Batsaikhan, O. (2015). Financing small and medium enterprises in Asia and the Pacific. Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, Emerald Group Publishing, 4(1), 2-32
[4] Abeygunasekera, A.W.J.C., & Fonseka, (2012). Non-compliance with standard accounting practices by small and medium scale enterprises in Sri Lanka, Postgraduate Institute of Management, University of Sri Jayawardenepura, Sri Lanka. 38-46. http://archive.cmb.ac.lk
[5] Addo, I. K. (2017). The effect of financial management practices on the financial performance of top 100 small and medium enterprises in Kenya (Master’s thesis), University of Nairobi, Kenya.
[6] Adeoti, J. O., & Asabi, M. O. (2018). Effect of Record Keeping Practices on the Performance of Micro Enterprises in Lagos State, Nigeria, Amity Journal of Corporate Governance,3(2).
[7] Adesina, J. B., Nwidobie, B. M., & Adesina, O. O. (2015). Capital structure and financial performance in Nigeria. International journal of business and social research, 5(2), 21-31.
[8] Adeyemi, A. Z. &Sajuyigbe, A. S. (2017). Financial Management Practices and Women Entrepreneurs Performance: An Empirical Investigation. International Journal of Economics and Business Management, 3(1).
[9] Agyei-Mensah, B. K. (2010). Financial management practices of small firms in Ghana: An empirical study. Available at SSRN 1597243.
[10] Ahmad, Z., Abdullah, N. M. H., &Roslan, S. (2012). Capital structure effect on firms performance: Focusing on consumers and industrials sectors on Malaysian firms. International review of business research papers, 8(5), 137-155.
[11] Ajith D Perera (2018). SME’s are the backbone of the economy. CMA, 6(3),6-16. https://www.cma-srilanka.org
[12] Akande, O.O. (2011). Accounting Skill as a Performance Factor for Small Businesses in Nigeria. Journal of Emerging Trends in Economics and Management Sciences, 2(5), 372-378.
[13] Al-Dalaien, B. O. A. & Khan, N. A. (2018). Effect of Accounting Information System on Financial Performance: A Study of Selected Real Estate Companies in Jordan. International Journal of Current Engineering and Scientific Research, 5(1), pp. 41-50.
[14] Alhassan, M., Erasmus D.G., & Portia P., (2018). “Financial Management Practices, Firm Growth and Profitability of Small and Medium Scale Enterprises (SMEs),” Information Management and Business Review, AMH International, vol. 10(3), pages 25-37.
[15] Ali, A. Y. S., &Isak, A. O. (2019). Financial management practices and financial performance of service companies in Somalia. Financial Management, 10(4).
[16] Alsharayri, M. (2013). Evaluating the performance of Accounting Information Systems in Jordanian Private Hospitals. Journal of Social Sciences 8 (1), 74-78.
[17] Amoako, G. K. (2013). Accounting practices of SMEs: A case study of Kumasi Metropolis in Ghana. International Journal of Business and Management, 8(24), http://dx.doi.org/10.5539/ijbm.v8n24p73
[18] Ampah, S. N., & Ambrose, J. (2015). Financial Management Practices and Profitability of Small and Medium Enterprises in the Tema Industrial Area in Ghana. International Journal of Management and Transformation: Vol. 8, Nos. 1-2, 64.
[19] Ansar, R., Abd Karim, M. R., Osman, Z., & Fahmi, M. S. (2019). The Impacts of Future Orientation and Financial Literacy on Personal Financial Management Practices among Generation Y in Malaysia: The Moderating Role of Gender. Asian Journal of Economics, Business and Accounting, 1-10.
[20] Aren, S., &Aydemir, S. D. (2015). The moderation of financial literacy on the relationship between individual factors and risky investment intention. International Business Research, 8(6), 17.
[21] Arthur, J. W. (2009). Modern Financial Management Theories & Small Businesses. Retrieved January 6, 2021, from http://ezinearticles.com/?Modern-¬Financial-¬Management–Theories-¬and-¬Small-Businesses&id=2298837
[22] van Mourik, C. (2014). The equity theories and the IASB conceptual framework. Accounting in Europe, 11(2), 219-233.
[23] Arunruangsirilert, T., &Chonglerttam, S. (2017). Effect of corporate governance characteristics on strategic management accounting in Thailand. Asian Review of Accounting, 25, 85-105.doi:10.1108/ARA-11-2015-0107
[24] Asiimwe, F. (2017). Corporate governance and performance of SMEs in Uganda. International Journal of Technology and Management, 2(1), 14-14.
[25] Azize&Esmeray, (2013). The Impact of Accounting Information Systems on Firm Performance: Empirical Evidence in Turkish Small and Medium Sized Enterprises. International Review of Management and Marketing, 6(2), 233-236.
[26] Bandara, C. (2016). What causes SMEs to fail in Sri Lanka. The Daily Mirror, http://www. dailymirror. lk.
[27] Bandara, R. M. S., &Rathnasiri, U. A. H. A. (2016). The Working Capital Management Practices of Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in Sri Lanka. ICME 2016, Faculty of Management and Finance, University of Ruhuna.
[28] Banyan Global (2011).Financial Management and Record Keeping Guide for BlueStar Franchisees.guide for the United States Agency for International Development
[29] Beg, K., (2018). Impact of Accounting Information System on the Financial Performance of Selected FMCG Companies. Asian Journal of Applied Science and Technology, 2(3), 08-17.
[30] Belal, Y. A. S. (2013). The use of accounting information by small and medium scale enterprises in South District of Jordan. Research Journal of finance and accounting, 4(6), 169- 175.
[31] Belkaoui, A. R. (2011). Accounting Theory Edisi 5. Jakarta: SalembaEmpat.
[32] Bellouma, M. (2011). The Impact of Working Capital Management on Profitability: The Case of Small and Medium-Sized Export Companies in Tunisia. Management international, 15(3),. 71–88.
[33] Blackburn, R., Carey, P., &Tanewski, G. (2018). Business advice by accountants to SMEs. Relationships and trust. Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, 15, 358-384.doi:10.1108/QRAM-04-2017-0022
[34] Bongomin, G. O. C., Ntayi, J. M., Munene, J. C., &Malinga, C. A. (2017). The relationship between access to finance and growth of SMEs in developing economies: Financial literacy as a moderator. Review of International Business and Strategy, 27(4), 520-538. https://doi.org/10.1108/RIBS-08-2019-0037
[35] Boyd, B. K., Haynes, K. T., Hitt, M. A., Bergh, D. D., &Ketchen, D. J. (2012). Contingency hypotheses in strategic management research: Use, disuse, or misuse. Journal of Management, 38(1), 278-313.
[36] Brijlal, P., Enow, S., & Isaacs, E. B. (2014). The use of financial management practices by small, medium and micro enterprises: a perspective from South Africa. Industry and Higher Education, 28(5), 341-350.
[37] Budiarto, D. S. (2014). Accounting Information System (AIS) Alignment and Non-Financial Performance in Small Firms. International Journal of Computer Networks (IJCN), 6(2)), 15-25.
[38] Busieney, S. K. (2012). Factors influencing the use of accounting services by small and medium enterprises in Kenya. Unpublished MBA project, University of Nairobi, Kenya: https://carijournals.org/journals/index.php/JACC/article/view/68. retrieved on 24.12.2019.
[39] Butt, B. Z., Hunjra, A. I. & Rehman, K.-U. (2010). Financial Management Practices and Their Impact on Organizational Performance. World Applied Sciences Journal, 9 (9), . 997- 1002.
[40] Central Bank of Sri Lanka, Annual Report, 2017 and 2018
[41] Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Jaffna District, Progress Report, 2018.
[42] Charitou, M. S., Elfani, M., & Lois, P. (2010). The effect of working capital management on firms profitability: Empirical evidence from an emerging market. Journal of Business & Economics Research (JBER), 8(12).
[43] Chelimo, J. K., &Sopia, I. O. (2014). Effects of bookkeeping on growth of small and medium business enterprises in Kabarnet town, Baringo County, Kenya. International Journal of Science and Research, 3(12), 432-437.
[44] Cheluget, D. C. &Morogo, V. J. (2017). Effect of Financial MAnagement Practices and Project Performance in UasinGishuCountry, Kenya. International Journal of Economics, Commerce and Management, 5, 214-226.
[45] Chepkemoi, P. (2013). An analysis of the effects of capital structure of small and medium enterprises on their financial performance: A case of Nakuru town (Doctoral dissertation, Kabarak University).
[46] Daniel, N &Japhet, D. (2017). Effect of financial management practices on financial performance of Small and medium-sized enterprises in Kiambu town, Kenya. American based research journal. 6(1).
[47] Deegan, C. (2001) Financial Accounting Theory, Sydney: McGraw-Hill. Golda, A.D. (2013). Effects of financial management practices on performance of KMTC. (Master’s thesis), University of Nairobi, Kenya. http://erepository.uonbi.ac.ke
[48] Deresse, M. L., &Prabhakara, D. R. (2012). Effect of financial management practices and characteristics on profitability: A study on business enterprises in Jimma Town, Ethiopia. Journal of Research in Commerce & Management, 2 (5), 64, 75.
[49] Dumbu, E., & Alexander, R. (2012). An Assessment of the Impact of Working Capital Management Practices on Performance of Manufacturing Micro and Small Enterprises in Zimbabwe: A case study of the Manufacturing MSEs in Masvingo Urban. International Journal of Research in Management, 6(6), 85-92.
[50] Ejoh, N. O., Okpa, I. B. &Ibanga, U. J. (2016). An Examination of the Relationship between Capital Investment Appraisal Techniques and Firms‟ Growth and Survival in Nigeria. Journal of Business and Management (IOSR-JBM), 18(1) .Ver. III), 45- 52.
[51] Esmeray, A. (2016). The Impact of Accounting Information Systems on Firm Performance: Empirical Evidence in Turkish Small and Medium Sized Enterprises. International Review of Management and Marketing, 6(2), 233-236.
[52] Ezeagba, C. (2017). Financial reporting in small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in Nigeria. Challenges and options. International Journal of Academic Research in Accounting, Finance and Management Sciences, 7(1), 1-10.
[53] Foyeke, O. I., Olusola, F. S. &Aderemi, A. K. (2016). Financial Structure and the Profitability of Manufacturing Companies in Nigeria. Journal of Accounting, Finance and Auditing Studies, 2(3), 56-63.
[54] Fuseini I. O., & Lawrence A. A.& Belinda B. (2018). Bookkeeping and perception of growth of small and medium scale enterprises in the Cape Coast Metropolis.European Journal of Business and Management, 10 (26), 84-97.
[55] Gamge, B. N. (2014). Promoting Small &Medium Scale Enterprises in Post Conflict Sri Lanka: Challengers and Opportunities. International Journal of Business & Management Studies, 357- 364.
[56] Gan, C., Chong, L., & Ahmed, Z. (2016). Impacts of FRS139 adoption on value relevance of financial reporting in Malaysia. Managerial Finance, 42, 706- 721.doi:10.1108/MF-06-2015-0167
[57] Gill, A., Biger, N., & Mathur, N. (2010). The relationship between working capital management and profitability: Evidence from the United States. Business and economics journal, 10(1), 1-9.
[58] Gitman, L. J., Juchau, R., & Flanagan, J. (2015). Principles of managerial finance. Pearson Higher Education AU.
[59] Hair Jr, J. F., Babin, B. J., &Krey, N. (2017). Covariance-based structural equation modeling in the Journal of Advertising: Review and recommendations. Journal of Advertising, 46(1), 163-177.
[60] Hamza, K., Mutala, Z., and Ankwi, K., (2015). Cash Management Practices and Financial Performance of Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in the Northern Region of Ghana, International Journal of Economics, Commerce and Management, United Kingdom, 3 (7).
[61] Harash, E. (2017). Accounting Performance of SMEs and Effect of Accounting Information System: A Conceptual Model. Global Journal of Management and Business Research: Accounting and Auditing, 17(3), 21-26.
[62] Hend , H., Ahmed, A., Rashed, A., Marwa, A. (2020). Effects of External and Internal success factors on SMEs performance in emerging economies: Evidence from Saudi Arabia., Journal Management System 42(1), 63-100.‎ DOI: 10.21608/zcom.2020.125267
[63] Hofmann, E., &Kotzab, H. (2010). A supply chain‐oriented approach of working capital management. Journal of business Logistics, 31(2), 305-330.
[64] Hoque, A. S. M. M., & Awang, Z. (2019). Does gender difference play moderating role in the relationship between entrepreneurial marketing and Bangladeshi SME performance?.Accounting, 5(1), 35-52.
[65] Hughes, C. (2003). Opportunities for records managers working in the private Sector. Records management society of Great Britain. Record management Journal, 13(3), 117 – 122.
[66] Hui, H., Wan, C., Radzi, J.W.M., Jenatabadi, H., Kasim, F.A., & Radu, S. (2013). The impact of firm age and size on the relationship among organizational innovation, learning, and performance: A moderation analysis in Asian food manufacturing companies. Interdisciplinary Journal of Contemporary Research in Business, 5,166-174.
[67] Hunjra, A. I., Shaheen, I. B., Niazi, G. S. K., & Rehman, I. (2012). Investment appraisal techniques and constraints on capital investment. Actual Problems of Economics, 2(4).
[68] Ismail, N.A. & Zin, R.M. (2009). Usage of accounting information among Malaysian Bumiputra small medium non-manufacturing firms. Journal of Enterprise Resource Planning Studies, l http://www.ibimapublishing. com/journals/JERPS/jerps.html (Retrieved on 24.01.2020)
[69] Jagoda, K. J. M. M., Maldeniya, A. G. M. N., Ravinath, K. A. P., Ranaweera, W. P. M., &Pushpakumara, H. P. I. P. (2018). Relationship between Financial Reporting and Analysis Practices and Financial Performance of Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in Sri Lanka. retrieved on 12.10.2019. https://mgt.sjp.ac.lk/acc/wp content/uploads/2018/12/a-article-2.pdf
[70] Jennifer, K., & Dennis, O. (2015). Financial management practices on growth of small and medium enterprises: A case of manufacturing enterprises in Nairobi County, Kenya. IOSR Journal of Business and Management, 17(8), 65-77.
[71] Jindrichovska, I. (2013). Financial management in SMEs.European Research Studies Journal 16(4):79-95
[72] Kader, M. A. (2019). Financial Management Practices on Financial Performance. Kader, Globus An International Journal of Management & IT. 11(1) , 06-20.
[73] Kahando, D. M., Maina, T. M. &Maina, C. M. (2017). An Appraisal of Financial Management Practices on the Growth of Micro Enterprise in Kenya. Journal of Business and Economic Development, 2(1), 63-70.
[74] Kajananthan, R. &Nimalthasan, P. (2013). Capital structure and its impact on firm performance: A study on Sri Lankan listed manufacturing companies. Merit Research Journal of Business and Management, 1(2), 037-044.
[75] Kalaipriya, K. (2018). The Relationship between Access to Finance and Growth of SMEs in the Northern Province of Sri Lanka: Financial Literacy as a Moderator. http://dr.lib.sjp.ac.lk
[76] Kamande, K. M. (2015). The relationship between financial management practices and financial performance in the dairy industry in Kenya (Doctoral dissertation, University of Nairobi). http://erepository.uonbi.ac.ke
[77] Karadag, H. (2017). The impact of industry, firm age and education level on financial management performance in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs): Evidence from Turkey. Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, 9 (3), 300-314. https://doi.org/10.1108/JEEE-09-2016-0037
[78] Karanja, C. N. (2012). The relationship between investment decisions and financial performance of small and medium scale enterprises in Limuru town, Kenya (Doctoral dissertation, University of Nairobi).
[79] Karunananda, A., &Jayamaha, A. (2011). Financial practices and performance of small and medium-sized enterprises in Sri Lanka. In Proceedings of International Conference on Business & Information. Available from: Digital Repository. kln. ac. lk.
[80] Kengatharan, L., &Yogendrarajah, R. (2017). Financial management Practices and performance of SMEs in Sri Lanka: Evidence from Jaffna district. International Journal of Accounting & Business Finance, 61-72.
[81] Khan, M. W. J., Khalique, M., & Nor, R. M. (2014). Exploring the measurements of organizational performance: Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) perspective. Market Forces, 9(2).
[82] Kiita, G. K. (2013). The relationship between financial management practices and financial performance in the shipping industry in Kenya. Master of Business Administration Thesis of University of Nairobi.
[83] Kilonzo, J. M., & Dennis, O. (2015). Financial Management Practices on growth of SMEs: A case of Manufacturing Enterprises in Nairobi County, Kenya. Journal of Business and Management (IOSR-JBM), 65-77. https://doi.org/10.9790/487X-17826577.
[84] Kitonga, K. G. (2013). The relationship between financial management practices and financial performance in the shipping industry in Kenya. Unpublished MBA project University of Nairobi, Kenya.Retrieved from http://erepository.uonbi.ac.ke/handle/11295/ 60435
[85] Kofi, M. E., Adjei, H., Collins, M. & Christian, A. O. A. (2014). Assessing Financial Reporting Practices among Small Scale Enterprises in Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly. European Journal of Business and Social Sciences, 2(10), 81 – 96.
[86] Kosgey , T. &Njiru, A. (2016). Influence of Working Capital Management on the Financial Performance of Small Enterprises; a Survey of Nakuru County. Journal of Business and Management (IOSR-JBM), 18(4 .Ver. II), 41-47.
[87] Kuluppuarachchi, M. K., Athauda, A. M. T. P., &Wijeyewardena, H. M. S. L. (2016). Obstacles for the sustainability of business start-ups: the case of north western province in Sri Lanka. Applied Economics & Business, 1 , 12-22. http://www.nastec.gov.lk
[88] Lau, C.M., &Sholihin, M. (2005). Financial and nonfinancial performance measurement: How do they effect Job Satisfaction? in the British. Accounting Review, 37(4), 389-413.
[89] Lazaridis, I., &Tryfonidis, D. (2006). Relationship between working capital management and profitability of listed companies in the Athens stock exchange. Journal of financial management and analysis, 19(1), 26-35.
[90] Longenecker, J. G., Petty, C. W., Moore, J. W. &Palich, L. E. (2006). Small Business Management, an Entrepreneurial Emphasis. London: Thomson South Western. https://www.amazon.com
[91] MacKinnon, D. P. (2011). Integrating Mediators and Moderators in Research Design. Research on Social Work Practice, 21(6), 675-681.
[92] Madurapperuma, M. W., Thilakerathne, P. M. C. &Manawadu, I. N. (2016). Accounting Record Keeping Practices in Small and Medium Sized Enterprise‟s (SME‟s) in Sri Lanka. Journal of Finance and Accounting, 4(4), 188-193.
[93] Majumdar, S. K. (1997). The impact of size and age on firm-level performance: Some evidence from India. Review of Industrial Organization, 12, 231 -241.
[94] Malait, J. C., Naibei, I. K. &Kirui, J. K. (2017). Efficacy of accounting systems on the performance of public Universities in Kenya: A case of Egerton University. International Journal of Scientific and Research Publications, 7(10), 464-474.
[95] Malawige, I. &Nanayakkara, L. (2014). Drawbacks in SMEs‟ EIS Applications: Framework for Development of EIS for SMEs in Sri Lanka. International Journal of Multidisciplinary Studies (IJMS), I( I), 63-73.
[96] Maseko, N. &Manyani, O. (2011). Accounting practices of SMEs in Zimbabwe: An investigative study of record keeping for performance measurement (A case study of Bindura). Journal of Accounting and Taxation, 3(8), 171-181.
[97] Masocha, R., Dzomonda, O. (2016). The mediating role of effective working capital management on the growth prospects of Small and Medium Enterprises in Polokwane Municipality. SAAPAM Limpopo Chapter 5th Annual ConferenceProceedings.
[98] Mbroh, J. K., &Assah, B. (2015). Financial records keeping and business decision-making practices by Small and Micro Enterprise owners in Ghana–evidence from the Central Region. International Journal of Economics, Commerce and Management, 3(8), 467-491.
[99] McMahon, R. G. (1999). Financial reporting to financiers Australian manufacturing SMEs. International Small Business Journal, 18(1), 35-52.
[100] McMahon, R. G. (2002). Business growth and performance and the financial reporting practices of Australian Manufacturing SMEs. Journal of Small Business Management. 39( 2), 152-164.
[101] McMahon, R. G. P. & Holmes, S. (1991). Small Business financial management practices in North America: A literature review. Journal of Small Business Management, . 29(2): 19-29.
[102] McMahon, R. G. P. (1999). Putting SME financial reporting into theoretical and accounting for non-accountants: Practical perspective. Reserved Paper Series, 1, 98-10.
[103] Ministry of Industry and Commerce, National Policy Framework for Small Medium Enterprise (SME) Development (2016). http://www.industry.gov.lk/web/images/pdf/ framew_eng.pdf.
[104] Muazu, I. & Alhassan, M. (2014). Record Keeping and the Bottom Line: Exploring the Relationship between Record Keeping and Business Performance among Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in the Tamale Metropolis of Ghana. Research Journal of Finance and Accounting, 5(2), 107-117.
[105] Muchira, B. W. (2012). Record keeping and growth of micro and small enterprises. A case study of Thika Municipality in Kenya. Unpublished MBA thesis, KenyattaUniversity-Kenya. https://ir-library.ku.ac.ke
[106] Muhindo, A., Kapute M., & Zhou, J. (2014). Impact of Accounting Information Systems on Profitability of Small Scale Businesses: A Case of Kampala City in Uganda. International Journal of Academic Research in Management (IJARM), 3(2), 185-192.
[107] Mumbo, G. O. (2013). Effects of financial statement on the performance and growth of SME‟s: A survey of SME‟s in Eldoret Langas area. European Journal of Business and Management, 5(24), 53-59.
[108] Muneer, S., Ahmad, R. A., & Ali, A. (2017). Impact of financial management practices on SMEs profitability with moderating role of agency cost. Information Management and Business Review, 9(1), 23-30.
[109] Muneria, W. B., &Otinga, H. N. (2019). Influence of financial literacy and working capital management on financial growth of small business enterprises in Kakamega County, Kenya. The Strategic Journal of Business & Change Management, 6(2), 1-17.
[110] Musah, A., Gakpetor, E. D., &Pomaa, P. (2018). Financial management practices, firm growth and profitability of small and medium scale enterprises (SMEs). Information management and business review, 10(3), 25-37.
[111] Mushaho, K. N., Mbabazize, M. & Shukla, J. (2015). The effect of capital budgeting investment decision on Organizational performance in Rwanda. A case study of Bahresa grain lilling Rwanda LTD. International Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship Research,.3(5), 100-132.
[112] Mwakujonga, J., & Bwana, K. M. (2013). The practice of preparing and using financial information in financial decisions: a survey of SMEs in Tanzania.European Journal of Business and Management, 5(9),
[113] Mwangi, L. W., Makau, M. S. &Kosimbei, G. (2014). Relationship between capital structure and performance of non-financial companies listed in the Nairobi Securities Exchange, Kenya. Global Journal of Contemporary Research in Accounting, Auditing and Business Ethics (GJCRA), 1(2),. 72-90.
[114] Mwebesa, L. C. K., Kansiime, C., Asiimwe, B., Mugambe, P., &Rwego, I. B. (2018). The effect of financial record keeping on financial performance of development groups in rural areas of Western Uganda. International Journal of Economics and Finance, 10(4), 136-145.
[115] National Policy Framework for Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) Development, Action Plan, Ministry of Industry and Commerce in Sri Lanka, (2016). http://www.industry.gov.lk
[116] NEDA, (2011) SME Guide book-“A guide to- wards a better business” Ministry of industry and commerce National Policy Framework for Small and Medium Enterprises Development in Sri Lanka. http://www.industry.gov.lk
[117] Nguyen, T. T. C., & Ho, M. H. (2021). Evaluation of Accounting Information Quality of Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises: An Empirical Study in Vietnam. The Journal of Asian Finance, Economics and Business, 8(7), 161–167. https://doi.org/10.13106/JAFEB.2021.VOL8.NO7.0161
[118] Nicholas. (2018):https://www.inc.com/peter-economy/17-motivational-quotes-to-inspire-small-business-owners.html
[119] Nirajini, A. & Priya, K. B. (2013). Impact of capital structure on financial performance of listed trading companies in Sri Lanka. International Journal of Scientific and Research Publications, 3(5), 1-9.
[120] Nisar, T. (ed.) (2005) Finance and management practice: a literature review , London, UK. Department for Business, Enterprise & Regulatory Reform, 124pp.
[121] Nketsiah, I. (2015). Financial Management Practices and Performance of Small and Medium Enterprises in the Sekondi-Takoradi Metropolis . SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2922436
[122] Nketsiah, I. (2018). Financial management practices and performance of SMEs in Ghana: The moderating role of firm age. Open Journal of Economics and Commerce, 1(4), 8-18.
[123] Nketsiah, I. (2018). Financial record keeping practices of small business operators in the Sekondi-Takoradi metropolitan area of Ghana. Asian Journal of Economics, Business and Accounting, 1-9.
[124] Nthenge, D., &Ringera, J. (2017). Effect of Financial Management Practices on Financial Performance of Small and Medium Enterprises in Kiambu Town, Kenya. American Based Research Journal, 6(1), 6-32.
[125] Nyakundi, T., Charlesb, O., Jaredd, A. &Zablonc, E. (2016). Influence of working capital management practices on financial performance of Small and Medium Enterprises in Machakos Sub-County, Kenya. International Journal of Sciences: Basic and Applied Research, 286-309.
[126] Nyamao, N. R., Patrick, O., Martin, L., Odondo, A. J., &Simeyo, O. (2012). Effect of working capital management practices on financial performance: A study of Small scale enterprises in Kisii South District, Kenya. African journal of business management, 6(18), 5807-5817.
[127] Obazee, A. (2019). Exploring Financial Management Practices of Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises in Nigeria (Doctoral dissertation, Walden University). https://scholarworks.waldenu.edu
[128] Observer, O. E. C. D. (2000). Small and medium-sized enterprises: local strength, global reach. Policy Brief. https://www.oecd.org/cfe/leed/1918307.pdf.
[129] Okpara, J. (2011). Factors constraining the growth and survival of SMEs in Nigeria Implications for poverty alleviation. Management Research Review, 34(2), 156-171.
[130] Olawale, F., Olumuyiwa, O. & George, H. (2010). An investigation into the impact of investment appraisal techniques on the profitability of small manufacturing firms in the Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Area, South Africa. African Journal of Business Management, 4(7), pp.1274-1280.
[131] Olukotun, A. G., James, S. O., &Ifedolapo, O. (2012). The roles of record keeping the growth and survival of small scale enterprises in Ijumu local government area of Kogi State. Global Journal of Management and Business Research, 12(13), 54 – 66.
[132] Oluoch, J. O. (2016). The impact of cash management practices on performance of SMEs: A survey of SMEs in Eldoret Central Business District. Journal of Economics & Finance, 7(6), 01-07.
[133] Onaolapo, A. A. &Odetayo, T. A. (2012). Effect of Accounting Information System on Organisational Effectiveness: A Case Study of Selected Construction Companies in Ibadan, Nigeria. American Journal of Business and Management, 1(4), 183-189.
[134] Orobia, L. A., Byabashaija, W., Munene, J. C., Sejjaaka, S. K., &Musinguzi, D. (2013). How do small business owners manage working capital in an emerging economy? A qualitative inquiry. Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management.10(12):127-143
[135] Owusu, J., Ismail, M. B., Osman, M. H. B. M., &Kuan, G. (2019). Financial literacy as a moderator linking financial resource availability and SME growth in Ghana. Investment Management and Financial Innovations 16(1):154-166. 10.21511/imfi.16(1).2019.12
[136] Ozatambgo, O. (2015). Financial record keeping in religious organizations: A case study of Catholic Church in Enugu Diocese. https://www.projectreserve.com
[137] Padachi, K. (2006.) Trends in working capital management and its impact on firms’ performance: an analysis of Mauritian small manufacturing firms. International Review of Business Research Papers,.2 (2), 45 -58.
[138] Palacios, H. A. C., Carrillo, E. P. M. & Guzmán, G. M. (2016). The effects of the capital structure in performance: Empirical study on manufacturing SMEs of México. Journal of Business & Economic Policy, 3(1), 1-10.
[139] Pandey, I. (2004). Financial Management, (8th ed). Vikas publishing house Pvt Ltd, Delhi.
[140] Porwal, L. S. (2001). Accounting Theory, 3E.
[141] Raheman, A., & Nasr, M. (2007). Working capital management and profitability: Case of Pakistani firms. International Review of Business Research Papers,3(1), 279–300.
[142] Rahman, M. M., Uddin, M. N. & Ibrahim, S. (2015). Measuring the Relationship Between Working Capital Management and Profitability: Empirical Evidence from Bangladesh. Journal of Accounting and Finance, 5(8), pp. 120-132.
[143] Rathnasiri, U A. H.A. (2014). Selected Accounting and Financial Management Practices of Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in Sri Lanka, Dissertation for M.Sc. Program DOI: 10.31357/fmscmst.2014.00345
[144] Rathnasiri, U. (2015). The Financial Management Practices of Small and Medium Enterprises in Sri Lanka. Global Journal of Contemporary Research in Accounting, Auditing and Business Ethics (GJCRA), An Online International Research Journal, 1(2), 379-399.
[145] Rathnasiri, U. A. H. A. (2014). Financial reporting practices of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in Sri Lanka. South East Asia Journal of Contemporary Business, Economics and Law, 4(1), 15-23.
[146] Rauf, A. L. A. (2016). Financial management practices in Small and Medium Sized Enterprises: Empirical evidence from the District of Ampara in Sri Lanka. International Journal of Economics, Business and Management Studies, 3(3), pp. 117-126.
[147] Romney, M. B., Steinbart, P. J., & Cushing, B. E. (2015). Accounting information systems. Boston, MA: Pearson.
[148] Ross, S. A., Westerfield, R., & Jordan, B. D. (2008). Fundamentals of corporate finance. Tata McGraw-Hill Education. ninth edition. s11747-011-0278-x.
[149] Saeed, R. B. A., &Badar, R. (2013). Impact of capital structure on performance empirical evidence from sugar sector of Pakistan. European Journal of Business and Management, 5(5), 78-86.
[150] Sai Krupakar, R. K., Avinash, R. N., Dhanunjay, N. P., Santosh, K. S., (2020). A Study on V2 Distribution Company. International Journal Of Innovative Research In Technology. 6(10), 392-395.
[151] Sajuyigbe, A. S., Adeyemi, A. Z. &Odebiyi, I. I. (2017). Financial Management Practices and Women Entrepreneurs Performance: An Empirical Investigation. International Journal of Economics and Business Management. 3 (1). 70-79.
[152] Salim, I. M., &Sulaiman, M. (2011). Organizational Learning, Innovation and Performance A Study of Malaysian Small and Medium Sized Enterprises. International Journal of Business and Management, 6(12), 118-126. doi: 10.5539/ijbm. v6n12p118
[153] Sallem, N. R. M., Nasir, N. E. M., Nori, W. M. N. W. M., &Kassim, C. K. H. C. K. (2017). Small and medium enterprises: Critical problems and possible solutions. International Business Management, 11, 47-52. doi:10.3923/ibm.2017.47.52
[154] Sarapaivanich, N. (2003). The Use of Financial Information in Financial Decisions of SMEs in Thailand, the Small Enterprise Association of Australia and New Zealand 16th Annual Conference. Ballarat, Australia, 28.
[155] Schroeder, R. G., Clark, M. W., & Cathey, J. M. (2019). Financial accounting theory and analysis: text and cases. John Wiley & Sons.
[156] Sekaran, U. & Bougie, R. (2009). Research Method for Business: A skill Building Approach, Fifth Edition. John Wiley and Sons: Danvers, Great Britain.
[157] Selvanayaki, S., Sivakumara, S., Rohinia, A. &Manib, K. (2016). Financial Management Practices and Profitability of Modern Rice Milling Firms in Kangayam Cluster, Tamil Nadu. Agricultural Economics Research Review, 29(2), pp.297-306.
[158] Semasinghe , D., Senanayake, M. & Banda , O. D. (2017). The effects of working capital management on profitability, liquidity,solvency and organic growth with special reference to SMEs: A review. International Journal of Accounting & Business Finance, 3(2), pp. 19- 50.
[159] Shahabi, A., Hosseinpour, S., &Soheila, Z. (2014). An investigation into Accounting Practices of Small and Medium Enterprises of Tehran Province in Iran.Reef Resources Assessment and Management Technical Paper, 40 (5), 285-295.
[160] Siaw, F. (2014). Effect of demand side factors on access to external finance by micro, small and medium manufacturing enterprises in Kumasi metropolis, Ghana. Unpublished Phd Thesis, School of Business, Kenyata University, Kenya.
[161] Sindani, M. N. (2019). The Moderating Effect of Financial Literacy on the Relationship between Accounts Receivable Management Practices and Growth of SMEs in Kenya. Expert Journal of Finance, 7(1).
[162] Singh, S., &Janor, H. (2013). Determinants of SMEs Financing Pattern in India-A Rotated Factor Analysis Approach. International Journal of Economics & Management, 7(2).
[163] Singh, V., & Sharma, S. K. (2016). Analyzing the moderating effects of respondent type and experience on the fuel efficiency improvement in air transport using structural equation modeling. European Transport Research Review, 8(2), 12.
[164] Somathilake, H. M. D. N., &Pathirawasam, C. (2020). The Effect of Financial Management Practices on Performance of SMEs in Sri Lanka.International Journal of Scientific Research and Management, 08(05),1789-1803.
[165] Sooriyakumaran, L., Pathirawasam, C., &Thrikawala, S. S. (2020). Maintaining accounting records and profitability of SMEs: Evidence from Jaffna District in Sri Lanka. International Journal of Engineering Science and Computing, 10(3).
[166] Sooryasena, R. S. S., &Palihena, P. D. N. K. (2020). The effect of financial management practices on financial performance of small and medium enterprises: Special reference to Kurunegala Divisional Secretariat. International Journal of Scientific Research and Management, 8(05), 1789–1803. https://doi.org/10.18535/ijsrm/v8i05.em05
[167] Sri Lanka Accounting standards for Small Medium sized entities (2012). Institute of Chartered Accountants of Sri Lanka : http://www.slaasc.lk/files/SLFRS%20for%20Smaller%20Entities_Attachment%20-%20SLFRS%20for%20Smaller%20Entities.pdf.
[168] Swarnapali, R.M.N.C. &Rathnayaka, A.R.N. (2016). Impact of Financial Management Practices on Financial Performance of SMEs in Sri Lanka: Evidence from Anuradhapura District. Proceedings of the Research Conference on Business Studies (RCBS-2016), Faculty of Business Studies, Vavuniya Campus of the University of Jaffna, Sri Lanka, Vavuniya, Sri Lanka, pp. 01-04.
[169] Tarhini, A. (2013). The effects of individual-level culture and demographic characteristics on e-learning acceptance in Lebanon and England: A structural equation modelling approach. Available at SSRN 2725438.
[170] Tauringana, V., &Afrifa, G. A. (2013). The relative importance of working capital management and its components to SMEs’ profitability. Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development. 20(3), 453 – 469.
[171] Tharindi, H. G. N., &Rathnayaka, R. M. C. L. K. (2016). Financial Management Practices and Performance of Small and Medium Enterprises in Sri Lanka.9th International Research Conference-KDU, Sri Lanka. http://ir.kdu.ac.lk/handle/345/1273
[172] Tharmini, T., &Lakshan, A. M. I. (2021). Impact of Financial Management Practices on Performance of Small and Medium Enterprises–Legitimacy Theory Perspectives. Kelaniya Journal of Management, 10(1).
[173] The International Accounting Standards Board. May 2014. Available at: http://www.ifrs.org/Meetings/MeetingDocs/IASB/2014/May/AP10E-Conceptual%20Framework.pdf
Mahesh, J., Phan, D., & Tran-Nam, B. (2018). The history of accounting standard setting in an emerging transition economy. The case of Vietnam. Accounting History, 23, 379-406.doi:10.1177/1032373217745672
[174] Thevaruban, J. S. (2009). Small Scale Industries’ and it’s Financial Problems in Srilanka. Journal of Asia Entrepreneurship and Sustainability, 5(2), 33.
[175] Thevrajah, K. (2015). Barriers of Failure of Small Business in Jaffna District: Conceptual Analysis, European Journal of Business and Management. 7(7), 400-402.
[176] Turyahebwa, A., Arthur, S., Aluonzi, B., &Byamukama, E. (2013). Financial Management Practices In Small And Medium Enterprises in Selected Districts In Western Uganda. Research Journal of Finance and Accounting. 4(2), 29- 35.
[177] Turyahebwa, A., Sunday, A., &Ssekajugo, D. (2013). Financial management practices and business performance of small and medium enterprises in western Uganda. African journal of business management, 7(38), 3875-3885.
[178] Uduwaka, U. H. S. M., &Dedunu, H. H. (2019). The effect of financial management practices on financial performances of small and medium enterprises in Sri Lanka (with special reference to Gampaha district).8th Annual International Research Conference, South Eastern University, Sri Lanka.
[179] Vaikunthavasan, S., Velnampy, T., & Sivarajah, R. (2019). Exploring the problems and challenges of micro small and medium enterprises in Northern Province. Business and Management Horizons, 7(1), 89-104.
[180] Vijayakumar, S. (2012). Growth and issues of small and medium enterprises in post conflict Jaffna Sri Lanka. Economia Seria Management, 16(1), 38-53.
[181] Wambua, P. M. & Koori, J. (2018). Investment Apprisal Techniques and financial performance of SMEs in Nirobi city coutry, Kenya. International journal of current aspects in finance,IV( II), 89-101.
[182] Waweru, C., & Ngugi, K. (2014). Influence of financial management practices on the performance of micro and small enterprises in Kenya. European Journal of Business Management, 1(11), 141-161.
[183] Wembe, M. A. (2015). Effects of Working Capital Management on the Performance of Firms in Kenya: A Case Study of Kenya Ports Authority. International Journal of Science and Research (IJSR), 4(4), pp. 1124-1136.
[184] Wickramatilake R.M.D., (2018). Development of SMEs in Sri Lanka: Are we serious about SME classification?, e-paper, Wijeya Newspapers Ltd, 4 July,2018: https://www.ft.lk/columns/Development-of-SMEs-in-Sri-Lanka%E2%80%94Are-we-serious-about-SME-classification-/4-658337.
[185] Wijekoon , M. H. N. W. (2018). Towards the development of a financial reporting framework for Sri Lankan SMEs (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)). The University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/11810
[186] Wijekumara, J. M. N. (2019). Factors Affecting the Adoption of a Formal Accounting System in Small and Medium Enterprises with Special Reference to Anuradhapura District.Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Management and Economics – 2019 :http://ir.lib.ruh.ac.lk.
[187] Wijewardana, W. P. (2018). Factors affecting business success: Evidence on Small and Medium Enterprises. In The 5th IBSM International Conference on Business, Management and Accounting (pp. 19-21).
[188] Wire, W. C. (2015). Influence of working capital management practices on financial performance of small and medium manufacturing enterprises in Nairobi County, Kenya (Doctoral dissertation, JKUAT). http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1866
[189] Wolmarans, H. P., &Meintjes, Q. (2015). Financial management practices in successful Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs). The southern African journal of entrepreneurship and small business management, 7(1), 88-116.
[190] Ye, J., &Kulathunga, K. M. M. C. B. (2019). How does financial literacy promote sustainability in SMEs? A developing country perspective. Sustainability, 11(10), 2990.
[191] Yıldız, S., &Karakaş, A. (2012). Defining Methods and Criteria for Measuring Business Performance: A Comparative Research Between the Literature in Turkey and Foreign. Procedia -Social and Behavioral Sciences, 58, 1091-1102. doi: 10.1016/j. sbspro.2012.09.1090
[192] Zada, M., Yukun, C., & Zada, S. (2021). Effect of financial management practices on the development of small-to-medium size forest enterprises: insight from Pakistan. GeoJournal, 86(3), 1073-1088.
[193] Zwiebel, J. (1996). Dynamic capital structure under managerial entrenchment. The American economic review, 1197-1215.

L. Sooriyakumaran, Dr. S. S. Thrikawala, C. Pathirawasam “A Study Between the Association of Financial Management Practices and Performance of Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) Background: A Working Paper” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.166-179 January 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6113

Download PDF

pdf

Internal Monitoring and Evaluation of Teaching in Secondary Schools of Kabwe District in Central Province, Zambia. Challenges and Possible solutions

Steven Lungu, Harrison Daka (PhD)- January 2022- Page No.: 180-186

This study aimed at investigating the challenges and possible solutions of conducting internal monitoring and evaluation of selected secondary schools teachers’ performance in Kabwe district. The study was conducted within the framework of mixed methodology using an embedded mixed design. The study collected data from 114 participants drawn from ten secondary schools in Kabwe district. The data was collected using questionnaires and interviews. The findings included the following challenges; minimal frequency of internal monitoring and evaluation, head teachers’ challenges of multiple roles, teachers’ divided attention between teaching in class and personal development, head teachers not being conversant with processes of monitoring and evaluation thus tended to be fault finding and intimidating in nature as opposed to providing constructive criticism and encouragement. The recommendations for addressing the challenges that emerged from the findings included; Head teachers to undergo training in educational management and administration, to increase frequency of internal monitoring and evaluation, roles of head teachers to be reduced to administration only, to introduce peer to peer monitoring, to encourage monitoring through intertwining of secondary schools in the district, and teachers to regularly attend Continuous Professional Development (CPD).

Page(s): 180-186                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 January 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6114

 Steven Lungu
Department of Educational Administration and Policy Studies, University of Zambia

 Harrison Daka (PhD)
Department of Educational Administration and Policy Studies, University of Zambia

[1] Chapman, C& Harris, A. (2004). Improving Schools in difficult and challenging contexts: Strategies for improvement, Educational Research, 46(1), 219-228.
[2] Chipindi, F. M., Serenje-Chipindi, J. and Daka, H. (2021). An Analysis of Epistemological Considerations in Educational Research. Journal of Lexicography and Terminology. Vol.4 (2), 105 – 118.
[3] Creswell, J.W. (2014). Research design: Qualitative and quantitative and mixed method Approach. (4th Edition). Sage Publication Ltd.
[4] Chimuka, R. (2016). Effects of the School Strategic Plan on Pupils’ Academic Performance in Selected Secondary Schools of Lundazi District, Zambia. Med. Thesis. The University of Zambia, Lusaka.
[5] Daka, H., Banda, S. S. and Namafe, C. M. (2017). Course management, Teaching and Assessing Undergraduates at the Medical School of the University of Zambia. International Journal of Humanities Social Sciences and Education. 4 (10), 10 – 18.
[6] Daka, H.,Namafe, C. M. and Katowa – Mukwato, P. (2019). Perspectives on Teaching Approaches and the Grade Point Average Attainment of Undergraduate Medical Students at University of Zambia. International Journal of Humanities Social Sciences and Education. Vol.6 (12), 75-82.
[7] Daka, H. (2019). Understanding the Correlation between Institutional Characteristics and Academic Performance: A case of Undergraduate Medical Students at University of Zambia. Journal of Lexicography and Terminology, 3 (2), 96 – 116.
[8] Daka, H., Banda, S. S., & Namafe, C. M. (2020). The Relationship between Course Management and Examination Attrition Rates among Undergraduate Medical Students at the University Of Zambia. International Journal of African Higher Education, 7(1), 97 – 112.
[9] Daka, H.,Chipindi, F. M. and Mwale, M. (2020). The Relationship between Assessment Practices and Students’ Academic Performances. A Case of Undergraduate Students at the Medical School of the University of Zambia, 2008 – 2016.Zambian Journal of Educational Management, Administration and Leadership, 1 (1), 143 – 156.
[10] Daka, H., Chipindi, F. M., Phiri A., Mulenga, B., Mvula, L and Chirwa, J. (2021). Administrative Mitigation Measures against Examination Attrition Rates in Tertiary Institutions: A Case of School of Education, University of Zambia. European Modern Studies Journal. 5 (3). 248 – 258
[11] Daka, H., Mulenga-Hagane, M. L., Mukalula-Kalumbi, M and Lisulo, S. (2021). Making Summative Assessment Effective.European Modern Studies Journal. (4), 224 – 237.
[12] Daka, H., Banda, S. S., & Namafe, C. M. (2020). The Relationship between Course Management and Examination Attrition Rates among Undergraduate Medical Students at the University Of Zambia. International Journal of African Higher Education, 7(1), 97 – 112.
[13] Daka, H.,Chilala, M. M., Hamatanga, O. H., Chirwa, B., Mumba, A., Kaoma, C. and Chikopela, C. (2021).Averting Learner Absenteeism in Zambian Urban and Rural Primary Schools. A Case of Kalingalinga and Simweendengwe Primary Schools. Journal of Lexicography and Terminology. Vol.5 (1), 33 – 55.
[14] Ehren, M.C.A., Perryman, J. & Spours, K. (2014). Accountability and School Inspection. Leading Education and Social Research. Institute of Education, University of London.
[15] Hamaleke, B, S andDaka, H.and Mphande, F. (2020).Strategies to overcome the Challenges faced by Weekly Boarders: A case study of Selected Day Secondary Schools in Chikankata District in Southern Province, Zambia.International Journal of Humanities Social Sciences and Education. Vol 7 (6), 175 – 186.
[16] Kakupa, P., Tembo P. and Daka, H. (2015). Linking Teacher Effectiveness to School Performance: Evidence from Rural Day-Secondary Schools in Western Province of Zambia. Zambia Journal of Teacher Professional Growth. 2 (2), 17-30.
[17] Kasonde, S.N. (2018). Writing a research proposal in education research. Lusaka: UNZA Press.
[18] Kruger, A. (2003). Instructional leadership: the impact on the culture of teaching and learning in two. South African Journal of Education, 23 (3), 206 – 211.
[19] Menlo, A. and Poppleton, P. (1990). A five-country study of the work perception of secondary school teachers in England, the United States, Japan, Singapore and West Germany (1986–1988). Comparative Education, 26:173-182.
[20] Ministry of Education (1996). Educating Our Future. National Policy. Lusaka, ZEPH.
[21] Ministry of Education (2010). School-Based Continuing Professional Development through Lesson Study. Implementation Guidelines. 4thEdition. Ministry of Education, Lusaka, Zambia.
[22] MOE (2016). Annual Report for 2015. Ministry of General Education, Lusaka.
[23] Mwamba, K. L., Musonda, A., Daka, H. and Mulenga, R. M. (2021).Strategies for Enhancing Mentorship in Entrepreneurship: A Case Study of Undergraduate Students of Kwame Nkrumah University, Kabwe-Zambia. International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science, 5 (9), 478 – 487.
[24] Namfukwe, I. (2016). The Impact Of Monitoring And Evaluation On The Performance Of Upper Primary School Teachers In Mbala District Of The Northern Province In Zambia. Thesis (M.ED) Lusaka, University of Zambia
[25] Nkinyangi, S. (2006). Quality Standards and Quality Assurance in Basic Education: Experience from Burundi, Eritrea, Kenya, Rwanda and Uganda. Nairobi Kenya
[26] Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development(2009). Teacher evaluation: A conceptual framework and examples of country practices. First Results from TALIS, OECD, Mexico City.
[27] Patton, M. (2002). Qualitative research and evaluation methods. (3rd Edition). London: Sage Publishers.
[28] Silwamba, V. and Daka, H. (2021). Investigating School Administrators’ and Education Standards Officers’ Monitoring and Evaluation of Teacher Performance in Nyimba District of Zambia. Zambia Interdisciplinary Journal of Education, 2 (1), 30 – 40.

Steven Lungu, Harrison Daka (PhD), “Internal Monitoring and Evaluation of Teaching in Secondary Schools of Kabwe District in Central Province, Zambia. Challenges and Possible solutions” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.180-186 January 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6114

Download PDF

pdf

Classroom Management Skills of Science Teachers

Apochi, M. A., AWOYEYE, Agnes Onyi – January 2022- Page No.: 187-191

Classroom is the centre focus of every educational setting due to the fact that it is the inevitable component of schools where students and teachers interacts for the purpose of imparting knowledge on students in line with the goal and objectives of policy of education of the society. Also, management of classroom is centered to effective teaching and learning. Hence, it is essential for teachers to be familiar with classroom management skills. This study investigated classroom management skills of science teachers in the Nigerian Capital, Abuja. The survey research design was adopted. 382 science teachers in both junior and senior secondary schools in the FCT, Abuja were randomly sampled. Data of the study were collected through as a questionnaire constructed in a 4-point modified Likert scale format. Data collected were analyzed using descriptive and, analysis of variance statistics. It was revealed that classroom management skills of science teachers are moderately satisfactory. However, academic attainment and work experiences of the teachers influence their classroom management skills. It was recommended that regular in-service training in classroom management should be organized for science teachers irrespective of educational attainment and working experiences.

Page(s): 187-191                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 January 2022

 Apochi, M. A.
Department of Science and Environmental Education, Faculty of Education, University of Abuja, Abuja-Nigeria

 AWOYEYE, Agnes Onyi
Department of Science and Environmental Education, Faculty of Education, University of Abuja, Abuja-Nigeria

[1] Adeyele, V. O., Sowunmi, E. T. &Adeosun, O. A. (2018). Assessment of classroom management practices on social-emotional behaviour of pupils. International Journal of Education and Evaluation, 4(4), 1 – 11.
[2] Adeyemo, S. A. (2012). The relationship between effective classroom management and students’ academic achievement. European Journal of Educational Studies, 4(3), 367 – 381.
[3] Agu, J. C. (2021). Influence of teachers’ classroom management techniqueon students’ academic performances in Njikoka LGA. International Journal of Innovative Education Research, 9(1), 33 – 44.
[4] Anonymous (2021). Six functions of the classroom setting. Retrieved fromhttp://bb.plsweb.com/ CM_Nav/m3/m3topicb_key1.html
[5] Ben, J. (2016).The 5 priorities of classroom management. Retrieved from https://www.edutopia .org/blog/5-priorities-classroom-management-ben-johnson
[6] Bosch, K. A. (2006). Planning classroom management. London: SAGE Publications.
[7] Cini, S. (2016). Seven key elements for effective classroom management. Retrieved from https://c lassroom.synonym.com/seven-elements-effective-classroom-management-6562940.html
[8] Emmer, E. T. &Gerwels, M. C. (2005). Establishing classroom management for cooperative learning. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Montreal, Canada, April.
[9] Fazilah, I., Zaharah, H., Azizah, Y., Saran, K. G.& Noor, A. M. A. (2011). The role of education in shaping youth’s national identity. Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences, 59, 443 – 450. Retrieved from www.sciencedirect.com
[10] Garrett, T. (2014). Effective of classroom management. Columbia University: Teacher College.
[11] Gu, Q. & Johansson, O. (2013). Sustaining school performance: School context matters. International Journal of Leadership in Education, 16(3), 301-326.
[12] Jones, V. F. & Jones, L. S. (2004). Comprehensive classroom management, creating communities of support and solving problems (7thEd.). USA: Allyn & Bacon Company.
[13] Kelly, M. (2020). Building an effective classroom. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/characteristics-of-an-effective-classroom-7735
[14] Mien (2021). 5 functions of active learning classrooms retrieved from https://miencompany.com/5-functions-of-active-learning-classrooms/
[15] Mudianingrum, R. A., Evenddy, S. S.& Rima, R. (2019). An analysis of teachers’ classroom management in teaching English. Journal of English Education Studies, 2(1), 1 – 11.
[16] Sadik, F. &Akbulut, T. (2015). An evaluation of classroom management skills of teachers at high schools (sample from the city of Adana). Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences, 191, 208 – 213. Retrieved from www.sciencedirect.com
[17] Spencer, B. (2018). Theimpact of effective classroom management. Retrieved from https://blog.teamsatchel.com/the-impact-of-effective-classroom-management

Apochi, M. A., AWOYEYE, Agnes Onyi, “Classroom Management Skills of Science Teachers” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.187-191 January 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-1/187-191.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Universe War Strategy on the March 1, 1949 General Attack in Yogyakarta

Syamsul Hilal, Afrizal Hendra, Tri Legionosuko, Helda Risman – January 2022- Page No.: 192-199

The General Attack of March 1, 1949 in Yogyakarta has significance in the course of history to maintain Indonesia’s independence from Dutch Aggression II., The purpose of this historical research seeks to examine and describe the events of the General Attack of March 1, 1949 and the application of the universal war strategy to the general attack in order to obtain victory and its impact for the international community.This paper is also expected for the younger generation to be an inspiration, foster nationalism and knowledge about the historical journey of the Struggle of the Indonesian nation in maintaining its independence. The methodology used in this writing is to use the approach of historical research methodology with the following four steps: Heuristics (attempts to find or find traces of history), Historical Criticism (selecting and testing traces / sources of history), Interpelasi (connecting and relating historical sources to each other), Historiography (writing or compiling historical stories).The results of this study showed that the universal war strategy used by the TNI in the General Attack of March 1, 1949 in seizing and controlling the city of Yoyakarta for 6 hours from dutch hands, had succeeded in supporting the struggle of Indonesian polytk diplomacy at the UNITED NATIONS forum in maintaining independence, by breaking Dutch propaganda and providing evidence to the international community that the existence of the Indonesian and TNI governments still exists.

Page(s): 192-199                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 January 2022

 Syamsul Hilal
Ministry of Defense of the Republic of Indonesia, Indonesia University of defense, Indonesia

 Afrizal Hendra
Ministry of Defense of the Republic of Indonesia, Indonesia University of defense, Indonesia

 Tri Legionosuko
Ministry of Defense of the Republic of Indonesia, Indonesia University of defense, Indonesia

 Helda Risman
Ministry of Defense of the Republic of Indonesia, Indonesia University of defense, Indonesia

[1] JS. Prabowo. (2009). Thoughts on the Universal War.Publisher: National Center for Assessment and Strategy (VAT), first print, october 2009.
[2] Seskoad. (1990). General Attack of March 1, 1949 in Yogyakarta, Background and Influence. Bandung. 1990.Ministry of Education and Culture, Secondary Education Book Procurement Project T.A 1991/1992.
[3] R. Ridhani. (2010). Flowers Battle General Attack March 1, 1949. PT. Sinar Harapan Library, Jakarta 2010.
[4] Batara R. Hutagalung. (2016). General Attack march 1, 1949, TNI struggle, diplomacy and people. Mata Padi Pressindo, Yogyakarta. 2016
[5] Abdul Haris Nasution (2012). The Guerrilla and Defense Points of the Republic of Indonesia in the Past and The Future. Publisher: Narasi (IKAPI Member), Yogyakarta 2012.
[6] Tashadi, Darto Hamoko, Suratmin, Hisbaron Muryantoro (1992). Role of Villages in the Struggle for Independence: Case Study of Involvement of Several Villages in Yogyakarta Region 1945-1949. Ministry of Education and Culture Directorate of History and Traditional Values of Jakarta National Historical Inventory and Documentation Project 1992.
[7] Alian. (2012) . Historical Methodology and Implementation in Research. Journal of Education and Historical Studies (Criksetra), Google Scholar.
[8] Ahmad Munthohar, Wakidi dan Syaiful M. (2014). Historical Review of the Role of Commander Bambang Sugeng in the General Attack event of March 1, 1949. Journal of Education and Historical Research (PESAGI) Vol. 2 No. 1. 2014.
[9] Iswantoro (2020). The Role of Sri Sultan Hamengku Buwono IX in Upholding the Independence of the Republic of Indonesia. JUSPI (Journal of the History of Islamic Civilization), 3(2), 2020.
[10] Iwan Dwi Aprianto, Andrian Eka Yulianto (2019). Soldiers of Sabil War in The Physical Revolution in Yogyakarta 1945-1949. WALASUJI Journal Volume 10, No. 2, December 2019.
[11] Agung Nugraha, Agus Mulyana, Achmad Iriyadi (2018). The Role of Mobile Brigades in Defending Indonesian Independence in 1946-1949 Factum: Journal of History and Historical Education, Vol. 7 No. 1, 2018.
[12] Djumarwan Danar Widiyanta, M.Hum (2018).Role of The Battle Student Police Force and Pugeran Church in the Indonesian Revolution of 1948 – 1949 in Yogyakarta. MOZAIK: Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities, 2018.
[13] Riana Agustini. (2010). A representation of the March 1, 1949 General Attack in the film “Six Djam in Djogja”. Thesis University of Indonesia Faculty of Cultural Sciences History Study Program.
[14] Nanang Setiawan (2020).Space Without Borders: History and Political Memory On Public Space Monument General Attack March 1, 1949. MOZAIK: Journal of Historical Studies, 2020.
[15] Agus Budiman (2019). History of Roem-Roijen Diplomacy in the Struggle to Defend the Independence of the Republic of Indonesia in 1949. Journal of Wahana Pendidikan, 2019.
[16] Murtini (1997). Role of Guerrilla Tactics in the Successful General Offensive of March 1, 1949. Thesis faculty of teacher training and education, University of Jember. March 1997.
[17] Endra Kusuma, Syaiful Anwar, Helda Risman & Ruslan Arief (2021). Battle of Surabaya in 1945 in the perspective of the Universal War. Journal of Research Innovation, Vol.1 No.12 May 2021.
[18] Juli Suspurwanto (2020). Strategic Leadership of General Sudirman in his Service as a Soldier of the Indonesian National Army. Journal of Universal War Strategy, Defense University Vol 6, No. 1 (2020).
[19] Sotardodo Siahaan, Afrizal Hendra, I Wayan Midhio (2021). Strategy of Universal War in aceh war (1873-1912). Journal of Research Innovation Vol 1 No 11: April 2021.
[20] Devis Lebo , Syaiful Anwar (2020). Empowerment of Cyber Communities by the Government of the Republic of Indonesia from the Perspective of The Universe War Strategy. Journal of Universal War Strategy, University of Defense.
[21] Mulyadi, Lukman Yudho Prakoso, I Wayan Mudhio (2021).Military Confrontation liberation of West Papua in perspective of Universal War Strategy. Indonesian Defense University. Journal of Research Innovation, Vol.2 No.1 June 2021.
[22] Rizqa Noor Abdi, Joni Wijayanto (2020).Aspects of Diplomacy, Universal Defense Strategy, and Irregular Warfare in Handling the Disintegration Movement in Indonesia. Journal of Cultural Religious Pulpit, 2020.
[23] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fAQzNDbqKbI. . Yogyakarta; Indonesia in Event (23/10/2019).
[24] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RtQawxrqpPY. Pak Harto: General Attack of March 1, 1949 Destroys Dutch Arrogance.
[25] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7fyvl_wRVTw&t=153sTni Attack against Jogja March 1, 1949 (6 hours in Jogja)
[26] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8a_kHSgm3wQ&t=25sRefusing to forget – General Attack of March 1, 1949.

Syamsul Hilal, Afrizal Hendra, Tri Legionosuko, Helda Risman “Universe War Strategy on the March 1, 1949 General Attack in Yogyakarta” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.192-199 January 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51211

Download PDF

pdf

Qualitative Study of Child Maltreatment in Cameroon

Teke Johnson Takwa – January 2022- Page No.: 200-208

Child maltreatment sometimes referred to as child abuse and neglect, is a global problem with serious negative life-long consequences. Unfortunately very few studies have been carried on this issue in Cameroon. This study seeks to throw some light on this worrisome social ill focus group discussion. During these discussions children below 18 who have been or currently undergoing maltreatment were guided to talk about the definitions, types, causes, perpetrators and consequences of this worrisome but often hidden social ill. Various forms of malpractices on children such as sexual abuse, neglect, physical and emotional harm were mentioned as some of the ills perpetrated against them by step mothers, uncles, non-relatives and sometimes their parents. Even though the most frequent forms of these abuses varied from one region to another, some of them such as neglect, sexual abuse and physical harm were reported in almost all the regions. Early and forced marriage was declared by some discussants in the northern regions especially among the Moslem community. The reported causes of these ill-treatments are jealousy from childless step mothers, ignorance, false accusation of witchcraft and stealing, polygamy, poverty, consumption of alcohol and substance abuse. The consequences negatively affect all domains of a child’s life and haveresulted to delinquency, retarded development, HIV/AIDS infection, etc. The gravity of the issues discussed calls for further enquiries as well as solutions.

Page(s): 200-208                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 January 2022

 Teke Johnson Takwa
Demographer, Central Bureau for Censuses and Population Studies, Cameroon

[1] Adamsons, K., Johnson, S.K., An Updated and Expanded Meta-analysis of Non-resident Fathering and Child Well-being .Journal of Family Psychology , 27, 589-599, 2013
[2] Adler-Baeder, F., What do we know about the physical abuse of stepchildren? A review of the literature.Journal of Divorce & Remarriage, 44(3-4), 67-81, 2006.
[3] Alicia, R.P., Overview of Child Maltreatment (Child Abuse), M.D, New York, 2020
[4] Amato, P. R., The consequences of divorce for adults and children. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 62, 1269–1287. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1741-3737.2000.01269.x, 2000
[5] America Academy of Pediatrics., Caring for Your School-Age Children: Ages 5 to 12, A.AP, 2004
[6] Amy, M., Child Development Guide, MD, 2021
[7] Barnett, O., Family Violence across the Lifespan. New York: Sage, 1997
[8] Cameroon Institute for Statistics., Demographic and Health Survey/Multiple Indicators Cluster Survey, Macro-International, Washington, 2011
[9] Cawson, P., et al., Child Maltreatment in the United Kingdom: A Study of the Prevalence of Child Abuse and Neglect. London, NCPCA, 2000
[10] Chan, Y.C., and Yeung, J.W., Children Living with Violence within the family and its Sequel: A Meta-analysis from 1995-2006, Agression and Violent Behaviour, 14(5), 313-322.doi 10.1016/javb.2009.04.001, 2009
[11] Conrad, M.S., Medical Definitions of Child Abuse, MedicineNet.com, 2021
[12] Cummings, E.M., and Davies, P.T.,Marital Conflict and Children: A Emotional Security Perspective, New York, Guilford Press, 2010.
[13] Daly, M., & Wilson, M. (2007). Is the “Cinderella Effect” controversial? A case study of the evolution-minded research and critiques thereof.In C. Crawford & D. Krebs (Eds.), Foundations of evolutionary psychology (pp. 383-400).
[14] Edna, A., et al., Women Living Under Muslim Laws: Child, Early and Forced Marriage: A Multi-Country Study, OCHCR, New York, 2013
[15] (http://www.cnn.com/2009/world /Africa (accessed August, 18th, 2017
[16] Gelles, R. J., &Harrop, J. W. (1991). The risk of abusive violence among children with nongenetic caretakers. Family Relations, 40(1), 78-83. Gil, D. 1970.
[17] Giles-Sims, J., &Finkelhor, D. Child abuse in stepfamilies. Family Relations, 33(3), 407-413. https://www.jstor.org/stable/584711, 1984.
[18] Lau, A.S et al, Parent-to child Aggression among Asian American Parents, Culture, Context and Vulnerability, Journal of Marriage and Family, 68(5), 1261-1275, 2006.
[19] Mbassa, M.D., Maltraitance Psychologique d’infants drépancytaire au Cameroun: Description et Analyse de Cas. Med. Trop2001 :163-168, 2001
[20] Mullers, Dowling., Mental Health Consequencesof Child Abuse. British Journal of Nursing, 17 (12), 1428-1433 doi: 10.12968/bjou.2008.17.22.31871
[21] Lewis, McElroy, Harlaar and Runyan., Does the Impact of Child Abuse Differ from Maltreated but Non-sexually Abused Children? A Prospective Examination of the Impact of Internalizing and Externalizing Behviour Problems. Child Abuse and Neglect 5(12) doi 10.101016/j-chiabu.2015.11.016, 2016
[22] Ngoura,C., La Protection Sociale de l’Enfantdans l’Afrique Traditionnelle : Rapport General des Journées d’Etudes sur les Enfants en Conflit avec la Lois, DEI-Cameroun, Yaoundé, 1993
[23] Sebre, S et al, “Cross-Cultural Comparisons of Child Reported Emotional and Physical Abuse. Rates, Risks Factors and Psychosocial Symptoms, Child Abuse and Neglect, the International Journal”, 28(1);113-127, 2003
[24] Stroebel et al., Brother-sister Incest: Data from Anonymous Computer Assisted Self Interviews. Journal of Child Sexual Abuse.22(3): 255-266 doi: 1080/10538712.2013.743952
[25] UNICEF, Child Marriage, New York, 2014
[26] Unite for Children, Children Accused of Witchcraft of Witchcraft: An Anthropological Study of Contemporary Practices in Africa, http://www.newsfromafrica.org/newsfromafrica/article/art 537.html. assessed on the 24th of July, 2021
[27] U.S. Department of health and Human Services, Children Bureau (2013) in Child
[28] Maltreatment,(https://www.researchgate.net/publication/13203198_Sexual_abuse_in_children_in_Cameroon [accessed Sep 26, 2017].
[29] W.H.O.,http://who.it/substance_abuse/terminology/who_lexicon/en/ lasted consulted on the 1st of August 2021.
[30] Wright, S.E., “Understanding Childhood Maltreatment: Literature Review and Practical Applications for Educators”, htt://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cebsdiss/245, 2015.

Teke Johnson Takwa “Qualitative Study of Child Maltreatment in Cameroon” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.200-208 January 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-1/200-208.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

A Re-examination of the Origin and Cycle of Prophetic Movement in Israel

Nyoyoko, Vincent Gabriel, Essien, Stella Patrick- January 2022- Page No.: 209-217

The upsurge of interest in the prophetic ministry in the 20th and 21st centuries is one that cannot be ignored. Its ever increasing significance presents an imperative for the critical Bible reader to evaluate modern claims to the prophetic ministry/gift in the light of the scriptures. Thus, questions regarding the origin, essence, characteristics and form of the prophetic ministry in the Bible abound, as scholars seek to give clarification, interpretation and/or credence to what is practiced today. The questions that comes to the fore, however, are (1) is prophecy to be understood as a novel means through which Yahweh communicated with His people in the Judeo-Christian tradition, or as an adoption of a religious medium of communication that was already prevalent in the Ancient Near East? (2) Can it be said that the model of prophecy that is prevalent in the 21st century conforms to that of the Judeo-Christian tradition? This essay adopts the historical and phenomenological methods of research, and the research findings agree with modern study of psychology and history of religions which has shown that prophecy is not a phenomenon limited to Israel alone, thus, the origins of prophetism can be traced together with the origin of the Israelite nation; and that prophecy was a phenomenon that shed light on the history and philosophy of Israel as a nation, seeking to align Yahweh’s people with His sovereign will at all times, not a one-sided venture seeking to please the people by saying what they wished to hear as is practiced by many acclaimed prophets today. The conclusion drawn is that, more than any other time in history, the prophetic ministry of the Church needs to be revived, revamped, and redirected in the 21st century, especially in the post-Covid-19 Nigeria in which corruption, nepotism, and bad leadership are being heightened by the day. Only then would the renewed interest in the prophetic ministry be justified and salubrious to the nation, as long as it conforms to the rubrics and ethics of the prophetic ministry as revealed in the holy writ.

Page(s): 209-217                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 January 2022

 Nyoyoko, Vincent Gabriel
Akwa Ibom State University, Nigeria

 Essien, Stella Patrick
Akwa Ibom State University, Nigeria

[1] Albright, William Foxwell. (1961). Samuel and the Beginnings of the Prophetic Movement. Cincinnati Hebrew University: College Press.
[2] Alcalay, Reuben. (1996). The Complete Hebrew – English Dictionary, Hemed Books, New York.
[3] Apuuivom, D. B., Annger, C. T. and Iortyer, H. T. (2020). “Deborah’s Leadership Success in Judges 4:1-24: Implications for Women Inclusion in Church Leadership in Nigeria.” International Journal of Biblical and Cognate Studies, 2: 19-38.
[4] Arena, F. (2020). Prophetic Conflicts in Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and Micah. Germany: Mohr Sieback.
[5] Blenkinsopp, Joseph. (1996). A History of Prophecy in Israel. 2nd ed. Louisville: Westminster/John Knox.
[6] Brown, R.E., Fitzmyer J.A., Murphy, R.E. (eds). (1990). The New Jerome Biblical Commentary. New Jersey: Princeton Hall.
[7] Broida, M. (2019). “Ritualization in Prophetic Intercession”. In Tiemeyer, L (ed.). Prophecy and Its Cultic Dimensions. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht GmbH & Co. KG.
[8] Campbell, Stacey. (2008). Ecstatic Prophecy. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Chosen Books/Baker Publishing Group.
[9] De Meneses, Rui SJ. (2009).The Global Vision of the Hebrew Bible. Mumbai, Bombay St. Paul’s Press.
[10] De-Vaux, Roland.(1965). Ancient Israel. New York: McGraw Hill.
[11] Ellis, Peter. (1963). The Men and Message of the Old Testament. Collegeville, Minn.: Liturgical Press.
[12] Ellis, Peter. (1967).1 & 2 Samuel, 1 & 2 Kings: Old Testament Reading Guide. Collegeville: Liturgical Press.
[13] Familusi, O. O. (2018). “Prophets as Social and Political Activists: The Nigerian example”. Prophecy, Politics and Power in Ancient Israel and the Nigerian Context. Festschrift in Honour of Most Rev. Dr. G. L. Lasebikan.
[14] Forbes, Christopher. (1997). Prophecy and Inspired Speech: in Early Christianity and Its Hellenistic Environment. Peabody, Mass.: Hendrickson.
[15] Gelin, Albert. (1959). The Religion of Israel. New York: Hawthorn Books.
[16] Heaton, E. W. (1961).The Old Testament Prophets. Baltimore: Penguin Books.
[17] Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). “Prophecy”. Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company.
[18] Huffmon, Herbert B. (1968) “Prophecy in the Mari Letters.” BA 31: 101–124.
[19] Huffmon, Herbert B. (1970) “The Origins of Prophecy.” Pp. 171–186 in Magnalia Dei. The Mighty Acts of God: Essays on the Bible and Archaeology in Memory of G. Ernest Wright. Edited by F. M. Cross, W. E. Lemke, and P. D. Miller. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday.
[20] Huffmon, Herbert B. (1976) “Prophecy in the Ancient Near East”. IDBSup: 697–700.
[21] Huffmon, Herbert B. (1992) “Ancient Near Eastern Prophecy”. ABD 5: 477–482
[22] Isaac, J. J. and Adeyeye, A. O. (2020). “Prophecy and Inspiration in Christianity: Any Relationship?” International Journal of Biblical and Cognate Studies, 1: 157-171.
[23] Jensen, Joseph (1970). “What Happened to Moses?” CBQ 32.
[24] Kelly, W. L. (2020). How Prophecy Works: A Study of the Semantic Field of נביא and a Close Reading of Jeremiah 1:4–19, 23:9–40 and 27:1–28:17. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht GmbH & Co.
[25] KirkPatrick “Prophetie” in The Free Dictionary, https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/prophetie.
[26] Ko, Grace. (2013) “The Ordering of the Twelve as Israel’s Historiography”. In Prophets, Prophecy and Ancient Israelite Historiography, edited by Mark J. Boda and Lissa M. Wray Beal, 315 – 32. Winona Lake. IN: Eisenbrauns.
[27] Leclerc, Thomas I. (2007). Introduction to the Prophets: Their Stories, Sayings and Scrolls. New York, Paulist.
[28] McKane, W. (1979). ‘Prophecy and the Prophetic Literature’, in Anderson, G.W. (ed.), Tradition and Interpretation: Essays by Members of the Society for Old Testament Study, Oxford: Oxford University Press: 163-88.
[29] Mckenzie, John L. (1956).The Two Edged Sword. Milwaukee: Bruce.
[30] Ndiokwere, N.I. (1995). Prophecy and Revolution. London: SPCK.
[31] Nissinen, M., (2004). ‘What is prophecy? An Ancient Near Eastern perspective’, in J. Kaltner & L. Stulman (eds.), Inspired speech. Prophecy in the Ancient Near East. Essays in Honor of Herbert B. Huffmon, London, T&T Clark International: 17−37.
[32] Nissinen, M. (2017). Ancient Prophecy: Near Eastern, biblical, and Greek perspectives. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
[33] Nissinen, M. (2019a). Prophets and Prophecy in the Ancient Near East. Atlanta: Society for Bible Knowledge
[34] Nissinen, M. (2019b). Prophetic Divination: Essays in Ancient Near Eastern Prophecy by De Gruyter, Volume 494 in the series Beihefte zur Zeitschrift für die alttestamentliche Wissenschaft https://doi.org/10.1515/9783110467765
[35] Nmah, P.E & Nwadialor, L. K. (May, 2011) “Biblical Theories of the History of Prophetism in Old Testament: An Ethical Monotheistic Approach”, in African Research Review: An International Multi-Disciplinary Journal, Ethiopia, Vol. 5 (3), Serial No. 20: 290 – 306.
[36] Noth, Martin. (1960).The History of Israel. London: Adam & Charles Black.
[37] Nyoyoko, V. G. (2003). Insights into the Monarchy in Israel (1030BC – 582BC). Takoradi, Ghana: St. Francis Press.
[38] Nyoyoko, V. G. (2006). Old Testament Explorations, Vol. 1. Port Harcourt: Epistemic Publishers.
[39] Okoronkwo, M. (2020). “The Prophets” (lecture notes for CRS217). Abuja: Noun Press.
[40] Pritchard, James. (1969). Ancient Near Eastern Texts Relating to the Old Testament. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press.
[41] Rowley, H. H. . (1956). Prophecy and Religion in Ancient China and Israel. New York: Harper & Brothers.
[42] Rowley, H. H. ed. (1950).Studies in the Old Testament Prophecy. Edinburgh: T & T Clark.
[43] Scott, Hahn, ed. (2009). Catholic Bible Dictionary RANDOM HOUSE.
[44] Scott, R.B.Y. (1969). The Relevance of the Prophets: An Introduction to the Old Testament Prophets and their Message. London: The Macmillan Company.
[45] Udoekpo, Michael Ufok. (2017). Rethinking the Prophetic Critique of Worship in Amos 5 for Contemporary Nigeria and the USA. Eugene, Oregon, Pickwick Publications.
[46] Vawter, Bruce. (1961).The Conscience of Israel. New York: Sheed and Ward.
[47] Von Rad, Gerhard.(1968). The Message of the Prophets. New York: Harper & Row.
[48] Weinfeld, Moshe. (1972). Deuteronomy and the Deuteronomistic School. Oxford: Clarendon Press.
[49] Wessels, W. J. (2021). “Engaging Old Testament Prophetic literature in Traumatic Times of Loss and Grief”. HTS Teologiese Studies/Theological Studies 77 (4), a6441.https://doi.org/10.4102/hts.v77i4.6441.

Nyoyoko, Vincent Gabriel, Essien, Stella Patrick, “A Re-examination of the Origin and Cycle of Prophetic Movement in Israel” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.209-217 January 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-1/209-217.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Coastal Erosion and Coastal Livelihood Activities in Ghana. A Case of Ada-Foahin the Greater Accra Region of Ghana

Emmanuel Agbenyegah Ayerteye – January 2022- Page No.: 218-226

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of coastal erosion and shoreline retreat on the livelihood activities of residents in the Ada-Foah area. To answer this research question, interview data were gathered from 30 participants comprising a sample of 20 residents of Ada-Foah, VRA, CDDF, NADMO, the District Assembly, the CRS, the Department of Wildlife, assemblymen, and chiefs, in connection with the major livelihood activities in the study area and how these have been impacted by erosion. From the data gathered, the major livelihood activities of the people in the study area were found to include: fishing, fish mongering, farming, salt mining, trading, and investment. Part of the data for answering this question was also obtained through field observation. The result of the study showed that coastal erosion has led to the loss of viable livelihood activities in the Ada-Foah areas creating survival problems for the coastal residents.

Page(s): 218-226                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 January 2022

 Emmanuel Agbenyegah Ayerteye
Social Studies Department, Mount Mary College of Education, Somanya, Ghana

[1] Abbot, P. L. (1999). Natural Disaster. Boston: McGraw- Hills.
[2] Adger, W. N., Hughes, T., Folke, C., Carpenter, S., &Rockstrom, J. (2005). Social-ecological resilience to coastal disasters. Science 30(9), 1036–1039.
[3] Agyedu, G.O., Donkor, F. &Obeng, S. (1999). Teach Yourself Research Methods. Kumasi: Home – Link Business Service.
[4] Allison, E. H., & Ellis, F. (2001). The livelihoods approach and management of small-scale fisheries. Marine Policy 25(4), 377–388.
[5] Armitage, D., & Johnson, D. (2006). Can resilience be recognized with globalization and increasingly complex resource degradation in Asian coastal regions? Ecology and Society 11(1) 1-2. Retrieved on 05/05/11 URL: http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol11/ iss1/art2/.-
[6] Assby, J. (2003). Introduction: Uniting Science and Participation in the process of Innovation. Research for Development. Pages 1-15. In B. Pound, S. Snapp, C. McDougall & A. Braun (eds.), Managing Natural Resources for Sustainable Livelihoods: Uniting Science and Participation. Canada: Earthscan Publications Ltd and IDRC
[7] Berkes, F., Colding, J. &Folke, C. (2003). Navigating social-ecological systems: building resilience for complexity and change. London: Cambridge University Press.
[8] Bird, K., & Shepard, A. (2003). Livelihoods and chronic poverty in semi-arid Zimbabwe. World Development 31:591–610.
[9] Blaikie, P. (1995). Understanding environmental issues. Pages 1–30. In S. Morse, and M. Stocking, (Eds). People and the environment. Glasgow, UK.: UCLA Press,
[10] Bradshow, M. (1997). World Regional Geography: The New Global Order. New York: Macmillan.
[11] Bouahom, B., Douangsavanh, L., &Rigg, J. (2004). Building sustainable livelihoods in Laos: untangling farm from non-farm, progress from distress. Geoforum. 3(5), 607-619.
[12] Carney, D., (Ed.). (1998b). Implementing the sustainable rural livelihoods approach. Paper presented to the DFID.
[13] Carpenter, S. R., Westley, F. & Turner. M. (2005). Surrogates for resilience of social-ecological systems. Ecosystems 8(5), 941–944.
[14] Chambers, R. & Conway, G. (1992). Sustainable rural livelihoods: practical concepts for the 21st century. IDS Discussion Paper 296, Brighton: Institute of Development Studies.
[15] Cramer, C. &Pontara, N. (1998). Rural poverty and poverty alleviation in Mozambique: what’s missing from the debate? The Journal of Modern AfricanStudies 36(1), 101–138.
[16] Damodaran, A. (2006). Coastal resource complexes of South India: Options for sustainable management. Journal of Environmental Management 79 (1), 64-73.
[17] Davies, S.(1996). Adaptable livelihoods: coping with food insecurity in the Malian Sahel. Science, Technology, and Development 14(1), 144–156.
[18] deHaan, L. (2000). Globalization, localization, and sustainable livelihood. SociologiaRuralis40 (3), 339–365.
[19] deHaan, L. &Zoomers, A. (2003). Development geography at the crossroads of livelihood and globalization. Tijdschriftvoor Economische en SocialeGeografie94(3):350–362.
[20] DFID. (2006a). DFID’s approach to the environment. London: Department for International Development.
[21] DFID. (2006b). Eliminating World Poverty: Making Governance Work for the Poor – A White Paper on International Development.London: Department for International Development.
[22] Ellis, F. (2000). Rural livelihoods and diversity in developing countries. UK:Oxford University Press
[23] Galles J. R. & Levine A. (1999). Sociology. An Introduction. New York: MacGraw-Hills.
[24] FAO. (2005). Technical guidelines for responsible fisheries, Increasing the Contribution of Small-Scale Fisheries to Poverty Alleviation and Food Security. Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization.
[25] Glavovic, B. C. &Boonzaier, S. (2007). Confronting coastal poverty: Building sustainable coastal livelihoods in South Africa. Ocean & Coastal Management, 50(4) 1-23.
[26] Gilbrt, A. E. (1982). Regional Geography of West Africa. London: Macmillan.
[27] Hinckley, A. D. (1976). Applied Technology: Non-Technical Approach. New York: Macmillan
[28] Islam, R. M. (2008). Towards institutionalization of global ICZM efforts. In: R. R Krishnamurthy (Ed.). Integrated coastal zone management. Singapore: Research Publishing Services.
[29] Kay, C. (2006). Rural poverty and development strategies in Latin America. Journal of Agrarian Change. 6 (4): 455-508.
[30] Kirkby, J., O’Keefe, P. &Howorth, C. (2001). Introduction: rethinking environment and development in Africa and Asia. Land Degradation and Development 12(1), 195–203.
[31] Kura, Y., Revenga, C., Hoshino, E. & Mock, G. (2004). Fishing for Answers: Making Sense of the Global Fish Crisis. Washington, DC: World Resources Institute.
[32] Kurien, J. (2003). The Blessing ofThe Commons: Small-Scale Fisheries, Community Property Rights, and Coastal Natural Assets. Paper presented at the International Conference on Natural Assets at Tagaytay City, Philippines in January 2003.
[33] Larson, M. H. & Simons, G. F. (2005). Natural Disasters. Are they getting worse? Awake Journal. New York: Watchtower.
[34] Leiva1, G. E. &Castilla, J. C. (2001). A review of the world marine gastropod fishery: evolution of catches, management and the Chilean experience. Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries. 11 (4): 283-300.
[35] Macmillan English Dictionary for Advanced Learners, (2002). The reference and electronic media division. Harlow: Bloomsbury Publishing.
[36] McGinn, C. (2002). The Making of a Philosopher – My Journey ThroughTwentieth-Century Philosophy. New York: HarperCollins.
[37] McGoodwin, J. R. (2001). Understanding the Cultures of Fishing Communities: A Key to Fisheries Management and Food Security. Rome: FAO Fisheries Technical Paper. 401.
[38] Mensah, M. A., Koranteng, K. A., Bortey, A. &Yeboah, D. A. (2006). The State of World Fisheries from a Fishworker Perspective: The Ghanaian Situation. Samudra Monograph. India: International Collective in Support of Fishworkers.
[39] MoWR (2006). Coastal development strategy. Water Resources Planning Organizations, Government Ofthe People’s Republic of Bangladesh. Ministry of Water Resources, 12(1), 4–5
[40] Narayan, D. R., Chambers, M. Shah, K. &Petesch, P. (2000). Voices of the poor. Crying out for change. UK: Oxford University Press for the World Bank.
[41] Negash, A. &Niehof, A. (2004). The significance of Enset culture and biodiversity for rural household food and livelihood security in Southwestern Ethiopia. Agriculture and Human Values, 21(1), 61-71.
[42] ODI. (1999). Rurallivelihood diversity. Retrieved on March 15, 2010. From http://www.smallstock.info/reference/ODI/odinrp40.pdf
[43] Odumah, L. &Adu-Gyimah, E. (2002). Social Studies for Senior Secondary Schools. Kumasi: Henry Ventures
[44] Patton, M. (1987). How to Use Qualitative Methods in Evaluation. California: Sage Publication.
[45] Pomeroy, S. R., Ratner, D. B., Hall J. S., Pimoljinda, J. &Vivekanan, V. (2006). Coping with disaster: rehabilitating coastal livelihoods and communities.
[46] Ramachandran, A., Enserink, B. &Balchand, A. N. (2005). Coastal regulation zone rules in coastal panchayats (villages) of Kerala, India vis-à-vis socio-economic impacts from the recently introduced peoples’ participatory program for local self-governance and sustainable development. Ocean & Coastal Management. 48(78): 632-653.
[47] Sachs, J. D. (2005). The End of Poverty: Economic Possibilities for Our Time. USA: Penguin Publishers.
[48] Scoones, I. (1998). Sustainable rural livelihoods: a framework for analysis. Institute of Development Studies (IDS), Brighton. IDS Working Paper 72.
[49] Sen, A. (1997). Editorial: Human Capital and Human Capability. World Development, 25 (12), 1959-1961.
[50] Singh, N. and J. Gilman. (1999). Making livelihoods more sustainable. International Social Science Journal 5(1), 539–545.
[51] Stegeman, J. J. & Solow, A. R. (2002). Environmental Health and the Coastal Zone. Environmental Health Perspectives. 110 (11), 660-661.
[52] Tripathy, S. N. & Sunakars, P. (1999). Fundamentals of Environmental studies. New Delhi: Vrinda Publication
[53] UNDP. (2006). Annual Report 2006. New York.
[54] WMO, (2003). Proceedings of the Fifth WMO International Workshop on Tropical Cyclones (IWTC-V). WMO Rep., Geneva, Switzerland, 31 pp.
[55] World Bank. (2005). Lessons from Natural Disasters and Emergency Reconstruction. Operations Evaluation Department, the World Bank, Washington, DC. Retrieved on April 8, 2010. From www.york.ac.uk/inst/sei/sustainability/livelihoods/def.html

Emmanuel Agbenyegah Ayerteye, “Coastal Erosion and Coastal Livelihood Activities in Ghana. A Case of Ada-Foahin the Greater Accra Region of Ghana” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.218-226 January 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-1/218-226.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Teacher resources available to facilitate inclusive educational practices in pre-schools within Obio-Akpor in Nigeria

Chima-Uzosike Ngozi, Michael Subbey – January 2022- Page No.: 227-233

Education is one of the tools humanity uses to help in developing society through man. Since society needs the contributions of everyone in developing it, a lot of efforts are made through research and others to educate almost everybody in society in contributing to it. The mind of the individual has to be trained to a level that it would be beneficial to each member of the society.
In creating a better society, we could not depend on one person in carrying out the desired development else society or community would lag behind. Hence every person whether with any form of disability or not has to be developed to his/her full potential. Inclusive education has been internationally recognized as a philosophy for attaining equity, justice and quality education for all children, especially those who have been traditionally excluded from mainstream education for reasons of disability, ethnicity, gender or other characteristics (Nguyet & Ha, 2010).

Page(s): 227-233                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 January 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6115

 Chima-Uzosike Ngozi
Department of Early Childhood Education, Faculty of Educational Studies, University of Education, Winneba, Ghana

 Michael Subbey
Department of Early Childhood Education, Faculty of Educational Studies, University of Education, Winneba, Ghana

[1] Adelowo, T.O. (2006). Education and human development of the special needs child: A global view. In T.C. Obani (Ed). Teaching pupils with special educational needs in the regular UBE classroom. Ibadan-Nigeria: Book-Builders. 1-36.
[2] Ainscow, M. (1997). Developing inclusive education system: what are the levels for change? Journal for Educational change 6, 109-124.
[3] Amedahe, F. K. (2002). Fundamentals of educational research methods. Cape Coast: UCC.
[4] Amedahe, F. K., & Gyimah, E.A. (2005). Introduction to educational research. Cape Coast: Centre for Continuing Education.
[5] Anaby D., Law M., Coster, W., Bedell, G., Khetani, M., & Teplicky, R. (2014). The mediating role of the environment in explaining participation of children and youth with and without disabilities across home, school, and community. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press.
[6] Avramidis, H. L., & Norwich, J. F. (2002). A validation study of the performance indicators and learner outcomes of Kentucky’s alternate assessment for students with significant disabilities. The Journal of the Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps, 24, 100-110.
[7] Bernheimer, L. P., Gallimore, R., & Weisner, T. S. (1990). Ecocultural theory as a context for the individual family service plan. Journal of Early Intervention, 14(3), 219-233.
[8] Bhandarkar, P. C. & Wilkinson, TS. (2010). Methodology and Techniques of Social Research. Mumbai: Himalaya.
[9] Booth, T. (1996). Index for inclusion: Developing learning and participation in schools. Bristol: Centre for studies on Inclusive Education.
[10] Deku, P., & Vanderpuye, I. (2008). Assessing instructional strategies: A case study of selected regular schools in Ghana. Implication for Inclusive education. African Journal of Special Educational Needs, 5(4), 67-78.
[11] Deng, H. (2010). Emerging patterns and trends in utilizing electronic resources in a higher education environment: an empirical analysis. New library world, 111(3-4), 87-103.
[12] Dyson, A. (1999), Special needs in the twenty first century: where have we been and where we‘re going (The Ron Guilford lecture). British Journal of Special Education of Special education, 28 (1), 24-49.
[13] Eleweke C. J. (2016). Nigeria’s national policy on special education: A critical appraisal.
http://www.firsteternal.com/africanadeleweke_001.html (Retrieved: 11/05/2016)
[14] Enabling Education Network (EENET) (2004). Preparing new teachers for inclusive schools and classrooms.
http://www3.interscience.wiley.com. (Retrieved: 02/04/2018)
[15] Engelbrecht, P. (1997). A theoretical framework for inclusive education. In P. Engelbrecht, L. Green, S. Naicker & L. Engelbrecht (Eds) Inclusive education in action in South Africa. Pretoria: Van Schaik. 3-12.
[16] Fraenkel, J. R., & Wallen, N.E. (2003). How to design and evaluate research in education (4th ed.). New Jersey: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
[17] Gardner, M., & Kelly, U. A. (2008). Introduction: Narrating transformative learning in education. In M. Gardner & U. A. Kelly (Ed.), Narrating transformative learning in education (pp. 105-201). New York: Macmillan.
[18] Garuba, A. (2003). Inclusive education in the 21st century: Challenges and opportunities for Nigeria. Asia Pac. Disab. Rehab. J., 2003; 14(2):191-200.
[19] Hayford, S. K. (2007). Continuous assessment and lower attaining pupils in primaryand junior secondary schools in Ghana. PhD Thesis: University of Birmingham.
http://etheses.bham.ac.uk/128/1/Hayford08PhD.pdf. (Retrieved: 12/09/2019)
[20] Hsu, C. & Sandford, B. (2010). Instrumentation. In Neil J. Salkind (Ed.), encyclopedia of research design. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
[21] Krejcie, R.V., & Morgan, D.W. (1970). Determining sample size for research Activities. Educational & Psychological Measurement, 30, 607-610.
[22] Kwabia, K. (2006). Theory in social research: The link between literature and observation. Accra: Woeli Publishing Services.
[23] Lidsay, G. (2003), Educational psychology and the effectiveness of inclusive education/mainstreaming. British journal of Educational psychology. 50 (4) 482-502.
[24] Moore, C., & Gilbreath, D. (1998). Educating students with disabilities in general. Retrieved from mrsh/files/Rapport.SEH_.pdf.
[25] Nguyet, D. T., & Ha, L. T. (2010). How to guide series: Preparing teachers for inclusive education. CRS Vietnam: Catholic Relief Services.
[26] Obi, F. (2013). An effective parenting of children with special needs. A guidebook for parents, special educators, counselors and related professional. Ibadon: Hope Publications.
[27] Obiakor, F. E., & Offor, M. T. (2012). Special education contexts, problems, and prospects in Nigeria. In: Winzer MA, Mazurek K. editors. International practices in special education: Debates and challenges. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press.
[28] Osuala, E. C. (2005). Introduction to research methodology. Onitsha: African First Publishers.
[29] Shuttleworth, M. (2008). Descriptive research design. http://www.experimentresources.com/descriptive-research-design.html (Retrieved: 10/10/2020)
[30] Sweetland, J. (2008). Making dissatisfaction divine: An inspired approach to whole school reform. International Journal of Whole Schooling, 4(1), 1-9.
[31] UNESCO (2009). Reaching the marginalized: How to approach inclusive education. UNESCO International Conference, Düsseldorf, Germany, 10-11 September 2009.
[32] Varkevisser, C. (2003). Research methodology. (3rded.). London: Oxford University Press.

Chima-Uzosike Ngozi, Michael Subbey “Teacher resources available to facilitate inclusive educational practices in pre-schools within Obio-Akpor in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.227-233 January 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6115

Download PDF

pdf

An Appraisal of Citizen Journalism in Democracy and Good Governance: Focus on EndSars Protest in Nigeria

Dr. Chiakaan, Gbaden Jacob, Kaigama, Kwapsoni Pius, Kpera, Wombu Richard, Tsokwa, Blessing Solomon- January 2022- Page No.: 234-240

This study is entitled: “An Appraisal of Citizen Journalism in Democracy and Good Governance: Focus on EndSars Protest in Nigeria.” The aim of the study is to appraise the role of citizens Journalism in democracy and good governance with a special focus on EndSars protest in Nigeria. Anchored on the democratic participant media theory which is concerned about individual citizen’s right to access to the media. The study, incline to the quantitative approach, adopts the survey design method with data were collected through the instrument of a questionnaire which was administered on 150 respondents in Nigeria using simple random sampling method. Findings from the study reveals that citizens journalism contributed to the success of the EndSars protest in Nigeria through different ways such as constant posting of information about the protest, creating awareness about the protest, setting agenda for public discussion in the media and telling Nigerians how the government and the police have failed. Findings further reveals that through sharing of pictures and video clips of victims of police brutality, exposing atrocities committed by members of the Sars group, encouraging Nigerians on the need for police reform and encouraging Nigerians on the need to EndSars and police brutality made many citizens all over the country to join the protest. The study concludes that Citizen Journalism has become an essential part of modern-day society because it has given voice to the voiceless especially in a diversified society like Nigeria. It therefore, recommends the convention media to encourage and train the citizen journalists who can be an asset to them.

Page(s): 234-240                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 January 2022

 Dr. Chiakaan, Gbaden Jacob
Department of Public Relations, Taraba State University, Jalingo, Nigeria

 Kaigama, Kwapsoni Pius
Department of Mass Communication, Taraba State Polytechnic, Jalingo, Nigeria

 Kpera, Wombu Richard
Department of Mass Communication, Taraba State Polytechnic, Jalingo, Taraba State, Nigeria

 Tsokwa, Blessing Solomon
Department of Broadcasting, Taraba State University, Jalingo, Nigeria

[1] Aborisade, R. & Fayemi, J. (2015). Police Corruption in Nigeria: A Perspective on its Nature and Control. Nigerian Journal of Social Sciences, XVII (2): 245-262
[2] Adelabu, O. (2008). Citizen journalism practice: The 21st Century Challenges for Nigerian Journalism. In Mojaye, Oyewo, E.M., Bayo, R. and Sobowale, I.A. (ed). Globalization and development communication in Africa. Ibadan: University Press.
[3] Amnesty International (2014) Welcome to Hell Fire: Torture and Other Treatment in Nigeria. London: Amnesty International Limited.
[4] Anorue, L.I., Paul, M.O. and Chima, A.O. (2013). Benefits, Challenges and Prospects of Citizen Journalism Practice in Nigeria. International Journal of Research in Arts and Social Sciences, Vol. 5. Pp.357- 368.
[5] Baase, S. (2008). A Gift of Fire (3rd ed.). Lebanon: Prentice Hall.
[6] Bruce R. Lindsay (2011). Social Media and Disasters: Current Uses, Future Options, and Policy Considerations, Congressional Research Service 7-5700 www.crs.gov R41987
[7] Chiakaan, G.J. and Ahmad, J.I. (2014). Mass Communication for Beginners. Makurdi: Azaben Publishers (ETF Sponsored).
[8] Chiakaan, G.J. and Tsafa, N.T. (2021). Development Communication in Nigeria: A Pragmatic Approach. Nonimob Ventures.
[9] Constanzo, M. & Gerrity, E. (2009). The Effects and Effectiveness of Using Torture as an Interrogation Device: Using Research to Inform the Policy Debate. Social Issues and Policy Review, 3(1): 179-210.
[10] Dare, S. (2011). The Rise of Citizen Journalism in Nigeria – A Case Study of Sahara Reporters. Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism.
[11] Emmanuel, D. (2020). Why Twitter Topped Facebook during Police Brutality Protest that went Viral. Extracted from: https://nairametrics.com/2020/10/28/endsars-why-twitter-topped-facebook-during-police-brutalityprotests-that-went-viral/)
[12] Etika, D.N. (2019). Citizen Journalism and it’s Impacts On Professional Journalism in Progressives Society: A Study of 2019 Governorship Election in Cross River State. International Journal of Recent Advances in Psychology & Psychotherapy Vol. 3, Issue 1 – 2019.
[13] Folarin, B. (1998). Theories of mass communication: An introductory text. Lagos: Stirling-Horden Publishers (Nig) Ltd.
[14] Itule, B. & Anderson, D. (2000). News Writing and Reporting for Today’s Media. 5th Ed.
[15] Nnanyelugo, O., Diri, C.T. and Odii, C. (2013). Citizen Journalism in Nigeria: Possibilities and Challenges. New Media and Mass Communication. Vol.11: 1-7.
[16] Ojewale, O. (2020). Africa in Focus: Youth protests for police reform in Nigeria: What lies ahead for #EndSARS. Thursday, October 29, 2020
[17] The Punch (2016, September 23). “You are Not Authorized to Kill”, IG tells SARS. The Punch Newspapers. Retrieved September 23, 2016, from http://punchng.com/ai-report-ig-warns-sars-operatives-suspects-torture/.
[18] Tomas F. (2020). Nigeria: #EndSARS Protests Against Police Brutality. Congressional Research Service https://crsreports.congress.gov IN11525

Dr. Chiakaan, Gbaden Jacob, Kaigama, Kwapsoni Pius, Kpera, Wombu Richard, Tsokwa, Blessing Solomon, “An Appraisal of Citizen Journalism in Democracy and Good Governance: Focus on EndSars Protest in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.234-240 January 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-1/234-240.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Development of Defense Forces in the North Sulawesi Border Area as the Implementation of the Big Island Defense Strategy

Emir Zulkarnain Mokodompis, Wayan Nuriada, Joni Widjayanto- January 2022- Page No.: 241-247

Indonesia as an archipelagic country has a very wide border area, including North Sulawesi which borders the Sulawesi Sea, the Pacific Sea, and the Republic of the Philippines. Based on the characteristics of the border area of North Sulawesi which is an archipelago and the lack of monitoring infrastructure, the supervision carried out by the TNI is less than optimal, so that it becomes a gap for foreigners to enter illegally and also has the potential to become an entry point for other threats to state sovereignty. Based on this, this research was carried out with the aim of analyzing the development of defense forces in the North Sulawesi Border Region which needs to be implemented in the context of implementing the defense strategy of the big islands. The approach used is qualitative with data in the form of secondary data obtained from literature studies. Data analysis was carried out using qualitative descriptive analysis techniques. The results of the study stated that the development of defense forces in the border area of North Sulawesi must refer to the orientation to self-reliance of Sulawesi as a whole as one of the big islands which is the center of national defense. This can be realized by building food, water, energy reserves and national infrastructure facilities. In addition, in accordance with the condition of the border area in the form of an archipelago, it is also necessary to procure means of inter-island transportation that is intended for the implementation of the border control function. The development of defense forces also pays attention to four important aspects that must be considered, namely the budget aspect, setting practical targets, improving the quality of defense soldiers, and increasing deterrence.

Page(s): 241-247                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 January 2022

 Emir Zulkarnain Mokodompis
Prodi Strategi Perang Semesta, Fakultas Strategi Pertahanan, Universitas Pertahanan, Indonesia

 Wayan Nuriada
Prodi Strategi Perang Semesta, Fakultas Strategi Pertahanan, Universitas Pertahanan, Indonesia

 Joni Widjayanto
Prodi Strategi Perang Semesta, Fakultas Strategi Pertahanan, Universitas Pertahanan, Indonesia

[1] Susdarwono, E. T., Setiawan, A., & Husna, Y. N. (2020). Kebijakan negara terkait perkembangan dan revitalisasi industri pertahanan Indonesia dari masa ke masa. Jurnal USM Law Review, 3(1), 155–181
[2] Lind, W. S. (2004). Understanding fourth generation warfare. Military Review, 12, 12–24.
[3] O’Brien, K., & Barnett, J. (2013). The global environmental change and human security (GECHS) project. Annnu. Rev. Environmen. Resource, 38, 373–391.
[4] Lasabuda, R. (2013). Pembangunan wilayah pesisir dan lautan dalam perspektif negara kepulauan republik Indonesia. Jurnal Ilmiah Platax, 1(2), 92–101.
[5] Suprapto. (2019). Inilah Konsep Pertahanan Negara Ala Prabowo Subianto, Jelaskan Indonesia Hilang Jika Tak Lakukan Ini. Wartakota.Tribunnews.Com. https://wartakota.tribunnews.com/2019/11/11/inilah-konsep-pertahanan-negara-ala-prabowo-subianto-jelaskan-indonesia-hilang-jika-tak-lakukan-ini?page=all
[6] Setiawan, B. (2017). Formation pattern state defense reserve components in five countries in Asian. Journal of Business & Behavioral Enterpreneurship, 1(1), 18–26.
[7] Putra, Y. M. (2015). Daerah Perbatasan Rawan Dimasuki Warga Negara Asing. Www.Republika.Co.Id.https://www.republika.co.id/berita/np4bbh/daerah-perbatasan-rawan-dimasuki-warga-negara-asing
[8] Sulut.kemenkumham.go.id. (2020). Kanwil Kemenkumham Sulawesi Utara Deportasi 51 WNA Filipina. https://sulut.kemenkumham.go.id/berita-kanwil/berita-utama/2904-kanwil-kemenkumham-sulawesi-utara-deportasi-51-wna-filipin
[9] Kiswondari. (2021). Kisah Prajurit TNI Jaga Pulau Terluar, Nebeng Perahu Warga hingga Ancaman Keamanan. Nasional.Okezone.Com. https://nasional.okezone.com/read/2021/10/12/337/2484908/kisah-prajurit-tni-jaga-pulau-terluar-nebeng-perahu-warga-hingga-ancaman-keamanan
[10] kemhan.go.id. (2017, May 3). Aksi bela negara se-Indonesia dimulai dari Sulut. https://www.kemhan.go.id/itjen/2017/05/03/aksi-bela-negara-se-indonesia-dimulai-dari-sulut.html
[11] Santoso, A. T., & Sudibyakto, H. A. (2011). Implementasi dan dampak kebijakan penataan ruang kawasan pertahanan di perbatasan Kalimantan Barat (studi di Kabupaten Sambas). Jurnal Ketahanan Nasional, XVII(1), 25–42.
[12] Jazuli, A. (2016). Pembangunan Pertahanan Dan Keamanan Demi Penegakan Hukum Di Indonesia: Kewibawaan Suatu Negara. Jurnal Penelitian Hukum, 16(2), 187–199.
[13] Sugiyono. (2013). Metode Penelitian Kuantitatif Kualitatif Dan R&D (Alfabeta).
[14] Miles, M. B., & Huberman, A. M. (2009). Qualitative Data Analysis. (terjemahan). Penerbit Salemba Empat.
[15] Rivai, V. (2014). Kepemimpinan Dan Perilaku Organisasi. Grafindo Persada.
[16] Wahyono, S. K. (2008). Membangun kekuatan pertahanan. Jurnal Ketahanan Nasional, XIII(2), 19–25
[17] Zahara, E. L., & Rizky, A. (2020). Analisis ringkas cepat anggaran pertahanan Indonesia. Analisis Ringkas Cepat.
[18] Noor, J. (2020). Manajemen strategi konsep dan model bisnis. La tansa mashiro publisher
[19] Zahara, E. L., & Rizky, A. (2020). Analisis ringkas cepat anggaran pertahanan Indonesia. Analisis Ringkas Cepat.

Emir Zulkarnain Mokodompis, Wayan Nuriada, Joni Widjayanto, “Development of Defense Forces in the North Sulawesi Border Area as the Implementation of the Big Island Defense Strategy” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.241-247 January 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-1/241-247.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Demographic Correlates of Deviance among Teachers in Public Secondary Schools in Nairobi County, Kenya

Magdalene Mwele, Stephen Asatsa (PhD), Simon Kang’ethe (PhD) – January 2022- Page No.: 248-253

Deviant behaviour is seen as a complex social and psychological phenomenon, associated with the way the person interacts with their environment. This would mean that deviant behaviour problem depends on the interaction between the personality and society. Deviant behaviour among teachers is in the rise assuming a global phenomenon. Although studies have been carried on deviant behaviours in school, majority of these researches are about students’ deviant behaviours sparing studies specifically on teachers’ deviance. Similarly, the approach used as an intervention measure to deviance is more punitive than supportive with skewed emphasis on disciplinary action and less focus on the psycho-social support. The purpose of this study was to assess the psychosocial correlates of deviant behaviour among teachers in public secondary school in Nairobi County. The study was guided by five research objectives namely to explore the motivation of deviant behaviours among teachers in public secondary schools, to determine the psychological correlates of deviant behaviour among teachers in public secondary schools, to determine the social correlates of deviance behaviour among teachers in public secondary schools, to examine the teacher’s perceptions towards the existing programs of managing psychosocial correlates of deviance among teachers in public and to establish the coping mechanisms used by teachers to deal with psychosocial correlates of deviance in public secondary schools. The study was anchored on two theoretical frameworks namely the Self-determination theory (SDT) and the Transactional Model and adopted the mixed methods embedded research design. The target population was 2387. Simple random sampling technique was used to select the 343 teachers, while purposive sampling was used to select the 30 principals and automatic inclusion technique to select those to participate in interview schedules. Quantitative data were collected using two standardized questionnaires namely the Multidimensional scaling toolwith reliability coefficient of 0.925. Qualitative data were collected using two interview guides for Principals (supervisors) and those participants who reported high level of deviance. Data analysis was done using Statistical package for Social Science, correlation analysis and thematic analysis backed by narratives. The study established positive significant correlation on deviance across psychological, social and demographic factors like, age and experience of the teachers. The study further established higher deviance among the less experienced teachers than those with more years of service. The results further showed that there was no significant correlation on deviance and gender. These findings may be relevant in designing future interventions for teachers with deviant behaviour and could enhance and complement the existing interventions. The study recommended further research on correlation on remuneration and deviance. The study recommended Psycho-social support programs be established by the employer to address deviance among teachers rather than disciplinary procedures as it is the practice currently in Kenya.

Page(s): 248-253                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 January 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6116

 Magdalene Mwele
Department of Psychology, The Catholic University of Eastern Africa

 Stephen Asatsa (PhD)
Department of Psychology, The Catholic University of Eastern Africa

 Simon Kang’ethe (PhD)
Faculty of Education, KCA University

[1] Anasiz, B. T., & Puskulluoglu, E. I., (2018). Phenomenological Analysis of Teachers’
[2] Orga the nizational Deviance Experiences in a Rural Primary School in Turkey. Journal of Education and Training Studies, Vol. 6, No. 1.
[3] Asiyai, R. (2019). Deviant Behaviour in Secondary School and its Impact on Students’ Learning.Journal of Educational and Social Research 9(3):170-177
[4] Braje, I. N., Aleksic, A. & Jelavic,S.R. (2020). Blame It on Individual or Organization Environment: What Predicts Workplace Deviance More?Social Sciences, MDPI, OpenAccess Journal, vol. 9(6), pp 1-12.
[5] Chernyak-Hai, L and Rabenu, E. (2018). The New Era Workplace Relationships: Is Social Exchange Theory Still Relevant? Industrial and Organizational Psychology, Cambridge University Press, Vol. 11(3), pp 456–481.
[6] Creswell, J. W. (2011). Controversies in Mixed Methods Research. In N. Denzin, & Y. S. Lincoln (Eds.). The Sage Handbook of Qualitative Research (4th ed., pp. 269-283). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
[7] D’Silva, J. L., Bachok, A., & Zawawi, D. (2020). Factors Affecting Deviant Behaviour at Workplace among Young Public Sector Employees. International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, 10(15), 176–188
[8] Fagbenro, D.A., & Olasupo, O. M. (2020). Quality of Family Life and Workplace Deviant Behaviour with Perceived Competence as a Mediator among University Staff,Naše gospodarstvo/Our Economy, 66(2), 15–27.
[9] Kagwe, M. Ngigi, S., K., Mutisya, S. (2018). Sources of Occupational Stress and Coping Strategies among Teachers in Borstal Institutions in Kenya.Edelweiss Psyi Open Access 2: 18-21
[10] Kerlinger, F. N & Lee, H. B. (2000). Foundations of Behavioural Research (4thed). California State University: Northridge.
[11] Kombo, D.L. and L.A. Tromp, 2006. Proposal and Thesis Writing: An Introduction. Pauline Publications. Nairobi, Kenya
[12] Robbin, S., L., & Bennet, R.J. (2000). A Typology of Deviant Workplace Behaviours: A Multidimensional Scaling Study. The Academy of Management Journal, Vol. 38, No. 2. (Apr., 1995), pp. 555-572.
[13] Rogelberg, S. & Stanton, J. Understanding and dealing with organizational survey non-response. Organizational Research Methods, 2007, 10, 195–209.
[14] Suleiman, Y., Suleiman, .J. M., Musa, M., & Abubakar, Y.A., (2018). Teachers’ Perceived Factors of Deviant Behaviour among Secondary School Students in Kwara State: Implication for Educational Managers. International Journal of Synergy and Research 7:59

Magdalene Mwele, Stephen Asatsa (PhD), Simon Kang’ethe (PhD), “Demographic Correlates of Deviance among Teachers in Public Secondary Schools in Nairobi County, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.248-253 January 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6116

Download PDF

pdf

Social Correlates of Deviant Behavior among Teachers in Public Secondary Schools in Nairobi County, Kenya

Magdalene Mwele, Virginia Nyagah (PhD), Simon Kangethe (PhD) – January 2022- Page No.: 254-260

Globally, deviant behavior is found to be a social challenge which has created different problems in the present society. With respect to school setting, the behavioral deviancy of teachers has attracted considerable attention of researchers and educationalists. This study therefore assessed demographic correlates of deviant behavior among teachers in public secondary schools in Nairobi County, Kenya. The study was guided by Self-determination theory and Transactional Models. The survey research design was adopted for the study. The target population was 2387 comprising of 2291 teachers. A total sample of 385 participants were selected using simple random sampling technique. Data were collected using modified workplace deviance scale and social correlates questionnaire. Data was analyzed using univariate analysis, and Pearson correlation analysis. From the findings teachers deviance had the highest on the sabotage domain (mean=3.0429; SD=1.09429) while the subscale of gossip had the lowest mean (mean=2.9898; SD=1.13283).On social correlates, workload had the greatest contribution to deviant behavior (mean=2.3507; SD=.86610) while responsibility had the lowest contribution to deviant behavior (mean=2.0442; SD=.73774).The findings indicate that teachers’ workload had high impact on their deviance behavior. This implies that education stake holders ought to engage teachers on the area of workload in order to define the appropriate optimum work that teachers should hold. This will help in reducing deviance and improving productivity.

Page(s): 254-260                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 January 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6117

 Magdalene Mwele
Department of Psychology, The Catholic University of Eastern Africa

 Virginia Nyagah (PhD)
Department of Psychology, The Catholic University of Eastern Africa

 Simon Kangethe (PhD)
KCA University

[1] Adeoti, M.O., Shamsudin, F.M. & Mohammad, A.M. (2021), “Opportunity, job pressure and Deviant Workplace Behaviour: Does Neutralization Mediate The Relationship? A study of faculty members in public universities in Nigeria”, European Journal of Management and Business Economics, 30 (2):170-190.
[2] Aksu, A. (2016). Organizational deviance and multi-factor leadership. Educational Research and abReviews, 11(8), 589-597.
[3] Anastasiou, S. & Papakonstantinou, G. (2015). Factors Affecting Job Satisfaction, Stress And Work Performance of Secondary Education Teachers in Epirus, NW Greece. Int. J. of Management in Education. 8(1), 37 – 53.
[4] Azim, A. M. M., Hassan, M. S., Zaid, D. S., & Daud, M. A. (2020). The Influence of
[5] Supervisor Support, Organizational Trust on Workplace Deviant Behavior: Do Psychological Contract Matter? International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, 10(2), 116–120.
[6] Bennett, R. J., Marasi, S., Locklear, L. (2018). Workplace Deviance, In: Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Business and Management. Oxford University Press, USA
[7] Bennett, R.J., Robinson, S.L., (2000). Development of a measure of workplace deviance. Journal of Applied Psychology 85 (1), 349–360.
[8] Bhui, K., Dinos, S., Galant-Miecznikowska, M., de Jongh, B., & Stansfeld, S. (2016).
[9] Perceptions of work stress causes and effective interventions in employees working in public, private and non-governmental organisations: a qualitative study. BJPsych bulletin, 40(6), 318–325.
[10] Coşkun, B. & Balci, A. (2020). Teachers’ Workplace Aggression Behaviors and Their Relationship with Organizational Justice. MANAS Journal of Social Studies9(3), 1391-1409.
[11] Fagbenro, D.A., & Olasupo, O. M. (2020). Quality of Family Life and Workplace Deviant Behaviour with Perceived Competence as a Mediator among University Staff. Naše gospodarstvo/Our Economy, 66(2), 15–27.
[12] Fischer, C. F. (2011).Supervisionofinstructionhttp://www.stanswartz.com/adm.txt/chap .htm retrieved 20th march 2016
[13] Howald, N. Lortie, B. Gallagher, C., & Albert, M. A., (2018). Preventing and Deterring
[14] Organizational Deviance. A White Paper prepared by the Visibility Committee of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology.
[15] Igbe, J. E. Okpa, J. T., & Aniah, E. A. (2017). Working conditions and deviant behaviour of employees in the University of Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria. IOSR Journal of Humanities and Social Science (IOSR-JHSS)(22) 7, 74-83.
[16] Kagwe, M., Ngigi S and Mutisya S.(2018). Sources of Occupational Stress and Coping
[17] Strategies among Teachers in Borstal Institutions in Kenya. Edelweiss Psyi Open Access 2 (1): 18-21
[18] Khan, P. (2017). An Analysis of Teachers’ Deviant Behavior and its Impact on Students’Academic Performance. FWU Journal of Social Sciences, Winter, 11 (2), 139-148
[19] Khan, S. A., Mahmood, A. & Kanwal, S. (2015). How Perceived Supervisor Support Effects Workplace Deviance? Mediating Role of Perceived Organizational Support. Pakistan Journal of Commerce and Social Sciences, 9 (3), 940-967.
[20] Koech, S.J., Tikoko, B.J., & Chemwei, B. (2014).Institutional factors that influence teachers’ turnover in public secondary schools in Baringo County, Kenya. International Journal of Education and Research,2(3), 20-39.
[21] Köse, G.S. (2013). Ortaokul öÄŸretmenlerinin örgütsel sapma ve stratejik liderlik
[22] arasındaki iliÅŸki üzerine algıları: Ä°zmir ili örneÄŸi, Yayımlanmamış Yüksek Lisans Tezi, Dokuz Eylül Üniversitesi, EÄŸitim Bilimleri Enstitüsü, Ä°zmir.
[23] Lawrence, T.B., & Robinson. S.L. (2007). Workplace Deviance as Organizational Resistance. Journal of Management, 33(3), 378-394.
[24] Muiga, W.F., Ombui, D., & Iravo, D.M. (2016). Effects of Work-Related Stress on Teachers ‟ Performance in Public Secondary Schools in Kikuyu Sub County, Kenya.
[25] Ndung’u, G. W. (2017). Teacher Indiscipline and the Effectiveness of Disciplinary Measures Employed By Head teachers In Public Secondary Schools In Githunguri, Kiambu County, Kenya. Published Master of Education Research Project. Kenyatta University Repository.
[26] Palomo, M., Beinart, H., & Cooper, M. J. (2010). Development and validation of the Supervisory Relationship Questionnaire (SRQ) in UK trainee clinical psychologists. British Journal of Clinical Psychology 49 (1): 131-149
[27] Peterson, D. K. (2002). Deviant workplace behavior and the organization’s ethical climate. Journal of Business and Psychology 17(1): 47-61.
[28] Salakhova, V. B., Bulgakov, A. V., Sokolovskaya, I. E., Khammatova, R. S. & Mikhaylovsky, M. N. (2016). Substantive (Content-Related) Characteristics of Deviant Behavior as a Social and Psychological Phenomenon. International Journal of Environmental & Science Education, 11 (17), 10609-10622
[29] Travers, C. J., & Cooper, C. L. (1996). Teachers under pressure: Stress in the teaching profession. London: Routledge
[30] Ünal, A. (2012). Deviant Teacher Behaviors and Their Influence on School Rules and Interpersonal Relationships at School. Egitim Arastirmalari. Eurasian Journal of Educational Research, 49 (1), 1-20.
[31] Uwannah, N. C. (2015). Absenteeism, favoritism, and tardiness as predictors of job deviance in academia: The Nigeria experience. Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities, 1(2), 75-81.

Magdalene Mwele, Virginia Nyagah (PhD), Simon Kangethe (PhD) “Social Correlates of Deviant Behavior among Teachers in Public Secondary Schools in Nairobi County, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.254-260 January 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6117

Download PDF

pdf

Empowerment of Maritime Potential in the Coastal Region of West Kalimantan in Support of the Preparedness of the Indonesian Naval Main Base – XII

Mokhamad Subur, Beni Rudiawan, Arief Rachman – January 2022- Page No.: 261-267

West Kalimantan as one of the third largest provinces in Indonesia, has a long coastline to the north bordering Malaysia. Based on its geographical location, one-third of West Kalimantan is on the coast and islands or maritime areas facing the Indonesian Archipelago Sea Lanes (ALKI I) making its territorial waters and coasts as strategic areas that have threats and opportunities. The presence of the Indonesian Naval Main Base – XII in west Kalimantan must be able to empower the maritime potential and resources available, especially in the region / along the coast of West Kalimantan to support the operation of the elements and equipment.
The research methods used in writing this article are literature studies with descriptive qualitative approaches, interviewing field guides, as well as literature studies that support problem solving.

Page(s): 261-267                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 January 2022

 Mokhamad Subur
Total War Strategy, Defense University of the Republic of Indonesia

 Beni Rudiawan
Total War Strategy, Defense University of the Republic of Indonesia

 Arief Rachman
Total War Strategy, Defense University of the Republic of Indonesia

[1] Central Bureau of Statistics of West Kalimantan Province. (2021). West Kalimantan Province in Numbers. Pontianak: BPS West Kalimantan Province.
[2] Marine and Fisheries Office of West Kalimantan Province. (2018). Strategic Plan (Renstra) 2018-2023. Pontianak: Marine and Fisheries Service of West Kalimantan Province.
[3] DPR RI. (2002). State Law of the Republic of Indonesia number 3 of 2002 concerning State Defense. Jakarta: DPR RI.
[4] DPR RI. (2004). Law of the Republic of Indonesia Number 34 of 2004 concerning the Indonesian National Army. Jakarta: DPR RI.
[5] Indonesian Rector’s Forum. (2015). Building Economic Synergy, Environment, Cultural Law, Security to Uphold Dignified Maritime States. Indonesian Rector’s Forum.
[6] Jablonsky, D. (1999). ed, Root of Strategy Book 4. Philadelphia: Stackpole Book.
[7] Coordinating Ministry for Maritime Affairs of Indonesia. (2017). Presidential Regulation of the Republic of Indonesia nmor 16 of 2017 on Indonesian Marine Policy. Jakarta: Coordinating Ministry for Maritime Affairs of Indonesia.
[8] Mahan, A. T. (1987). The Influnece of The Sea Power Upon History 1660-1783. New York: Dover Publication Inc.
[9] Marsetio. (2014). Indonesian Sea Power. Jakarta : Indonesia Defence University.
[10] Marsetio, D. (2017). Makalah FGD “Indonesia Sebagai Poros maritim Dunia”. Bandung : Universitas Pajajaran.
[11] Marsetio, L. T. (2014). Strategic Management of Maritime Countries in Economic and Defense Perspective. Graduation Scientific Oration to XXVI Stima IMMI Graduate Program. Jakarta.
[12] Sugiyono. (2014). Quantitative, qualitative and R&D research methods. Bandung: Alfabeta.
[13] TNI AL. (2015). Regulation of the Chief of Naval Staff number 3 of 2015 concerning the Improvement of Naval Base Class B Pontianak to the Main Base of the Navy XII. Jakarta: TNI AL.
[14] Tismananda, D. S. (2016). Implementation of ASEAN Maritime Forum in Indonesia Maritime Security System. Surabaya: Faculty of Tenik and Marine Sciences Hang Tuah University.
[15] Decree of the Chief of Staff of the Navy (2018), Doctrine of The Empowerment of Marine Defense Areas
https://kalbarprov.go.id/page/geografis

Mokhamad Subur, Beni Rudiawan, Arief Rachman , “Empowerment of Maritime Potential in the Coastal Region of West Kalimantan in Support of the Preparedness of the Indonesian Naval Main Base – XII” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.261-267 January 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-1/261-267.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Enterprise Risk Management and Banks’ Financial Performance: Evidence from West African Countries

Dr. Augustine C. Odubuasi, Dr. Felix Enaibre Ighosewe & Dr. Nkechi T. Ofor- January 2022- Page No.: 268-272

This paper studied the effect of enterprise risk management (ERM) on bank performance in three selected African countries over a study period of ten years spanning from 2009 to 2018. The study covered selected banks in Ghana, South Africa and Nigeria. The regressor is ERM measured by strategy, operation, reporting & compliance while the regressed is bank performance measured by return on equity. Also, we controlled for firm size and leverage. The data generated were analysed using Stata 13 version, which assisted the use of some analytical techniques.. Panel regressionanalysis was conducted alongside Hausman effect test which indicated the better model that was interpreted between Random Effect (RE) and fixed effect (FE) models. As specified by the Hausman test, the FE model was used for model 1 while the random effect model was used to test model 2. The result revealed that enterprise risk management on the overall has a positive significant effect on bank performance provided it takes into consideration control variables like financial leverage and firm size. Hence, the study concludes that, ERM is instrumental to improved banks’ financial performance (ROE). As such, regulatory authorities should come up with legislation(s) that should enforce and strengthen the enactment of enterprise risk management across banks in the study area.

Page(s): 268-272                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 January 2022

 Dr. Augustine C. Odubuasi
Department of Accounting, Hezekiah University, Imo State – Nigeria

 Dr. Felix Enaibre Ighosewe
Department of Accounting, Dennis Osadebay University, Asaba, Delta state, Nigeria

 Dr. Nkechi T. Ofor
Department of Accounting, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Anambra State, Nigeria

[1] Abdullah, A & Ismail, K.N. (2015).Hedging activities information and risk management committee effectiveness: Malaysian evidence.Australian Journal of Basic and Applied Sciences, 9(37), 211 – 219.
[2] Abdullah, H.S.B., Janor, H., Hamid, M.A., &Yatim, P. (2017). The effect of enterprise risk management on firm value: Evidence from Malaysian technology. JurnalPengurusan, 49(2017), 3-11.
[3] Alawattegama, K.K. (2018). The Effect of Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) on Firm Performance: Evidence from the Diversified Industry of Sri Lanka. Journal of Management Research, 10(1), 75 – 93.
[4] Ali, S.M., & Isa, M.A. (2018).Firms attributes and corporate social responsibility disclosure: A literature review.International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, 8(4), 312– 325.
[5] Altanashat, M., Dubai, M., &Alhety, S. (2019).The impact of enterprise risk management on institutional performance in Jordanian public shareholding companies. Journal of Business and Retail Management Research, 13 (3), 256 – 269.
[6] Andersson, P., &Wallgren, F.M. (2018). Board gender diversity and firm financial performance. Unpublished Master thesis submitted to the Department of Business Administration,JÖNKÖPING University, Jönköping International Business School, Sweden.
[7] Anton, S.G. (2018). The impact of enterprise risk management on firm value: Empirical evidence from Romanian non-financial firms. InzinerineEkonomika-Engineering Economics,29(2), 151–157.
[8] Araoye, F.E., &Olatunji, T.E. (2019).Board meetings and financial performance of insurance companies in Nigeria.European Journal of Accounting, Auditing and Finance Research,7(9), 1-16.
[9] Bédard, J., Sonda, M.C., &Courteau, L. (2004).The effect of audit committee expertise, independence, and activity on aggressive earnings management.Auditing-A Journal of Practice & Theory, 23, 13-35.
[10] COSO (2004) Enterprise Risk Management —Integrated Framework: Executive Summary, available at http://www.coso.org
[11] Florio, C., &Leoni, G. (2017). Enterprise risk management and firm performance: The Italian case. The British Accounting Review, 49(2017), 56 – 74.
[12] Ghosh, A., (2013). An empirical investigation into enterprise risk management in India. Working Paper Series, WPS No. 722/ February, Indian Institute of Management Calcutta, Finance and Control Group.
[13] Gordon, L.A., Loeb, M.P., & Tseng, C.Y. (2009). Enterprise risk management and firm performance: A contingency perspective. Journal of Account, Public Policy, 28 (2009), 301 – 327.
[14] Husaini, &Saiful. (2017). Enterprise risk management, corporate governance and firm value: Empirical evidence from Indonesian public listed companies. International Journal of
[15] Markowitz, H. (1952). Portfolio Selection.The Journal of Finance7(1), 77-91.
[16] Markowitz, H. (1959). Portfolio Selection. New Haven, Connecticut: Yale University Press.
[17] Mashonganyika, T.B. (2015). The relationship between corporate governance and firm performance in South Africa. An unpublished Master thesis submitted to the university of Witwatersrand, Faculty of Commerce, Law and Management, Johannesburg, South- Africa.
[18] McClure, B. (2010). Modern portfolio theory: Why it’s still hip. Investopedia.Retrieved on 12/10/19 from http://www.investopedia.com/articles/06/MPT.asp#axzz1g3JQY7nY.
[19] Musyoki, D., &Komo, L. (2017). Risk factors and enterprise risk management in the financial service industry: A review of theory and evidence. International Journal of Economics and Business Management, 3 (1), 29-45.
[20] Nasir, N. (2018). Effect of enterprise risk management on firm value: Empirical evidence from non-financial firms in Pakistan. A masters degree thesis to faculty of management sciences, Capital University of Science and Technology, Islamabad.
[21] Naz, F., Ijaz, F., &Naqvi, F. (2016). Financial performance of firms: Evidence from Pakistan cement industry. Journal of Teaching and Education, 05 (01), 81 – 94.
[22] Ojeka, S.A., Adegboye, A., Adegboye, K., Alabi, O., Afolabi, M., &Iyoha, F. (2019). Chief financial officer roles and enterprise risk management: An empirical based study. Journal List Heliyon, 5(6), 19 -34.
[23] Ramlee, R., & Ahmad, N. (2015).Panel data analysis on the effect of establishing the enterprise risk management on firms’ performances. Proceedings of 4th European Business Research Conference 9-10 April, Imperial College, London, UK.
[24] Rao, A. (2018). Empirical analysis of joint impact of enterprise risk management and corporate governance on firm value.International Review of Advances in Business, Management and Law, 1 (1), 34 – 52.
[25] Salaudeen, Y.M, Atoyebi, T.A., &Oyegbile, B.A. (2018). Enterprise risk management and performance of selected listed consumer goods companies in Nigeria. ApplieFinance and Accounting, 4(1), 112 – 121.
[26] Şenol, Z., &Karaca, S.S. (2017). The effect of enterprise risk management on firm performance: A case study on Turkey. Financial Studies, 2(2017), 6 – 30.
[27] Soliman, A., & Adam, M. (2017). Enterprise risk management and firm performance: An integrated model for banking sector. Banks and Bank System, 12(2), 116–123.
[28] Teoh, A.P., Lee, K.Y., & Muthuveloo, R. (2017).The impact of enterprise risk management, strategic agility, and quality of internal audit function on firm performance. International Review of Management and Marketing, 7(1), 222 – 231.
[29] Zuo, X., Isa, C.R., &Rahman, M. (2017). Valuation of enterprise risk management in the manufacturing industry.Total Quality Management & Business Excellence, DOI: 10.1080/14783363.2017.1369877.
[30] Kopia, J., Just, V., Geldmacher, W., &Bubian, A. (2017). Organization performance and enterprise risk management. EGOFORUM, 6 (1(10), 1 – 14.

Dr. Augustine C. Odubuasi, Dr. Felix Enaibre Ighosewe & Dr. Nkechi T. Ofor, “Enterprise Risk Management and Banks’ Financial Performance: Evidence from West African Countries” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.268-272 January 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-1/268-272.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

The Effect of Inventory Control Systems on Organisational Performance in the Mining Sector of Zimbabwe

Dumisani Mawonde and Casper Demberere- January 2022- Page No.: 273-279

The aim of this study was to determine the effect of inventory control systems on organisational performance in the mining sector of Zimbabwe. A quantitative survey approach was used and a sample of 203 mining companies was used for data analysis. Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) was run in Analysis for Moment Structures (AMOS) version 22 to test the formulated hypotheses. The findings of the study were that, inventory control systems have both positive direct and positive indirect effect on organisational performance. The study concluded that, inventory control systems have a positive effect on organisational performance in the mining sector of Zimbabwe. The study recommended mining companies in Zimbabwe to implement modern computerised inventory control systems for effective inventory management in order to enhance organisational performance.

Page(s): 273-279                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 January 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6118

 Dumisani Mawonde
Bindura University of Science Education, Bindura, Zimbabwe

 Casper Demberere
Bindura University of Science Education, Bindura, Zimbabwe

[1] Adeyemi, S. L. & Salami, L.O., (2010). Inventory management: A tool of optimizing resources in a manufacturing industry. Journal of Social Science
[2] Andriolo, A., Battini, d., Grubbström, R. W., Persona, A., & Sgarbossa, F., (2014)A century of evolution from Harriss basic lot size model: Survey and research agenda, International Journal of Production Economics, (155), 16-38. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpe.2014.01.013
[3] Anton Dolinsky (2007), Barcodes, sales and inventory control Retrieved 22 Jun 2013 http://www.almyta.com/Inventory_Management_History_4.asp
[4] Akindipe, O. S. (2014). Inventory Management: A Tool for Optimal use of Resources and Overall Efficiency in Manufacturing SMEs. Journal of Entrepreneurship and Innovation (JEMI)
[5] American Production and Inventory Control Society (APICS), (2001)
[6] Ahmad, N.M.N.N., Nawawi, A. & Salin, A.S.A.P. (2016), “The relationship between human capital characteristics and directors’ remuneration of Malaysian public listed companies”, International Journal of Business and Society,
[7] Akkermans, H.A., Bogerd, P., Yucesan, E., & van Wassenhove, L.N. (2003). The impact of ERP on supply chain management: Exploratory findings from a European Delphi study. European Journal of Operational Research,
[8] Alm, N. (2000).Bank Management (4th Ed). Fort Worth: Dryden Press.
[9] Anichebe, N. A. & Agu, O. A. (2013). Effect of Inventory Management on Organizational Effectiveness.Information and Knowledge Management
[10] Atnafu, D., & Balda, A. (2018). The impact of inventory management practice on firms’ competitiveness and organizational performance: Empirical evidence from micro and small enterprises in Ethiopia. Cogent Business & Management
[11] Babbie, E. R., (2012). The Basics of Social Research. 6 ed. s.l.:Cengage.
[12] Ballon, R. H. (2000). Business logistics/supply chain management. Planning, organizing and controlling the supply chain (5th ed.). USA: Pearsons-Prentice Hall
[13] Barwa, M. T., (2015) Inventory Control as an Effective Decision-Making Model and Implementations for Company’s Growth. International Journal of Economics, Finance and Management Sciences
[14] Bawa, S., Asamoah, G.E., & Kissi, E., (2018), Impact of inventory management on firm performance: A case study of listed manufacturing firms in Ghana. DOI: 10.5923/j.ijfa.20180704.01
[15] Bell, J., (2005). Doing Your Research Project: A guide for first-time researchers in education, helath and social scinece. 4th ed. Berkshire: Open University Press.
[16] Berthod, O. (2017) ‘Global Encyclopedia of Public Administration, Public Policy, and Governance’, pp. 1–5. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-31816-5.
[17] Broatch, M. (2001).Making the ERP connection. Computerworld New Zealand, July.
[18] Bowersox, D. J. (2002). Supply chain – Logistics management. International edition. USA: M C Graw Hill.
[19] Byrne, B.M. (2010). Structural Equation Modeling with AMOS: Basic Concepts, Applications, and Programming (2nd Edition). New York: Taylor and Francis Group Publication.
[20] Cagliano, A. C., DeMarco, A., Rafele, C. & Volpe, S. (2011). Using System Dynamics in Warehouse Management: A Fast-fashion Case Study. Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management
[21] Carr, A. S., & Pearson, J. N. (2002).The impact of purchasing and supplier involvement in strategic purchasing and its impact on firm’s performance.International Journal of Operations & Production Management.
[22] Chen, I.J. (2001). Planning for ERP systems: Analysis and future trend.Business Process Management Journal.
[23] Chen, I. J., Paulraj, A., & Lado, A. A. (2004). Strategic purchasing, supply management, and firm performance. Journal of Operations Management.
[24] Chitale A.K & Gupta R.C (2014), materials management supply chain perspective (6th edition) PHI learning private limited, New Delhi.
[25] Cho, J. & Dansereau, F. (2010), “Are transformational leaders fair? A multi-level study of transformational leadership, justice perceptions, and organizational citizenship behaviours”, The Leadership Quarterly, Vol. 21 No. 3, pp. 409-421
[26] Choi, T. (2012).Handbook of EOQ inventory problems – Stochastic and deterministic models and applications. New York, Heidelberg, Dordrecht, London: Springer.
[27] Chuang, H.H.C. & Oliva, R. (2015), “Inventory record inaccuracy: causes and labour effects”, Journal of Operations Management
[28] Cohen, L., Manion, L. & Morisson, K., (2007). Research in education. 6th ed. Routledge
[29] Confederation of Zimbabwe Industries Mining Sector Survey Report, (2018)
[30] Creswell, J. W. (2014). Research design: qualitative, quantitative and mixed approaches. Los Angeles: Sage Publications
[31] Ciudad-Gómez, A., & Valverde-Berrocoso, S. J. (2014). Reliability Analysis of an Evaluation Rubric for University Accounting Students: A Learning Activity about Database Use. Journal of International Education Research, Volume 10, Number 5(Special Issue 2014)
[32] DiMaggio, P., & Powell, W. (1983). The Iron Cage Revisited: Institutional Isomorphism and Collective Rationality in Organizational Fields. American Sociological Review
[33] Dimitrios, P. (2008). The effect of inventory management on firm performance. International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management
[34] Dr. Euginen,C., & Rubha.S., (2017).“AN OVERVIEW ABOUT JIT (JUST-IN-TIME) – INVENTORY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM.” International Journal of Research – Granthaalayah, 5(4)SE, 14-18. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.569368.
[35] Chandler, D., & Hwang, H. (2015). Learning from Learning Theory: A Model of Organizational Adoption of Organizational Strategies at the Micro Foundations of Institutional Theory. Journal of Management,
[36] Donselaar, K.H. van, (1989) Material Coordination under Uncertainty, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
[37] Donselaar, K.H. van, (1990) “Integral stock norms in divergent systems with lot-sizes”, European Journal of Operations Research
[38] Drurry, C. (2004). Management and cost accounting . London: Prentice hall.
[39] Ellram, L. M. (1996). The Use of the Case Study Method in Logistics Research.Journal of Business Logistics.
[40] Feinstein, A. H., & Stefanelli, J. M., (2000) Selection and Procurement for the Hospitality Industry.5th Edition. John Wiley & Sons: New York, USA
[41] Forrester, J.W., Industrial Dynamics, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, (1961).
[42] Gitman, L. J. (2009). Principles of managerial finance (12th ed.). Bostos, MA: Pearson Prentice Hall.
[43] Gefen D. (200).A Multi-level Approach to Measuring the Benefits of an ERF System in Manufacturing Firms. Information Systems management
[44] Gratton, C. and Jones, I., (2010). Research Methods for Sports Studies. 2nd ed. Oxon: Routledge.
[45] Golafshani, N. (2003) ‘Understanding Reliability and Validity in Qualitative Research’, 8(4), pp. 597–606.
[46] Goldratt, M. E. (2004). The goal: A process of ongoing improvement. New York: North River Press
[47] Hair J. F., Bush R. P., and Ortinau D. J. (2003). Marketing Research Within a Changing Information Environment. 2nd Edition. McGraw-Hill Companies.
[48] HassabElnaby, H. R., Hwang, W., & Vonderembse, M. A., (2012), “The impact of ERP implementation on organizational capabilities and firm performance”, Benchmarking: An International Journal, Vol. 19
[49] Hopp, W. J. & Spearman, M. L. (2000).“Factory Physics”. Boston: McGraw-Hill/Irwin
[50] Hutchins, D. (1999). Just in time. UK: Gower Publishing, Ltd
[51] Hoyle, R.H. (1995). Structural equation modeling: Concepts, issues, and applications. London: SAGE.
[52] Johnson, F., & Ruankaew, T., (2017) A Study of Inventory Control Systems by Jamaican SMEs in Retail and Manufacturing/Distribution Industries. International Journal of Business and Management
[53] Kakeeto, F., Micheal, T., Pastor, K., & Osunsan, O. K., (2017). Inventory Management and Organizational Profitability at Gumutindo Coffee Cooperative Enterprise Limited, Uganda. International Journal of Business and Management Invention
[54] Kauppi, K. (2013). Extending the Use of Institutional Theory in Operations and Supply Chain Management Research Review and Research Suggestions. International Journal of Operations & Production Management
[55] Kakwezi, D. & Nyeko, P. K. (2014). Procurement Processes and Performance: Efficiency and Effectiveness of the Procurement Function
[56] Kazim, S. (2008).inventory inaccuracy and performance of collaborative supply chain practices. Industrial management and data systems.
[57] Khan S. (2010). Supplier choice criteria of executing agencies in developing countries.”16, 4/5; ABI/INFORM Global. The International Journal of Public Sector Management
[58] Klenke, K., (2008). Qualitative Research in the Study of Leadership. Bingley: Emrald.
[59] Koumanakos, D.P (2008).The effect of inventory management on firm performance International Journal of productivity and performance Management, Emerald Group Publication
[60] Kolawole, A. D., Akomolafe, A. B., & Olusipe, B. J., (2019) Inventory Management: An Impetus for Increased Profitability in Manufacturing Firms. International Journal of Accounting, Finance & Risk Management. Vol. 4, No. 4, 2019, pp. 110-115. doi: 10.11648/j.ijafrm.20190404.12
[61] Kwame, K. (2007). Working Capital Management Practices of Small Firms in the Asharti Region of Ghana. Retrieved September 15, 2015 from http://www.ssrn.com
[62] Lantai, T. (no date) ‘University of Stavanger’.
[63] Lazaridis, I. & Tryforidis, D. (2006).Relationship between Working Capital Management and Profitability of Listed Companies in the Athens Stock Exchange. Journal of Financial Management and Analysis
[64] Lysons, K and Gillingham, M. (2003). Purchasing and supply chain management. London:Prentice Hall
[65] Lumsden, K. (2012). Logistikens Grunder. (3. uppl.). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB.
[66] Lwiki T., Ojera P. B., Mugend N., & Wachira N., (2013), “The impact of inventory management practices on financial performance of sugar manufacturing firms in Kenya”, International Journal of Business, Humanities and Technology
[67] Lysons, K., & Farrington, B., (2016). Purchasing and Supply Chain Management, 9th Edition, England
[68] Macdonald, J. (2019).Production Accounting and Inventory Management: a Digital Transformation Approach in Mining Operations. AVEVA Group, UK
[69] Magee, J.F., Production (1985) Planning and Inventory Control, McGraw-Hill, New York, NY.
[70] Mathuva, D. (2010). The Influence of Working Capital Management Components on Corporate Profitability: A Surveyon Kenyan listed firms. Research Journal of Business Management
[71] Meindl, P., Chopra, S., (2010) Supply Chain Management STRATEGY, PLANNING, AND OPERATION. 5th Edition: Prentice Hall. U.S.A
[72] Mohamad, A. (2011). “Working Capital Management and Profitability: Evidence from Iran”.World Applied Sciences Journal
[73] Moore, L. J., Lee, S. M. & Taylor, B. W. (2003).Management Science. Needham: Allyn and Bacon
[74] Mwangi, L., (2016). The effect of inventory management on firm profitability and operating cash flows of Kenya breweries limited, beer distribution firms in Nairobi county: A Research Project Submitted in Partial Fulfilment of the Requirements for the Award of the Degree of Master of Science in Finance, School of Business, University of Nairobi.
[75] Nachtigall, C., Kroehne, U., Funke, F., & Steyer, R., (2003). Pros and Cons of Structural Equation Modeling: Methods of Psychological Research Online 2003, Vol.8, No.2, pp. 1-22
[76] NdiranguKung’u, J., (2016) Effects of Inventory Control on Profitability of Industrial and Allied Firms in Kenya. IOSR Journal of Economics and Finance (IOSR-JEF)
[77] Neely, A.D., Gregory, M., Platts, K., (1995). Performance measurement systems design: a literature review and research agenda. International Journal of Operations & Production Management
[78] Neely, A. D., (199, ‘The performance measurement revolution: why now and where next’, International Journal of Operations and Production Management
[79] Nkwankwo, O. & Osho, G. S. (2010). An Empirical Analysis of Corporate Survival and Growth: Evidence from Efficient Working Capital Management. International Journal of Scholarly Academic Intellectual Diversity
[80] Nyabwanga, R. N., & Ojera, P. (2012).Inventory Management Practices and Business Performance for Small-Scale Enterprises in Kenya. Journal of Business Management
[81] Nunnally, J. C. and I. Bernstein (1994).”The assessment of reliability.” Psychometric theory 3: 248-292.
[82] Ogbo, A.I. (2011). Production and Operations Management. Enugu: De-verge Agencies Ltd.
[83] Ogbo, A. I.,Onekanma I.V. & Wilfred I. U. (2014).The Impact of Effective Inventory Control Management on Organisational Performance: A Study of 7up Bottling Company NileMile Enugu, Nigeria.Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences, MCSER Publishing, Rome-Italy
[84] Ogbo, A. I. & Ukpere, W. I. (2014) “The Impact of Effective Inventory Control Management on Organisational Performance: A Study of 7up Bottling Company Nile Mile Enugu, Nigeria”, Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences, 5 (10), p.109
[85] Oliveira, J., & Rodrigues, P. C. (2008).Study of Management of Intermediate Inventory in the Manufacture of Paper Products in Brazilian Companies. In: Proceedings of POMS 19th Annual Conference, La Jolla/California.
[86] Orlicky, J., Materials Requirements Planning, McGraw-Hill, New York, NY, 1975
[87] Pandey, I. M. (2008). “Financial Management”, 10th Edition. New Delhi: VikasPublishingHousePvt.Limited
[88] Peterson, R. & Joyce, E. A. 2007.Decision Systems for Inventory Management and Production Planning. New York: John Wiley and Sons
[89] Prempeh, K.B. (2016). The impact of efficient inventory management on profitability: evidence from selected manufacturing firms in Ghana. International Journal of Finance and Accounting
[90] Porter, M.E. (1980). Competitive strategy: Techniques for Analysing, Industried and Competitiors New York: The Free Press
[91] Rajeev, N. (2008). an evaluation of inventory management in indian machine tool SMEs: An exploratory. 4th IEEE International Conference on Management of Innovation and Technology. Bank, Thailand: bank.
[92] Randeree, K. & Al Youha, H. (2009), “Strategic management of performance: an examination of public sector organizations in the United Arab Emirates”, International Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Change Management, Vol. 9 No. 4
[93] Rashid, M. A., Hossain, L., & Patrick, J.D., (2002) The Evolution of ERP Systems: A Historical Perspective: Idea Group Publishing
[94] Ray, W., (2012). Methods Toward a Science of Behavior and Experience. Belmont: Wadsworth.
[95] Rossetti, C., & Choi, T. Y. (2005). On the Dark Side of Strategic Sourcing : Experiences from the Aerospace Industry.
[96] Ryan, G., Emmerling, R.J. & Spencer, L.M. (2009), “Distinguishing high-performing European executives: the role of emotional, social and cognitive competencies”, Journal of Management Development, Vol. 28
[97] Rushton.A. (2010).The Handbook of Logistics andDistribution Management.2nd Edition.Kogan Page Ltd. USA
[98] Sahari, S., Tinggi, M. & Kadri, N. (2012). Inventory management in Malaysian construction firms: Impact on performance. SIU Journal of Management
[99] Salahudden, L. A., & Abraham, O. A., (2018) Effect of Inventory Management System on Operational Performance in Manufacturing Firms: Study of May and Baker Manufacturing Industry Nig Ltd, Lagos. IRE Journals ,Volume 2 Issue 5, ISSN: 2456-8880
[100] Salawati, S., Tinggi, M., & Kadri, N. (2012).inventory management in malasyianconstrucion firms: impact on performance. SIU Journal management
[101] Saleemi N. A. (1993). Business Finance Simplified. Nairobi: Saleemi Publications Limited
[102] Sandberg, E. (2007). Logistics collaboration in supply chains: practice vs. theory. International Journal of Logistics Management, 18 (2), pp. 274-293.
[103] Saunders, M. & Tosey, P., (2012).The layers of research desgin. Rapport, pp. 58-59.
[104] Saunders M, & Lewis P, T. A. (2016) Research Methods for Business Students. 7th edn. Essex: Pearson Education Limited.
[105] Saunders, M., Lewis, P. & Thornhill, A., (2003).Research methods for business students. 3rd ed. Harlow: Prentice Hall.
[106] Sekaran, U., (2003). Research Methods for Business: 4th Edition. Hermitage Publishing Services. U.S.A
[107] Setyaningsih S. & Basri M. H., (2013).Comparison continuous and periodic review policy inventory management system formula and enteral food supply in public hospital bandung. International Journal of Innovation, Management and Technology
[108] Shah N. H & M. Mandeep (2016), “Optimal Inventory Control and Management Techniques”United states: IGI Global publisher
[109] Shin, S., & Ennis., (2015). A study of relationship between inventory management efficiency and profitability: U.S.A manufacturing industry. Mississippi State University, Meridian
[110] Sitienei, E & Memba, F. (2015), the effect of inventory management on profitability of cement manufacturing companies in Kenya: A case study of listed cement manufacturing companies in Kenya. International Journal of Management and Commerce Innovations ISSN 2348-7585 (Online) Vol. 3
[111] Stevenson, B. (2010). Operations management (10th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill Publishing.
[112] Schonsleben, P., (2007) Integral logistics management. 3rd Edition. Operations and Supply Chain Management in Comprehensive Value-Added Networks: Auerbach Publications. New York
[113] Silver, E.A. & Peterson, R., (1985) Decision Systems for Inventory Management and Production Planning, John Wiley & Sons, New York, NY.
[114] Sporta, F. O., (2018). Effect of Inventory Control Techniques on Organization’s Performance at Kenya Medical Supplies Agencies. The International Journal Of Business & Management (ISSN 2321–8916)
[115] Sumil B. & Sameer, P. (2007). International Purchasing, Inventory Management and Logistics London: Prentice Hall
[116] State of The Mining Industry Survey Report, (2018)
[117] Tomal, D.R. & Jones, K.J. (2015), “A comparison of core competencies of women and men leaders in the manufacturing industry”, The Coastal Business Journal
[118] Umble, M., Umble, E., & Murakami, S. (2006). Implementing theory of constraints in trading Japanese manufacturing: The case of Hitachi Tool engineering . International Journal of production research
[119] Walliman, N., (2011).Research methods, the basics. New York U.S.A:Routledge:
[120] Waters, C.D.J., (2003). An introduction to supply chain management – 2nd Edition. Chichester: Palgrave Macmillan
[121] Yin, R., (1984). Case Study Research: Design and Methods. Beverly Hills: Sage Publication.
[122] Zhang, X., (2005). Delayed demand information and dampened bullwhip effect. Operations Research Letters
[123] Zhang Z. (2005) A Framework for ERP Systems Implementation in China: An Empirical Study. International of production Economics
[124] Zimbabwe Mining Performance Report, (2019)
[125] Zimbabwe Economic Report, (2018)
[126] Mining Zimbabwe Magazine, (2019)
[127] Zinbarg,M. (2005), Research methods.(1st Edition).New Jersey: Pearson Publishers.NewJersy.
[128] Zuva, B., & Choga, F., (2019) Inventory Management System and Business Performance: Case of Zimbabwean Mining Sector. IOSR Journal of Business and Management (IOSR-JBM)

Dumisani Mawonde and Casper Demberere, “The Effect of Inventory Control Systems on Organisational Performance in the Mining Sector of Zimbabwe” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.273-279 January 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6118

Download PDF

pdf

Transmission and spread of STIs and RTIs among Youths’ in Higher Learning Institutions and Neighbors Villages in Mbeya City, Tanzania

Dr Kibani L. H, Mr Matem A. & Dr Mwangosi F – January 2022- Page No.: 280-287

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) are diseases often spread from person to person through sexual contact. The infections cause sexually transmitted diseases and Reproductive Tract Infections (RTIs). It has been well established that risk sexual behaviors among youths significantly influences their reproductive and general health. This study therefore investigated on the spread and transmission of sexual transmitted and reproductive tract infections to three Higher Learning Institutions (HLIs) and Neighbor Village Youths (NVYs) in Mbeya district Tanzania. The study aimed at identifying the social interaction, sexual behaviors, knowledge on impact of sexual transmitted infections, influence of physical environment and future plan of HLIs and NVYs. The study was guided by two theories, social learning theory in particular ‘Social Psychology Theory’ and the ‘Theory of Possible Selves’. The study included 210 HLIs and 100 NVYs all aged between 18-30 years. Youths were randomly sampled from their areas. Data collection methods included survey questionnaires, focus group discussion and documentary review. The study employed a random sampling procedure. A cross-sectional research design was adopted. Thematic and descriptive statistical analysis were employed. The results were as follows: Social interaction among youths of both sides, higher learning institutions and neighbor villages has negative impact since it creates vulnerability to STIs/RTIs/HIV infections. Youths were found engaging much in risk social behaviors which in turn lead them to reproductive complications such as abortions, PID, unplanned pregnancies, single parent childcare, academic dropout, poor academic achievement and the whole issue of personal and public underdevelopment socially, healthily and mentally. Results shows that youths lack clear knowledge about STIs and RTIs but were familiar with HIV/AIDS however, they were fearing of getting pregnancies rather than infections. Village youths’ future plans were about getting money and become rich person while higher learning institutions youths planned to get employment after graduating, to get nice houses and becoming somebody. In general risky sexual behaviors such as love affairs, unprotected sexes, multiple partners, luxurious lives, lack of knowledge, poverty, homeless, poor socio-economic status, low income, inherited western cultures and poor use of mobile networking among youths found as key contributors of spread and transmission of STIs/RTIs and HIV/AIDS in Mbeya district. The study recommend for collaborative effort between varied stakeholders in educating and giving supportive services to youths to improve their health and wellbeing.

Page(s): 280-287                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 03 February 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6133

 Dr Kibani L. H
Mbeya University of Science and Technology, Department of Technical Education
P.O Box 131 Mbeya City, Tanzania

 Mr Matem A.
Mbeya University of Science and Technology, Department of Technical Education
P.O Box 131 Mbeya City, Tanzania

 Dr Mwangosi F
Mbeya University of Science and Technology, Department of Technical Education
P.O Box 131 Mbeya City, Tanzania

 

[1] Abdul, R; Gerritsen, A.A.M; Mwangoma, N & Geubbel, E. (2018). Prevalence on self-reported symptoms of sexually transmitted infections, knowledge and behavior.https:/doi.org/10.1186/s12879-018-3138-1
[2] G; Mbwana, J; Mhalu, F; Mmari, E; Majigo, M; Swai, A; Urassa, W and Sandstrom, E. (2016). Patterns of sexually transmitted infections in adolescents and youths in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Doi: 10.1186/1471-2334-6-22
[3] Cheng, I. (2018). Sexuality education in Taiwan. Research Office Information Services: Division Legislative Council Secretariet. http://homepage.ntu.edu.tw/ntuidrec/file/20180913/4
[4] Fenton, K.A; Johnson, A. M; McManus, S & Erens, B. (2021). Measuring sexual behavior: Methodological challenges in survey research. Vol. 4, 77; 84-92. http://sti.bmj.com/Nov. 6, 2021.
[5] Gosselin, K; Roman, J & Bunuan, R. (2010). The theory of ‘Possible-selves’. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2010.02.005
[6] Kristin, D.T; Rena, L; Claire, D; Brindis, D & Philip, R. L. (2011). Improving the health of youth: A guide for state-level strategic planning and action. National Adolescent Health Information and Innovation Center, University of Califonia, San Francisco.
[7] Madeni, F; Horiuchi, S & Lida, M. (2011). Evaluation of reproductive health awareness program for adolescence in urban Tanzania-A quasi-experimental pre-test post-test research. http:///www.reproductive-health-journal.com/content/8/1/21
[8] Ministry of health and social welfare, MHSOW, Tanzania (2018). National Guidelines for management of sexually transmitted and reproductive tract infections
[9] USAID (2010). Tanzania service delivery guidelines for cervical cancer prevention and control. Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
[10] Wekesh, F.M; Nyakangi, V; Njagi, J & Bangha, M. (2019). Comprehensive sexuality education in Sub-Saharan Africa. Forum for African Women Educationalists. African Population and Health Research Center (APHRC). Nairobi, Kenya.
[11] World Health Organization (WHO) (2016). Global health-sector strategy on: Sexually transmitted infections 2016-2021. Towards ending STIs. Department of Reproductive Health and Research.
[12] WHO/UNAIDS (2021). Sexually transmitted diseases: Policies and principles for prevention and care.

Dr Kibani L. H, Mr Matem A. & Dr Mwangosi F, “Transmission and spread of STIs and RTIs among Youths’ in Higher Learning Institutions and Neighbors Villages in Mbeya City, Tanzania” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.280-287 January 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6133

Download PDF

pdf

Impact of Infrastructure Investment on Economic Growth in Nigeria: An Autoregressive Distributed Lag Approach

Irene Olanma Onwuemeka, Uche Collins Nwogwugwu and Emmanuel Onwuka – January 2022- Page No.: 288-298

This study examined the relationship between government spending on economic infrastructure and economic growth in Nigeria from 1989 to 2018. Real gross domestic product was used to proxy economic growth and was specified as a function of government spending on transport and communication, government spending on power and employment rate (as a proxy for the classical theory of labour force).The Autoregressive Distributed Lag Bounds method to co-integration was chosen to ascertain the impact and the long-run relationship between the dependent and independent variables. The short-run and long-run results showed that government spending on power exerted a positive but insignificant effect on Nigeria’s RGDP. However, government spending on transport and communication had a positive relationship in the short-run but negative relationship in the long-run. Furthermore, the Causality results showed a uni-directional causality running from RGDP to GEXP and EMP to GEXTC but there was no evidence to support the existence of causality between the remaining pairs of variable. It is recommended that in order for Nigeria to achieve infrastructure development success, it is important that the government redirect excessive revenue in the maintenance of government official to these pivotal sectors of the economy with a view to monitoring the implementation after disbursing funds to the affected ones to subsequently trigger economic growth.

Page(s): 288-298                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 February 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6119

 Irene Olanma Onwuemeka
Department of Economics, Renaissance University Agbani, Enugu State, Nigeria

 Uche Collins Nwogwugwu
Department of Economics, Renaissance University Agbani, Enugu State, Nigeria

 Emmanuel Onwuka
Department of Economics, Renaissance University Agbani, Enugu State, Nigeria

[1] Abu, N. and Abdullahi, U. (2010). Government expenditure and economic growth in Nigeria, 1970 – 2008: A Disaggregated Analysis, Business and Economic Journal, (BEJ) 4(2),1-11.
[2] Amadi, K., C and Alolote , I.A. (2020). Government expenditure on infrastructure as a driver for economic growth in Nigeria. Journal of International Business Researchand Marketing 5( 2), 20-26.
[3] Amassoma, D., Nwosa, P., and Ajisafe, R. (2011). Components of government spending and economic growth in Nigeria: An Error Correction Modeling. Journal of Economics and Sustainable Development, IISTE 2(4), 17-19.
[4] Arewa, A., and Nwakahma C. (2013). Macroeconomic variables and the dynamic effect of public expenditure: Long-term Trend Analysis in Nigeria. Journal of Knowledge Management, Economics and Information Technology 3(6).
[5] Aschauer, D. A. (1989). Is Public Expenditure Productive? Journal of Monetary Economics 23(2), 177-220.
[6] Charles, D., Onuchukwu, O., and Tamuno, S. (2018). Government expenditure on construction, transport and communication and economic growth in Nigeria. International Journal of Scientific Research 3(2).
[7] Ebuh, G. W., Ezike, I. B., Shitile, T. S., Eboh, S. S. and Haruna, T. M. (2019). “The Infrastructure–Growth Nexus in Nigeria: A Reassessment” Journal of Infrastructure Development 11(1–2) 41–58.
[8] Edame, G. E., Udude, C. C. and Ugwu, U. D. (2014). An analysis of public expenditure growth on infrastructure in Nigeria, 1970 – 2006. International Journal of Humanities Social Sciences and Education (IJHSSE) 1(12), 18-36.
[9] Fasoranti, M. M. (2012). The effect of government expenditure on infrastructure on the growth of Nigeria economy, 1977 -2009, International Journal of Economics Financial 4(2), 513 – 518.
[10] Furrukh, B., Hafeez, U. R. and Muhammad, Z. F. (2013). Social overhead capital and economic output in Pakistan: An ADRL Bound Testing Approach. FWU Journal of Social Sciences, Winter 7( 2), 181 – 192.
[11] Iheanacho, E. (2016). The contribution of government expenditure on economic growth of Nigeria Disaggregated Approach. International Journal of Economics & Management Sciences, 5(5), 1-8.
[12] Juma, C. (2006), Redesigning African Economies: The Role of Engineering International Development. The 2006 Hilton Lecture, Royal Academy of Engineering, U.K.
[13] Moeketsi, A. (2017). The Relationship between road infrastructure investment and economic growth in South Africa. Published M.Sc Thesis submitted to the department of Economics, North West University, Mafikeng campus, South Africa.
[14] Mayekiso, S. (2015). The impact of transport infrastructure investment on unemployment in South Africa. Published M.Sc Thesis submitted to the department of Economics, University of Fort Hare, Alice, South Africa.
[15] Narayan, P. K. (2005). The saving and investment nexus for China: Evidence from co-integration tests. Applied Economics, 37(17), 1979-1990.
[16] Nedozi, F. O., Obasanmi, J. O. and Ighata, J. A. (2014). Infrastructural development and economic growth in Nigeria: Using Simultaneous Equation. Journal of Economics,5(3),325-332.
[17] Nworji, I. D and Oluwalaiye, O. B. (2012). Government spending on road infrastructure and Its impact on the growth of Nigerian economy. International Journal of Management and Business Studies (IJMBS) 2(2), 24 – 30.
[18] Ogbaro, B. E. O. and Omotoso, D. C. (2017). The impact of infrastructure development on economic growth in Nigeria. Nigerian Journal of Management Science, 6(1), 270 – 275.
[19] Orji, K. E., Worika, I. L. and Umofia, N. (2017). The Impact of infrastructure development on Nigera’s industrial sector. African Research Review: An International Multi – disciplinary Journal, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia, 11(3), 23-30.
[20] Osundina, C. K., Ebere, C. and Osundina, O. A. (2014). Disaggregated Government Spending on Infrastructure and Poverty Reduction in Nigeria. Global Journal of Human – Social Science: Economics, 14 5.
[21] Perkins, D. H., Radelet, S., Lindauer, D. L. and Block, S. A. (2013). Economics of development (7th ed.) NY: New York, W.W. Norton and Company.
[22] Pesaran, M. H., and Shin, Y. (1999). An autoregressive distributed modeling approach to cointegration analysis. Econometrics and economic theory in the 20th century: The Ragnar Frisch Centennial Symposium. Cambridge University Press.
[23] Pesaran, M. H., and Shin, Y., and Smith, R.J. (2001). Bounds testing approaches to the analysis of level relationships. Journal of Applied Econometrics, 16(3), 289-326.
[24] Rostow, W.W. (1960). The Stages of Economic Growth: A won Communist manifesto. Cambridge University Press
[25] Wainaina, M.C. (2012), Telecommunication infrastructure and economic growth: A Case of Sub-Saharan Africa (1988-2010), Ph.D Dissertation in department of Economics Kenyatta.
[26] Waverman, L., Meloria, M. and Melvyn, F. (2005). The impact of telecommunication on economic growth in developing countries. Vodafone Policy paper series, 2, 10-24.
[27] William, A. A. (2016). The impact of transportation infrastructure on Nigeria’s economic development. Walden Dissertations and Doctoral Studies, Walden University

Irene Olanma Onwuemeka*, Uche Collins Nwogwugwu and Emmanuel Onwuka “Impact of Infrastructure Investment on Economic Growth in Nigeria: An Autoregressive Distributed Lag Approach” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.288-298 January 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6119

Download PDF

pdf

Relevance of African Indigenous Education in the Kenyan Society

John Kibwage Nyangaresi- January 2022- Page No.: 290-295

The article examined the relevance of African indigenous education in the Kenyan society. The paper emphasized on the relevance of African indigenous education’s goals to the Kenyan Society, indigenous education’s modes of transmission and its nature. The study employed descriptive research design. The target populations of this research were families living in urban areas among the Kenyan towns. The study used probability sampling (objective sampling) systematic method was employed where the respondents were randomly selected to participate in the research. The study findings ascertained that African indigenous education is relevant it terms of closely, socially linked to the people 38.71%, and focused to responding to social needs 32.26%, continuously generated from the people 22.58% and its holistic nature 6.45%. On relevance to its goals 45.16% sail it produced holistic persons, 32.26% it inspired attainment of knowledge. Similarly 32.26% confirmed its achievement of quality education. Relevancy in relation to its modes of transmission language was supported by 41.94%, followed by music 40% then proverbs and myths 20% and finally oral traditions at 15%.

Page(s): 290-295                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 February 2022

 John Kibwage Nyangaresi
Department of Educational Foundations, Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology, P. O. BOX 190-50100, Kakamega, Kenya

[1] Achi, A. (2021). African Indigenious Education . Retrieved May 11, 2021, from Researchgate: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/357050398_African_Indigenous_Education
[2] Bude, U. E. ( 1985.). Primary Schools, Local Community and Development in Africa. Baden-Baden: DSE.
[3] Cameroon, J. a. ( 1970). .Society, Schools and Progress in Tanzania 1919-1970. London: James Currey.
[4] Crenier. (1998). Characteristics of Indigenious Education.
[5] Dr Hamilton-Ekeke, J.-T. a. (2005). Relevaqncy of Indigeniuos Education. British Journal of Education, 32-39.
[6] Duit, R. (1991). On the role of analogies and metaphors in learning science. Science Education, , 75(6), 649–672.
[7] Eziobu, C. (2019). Indigeneous Knowledge and Education in Africa. Los Angeles. Los Angeles: Springer.
[8] Grenier, L. (1998). Working With Indigenous Knowledge: A Guide For Researchers. IDRC: Ottawa, Canada.
[9] Hamilton-Ekeke, J.-T. a. (2015).
[10] Hitchcock. (2018, July 21). StanFord Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Retrieved May 5, 2021, from https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/critical-thinking/#EducMeth
[11] ICDR. (1993.). “The role of culture and environment in curriculum development for primary education in Ethiopia”. In:Culture and environment in primary education. Bonn:: ZED.
[12] Mushi. ( 2009). African Indigenous education. Chicago: Adventure Works Press.
[13] Nassiuma, D. ( 2000). Survey Sampling: Theory and Methods. Njoro- Kenya: Egerton University Press.
[14] Omolewa, M. (2007). Traditional African Modes of Education: Their relevance in Modern World. International review of Education, 53(5/6), 593-612.
[15] Riedmiller, S. a. (1991). Primary School Agriculture in Sub-Saharan Africa: Policies and Practices. Germany: GTZ.: . Eschborn,.
[16] Yonah, H. O. (2013). African indigenious Knowledge Systems and Relevance of Higher Education. The International educational Journal:Comparative perspectives, 30-40.

John Kibwage Nyangaresi, “Relevance of African Indigenous Education in the Kenyan Society” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.290-295 January 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-1/290-295.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Review of Literature on Work – Life Balance

W M I Udayanganie – January 2022- Page No.: 296-299

Work-life balance is an increasingly integral concern for both individuals and corporations. An individual has been attempting to achieve balance between his personal and professional lives for decades. At every stage, the organization plays a vital role in ensuring that they have all of the resources they required support them by putting in place innovative policies and initiatives that contribute to a happier life. Many scholars have been attempting to investigate the aspects that influence work-life balance for years’ employees and employers are both subject to policies. The literature review on Work-Life Balance has been structured in light of its growing popularity, with the main goal of achieving societal prosperity and the realization of meaningful lifestyles for its employees by supporting each employee’s growth and the firms’ continued development.Employee performance, employee satisfaction, employee commitment, work stress and employee retention were all discovered in the literature. Through a study of current literature, this report gave an overview of several facets of work-life balance. All these factors are globally accepted and common to any society of employees.In this Covid – 19 pandemics the topic is well discussed in different specialize areas. Various journals, books, articles, doctorate theses, working papers, reports, periodicals, internet sites, newspapers, and other sources were referred to, and they were listed as references at the conclusion.

Page(s): 296-299                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 February 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6120

 W M I Udayanganie
Department of Interdisciplinary Studies, Faculty of Engineering, University of Ruhuna, Sri Lanka

[1] Oludayo, O.A., Gberevbie, D.E., Popoola, D. &Omonijo, D.O. (2015). A study of multiple work-life balance initiatives in banking industry in Nigeria. International Research Journal of Finance and Economics, 109- 125.
[2] Robbins, S. P. & Coulter, M. (2012). Manajemen/Management. Jakarta: Erlangga.
[3] Fisher-McAuley, G., Stanton, J., Jolton, J., & Gavin, J. (2003). Modelling the relationship between work-life balance and organizational outcomes. Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Society for Industrial Organizational Psychology, 1-26. Crossref
[4] Qodrizana, D. L., & Al Musadieq, M. (2018). Pengaruh work-life balance terhadapkepuasankerja (Studipadakaryawanperempuanyayasaninsanpermatatunggulwulungkotamalang)/ The effect of work-life balance on job satisfaction (study on female employees of the Insan PermataTunggulwulung Foundation, Malang City). Jurnal Administrasi Bisnis, Vol. 60(1), pp. 9-17.
[5] Garg, P, Yajurvedi, N. (2016). Impact of work-life balance practices on employee’s retention and organizational performance-a study on it industry. Indian Journal of Applied Research, Vol. 6(8), pp. 105-8.
[6] Lewis, S. (2000) “Restructuring workplace cultures: the ultimate work-family challenge?” Women in Management Review, Vol. 16, No. 1, pp. 21-29.
[7] Parasuraman, S. and Simmers, C.A. (2001), “Type of employment, work-family conflict andwell-being: a comparative study”, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Vol. 22, pp. 551-68.
[8] Barrera, S. (2007). Work life balance: From rhetoric to reality. Retrieved October 19, 2019, from http://www.docep.wa.gov.au/WorkSafe/PDF/Forums/worklife_balance.pdf
[9] Greenhaus, J. H., Collins, K. M., & Shaw, J. D. (2002). The relation between work-family balance and quality of life. Journal of Vocational Behaviour, 63(2003), pp. 510-531. Elsevier Science (USA)
[10] Haar, J. M., Russo, M., Sune, A., &Ollier-Malaterre, A. (2014). Outcomes of work-life balance on job satisfaction, life satisfaction and mental health: A study across seven cultures. Journal of Vocational Behaviour, 85, 361-373.
[11] Helmle, J. R., Botero, I. C., &Seibold, D. R. (2014). Factors that influence work-life balance in owners of copreneuralfirms.Journal of Family Business Management, 4(2), 110-132
[12] Au, W. C. & Ahmed, P.K. (2014). Sustainable people management through work-life balance: A study of the Malaysian Chinese context. Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, 6(3), 262-280.
[13] Shaffer, M. A., Reiche, B. S., Dimitrova, M., Lazarova, M., Chen, S., Westman, M., &Wurtz, O. (2016). Work and family role adjustment of different types of global professionals: Scale development and validation. Journal of International Business Studies, 47(2), 113-139.
[14] Anwar, J., Hansu, S. A. F., &Janjua, S. Y. (2013). Work-life balance: What should organisations do to create balance?World Applied Sciences Journal, 24(10), 1348-1354.
[15] White,M., Hill,S.,et al(2003). High-performance‘ManagementPractices, Working Hours and Work–Life Balance, British Journal of Industrial Relation, Vol.41(2), pp. 175–195
[16] Wright, P. M. and McMahan, G.C. (2011). Human resources and sustained competitive advantage: A resource-based perspective. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 5, 301–326.
[17] Boxall, P. Ang, H.S., and Bartram, T. (2011). Analysing the Black box of HRM: uncovering HR goals, mediators and outcomes in a standardized service environment. Journal of management studies, 1504 – 1532
[18] Siagian, S. (2002). Manajemensumberdayamanusia/Human resource management. Jakarta: BumiAksara.
[19] Kuswadi. (2005). Cara mengukurkepuasankaryawan/ How to measure employee satisfaction. Jakarta: Alex Media Komputindo.
[20] Fisher-McAuley, G., Stanton, J., Jolton, J., & Gavin, J. (2003). Modelling the relationship between work-life balance and organizational outcomes. Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Society for Industrial Organizational Psychology, 1-26. Cross ref
[21] Robbins, S. P. & Coulter, M. (2012). Manajemen/Management. Jakarta: Erlangga.
[22] Qodrizana, D. L., & Al Musadieq, M. (2018). Pengaruh work-life balance terhadapkepuasankerja (Studipadakaryawanperempuanyayasaninsanpermatatunggulwulungkotamalang)/ The effect of work-life balance on job satisfaction (study on female employees of the InsanPermataTunggulwulung Foundation, Malang City). Jurnal Administrasi Bisnis, Vol. 60(1), pp. 9-17.
[23] Oludayo, O.A., Gberevbie, D.E., Popoola, D. &Omonijo, D.O. (2015). A study of multiple work-life balance initiatives in banking industry in Nigeria. International Research Journal of Finance and Economics, 109-125.
[24] Aldwin, C. M. (2007). Stress, coping, and development: An integrative perspective (2nd Ed). New York: Guilford Press.
[25] Fuenzalida, C. (2007). Effect of Workload History on Task Performance. Human Factor: The Journal of The Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, 49 (2), 277-291.
[26] Erkutlu, H. V., &Chafra, J. (2006). Relationship Between Leadership Power Bases and Job Stress of Subordinates: Example from Boutique Hotels. Management Research News , 29 (5), 285-297
[27] Safaria, T., Ahmad, &Nubli, M. (2011). Role Ambiguity, Role Conflict, The Role of Job Insecurity as Mediator Toward Job Stress Among Malay Academic Staff: A SEM Analysis. Current Research Journal of Social Sciences, 3 (3), 229-235.

W M I Udayanganie, “Review of Literature on Work – Life Balance” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.296-299 January 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6120

Download PDF

pdf

The Next Normal Impact on Organizational Dynamics by Telecommuting Practices in Information Technology Industry of Sri Lanka

Ayodya S. R. Dahanayake – January 2022- Page No.: 300-303

The information technology sector is the fourth largest export earner of Sri Lanka. The output of ICT services are highly important for the economic stability of the country. The ICT sector currently services over 300 companies in different industry verticals. The export revenue of the industry was increased since 2007, USD 213 million to USD 1089 million in 2019. The ICT sector s created more than 150,000 employment opportunities in 2020, which is expected to increase over 200,000 employment opportunities by 2022. With the Covid 19 pandemic, the IT infrastructure requirements were increased island wide in all sectors. The pandemic has become an eye opener for many industries and new strategic imperatives were implemented. The pandemic encouraged most of the industries to trial telecommuting strategy and the majority of the companies moved to the remote working concept. Especially in the IT sector telecommuting has become new normal after the first wave of the corona pandemic in Sri Lanka. Most likely, most IT organizations will stick to giving their employees the opportunity of remote work even if the pandemic is over. However, there could be gaps in telecommuting practices and the productivity of employees by remote work is still questionable. This paper provides an opportunity to have a basic understanding on the gaps of the telecommuting practices and how they could affect the employee productivity. The reviews from different papers and articles on telecommuting practices at the global level and in the Sri Lankan context are also included in this study The literature review emphasize the empirical discussions related to the IT sector both internationally and locally about the challenges and the suggestions which other researchers made. Finally, the paper concludes by discussing the overall reviews and by making suggestions to overcome the situation in the long run, and also highlighting the further research areas related to the topic.

Page(s): 300-303                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 February 2022

 Ayodya S. R. Dahanayake
Doctoral Student of Business Administration, University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka

[1] Almuth McDowall, M. N. (2010). UK managers’ conceptions of employee training and development. Journal of European Industrial Training, 34(7), 601.
[2] Bandura. (2006.). Self-Efficacy: The Exercise of Control. New York.
[3] Battiston, D. B. (2017). “Is Distance Dead? Face-to-face communication and productivity in teams”. CEPR Discussion Paper.
[4] Beckmann, M. (2016). Self managed working time and firm performance: Micro econometric evidence. Center of Business and Economics.
[5] Bloom, N. e. (2015). “Does Working from Home Work? Evidence from a Chinese Experiment”. The Quaterly Journal of Economics, 122(4), 1351-1408.
[6] Bohns, V. (2017). A face to face request is 34 times more successful than Email. Harvard Busines Review.
[7] Bonet, R. &. (2017). “When the boss is away: Manager-worker separation and worker performance in a multisite software maintenance organization”. Organization Science, 28/2, 244-261.
[8] Butakhieo, L. V. (2020). The impact of working from home during COVID-19 on work and life domains: an exploratory study on Hong Kong. Policy design and practice.
[9] Collins, J. &. (2009). “The Benefits and Limitations of Telecommuting.” . Defense AR Journal, 16(1), 55-66.
[10] Dias, N. R., & Eliatamby, N. (2020, 11 1). www.themorning.lk. Retrieved from www.themorning.lk: https://www.themorning.lk/is-sri-lanka-better-prepared-to-work-from-home/
[11] Donadio, R. (2020). The Coming Setback for Women in the Workplace. The Atlantic.
[12] Etheridge, B., Tang, L., & Wang, Y. (2020). Worker productivity during lockdown and working from home: Evidence from self reports. CEPR PRESS, 118-141.
[13] Eurofound and ILO. (2017). Working anytime, anywhere: The effects on the world of work. Retrieved March 04, 2021, from https://www.eurofound.europa.eu/publications/report/2017/working-anytime-anywhere-the-effects-on-the-world-of-work
[14] Financial Times. (2020). Coronavirus may create lasting workplace change. Retrieved March 04, 2021
[15] Godart, O. G. (2017). “Trust-Based Work Time and Innovation: Evidence from Firm-Level Data”. ILR Review, 70(4), 894-918.
[16] Gorlick, A. (2020). The productivity pitfalls of working from home in the age of COVID-19. Stanford news.
[17] Iedeals J & Montellas M. (2017). The effective growth objectives of Business Models . The National Business Systems Journal of UK , 42(2017), 32 – 52.
[18] Lister, K. a. (2019). “Telework and its effects in the United States”. Edward Elger Publishing Inc., 128-170.
[19] Lupu, V. (2017). Teleworking and its benefits on work-life balance. International Multidisciplinary Scientific Conference on Social Sciences, 693.
[20] Lupu, V. (2017). Teleworking and its benefits on work-life balance. International Multidisciplinary Scientific Conference on Social Sciences, 693.
[21] Messenger, J. C. (2019). Telework in the 21st Century, An Evolutionary Perspective. ILO future work series.
[22] Minsela W. (2018). The evolution of mobile banking in related to furture banking concepts . The success factors of the digitalization and furture markets, 24(2018), 26 -29.
[23] Morikawa, M. (2021, 03 16). How does working from home impact productivity? Retrieved from World Economic Forum: https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2021/03/study-how-does-working-from-home-help-productivity/#:~:text=The%20average%20productivity%20of%20employees,people%20to%20work%20from%20home.
[24] Ozimek. (2020). The Future of Remote Work. Upwork.
[25] Sardeshmukh, S. R. (2012). Impact of Telework on Exhaustion and Job Engagement: A Job Demands and Job Resources Model. New Technology Work and Employment, 27(3).
[26] Spataro, J. (2020). Key findings about remote work: lessons from our colleagues in China. Microsoft.

Ayodya S. R. Dahanayake “The Next Normal Impact on Organizational Dynamics by Telecommuting Practices in Information Technology Industry of Sri Lanka” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.300-303 January 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-1/300-303.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Financial Management, Project Monitoring and Evaluation and Sustainability of Youth Income Generating Projects in Kiambu County, Kenya

Nyaga G. Juster- January 2022- Page No.: 304-311

For Kenya to change from middle to a developed economy, sustainable income generating projects have to be embraced. Sustainability of income generating projects has attracted support from various players in terms of educating community on techniques for financial management and tools for project monitoring and evaluation. However, majority of the income generating projects have been collapsing two years after implementation and others to not produce the expected impact to the youth, hence a need to carry out a study to determine the influence of financial management and monitoring and evaluation on project sustainability. The study was based on contingency theory to inform the relationship which exist in proper management of the projects in terms of financial and monitoring and evaluation to ensure sustainable operations. Since the population was small, all the forty-three active youth income generating projects operating in Kiambu County were targeted. For validity and reliability five youth income generating projects in Murang’a County were used for pilot testing. The questionnaire which was sent via emails to the respondents and which contained semi-structured questions were used to collect primary data. Data were normally distributed with Shapiro-Wilk test which gave significant values greater than 0.5 and VIF of less than 10 indicated lack of multicollinearity. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics mainly mean and standard deviation and the relationship was determined using multiple regression model. The study will be of beneficial to youth income generating groups’ leaders, County government funding departments and donors by enhancing knowledge on how to bridge the gaps related to financial management and monitoring and evaluation. The study found that financial management and Monitoring and evaluation have a positive effect on the sustainability of youth income generating projects in Kiambu County. The study recommended that the National and County Government agencies involved in youth empowerment should provide the youth groups with comprehensive, quality and convenient training on financial management and on project monitoring and evaluation of projects to ensure sustainable income generating projects. Frequency of monitoring and evaluation should be enhanced so as to seek feedback and arrest any problem which may lead to project failure.

Page(s): 304-311                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 February 2022

 Nyaga G. Juster
Lecturer, Management University of Africa

[1] Alexia, F. (2006). Taking a Fresh Look at Informal Finance. Informal Finance in low-income countries, Boulder: Westview Press
[2] Clarke, F. and Oswald, J. (2017). Sustainability of rural water supply. A paper presented at the 21st WEDC Conference, Kampala Uganda.
[3] Cooper, D., and Schindler, P. (2011). Business Research Methods (8th Edition). McGraw-Hill. New York.
[4] Gitonga, B. (2013). Project Monitoring and evaluation, Control and Reporting: Community Development Approach. Project support Information consultants Publications, Revised edition, Nairobi.
[5] IFAD (2017). IFAD’s Approach to Sustainability. IFAD (2017b) IFAD Strategic Framework 2017-2019. Rome, Italy.
[6] IFAD (2012). IFAD’s Approach to Sustainability: Strategic Framework 2007-2010. Rome. Rome, Italy.
[7] Kinyua, B. (2013). Influence of Management Practices on Sustainability of Youth Income Generating Projects in Kangema District, Murang’a County, Kenya. Journal of Education and Research Vol. 3 No. 2 February 2013.
[8] Kiogora, M.K (2009). Financial Records for Sustainability of Projects. University of Nairobi Press.
[9] Kothari, C.R. (2004). Research methodology: methods and techniques, (2nded.). New Delhi. New Age International (P) Limited.
[10] Landale, R. (2016). Training for Project Sustainability, Eton Press University of Bristol.
[11] Mark, M. M., Henry, G. T. and Julnes, G. (2000). Evaluation: An Integrated Framework for Understanding, Guiding, and Improving Policies and Programmes. Jossey-Bass, Inc., San Francisco.
[12] Mark, L. and Julnes, P. (2019). Financial Vulnerability among Arts Organizations: A Test of the Tuckman-Chang Measures. ‘Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly 30(2), New Orleans, LA.
[13] Massie, J. L. (2010). Essentials of Management, Fourth Edition. Prentice-Hall of India, New Delhi. University of Kentucky.
[14] Madison, N. (2009). What is financial planning? Retrieved: February 27th 2020 at 11.07am from http://www.wisegeek.com/ what- is –financial- planning. Html.
[15] Mrosek,T., Balsillie, D., Schleifenbaum, P. (2016). Field testing of a Criteria and Indicators System for Sustainable Forest Management at the Local Level: Case Study Results Concerning the Sustainability of the Private forest Haliburton Forest and Wildlife Reserve in Ontario, Canada. Forest Policy and Economics, 8, 593-609.
[16] Mutimba, S. (2013). Determinants of Sustainability of Donor Funded Projects: The Case of Selected Projects in Ganze Constituency in Kilifi County, Kenya. Unpublished Thesis, University of Nairobi.
[17] Norton B. G. (2010). Sustainability: A philosophy of adaptive ecosystem Management. Chicago: University.
[18] Nthenge, F. (2014). Factors influencing sustainability of donor funded projects: A Case of Wenje water project Tana River County, Kenya. Unpublished Thesis, University of Nairobi
[19] Sagwe, J., Gicharu, F. and Mahea, J., (2015). Influence of management practices on sustainability of youth income generating projects in Soy Sub County, Uasin Gishu County Kenya. Unpublished Thesis, University of Nairobi
[20] Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) (2011). Training for Project Development and Sustainability, Australia Press. OECD.
[21] Okwach, M. (2015). Management practices and their role on sustainability of income generating projects in Kilifi County, Kenya. Unpublished Thesis, University of Nairobi
[22] TANGO International (2008). IFAD – Design framework and supporting programmes On Sustainability, Desk review. Tucson, AR.
[23] Tucson, AR. Tembo, F. (2010). Participation, Negotiation and Poverty. Encountering the Power of Images. England. Ashgate.
[24] United nation (2018). Unlocking the human Potential for Public Sector Performance, world Public Sector Report, 2018.
[25] World Bank (2013). Financial Management. Retrieved: Jan 12, 2015 at 3.00 p.m. fromhttp://web.worldbank.org.
[26] World Bank. (2015). Guidelines for Monitoring and Evaluation for Biodiversity Projects, The World Bank, Washington DC, USA

Nyaga G. Juster, “Financial Management, Project Monitoring and Evaluation and Sustainability of Youth Income Generating Projects in Kiambu County, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.304-311 January 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-1/304-311.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Adolescents’ Sexual and Reproductive Health Behavior Amidst the Covid-19 Pandemic in Lurambi Sub-County, Kakamega, Kenya: The Impact of Prior Knowledge

Ooko, S, Okoth, A.W, Kariaga, M. G, Namazzi, E, Barasa, Achoka, J.S.K, Opiyo. A., Elizabeth Omukunda, Njeru, F., Dipondo, J. and Ursula Samoei- January 2022- Page No.: 312-322

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines adolescents as persons between the age of 10 and 19 years, a majority fitting the age-based definition of a “child” by the Convention on the Child’s Rights. Adolescents go through significant physical, physiological, and psychosocial changes from childhood to adulthood during this period. There are indications that during the COVID-19 pandemic, adolescents experienced a myriad of challenges as reported by various forms of media. These challenges included teenage pregnancies/ motherhood and early marriages amongst girls, drug and substance abuse, and other social deviancies that came with devastating consequences, notably a surge in school dropout, which shuttered their dreams for a better future. During the outreach activities by the African Women in Science and Engineering (AWSE), MMUST chapter, a gap for research in the realm of Sexual and Reproductive Health of adolescents was established, necessitating this study. The objective guided the study: To establish the adolescents’ prior Knowledge on Sexual and Reproductive Health (ASRH) and how this Knowledge shaped their behavior in the wake of the Covid-19 Pandemic. The study adopted a Mixed Methods Research (MMR) approach, drawing on the strengths of both quantitative and qualitative paradigms.
A total of 340 adolescents formed the study sample, and the sampling techniques employed were multi-stage, purposive, stratified, and simple random sampling. The data collection tools included questionnaires, interviews schedules, and Focus Group Discussions (FGDs). Data was collected on the ASRH knowledge base and their behavior within the period of the Covid-19 Pandemic. This was done conscious of the various demographic parameters that are likely to influence adolescents’ knowledge and behavior, such as parents’ level of education and occupation; Faith of the family, and the gender of the adolescent, among others. Quantitative data were analyzed descriptively and inferentially using SPSS version 20. Qualitative data were analyzed thematically and used in triangulating quantitative findings. Results showed that 90% of adolescents had Knowledge of sexual and reproductive health, an indication that there was a10% knowledge gap. Significant differences were recorded across gender (Chi=4.715, p=0.030); age (Chi=8.775, p=0.012); religion (Chi=10.204, p=0.017) and education level (Chi=14.338, p=0.008), among others. Results further showed that Knowledge on ASRH had a positive impact on adolescents’ behavior as a smaller proportion (34.3%) of those with the Knowledge engaged in sexual relationships, compared to 42.9% of those without the Knowledge. Whereas they had Knowledge of sexual and reproductive health, it was evident that this did not translate to better behavior as manifested in a surge in unsafe abortions, failure to embrace contraception, and inability to seek appropriate medical care. In this vain, the study recommends empowerment of youth through developing education programs that focus on the needs of adolescent sexual reproductive health and development and implementation of appropriate regulatory frameworks and policies to mitigate the risks and challenges adolescents encounter.

Page(s): 312-322                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 06 February 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6121

 Ooko, S
Principle Investigator, Senior Lecturer In Chemist at Masinde Muliro University Faculty of Pure Science

 Okoth, A.W
Lecturer In Mathematics at Masinde Muliro University Faculty of Pure Science Department

 Kariaga, M. G
Senior Lecturer In-Plant diseases at Masinde Muliro University Faculty of Agriculture and veterinary science and technology department of agriculture and land use management.

 Namazzi, E
Masinde Muliro University, Kenya

 Barasa
Masinde Muliro University, Kenya

 Achoka, J.S.K
Masinde Muliro University, Kenya

 Opiyo. A.
Masinde Muliro University, Kenya

 Elizabeth Omukunda
Masinde Muliro University, Kenya

 Njeru, F.
Masinde Muliro University, Kenya

 Dipondo, J.
Masinde Muliro University, Kenya

 Ursula Samoei
Masinde Muliro University, Kenya

[1] Bouma, G. D. (2016). The role of demographic and socio-cultural factors in Australia’s successful multicultural society: How Australia is not Europe. Journal of Sociology, 52(4), 759-771. https://doi.org/10.1177/1440783315584210.
[2] Czyz, E. K., Horwitz, A. G., & King, C. A. (2016). Self‐rated expectations of suicidal behavior predict future suicide attempts among adolescent and young adult psychiatric emergency patients. Depression and anxiety, 33(6), 512-519.
[3] Brown, J., Cohen, P., Johnson, J. G., & Smailes, E. M. (1999). Childhood abuse and neglect: specificity of effects on adolescent and young adult depression and suicidality. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 38(12), 1490-1496.
[4] Coronavirus disease, (2019) Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2(SARS CoV 2) is the virus that causes COVID-19.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Severe_acute_respiratory_syndrome_coronavirus_2
[5] Kiptoo-Tarus, P. (2020). Teenage pregnancy: A psychosocial burden on girlchild education in Kenya. Research Journal in Advanced Humanities, 1(2), 64-76.
[6] Geerts, R. D. (2021). Pregnancy care: a burden or a gift? The adherence to maternal health care of adolescent girls in Kenya, before and during the COVID-19 outbreak (Master’s thesis).
[7] Varga, C. A. (2003). How gender roles influence sexual and reproductive health among South African adolescents. Studies in family planning, 34(3), 160-172.
[8] Arnett, J. J. (2014). Emerging adulthood: The winding road from the late teens through the twenties. Oxford University Press.
[9] VanderStel, A. (2014). “The impact of demographics in education.”
[10] Hedayat, A., & Sinha, B. K. (1991). Design and inference in finite population sampling. Wiley. https://openlibrary.org/works/OL454474W/Design_and_inference_in_finite_population_sampling
[11] Jaguga, F., & Kwobah, E. (2020). Mental health response to the COVID-19 Pandemic in Kenya: a review. International journal of mental health systems, 14(1), 1-6
[12] Ngwacho, A. G. (2020). COVID-19 pandemic impact on Kenyan education sector: Learner challenges and mitigations. Journal of Research Innovation and Implications in Education, 4(2), 128-139.
[13] Karp, C., Moreau, C., Sheehy, G., Anjur-Dietrich, S., Mbushi, F., Muluve, E., … & Austrian, K. (2021). Youth Relationships in the Era of COVID-19: A Mixed-Methods Study Among Adolescent Girls and Young Women in Kenya. Journal of Adolescent Health, 69(5), 754-761
[14] Addae, E. A. (2020). COVID‐19 pandemic and adolescent health and well‐being in sub‐Saharan Africa: Who cares?. The International Journal of Health Planning and Management.
[15] Meherali, S., Adewale, B., Ali, S., Kennedy, M., Salami, B. O., Richter, S., … & Lassi, Z. (2021). Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Adolescents’ Sexual and Reproductive Health in Low-and Middle-Income Countries. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18(24), 13221
[16] Doyle, A. M., Mavedzenge, S. N., Plummer, M. L., & Ross, D. A. (2012). The sexual behavior of adolescents in sub‐Saharan Africa: patterns and trends from national surveys. Tropical Medicine & International Health, 17(7), 796-807.
[17] World Health Organization. (2006). Orientation programme on adolescent health for health care providers.
[18] World Health Organization. (2015). Core competencies in adolescent health and development for primary care providers: including a tool to assess the adolescent health and development component in pre-service education of healthcare providers. World Health Organization.
[19] Munro, E. R., Pinkerton, J., Mendes, P., Hyde-Dryden, G., Herczog, M., & Benbenishty, R. (2011). The contribution of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child to understanding and promoting the interests of young people making the transition from care to adulthood. Children and Youth Services Review, 33(12), 2417-2423.
[20] Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS., UNICEF., World Health Organization, & United Nations Population Fund. (2009). Children and AIDS: Fourth Stocktaking Report, 2009. UNICEF.

Ooko, S, Okoth, A.W, Kariaga, M. G, Namazzi, E, Barasa, Achoka, J.S.K, Opiyo. A., Elizabeth Omukunda, Njeru, F., Dipondo, J. and Ursula Samoei, “Adolescents’ Sexual and Reproductive Health Behavior Amidst the Covid-19 Pandemic in Lurambi Sub-County, Kakamega, Kenya: The Impact of Prior Knowledge” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.312-322 January 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6121

Download PDF

pdf

Influence of Peer Pressure and Parenting Styles on Criminal Thinking among Secondary School Students in AMAC

AMBROSE, Irene Ugochinyere, BAHIJJA, Tanko Kasim & AJAYI, Oluwabunmi Hezekiah- January 2022- Page No.: 323-331

This study examined influence of peer pressure and parenting style on criminal thinking among secondary school students in Abuja Municipal Area Council (AMAC). Using a cross-sectional survey design, 350 secondary school students in AMAC were systematically sampled as participants across Government Secondary School Gwarimpa Life Camp and Government Secondary School Jabi, (AMAC). Peer Pressure and Popularity Scale, Parental Care Scale (PCS) and Criminal Thinking Scale were used for data collection. Three hypotheses were formulated and tested using Simple Linear Regression and multiple linear regressions. Findings of the study revealed that peer pressure had significant influence on criminal thinking (R= .325, R2= .106, F (1,348) =41.200, P<.01) among secondary school students in AMAC. Result further reviewed that parenting style had significant influence on criminal thinking (R= .329, R2= .108, F (3,346) =14.032, P<.01) among secondary school students in AMAC. The result further revealed that permissive parenting style (β=.307, P<.01) had the most significant independent influence on criminal thinking followed by authoritarian parenting (β=.215, P<.01) while authoritative parenting (β=-.069, P>.01) had no significant independent influence on criminal thinking among secondary school students in Abuja Municipal Area Council AMAC. Finally, it was revealed that, there was significant joint influence of peer pressure and parenting styles on criminal thinking (R=.496, R2=.246, F (4,345) =28.127, P<.01) among secondary school students in Abuja Municipal Area Council. The researcher concluded that peer pressure and parenting styles independently and jointly influence criminal thinking among secondary school students in AMAC. The researcher therefore recommended that effort should be made by the school authority to encourage and educate students to understand people they interact with so that they will not be pressured by bad friends to think or indulge in criminal acts. Parents should be made to understand and maintain the styles they bring their children up that will help in relating with their children so as to free them from been criminally-minded.

Page(s): 323-331                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 06 February 2022

 AMBROSE, Irene Ugochinyere
Department of Psychology, Federal University, Lafia, Nigeria

 BAHIJJA, Tanko Kasim
Department of Psychology, Federal University, Lafia, Nigeria

 AJAYI, Oluwabunmi Hezekiah
Brains Specialist Hospital, Nigeria

[1] Ahigren, A. Norem, A. Hochauser, M. & Garvin, J. (1982). Antecedents of Smoking Among Pre-Adolescent. Journal of Drug Education, 12, 325-340
[2] Akers, R., & Lee, G. (1996). A Longitudinal Test of Social Learning, Adolescent Smoking. Journal of Drug Abuse, 26, 317- 343.
[3] Allen, M., Donohue, W.A., Griffin, A., Ryan, D., & Turner M. M.M. (2003). Comparing the influence of Parents and Peers on the Choice to use Drugs: A meta-analytic summary on literature. Criminal Justice and Behaviour 163-186.
[4] Ashrafa, M.U., Ahmad, A.H.B., & Talib, A.B. (2019). The Role of Parenting and Peer Pressure in the Development of Juvenile Delinquent Behaviour among Higher Secondary School Children in Punjab, Pakistan: A Proposed Framework. International Journal of Innovation, Creativity and Change. 7, (5).
[5] Baumrind, D. (1971). Current patterns of Parental Authority. Developmental Psychology, 4(1, Part 2).
[6] Baumrind, D., & Black, A.E. (1967). Socialisation practices associated with dimensions of competence in preschool boys and girls. Child Development, 38, 291-327.
[7] Beaver, K., Schwartz, J. A., Connolly, E. J., Al-Ghamdi, M.S., &Kobeisy. A. N. (2015). The Role of Parenting in the Prediction of Criminal Involvement: Findings from a nationally representative sample of youth and a Sample of adopted youth. Developmental Psychology,51(3) 301-308.
[8] Beck, A.T. (1976). Cognitive therapy and the emotional disorders. International Universities Press.
[9] Beck, A.T. (1999). Prisoners of hate: The cognitive basis of anger, hostility, and violence. Harper Collins Publishers, Inc.
[10] Brown, B.B. (2004). Adolescents’ relationships with peers. In R.M. Lerner & L. Steinberg (Eds), Handbook of adolescent psychology. John Wiley& sons Inc.
[11] Carlson, A. (2012). How Parents Influence Deviant Behaviour among Adolescent: An Analysis of their Family, Life, their Community and their Peers.
[12] Darling, N., & Steinberg, L. (1993). Parenting style as context: An integrative model. Psychological Bulletin, 13(3), 487-496.
[13] Durkheim, E. (1966). “Suicide: A Study in Sociology Translated by J.A. Spaulding and G. Simpson Trans New York. The Press 1951.
[14] Esiri, M. &Ejechi, E. (2013). ‘Area Boys Syndrome and the Upsurge of Juvenile Delinquency in Nigeria‟ In Ethnographer Vol. 11 No 3. ISSN: 1199-5223. Published by the Niger Delta Research Assessment in Collaboration with the Centre for Niger Delta Studies Niger Delta University, Wilberforce Island.
[15] Esiri, M. (2016). The Influence of Peer Pressure on Criminal Behaviour. IOSR Journal Of Humanities And Social Science (IOSR-JHSS) 21, (1),
[16] Farrington, D.P (1991). Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health volume 1.Whurr publishers Ltd.
[17] Farrington, D. P., Loeber, R., & Howell, J. C. (2012). Young adult offenders: The need for more effective legislative options and justice processing. Criminology and Public Policy, 11(4), 729–750.
[18] Hayes, A. (2020). Systematic Sampling. Corporate & financial analysis.
[19] Igbini, M.D. (2020). Insurgency in Nigeria: The Prognosis and its Effects on the NigerianPolitics. Danubius Journalshttps://dj.univ-danubius.ro/index.php/JDSR/article/view/567/838
[20] Igbinovia, P.E. (2003). The Criminal in all of Us: Whose Ox have we not Taken” An inaugural Lecture Delivered at the University of Benin, November 27th 2003 Benin: University of Benin Press.
[21] Iyoha, O. (1997). Sociological and Legal Elements of Deviance. Benin-City, Nigeria: Goboh Ventures.
[22] Lapiere, R. T. (1954). ‘Attitudes Versus Action’ Social Forces. Vol. 13
[23] Lemieux, M.V. (2020). An Exploration of the Criminal Thinking Processes in Criminal Offenders. Walden Dissertations and Doctoral Studies Collection. Walden University.
[24] Maccoby, E. E., & Martin, J. A. (1983). Socialisation in the context of the family: Parent–child interaction. P. H. Mussen (Ed.) & E. M. Hetherington (Vol. Ed.), Handbook of child psychology: Vol. 4. Socialisation, personality, and social development (4th ed., pp. 1-101). New York: Wiley.
[25] Mandracchia, J. T., Morgan, R. D., Garos, S., & Garland, J. T. (2007). Inmate thinking patterns: An empirical investigation. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 34(8),1029-1043.
[26] Musyoki, M.Y. (2017). The relationship between parenting style and crime among youths in informal settlement in Hananasif (DAR-ES-SALAAM-TANZANIA).
[27] Nisar, M., Ullah, S., Ali, M., &Alam, S. (2015). Juvenile delinquency: The Influence of family, peer and economic factors on juvenile delinquents. Applied Science Reports, 9(1), 37-
[28] Obaro, G. A. (2013). ‘Predictors and Prevention of Juvenile Delinquency’, In Nigerian South-South. Journal of Social Studies and Civic Education, Vol. 8(7). Pp 243-255.
[29] Ogbebor, G. G. (2012). ‘Youth Violence in Contemporary Nigerian Society: A Psychological Approach’. In Journal of the Nigerian Sociological Society, Vol 2, 53-59.
[30] Okorodudu, G.N. (2010). Influence of parenting styles on adolescent delinquency in Delta Central Senatorial District Abraka. Publication of institute of education, Delta state.
[31] Santor, D.A., Messervey, D., &Kusumakar, V. (2020): Measuring Peer Pressure, Popularity, and Conformity in Adolescent Boys and Girls: Predicting School Performance, Sexual Attitudes, and Substance Abuse. Journal of Youth and Adolescence.
[32] Szapocznik, J. & Brown, B. (2015). The Extent and Effects of Peer Pressure among High School Students: A Retrospective Analysis. Journal of Youth and Adolescents.121-123.
[33] Ukoji, V. N. (2006); A Study of Crime Reporting in Nigeria
[34] Walters, G. D. (1990). The criminal lifestyle: Patterns of serious criminal conduct. Newbury Park: Sage Publications.
[35] Yochelson, S. &Samenow, S.E. (1976). The criminal personality, volume I: A profile for change. Northvale, New Jersey: Jason Aronson, Inc.
[36] Yochelson, S. &Samenow, S.E. (1977). The criminal personality, volume II: The change process. New York: Jason Aronson.

AMBROSE, Irene Ugochinyere, BAHIJJA, Tanko Kasim & AJAYI, Oluwabunmi Hezekiah, “Influence of Peer Pressure and Parenting Styles on Criminal Thinking among Secondary School Students in AMAC” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.323-331 January 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-1/323-331.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Accountability during the Incorporation of Public and Private Limited Companies under Ohada Law

Merinda Afanui Sama – January 2022- Page No.: 332-337

This work sets out to evaluate the OHADA Uniform Act’s laws on accountability in Private and Public Limited Companies. Normally, laws which provide for effective
accountability, guarantee the smooth functioning and stability of companies since its rules work at averting all forms of mismanagements. The inspiration of this work stems from the realization that, levels of accountability in these companies are still wanting. Hitherto, companies are plagued with vices of obscured activities, fake transactions, non-transparent reporting and acute dishonesty by its organs. It is therefore baffling that, these are still prevalent despite the existence of the Uniform Act’s laws which contains accountability mechanism aimed at dispelling all these forms of corporate transgressions. From this arose lingering doubts as to how these laws are.
This leads one to the assumption that, these laws are not efficacious in guaranteeing the effectiveness of this aspect of corporate governance. What then are these techniques and how effective are they? This work highlights and analyses these mechanisms and evaluates the extent of their efficacy. We therefore propose that, these mechanisms be reviewed and amended to be more authoritative, unequivocal, specific, realistic and punitive such that, they will ensure better levels of rendering accountability. In consequence, these companies shall flourish, achieve their desired objectives, experience maximum productivity and generate more profit.

Page(s): 332-337                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 06 February 2022

 Merinda Afanui Sama
Ph.D. in English Law 5847
University of Bamenda, HTTTC Bambili

[1] Dickson, BRICE., (1994), ‘’Introduction to French Law,’’ London, Pitman, p.177.
[2] BorisMARTOR., et al, (2002), ‘’Business Law in Africa: OHADA and the Harmonization process’’, London, Eversheds, Kogan page LTD.
[3] Ekome, E., (2017), “Company law”, first semester lecture notes, FSMS, University ofBuea.
[4] NatalyaMOSUNOVA, (2014) ‘’ the content of accountability in corporate Governance’’, Russian law Reform, Vol. 2 University of East Anglia, https://www.researchgate.net/publication/28160660, Accessed on the 5th of August 2021
[5] Oumar SAMBE et Mamadou Ibra Diallo, (1998), ‘’Guide pratique des societes Commerciales et Groupement d’Interet Economique (GIE) OHADA’’ Dakar Editions Comptables et Juridiques.
[6] Rose, F., (2009), Nutshells, Company Law, 7th Ed., London, Sweet and Maxwell
[7] Tabe Tabe, S., (2018), Understanding OHADA Company Law in Cameroon, 1st Ed, Bamenda,
Ultranet,
[8] Modi Koko, D., (2018) “Company Law”, first semester lecture notes, FSJP, University of
Dschang
[9] Martor, B. et al., (2002), Business Law in Africa, OHADA and the Harmonisation Process,
1st Ed, London, Eversheds, 356 Pages
[10] Nah Thomas, F., (2020), “Corporate Criminal Responsibility” first semester lecture notes,
FSJP, University of Dschang.
[11] Cozam, M Viandier. A et Deboissey F.I., (1999), Droit des Societes, 12th Ed., Paris, Litec,

LOCAL STATUTES
[1] Law No. 2017/11 of 12 July 2017 to Lay down the Genera Rules and Regulations Governing public corporations.
[2] Law No. 96/06 of 18 January 1996 amending the Constitution of 2nd June 1972 revised by
Law No. 2008/001 of 14 April 2008.
[3] Law No. 99/16 of 22nd December 1999 as amended by Law No. 2017/011 of 12 July 2017
laying down general rules governing Public establishments and para-public companies.
[4] Ordinance No. 81/02 of 29th June 1981 relating to the Civil Status Registration Ordinance.
[5] Uniform Act on General Commercial Law adopted in 1998 and revised on 15th December
2010
[6] Decree No 67-236 of 23rd March 1967 on Commercial Companies
REGIONAL STATUTES
[1] Uniform Act on Commercial Companies and Economic Interest Groups adopted on 17th
April 1997, revised on 30th January 2014.
ARTICLE
[1] (Article 13 of the UACCEIG) adopted on January 3rd, 2014.
[2] Njeufack R, T., (2006), ‘‘La Règle de la majorité en droit des sociétés commerciales
OHADA’’, Annales de la faculté de Science Juridique et Politique, Universite de Dschang,
Tome.
[3] Nah Thomas, F., (2020), “Corporate Criminal Responsibility” first semester lecture notes,
FSJP, University of Dschang.

Merinda Afanui Sama , “Accountability during the Incorporation of Public and Private Limited Companies under Ohada Law” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.332-337 January 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-1/332-337.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Parenting Styles as Correlates of In-School Adolescents’ Sexual Behaviour in Cross-River and Akwa-Ibom States of Nigeria

Catherine Katanyi Oshie & Prof. Happiness, Ihuoma Igbo – January 2022- Page No.: 338-345

The study investigated the relationship between parenting styles and in-school adolescents’ sexual behavior in Cross-River and Akwa-Ibom States of Nigeria. The study looked at the prevalent sexual behaviors among in-school adolescents, the relationship between authoritative parenting style, permissive parenting style, and in-school adolescents’ sexual behaviors. Three specific objectives with corresponding research questions guided the study, and two hypotheses were formulated and tested at a 0.05 level of significance. The study adopted a correlation research design. The population for the study comprises all 68 226 senior secondary school students (SS1 to SS3) in the 722 public secondary schools in Cross-River and Akwa-Ibom States of Nigeria. The sample size for the study was 385 students who were selected using proportionate stratified and convenience sampling techniques. The instrument used for data collection was a structured questionnaire titled “Parenting Styles and Adolescents’ Sexual Behaviour Questionnaire (PSASBQ). Three experts validated the questionnaire, and its reliability was established using the Cronbach Alpha method, which yielded a coefficient of 0.79. Data collected for the study were analyzed using Means, Standard Deviation, and Pearson Product Moment Correlation Coefficient. Findings of the study revealed that the prevalent sexual behaviors among in-school adolescents in Cross-River and Akwa-Ibom States include: watching videos/movies, magazines, and pictures of naked men and women, kissing, having oral and sexual intercourse with the opposite gender, and stimulating self-genital organ for sexual pleasure. The findings also revealed that authoritative parenting style had no significant relationship with in-school adolescents’ sexual behaviors. Further, it was revealed that permissive parenting style was significantly related to in-school adolescents’ sexual behaviors. The study concluded that adoption of a parenting style like that of authoritative could lower in-school adolescents’ involvement in sexual behaviors. At the same time, permissive make in-school adolescents vulnerable to sexual behaviors that can ruin their lives. The study recommended that Counsellors establish centers for “Parenting Therapy” where parents will be acquainted with tools needed to function optimally within their family unit and bring up their children in such a manner that discourages early involvement in sexual behaviors.

Page(s): 338-345                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 06 February 2022

 Catherine Katanyi Oshie
Psychology Department, Federal Colleges of Education, Obudu, Cross River State, Nigeria

 Prof. Happiness, Ihuoma Igbo
Psychology Department, Federal Colleges of Education, Obudu, Cross River State, Nigeria

[1] Abu, P. B., & Akerele, E. O. (2016). Parental influence on adolescents’ sexual behaviour in Ibadan North Local Government Area of Oyo State, Nigeria. International Journal of African-American Studies, 5(1), 41-56.
[2] Adesegun, O. F. & Blum, R. W. (2008). Predictors of early sexual initiation among a nationally representative sample of Nigerian adolescents. Bio-Med. Central Public Health (BMC)1 – 14. doi:10.1186/1471-2458-8-136
[3] Alika, H. I., Akanni D. O. & Akanni, O. O. (2016). Parenting styles and family characteristics as correlates of psychological distress among Nigerian adolescents. International Journal of Psychology and Counselling, 8(9), pp. 102-108
[4] Amakali-Nauise, T. & Mitonga, K. H. (2016). Sexual Behaviours and Pregnancies of in School and out of School Adolescents in Kavango region, Namibia. Texila International Journal of Public Health, 4(4), 1 – 10
[5] Ankomah,A.; Mamman-Daura, F.; Omoriege, G. & Anyati, J. (2011). Reasons for delaying or engaging in early sexual initiation among adolescents in Nigeria. Adolescent Health, Medicine and Therapeutics, 75 – 84
[6] Cherry, K. (2019). Permissive Parenting Characteristics and Effects. Very well mind. Retrieved from https://www.verywellmind.com/what-is-permissive-parenting-2794957. Accessed 25th June, 2019
[7] Coley, R. L., Votruba-Drzal, E. &Schindler, H. S. (2009). Fathers’ and mothers’ parenting practices and responding to adolescent sexual risk behaviours. Child Development.80(3):808–827. doi:10.1111/j.1467-8624.2009.01299.x.
[8] Hennessey, J. (2015). Interaction Effects of Parenting Styles and Child Temperament: Motor, Cognitive, and Language Development in Children Prenatally Exposed to Alcohol (Doctoral dissertation, Duquesne University). Retrieved fromhttps://dsc.duq.edu/etd/647
[9] Inyang, M. P. (2015). Female Secondary School Adolesents sexual behaviour and school based HIV/AIDS education programmes. Journal of Research, 8(2) 55-61
[10] Kincaid, C., Jones, D. J., Cuellar, J. & Gonzalez, M. (2011). Psychological control associated with youth adjustment and risky behaviour in African American single mother families. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 20(1):102–110
[11] Kuppens, S. & Ceulemans, E. (2019). Parenting Styles: A Closer Look at a Well-Known Concept. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 28(1): 168–181
[12] Longmore, M. A., Eng, A. L., Giordano, P. C., Manning, W. D. (2009). Parenting and adolescents’ sexual initiation. Journal of Marriage & the Family, 71(4):969–982
[13] Mbua, A.P. & Adigeb, A. P. (2015). Parenting Styles and Adolescents’ Behaviour in Central Educational Zone of Cross River State. European Scientific Journal, 11(20), 355-368
[14] Oluyemi, J. A., Yinusa, M. A., Abdullateef, R., Kehinde, K. & Adejoke, J. (2017). Parental Influence on Adolescent Sexual Behaviour among Secondary School Students in Ogbomoso, Nigeria. African Journal of Social Work, 7(1): 37-43
[15] Pullack, W.S. (2004). Parents-Child Connections: New Direction for Youth Development,103, 17-30
[16] Rahman, O. A., Shahrin, N. N & Kamaruzaman, Z. (2017). The Relationship between Parenting Style and Self-Concept. Journal of Education and Social Sciences, 7(1), 190-195
[17] Shabbir, F. & Ishaq, K. (2019). Impact of Perceived Parenting Style and Emotional Intelligence on Communication Competence among Adolescents. ARC Journal of Psychiatry, 4(3): 1-21
[18] Shah, A. (2019). 4 Types of Parenting Styles and their effects on Children. Retrieved from https://everydayscience.blog/4-types-parenting-styles/
[19] Shannon, M. P., Cheryl, L. S., Ashley R. C., Hillman, B. S.,& Partridge, R.T. (2014). Maternal and Paternal Parenting Style Patterns and Adolescent Emotional and Behavioural Outcomes, Marriage & Family Review, 50:4, 342-359,
[20] Somers, C. L. & Ali, W. F. (2011). The role of parents in early adolescents’ sexual attitudes and behaviour. The Open Psychology Journal,4, 88-95.
[21] Ugoji, F. N. & Ebenuwa, E. E. (2015). Parenting styles, peer group influence as correlates of risky sexual behaviour among undergraduate adolescents. International Journal of Humanities Social Sciences and Education (IJHSSE), 2(8), 103-110
[22] Ugwu, M. P. (2011). The influence of parenting style and Gender as predictors of disposition towards antisocial behaviour. (Master dissertation, University of Nigeria, Nsukka).
[23] Uya, E. M. (2015). An analysis of causes and effects of moral value degeneration among adolescents in Nigeria. In N. Obikeze and A. K. J. Musa (eds) Adolescent behaviours: Issues and problems, pp.123-132.

Catherine Katanyi Oshie & Prof. Happiness, Ihuoma Igbo, “Parenting Styles as Correlates of In-School Adolescents’ Sexual Behaviour in Cross-River and Akwa-Ibom States of Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.338-345 January 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-1/338-345.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Why Tourism Regulation Matter to Sustainable Marine Tourism? Lesson Learnt from Berau Regency, East Borneo Province, Indonesia

Anugrah Adiastuti, Heri Hartanto, Adriana Grahani Firdaussy – January 2022- Page No.: 346-353

The development of tourism especially in marine tourism has been rocketed steadily year by year. This situation also happened in Indonesia. Supported with vast territory, oceans are central for Indonesia prosperity’s because it captures fisheries and aquaculture activities, tourism industries and activities, including marine transportation and construction. Even though the income from tourism sector is quite promising but there is a widespread consensus that tourism growth especially in marine tourism should be sustainable. A number of threats that marine tourism shall be sustained, for instance unoptimized fisheries management, human impacts to coral reefs, substantial loss of mangroves especially in coastal development area, and the crucial thing about waste and plastic litter which impacts to ecosystems, community, and all related sectors. This writing analyse on the necessity of tourism regulation that matter to sustainable marine tourism. This research uses normative legal research which is a research design that examines the aspect of theories, concepts, legal principles, and regulations/legislations where relate to certain topics of this research which mainly focus in analyzing the matter of existing regulation to maintain the implementation of sustainable marine tourism in Berau Regency, East Borneo Province. Tourism regulation is required for sustainable tourism because it endows certainty on environmental protection, as legal basis for government officers/agencies in conducting action prevention and repressive action in connection with law enforcement, provide legal certainty on authority sharing between central government and regional government, and prevent overlapping jurisdiction but alongside each other making synergy and coordination must be held by inter and intra institution. As result, regulation either from central government and/or regional government, on marine tourism especially in Berau Regency, contributes to the obedience and law enforcement of to all parties who are interconnected to tourism sector.

Page(s): 346-353                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 08 February 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6123

 Anugrah Adiastuti
Department of International Law, Faculty of Law, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Surakarta, Indonesia

 Heri Hartanto
Department of Procedural of Law, Faculty of Law, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Surakarta, Indonesia

 Adriana Grahani Firdaussy
Department of Constitutional Law, Faculty of Law, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Surakarta, Indonesia

[1] Wakimin N., Azlinaa A., Hazman S. Tourism demand in Asean-5 countries: Evidence from panel data analysis. Manag. Sci. Lett. 2018;8:677–690. doi: 10.5267/j.msl.2018.4.023; Hwang J., Lee J. A strategy for enhancing senior tourists’ well-being perception: Focusing on the experience economy. J. Travel Tour. Mark. 2019;36:314–329. doi: 10.1080/10548408.2018.1541776 www.unwto.org https://law.ui.ac.id/v3/the-role-of-indonesia-as-the-largest-archipelagic-state-in-the-world/
[2] World Bank (2021). Oceans for Prosperity: Reforms for a Blue Economy in Indonesia. The World Bank, Washington, D.C.
[3] Gössling S., Peters P., Ceron J.P., Dubois G., Patterson T., Richardson R.B. The eco-efficiency of tourism. Ecol. Econ. 2005;54:417–434. doi: 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2004.10.006
[4] Wang, L., & Zhang, H. (2019). The Impact of Marine Tourism Resources Development on Sustainable Development of Marine Economy. Journal of Coastal Research, 589–592. https://www.jstor.org/stable/26854009 https://www.iora.int/media/23919/cios-prof-attri-presentation.pdf
[5] Rumiati, A. T., Gunawan, J., & Ekasari, N., (2019). Developing Indicators to Measure Sustainable Marine Tourism Development Study Case: In Selong Belanak Village, West Praya, Central Lombok Province. PEOPLE: International Journal of Social Sciences, 5(2), 833-847. https://pusbangsdm.kemenparekraf.go.id/index.php/profil-singkat/
[6] Law of the Republic of Indonesia Number 10 of 2009 on Tourism.
[7] Law of the Republic of Indonesia Number 32 of 2009 on Environmental Protection and Management.
[8] Law of the Republic of Indonesia Number 23 of 2014 on Regional Government.
[9] Law of the Republic of Indonesia Number 32 of 2014 on Marine and Fisheries. Regulation of The President of the Republic of Indonesia Number 40 of 2017 on the Amendment to Number 64 of 2014 on Strategic Coordination on Cross Tourism Sector.
[10] Tonazzini, D., Fosse, J., Morales, E., González, A., Klarwein, S., Moukaddem, K., Louveau, O. (2019) Blue Tourism. Towards a Sustainable Coastal and Maritime Tourism in World Marine Regions. Edited by Eco-Union. Barcelona. Regulation of The Minister of Tourism of Republic of Indonesia Number 10 of 2016 on Integrated Tourism Master Plan for Regional Government.
[11] Dimas Y.N., et.al. (2019). “Smart Tourism Strategy in Increasing the Number of Tourist in Indonesia”. Advance in Economics, Business and Management Research. Volume 65. Atlantis Press. pp. 149-154. DOI=https://doi.org/10.2991/icebef-18.2019.36.
[12] Ministry of Tourism and Creative Economy of the Republic of Indonesia in cooperation with International Labor Organization. (2012). “Strategic Plan Sustainable Tourism and Green Jobs for Indonesia”. Indonesia. Regulation of The Minister of Tourism of the Republic of Indonesia Number 14 of 2016 on Sustainable Tourism Destinations Handbook. Regency Regulation Number 9 of 2017 on Berau Regency Spatial Planning year 2016-2036. Regency Regulation Number 3 of 2018 on Berau Regency Integrated Tourism Master Plan Year 2016-2031. Regency Regulation Number 16 of 2019 on the Protection oof Shark, Manta Rays, certain fishes and Coral Reefs. https://kemenparekraf.go.id/post/percepatan-pengembangan-destinasi-wisata
[13] Regent Decree of Berau Number 886 of 2015 on Governance Establishment of Derawan Destination Management Organization.
[14] Regent Decree of Berau Number 101 of 2017 on Working Group Establishment of Berau Regency Tourism Development Acceleration in 2017.
[15] Regent Decree of Berau Number 709 of 2017 on Arrangement of Mina Bestari Fishing Village Location at County of Derawan islands.

Anugrah Adiastuti, Heri Hartanto, Adriana Grahani Firdaussy, “Why Tourism Regulation Matter to Sustainable Marine Tourism? Lesson Learnt from Berau Regency, East Borneo Province, Indonesia” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.346-353 January 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6123

Download PDF

pdf

Issues in Rural Development and Management Theories: A Review

Owigho Ogheneovo and Eromedoghene Ezekiel Ovoh- January 2022- Page No.: 354-361

The notion of people’s engagement in rural development is gaining attraction in Nigeria as a key tool for mobilizing resources and organizing the rural populace to have invested interests in their own well-being. Governments at all levels, including the federal, state, and local levels, have accepted that “traditional democratic philosophy,” which promotes rural people’s active engagement in decision-making and policies implementation that touch and shape their lives, has an intrinsic mandate. This article provides a survey that reveals specific strategies to modernize and correct the rural development model based on both local and international practice. Analyzing the theoretical and Management side of rural areas’ steady development, the association between a variety of rural economy structures and rural areas’ multifunction character is discovered, necessitating the diversification of rural economies through the stimulation of numerous organizations. It has been established that the rural economy is a complex socioeconomic system, with object-subject connectivity influencing its diversification. In general, the review concludes that, in addition to emphasizing the need to compliment the theory behind the new rural development theory with new interpretations that help us with better understanding about rural development. This study establishes a different rural development definition and recommended global best practice using smart growth development as a necessary step in rural people management.

Page(s): 354-361                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 February 2022

 Owigho Ogheneovo
Delta State University Abraka, Nigeria

 Eromedoghene Ezekiel Ovoh
Delta State University Abraka, Nigeria

[1] Adisa, R. S. (2014). Rural Development in the Twenty-First Century as a Global Necessity. Ilorin, Nigeria: University of Ilorin.
[2] Anríquez, G., and Stamoulis, K. ( 2007). Rural Development and Poverty Reduction: Is Agriculture Still the Key? ESA Working Paper No. 07-02 ESA Working Paper No. 07-02June 2007
[3] Charles, J. O. (2010) Sociological Theory: A Historical Analytical Approach on Man and Society. Lagos: Serenity Press.
[4] Dudek M. (2018). Opportunities and barriers for smart rural development in Poland in light of field studies. Economic and Regional Studies 11 (4): 57-68.
[5] Ebong, M. (1991) Mobilisation of Resources for Rural Development in Nigeria, Calabar: Wusen Press Ltd.
[6] Ekong, E. E. (1988). An Introduction to Rural Sociology, Ibadan: Jumak Publishers Limited.
[7] Ekpo, A. H. (1991) “The Dialectics of Rural Development: Theory and Evidence”, Mobilisation of Resources for Rural Development in Nigeria, Calabar: Wusen Press Ltd.
[8] Ering, S. O.; Etuk, G. R; Enang, E. E. and Omono. C. E. (2012). “Facilitating rural transformation through Community Driven Development Approach: An Empirical Analysis of Community and Social Development Project (CSDP) in Cross River State, Nigeria”, International Research Journal of Humanities, 4(2) pp. 2-19.
[9] Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO). (2020). A New Rural Development Paradigm for the 21st Century. OECD. Available at http://www.fao.org/family-farming/detail/en/c/1111188/.
[10] Global Food Policy Report (GFPR). (2019). Crises in Rural Areas Threatens Progress in Hunger, Poverty Reduction; Urgent Need for Rural Revitalization, Strong Policies, and Accountability. Washington, D.C. USA: International food policy research institute(IFPRI).
[11] Guinjoan, E., Badia, A., and Tulla, F., (2016). The New Paradigm Of Rural Development. Reconceptualization Using The ‘Rural Web’ de la Asociación de Geógrafos Españoles No 71, pp 495-500Hansen, W. and Schulz, B. (1981). Imperialism, Dependency and Social Class. Africa Today. 29(3) 5-36.
[12] (IFAD), I. F. (2016). Rural Development Report: Fostering inclusive rural transformation. Rome, Italy: Quantity.
[13] Johnston, B. (1970). Agriculture and Structural Transformations in Developing Countries: A Survey of the Research. Journal of Economic Literature, 8(2), 369-404.
[14] Kata, S. ( 1986). “Rural Development Principles and Policies and management. New Delhi: Sage Publication.
[15] Madhu, I. A. (2000). Rural Markets as a factor of Rural Development in N. Sukka Region Southeastern Nigeria. unpublished Ph.D. Thesis, Department of Geography University
Nigeria Nsukka.
[16] Muoghalu, L.N. (1992). “Rural Development in Nigeria: A Review of Previous Initiatives” in Olisa, M.S.O. and Obiukwu, J.I. (eds) Rural development in Nigeria: Dynamics and strategies: Awka; Meklinks Publishers.
[17] Naldi Lucia, Pia Nilsson, Hans Westlund, Sofia Wixe. (2015). What is smart rural development? Journal of Rural Studies 40: 9-101.
[18] Okafor, F.C (1984a), “Dimensions of Community Development Projects in Bendel State, Nigeria”. Public Administration and Development, 4:249-258.
[19] Olayide, S. O. et al (1981) Elements of Rural Economics, Ibadan: Ibadan University Press.
[20] Phillips, C. (1992) Changing Communities: A Practical Guide for Rural People and Community Leaders. Rural Health Project, Uniting Church of Australia, Melbourne
[21] Singh, K. (2009). Rural Development, 3rd ed. New Delhi: Sage
[22] The United States Department of Agricultural (USDA. (2019, October 23). Economic Research Service from https://www.ers.usda.gov/topics/rural-economypopulation/rural classifications/what-is-rural/
[23] Udoye, E.E. (1992). “Grassroots Involvement in Rural Development” in Olisa, M.S.O. and Obiukwu, J.I. (eds) Rural Development in Nigeria: Dynamics and Strategies. Awka; Mekslink Publishers.
[24] Wikipedia. (2014.). Retrieved 10 02, 2021, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rural_area
[25] Wolski, O. (2018). Smart Villages in EU Policy: How to match innovativeness and pragmatism, WieśiRolnictwo4 (181): 163-179. DOI: 10.7366/wir042018/09.
[26] World Bank (1975) Rural Poverty in Agriculture, Washington D.C.
[27] World Bank (2000) Rural Poverty under Previewed: Problems and Remedies, Washington D.C.

Owigho Ogheneovo and Eromedoghene Ezekiel Ovoh, “Issues in Rural Development and Management Theories: A Review” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.354-361 January 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-1/354-361.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Strategy of Universal War:Padri War in The Face of the Netherlands inMinangkabau in 1803-1838

Abdur Rahim, Sutrimo Sumarlan, Arief Rachman- January 2022- Page No.: 362-366

This article discusses the Strategy of The Padri War in the face of the Netherlands in Minangkabau, which took place in the early 17th century, precisely from 1803 to 1838. The historical background of the Padri War began with religious and customary issues, but the final period of the Padri war on the own consciousness of the Padri and the Indigenous people turned into jointly against the Netherlands. This war became a place of resistance of the Minangkabau people against Netherlands invaders led by several prominent figures known as The Tiger Nan Salapan. The last period of the Padri war in 1830-1837, which was a war between the coalition of indigenous peoples and padri against the Netherlands, received its own assessment from the Netherlands. The Netherlands recognized that the Padri war was a difficult enough war for the Netherlands to win, and it became a record for the Netherlands that the Padri war was the longest war in Netherlands history. Guerrilla warfare strategy supported by the full force of indigenous people and Padri in the war overwhelmed the Netherlands forces, resulting in many casualties. After 35 years of Netherlands fighting against Padri forces, then Minangkabau can be controlled by the Netherlands, Tuanku Imam Bonjol as warlord Padri captured then on January 19, 1839 exiled to Ambon, then in 1841 transferred to Manado until his death on November 6, 1864.

Page(s): 362-366                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 February 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6122

 Abdur Rahim
University of Defense of the Republic of Indonesia, Bogor, West Java, Indonesia

 Sutrimo Sumarlan
University of Defense of the Republic of Indonesia, Bogor, West Java, Indonesia

 Arief Rachman
University of Defense of the Republic of Indonesia, Bogor, West Java, Indonesia

[1] Weigert and W. Hans., (1957). Principles of Political Geography, New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts
[2] Sartono Kartodirdjo., (1993). Introduction to the History of a New Indonesia: The History of the National Movement “From Colonialism to Nationalism”. Jakarta, Publisher: Gramedia Pustaka Utama
[3] Directorate General of Culture., (1978). History of National Awakening of West Sumatra Region
[4] Saifullah, et al., (2017). The Historical Cultural Link of Minangkabau and The State of Nine. West Sumatra: Indonesian Institute of Arts Padang Panjang
[5] Hendriks., (1881). Oorlogvoeren op Sumatra, Indische Militair Tijdschrif
[6] Sugiono., (2015). Qualitative quantitative research methods and R&D, Bandung: CV Alfabeta
[7] Azyumardi Azra., (2004). The Origins of Islamic Reformism in Southeast Asia: Networksof Malay-Indonesian and Middle Eastern Ulama in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries
[8] Marwati Djoened Poesponegoro Nugroho Notosusanto., (1992). National History of Indonesia. Jakarta: Library Hall
[9] Zulkifli Ampera Salim., (2005). Minangkabau in the Scattered Historical Record. PadangIndonesian cultural image.
[10] M.D. Mansoer, et al., (1970). Sedjarah Minangkabau, Library Hall. Jakarta:Bhtratara
[11] Sjafnir Aboe Naim., (2008). Tuanku Imam Bonjol: The Intellectual History of Islam in Minangkabau (1784-1832). Padang: Padang Publisher
[12] Poerwadarminta,W.J.S., (1990). General Dictionary Indonesian. Jakarta: PN. Library Hall
[13] Mhd Nur., et al, (2016).Sultan Alam Bagagar Syah Struggle Against Netherlands Invaders in Minangkabau In the 19th Century, Tabing Padang: West Sumatra
[14] Syafnir Abu Naim., (1993). Tuanku Imam Bonjol, Padang: Esa
[15] Cristene Dobbin., (1992). The Rise of Islam in the Changing Farmer Economy: Central Sumatra 1784-1847, Ter. Lilian D. Tedjasudhana, Jakarta: INIS
[16] Kahin, A., (2008). From Rebellion to Integration: West Sumatra and Indonesian Politics (1926-1998). Jakarta: Obor Indonesia Foundation
[17] Amran, Rusli., (1981). West Sumatra To Plakat Panjang, Jakarta: Sinar Harapan
[18] Azyumardi Azra., (2003). Surau Traditional Islamic Education in Transition and Modernization, Jakarta: Logos Wacana Ilmu
[19] Uun Lionar, et al., (2020). Long Plaque Until the Kamang War: Minangkabau People’s Movement Against Netherlands Colonial Taxes, Journal of Studies, Research & Development of Historical Education
[20] Ricklefs, M.C., (2008). History of Modern Indonesia (Tim Serambi, Translator). Jakarta: Serambi
[21] Perwita, Anak Agung Banyu., (2013). Introduction to strategic studies, Jakarta: Graha Ilmu
[22] Danil Mahmud Chaniago., (2020). NATIONALISM Roots and Growth in Minangkabau, Padang: UIN Imam Bonjol Padang
[23] Damsar, Indrayani., (2016). Minangkabau Socio-Cultural Construction over the Market, journal Anthropology: Socio-Cultural Issues

Abdur Rahim, Sutrimo Sumarlan, Arief Rachman, “Strategy of Universal War:Padri War in The Face of the Netherlands inMinangkabau in 1803-1838” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.362-366 January 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6122

Download PDF

pdf

Knowledge Management and Information Technology Competency of Public Universities in Rivers State

Ikegwuru, Mac-Kingsley (PhD), Elekwachi, Happiness Nwanyi- January 2022- Page No.: 367-372

The implementation of effective and efficient knowledge management practices stands as one of the most important dynamics for improving information technology competency. This dynamic has significant role in increasing information technology competence in public universities. Hence, implementation of appropriate knowledge management practices will influence information technology competency. This study therefore, investigates the influence of knowledge management on information technology competency of public universities in Rivers State of Nigeria. The target population for the study comprised all teaching staff from three universities within Rivers State. The total population of academic staff of the three universities combined as at December, 2017, was 2,517. The sample size of teaching staff studied was determined by the use of the formula developed by Taro Yamane (1967) and Krecjie and Morgan (1970). The study used simple random sampling and stratified sampling to decide on respondents from each of the universities, and a total of 365 respondents were obtained from the public universities studied. Primary data were processed using simple regression analysis, and the findings of the study revealed that, knowledge generation, knowledge transfer and knowledge codification and storage have a very strong, positive and significant influence on information technology competency. The study therefore concludes that, knowledge management significantly influence information technology competency, and recommends that university management should sensitize their teaching staff on knowledge generation, knowledge transfer and knowledge codification and storage standard being applied in their relevant institutions and channel them all the way through their profession conduit to attract an efficacious information technology competency process.

Page(s): 367-372                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 February 2022

 Ikegwuru, Mac-Kingsley (PhD)
Department of Marketing, Rivers State University, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

 Elekwachi, Happiness Nwanyi
Department of Office and Information Management, Rivers State University, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

[1] Alavi, M.L. & Leidner. D.E. (2001). Review: Knowledge management and knowledge management systems: Conceptual foundations and research issues. MIS Quarterly 25(1): 107–136.
[2] Attar, G. &Sweiss, R. (2010). The relationship between information technology adoption and job satisfaction in contracting companies in Jordan, Journal of Information Technology in Construction (ITcon), 15, 44-63.
[3] Awara, N.F., Udoh, E.G. & Anyadighibe, J.A. (2018). Information technology tools and supply chain performance of online retailers in Calaber metropolis, Cross Rivers State, Nigeria. Global Journal of Social Sciences, 17, 55-67.
[4] Bhatt, G.D. (2001). Knowledge management in organizations: Examining the interaction between technologies, techniques and people. Journal of Knowledge Management 5(1), 68–75.
[5] Bounfour, A. (2003). The management of intangibles. The organization’s most valuable assets. London: Roudlege.
[6] Bueno, E. & P. Ordoñez. (2004). Innovation and learning in the knowledge-based economy: Challenges for the firm. International Journal of Technology Management 27(6/7), 531–533.
[7] Casey, A. (1997). Collective memory in organizations. Advances in Strategic Management 14: 444–446.
[8] Choi, B., Poon, S.K. & Davis, J. G. (2008). Effects of knowledge management strategy on organizational performance: A complementarity theory-based approach. Omega 36, 235–251.
[9] Constant, D., Sproull, L &Kiesler, S. (1996). The kindness of strangers: The usefulness of weak ties for technical advice. Organization Science 7(2), 119–135.
[10] Cross, R. & Baird, L. (2000). Feeding organizational memory: Improving on knowledge management’s promise to business performance. In Strategic learning in a knowledge economy. Individual, collective and organizational learning process, ed. L. Robert, J. Cross, and S.B. Israelit, 69–90. Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann.
[11] Davenport, T.H., De Long, D.W. & Beers, M.C. (1998). Successful knowledge management projects, Sloan Management Review , Winter, 43–57.
[12] Farrell, J., Saloner, G. (1986). Installed base and compatibility: Innovation, product preannouncements and predation. American Economic Review, 76, 940-955.
[13] Gangwar, H., Date, H., &Raoot , A.D. (2014). Review on IT adoption: insights from recent technologies. Journal of Enterprise Information Management, 27, 488 – 502.
[14] Ghezzi, A., Rangone, A. & Balocco, R. (2013). Technology diffusion theory revisited: a regulation, environment, strategy, technology model for technology activation analysis of mobile ICT. Technology Analysis & Strategic Management, 25(10), 1223-1249.
[15] Hayes, N. & Walsham, G. (2003). Knowledge sharing and ICTs: A relational perspective. In Handbook of organizational learning and knowledge management, ed. M. Easterby-Smith, and M.A. Lyles, 55–77. Malden, MA, Blackwell.
[16] Katz, M. & Shapiro, C. (1986). Technology adoption in the presence of network externalities, Journal of Political Economy, 94, 822-841.
[17] Kim, Y. J., Seokwoo, S., Sambamurthy, V & Young, L. L. (2012). Entrepreneurship, knowledge integration capability, and firm performance: An empirical study. Information Systems Frontiers 14 (5), 1047–60.
[18] Krishnan, V., Bhattacharya, S. (2002). Technology selection and commitment in new product development: The role of uncertainty and design flexibility, Management. Retrieved from www.google.com. Accessed on August 3, 2021.
[19] Lee, S.M., & Hong. S (2002). An enterprise-wide knowledge management system infrastructure. Industrial Management & Data Systems 102(1), 17–25.
[20] Levitt, B. & March, J.(1988). Organizational learning. American Review of Sociology 14: 319–340.
[21] Ming-Lang, T., Kuo-Jui, W. & Nguyen, T.T. (2011).Information technology in supply chain management; a case study. Procedia-Social and Behavioral Sciences, 25, 257-272, International Conference on Asia Pacific Business Innovation and Technology Management (APBITM).
[22] Teeche, D.J. Pinsno, G. &Shuen, A. (1991). Dynamic capabilities strategic management. working paper, centre for research in management, Berkley. Teece DJ, 69
[23] Wigg, K.M. (1999). Introducing knowledge management into the enterprise. In Knowledge Management Handbook , ed. J. Liebowitz. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press.
[24] Wiig, K.M. (1997). Integrating intellectual capital and knowledge management. Long Range Planning 30(3), 399-405.
[25] Zheng, W., Baiyin, Y. & Gary, N. M. (2010). Linking organizational culture, structure, strategy, and organizational effectiveness: Mediating role of knowledge management. Journal of Business Research. 63 (7). Elsevier Inc. 763–7

Ikegwuru, Mac-Kingsley (PhD), Elekwachi, Happiness Nwanyi, “Knowledge Management and Information Technology Competency of Public Universities in Rivers State” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.367-372 January 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-1/367-372.pdf

Download PDF

pdf

Towards Achieving Quality in Distance Higher Education Teaching and Learning: Experiences from Zimbabwe

George N. Shava, Siphumuzile Hleza, Mlisa Jasper Ndlovu, Paradzai P. Makokoro, Faith Tlou – January 2022- Page No.: 373-381

Zimbabwe has managed to respond to the movement in support of UNESCO’s lifelong learning concept and strategy that seeks to widen and deepen access to higher education through distance education initiatives. Despite the significant increase in students enrolling in distance education institutions, the gold standard of excellence that is sought by many nations has gradually been compromised. There are symptoms of a downward trend in terms of quality in open distance learning institutions. The qualitative study analysed major factors affecting the provision of quality distance higher education with specific reference to the Zimbabwe Open University, the sole provider of university distance education in Zimbabwe. The study focused on three Zimbabwe Open University regional centres in Zimbabwe. The paper seeks to identify major factors contributing to the declining quality of distance education and discusses measures that distance education providers in Zimbabwe can undertake in order to promote excellence for effective learning in the 21st century. The study established that several factors are affecting the quality of distance education in Zimbabwe. The lack of Information Communication Technologies (ICTs) facilities at regional and district centres was a major hindrance to effective teaching and learning

Page(s): 373-381                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 08 February 2022

 George N. Shava
National University of Science and Technology, Zimbabwe

 Siphumuzile Hleza
National University of Science and Technology, Zimbabwe

 Mlisa Jasper Ndlovu
National University of Science and Technology, Zimbabwe

 Paradzai P. Makokoro
National University of Science and Technology, Zimbabwe

 Faith Tlou
National University of Science and Technology, Zimbabwe

[1] Archer, M. S. (1995). Realist socialist theory. The morphogenetic approach. Cambridge:
[2] Archer, M. S. (1996). Culture and agency. The place of culture in social theory. Cambridge. Cambridge University Press.
[3] Archer, M. S. (2003). Structure, agency and the internal conversation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
[4] Boeren, E., Whittaker, S., &Riddell. S. (2017). Provision of seven types of education for (disadvantaged) adults in ten countries: Overview and cross-country comparison. Brussels: European Commission.
[5] Bougley, C. (2012). Significance of structure, cultured agency in supporting and developing students learning at South African universities: available at http://rhodes.za.academia.edu/chrissieboughey/papers4462.zaacademia.Edu/chrissie Bonghey/
[6] Bourdieu, P. (1984). Distinction. A social critique of the judgement of taste. London: Rutledge.
[7] Barret, B. 2010. Virtual Teaching and Strategies: Transitioning from Teaching Traditional Classes to Online Classes. Contemporary Issues in Education Research 3(12): 17-20
[8] Bates, A.W. 1995. Technology: Open Learning and Distance Education. New York: Routledge.
[9] Bryant, A., and K. Charmaz. (2007) The Sage Handbook of Grounded Theory, London: Sage.
[10] Charmaz, K. 2006. Constructing Grounded Theory: A Practical Guide through Qualitative Research. London: Sage.
[11] A.W Chickering and Z. Gamson. 1987. Seven Principles of Good Practice in Undergraduate Education American Association of Higher Education Bulletin, March (1986).
[12] Corry, M. 2008. Quality in Distance Learning – Distance Learning 5(1): 88-91
[13] Creswell, J.W. 2009. Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Approaches. Los Angeles: Sage.
[14] Creswell, J.W. 2007. Qualitative Inquiry and Research Design. Choosing among Five Traditions. New York: Thousand Oaks.
[15] Creswell, J.W. 2014.Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods. New York: Thousand Oaks.
[16] Daiziel. C. 1994. New Connection: A College President’s Guide to Distance Education. Washington: Instructional Telecommunications Council.
[17] Elias, T. 2012. Universal Instructional Design Principles for Moodle
[18] International Review of Research in Open Distance Learning Retrieved from http://www.irrodl.org/inex.phd/irrod/article/view869
[19] Giddens, A. (1984). The constitution of society. Outlines of the theory of structuration. Cambridge. Blackwell/ Polity Press.
[20] Holton, J.A. 2010. The Coding Process and its Challenges. London: Sage.
[21] Kirkpatrick, K. P (2005) Quality Assurance in Open and Distance Learning Commonwealth of Learning Vancouver.Retrievedfromwww.col.org/colweb/webdav/site/myjahiasite/shared/doc/PS-QA
[22] Koul, B.N. 2005.Perspectives on Distance Education: Towards a Culture of Quality. Vancouver: Commonwealth of Learning.
[23] Moore M.G. and G. Kearsely. 1996. Distance Education: A System View. Belmont, CA, Washington: Wadsworth.
[24] Patton, M.Q. 2001. Evaluation in Education. London: Longman’s.
[25] Pereira, L. 2012.A Critical Realist Exploration of the Implementation of a Curriculum in Swaziland. Grahamstown: Published Doctoral Thesis, Rhodes University.
[26] Rikers, R.M.J.P. 2006. A Critical Reflection on Emerging Topics in Cognitive Load Research.Appl. Cognie. Psycho 20: 359 – 364. Doi: 10.1002/acp.1252
[27] Rodgers, P. 2009. Encyclopaedia of Distance Learning. Information Sciences References
[28] SAUVCA’s National Quality Assurance Forum. 2002. Quality Assurance in South African Universities: Views from the SUVCA’s National Quality Assurance Forum. Pretoria: SAUVCA
[29] Silverman, D. 2014. Interpreting Qualitative Data. London: Sage.
[30] Simonson, M.2012. Teaching and Learning at a Distance: Foundations of Distance Education. Boston: Pearson.
[31] Simonson, M., C. Schlosser and A. Orellana. 2011. Distance Education Research: a Review of the Literature. Journal of Computing in Higher Education. 23 (2-3), 124-142. Doi: http://dx.doc.org/10.1..7/512525-011-9045-8
[32] Willis, B. 1993.Distance Education: A practical guide. New York: Educational Technology Publication, Inc Englewood Cliffs.

George N. Shava, Siphumuzile Hleza, Mlisa Jasper Ndlovu, Paradzai P. Makokoro, Faith Tlou “Towards Achieving Quality in Distance Higher Education Teaching and Learning: Experiences from Zimbabwe” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.373-381 January 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2021.51219

Download PDF

pdf

Life in a Pandemic: Some Reflections from The Plague (1947) and the COVID-19 Pandemic

Melchor L. Cuizon, Nympha C. Cuizon- January 2022- Page No.: 382-385

Human existence is a continual struggle against various kinds of calamities including infectious diseases like the COVID-19 virus that threatens the vulnerability of human life. It has affected humanity throughout the globe who are either hungry due to financial crisis or hospitalized or even killed because of the virus infections. This enduring threat continues to persist as long as the holding sway of the coronavirus remains unresolved. It is no accident that the pandemic of the century mirrors The Plague (1947) of Albert Camus in which both catastrophic events challenged the social order and the vulnerability of human life. Although the health crisis exists in a different period in the history of mankind, nevertheless, the existential crisis it has created has no different. This paper aims to (1) highlight some of the similar events in both pandemics and (2) argue that the pandemic can be an avenue for religious introspection.

Page(s): 382-385                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 08 February 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6124

 Melchor L. Cuizon
Department of Social Sciences, Central Luzon State University, Philippines

 Nympha C. Cuizon
Department of Social Sciences, Central Luzon State University, Philippines

[1] Aruta, J.J.B.R. (2020). Socio-ecological determinants of distress in Filipino adults during COVID-19 crisis. Springer Science & Business Media. doi.org/10.1007. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12144-020 01322-x.
[2] Baker, J., Martí, G., Braunstein, R., Whitehead, A. L., & Yukich, G. (2020). Religion in the age of social distancing: How COVID-19 presents new directions for research. Sociology of Religion, 81(4), 357– 370. https://doi.org/10.1093/socrel/sraa039.
[3] Bednarik, J. O.F.M. (2013). Catholic Social Teachings on Solidarity. The Diocese of Harrisburg. https://www.hbgdiocese.org/catholic-social-teaching-on solidarity/.
[4] Belghazi, T., Maarouf, M., & Maarouf, F. (2020). Covid – 19: A Critical Ontology of the present. Educational Philosophy and Theory. doi:10.1080/00131857.2020.1757426.
[5] Bernstein, J., Hutler, B., Rieder, T., Fade, R., Han, H., & Barnhill, A. (2020). An ethics framework for the Covid-19 reopening process. Johns Hopkins University. https://bioethics.jhu.edu/research-and-outreach/covid-19.bioethics-expert-insights/resources-for-addressing-key-ethical. areas/grappling-with-the-ethics-of-social-distancing/.
[6] Bonk, R. J. (2010). Medicine as an Absurdist Quest in Albert Camus’ The Plague. pp.1-22. http://www.ea-journal.com/art2.1/Medicine-as-an-Absurdist Quest.pdf
[7] Buenaventura, R.D., Ho, J., Lapid, M. (2020). COVID-19 and mental health of older adults in the Philippines: a perspective from a developing country. International Psychogeriatric Association. doi:10.1017/S1041610220000757.
[8] Camus, A. (1947). The Plague. (S. Gilbert, Trans.). The Modern Library Colleg Editions.
[9] Cupich, B. (29 May 2020). Why do we pray during a global pandemic. Vatican News. L’Osservatore Romano. https://www.vaticannews.va/en/church/news/2020-05/prayer-during-global-pandemic-cardinal-blase-cupich.html.
[10] Cummins, R. (2021) How the Pandemic Plans Unfold in The Truth about COVID-19: Exposing The Great Reset, Lockdowns, Vaccine Passports, and the New Normal. Joseph Mercula, Ronnie Cummins, and Robert F. Kennedy Jr. Chelsea Green Publishing, London.
[11] Del Castillo, F., Del Castillo, D., & Corpuz, J.C. (2021). Dungaw: Re‑imagined Religious Expression in Response to the COVID‑19 Pandemic. Journal of Religion and Health. Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-021-01266-x.
[12] Estadilla, L. (2020). Community quarantine in the Philippines. Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics. Vol. 30 (5) pp. 254 – 255. https://philpapers.org/rec/ESTCQI.
[13] Genalyn K. (2020, March 20). “Duterte admits Luzon already in ‘lockdown’, stresses ‘it will effectively kill COVID-19’. Manila Bulletin, https://news.mb.com.ph/2020/03/20/duterte-admits-luzon-already-in-lockdownstresses-it-will-effectively-kill-covid-19/.
[14] Haleem, A., Vaishya, R., & Javaid, M. (2020). Effects of COVID-19 pandemic in daily life, Current Medicine Research and Practice, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmrp.2020.03.011.
[15] Heidegger, M. (1977). The Question Concerning Technology. The Question Concerning Technology and Other Essays. William Lovitt (Trans.) New York: Harper Colophon Books. p. 26.
[16] https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/feb/08/if-china-valued-free-speech there-would-be-no-corona-virus-crisis.
[17] Heynders, O. Perpectives on the Common: The Input of Literature in The New Common: How the COVID-19 Pandemic is Transforming Society edited by Emile Aarts, Hein Fleuren, Margriet Sitskoorn andTon Wilthagen. Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-65355-2.
[18] Honigsbaum, M. (2019). The Pandemic Century: A History of Global Contagion from the Spanish Flu to Covid-19. Penguin Random House, UK. p.273.
[19] Judt, Tony. (2001). On the plague. November 29, 2001 issue. https://www.nybooks.com/articles/2001/11/29/on-the-plague/ p.2
[20] Muthulekshmi, B. & Indu, A.S. (2020). Crisis Across Cultures: A study on the Disruption of Social Order over Centuries based on Camus’s The Plague and Covid – 19. Psychology and Education 57 (9): 5614-5623 ISSN: 00333077.
[21] Pope Francis (2020) Life After the Pandemic. Card. Michael Czemy (Preface). Libreria Editrice Vaticana. www.libreriaeditricevaticana.va.
[22] Puyat, J., Conaco, M.C., Natividad, J., & Banal, M.A. (2020). Depressive symptoms among young adults in the Philippines: Results from a nationwide cross-sectional survey. Journal of Affective Disorders Reports journal www.elsevier.com/locate/jadr. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadr.2020.100073.
[23] Schwab, C., & Malleret, T. (2020). Covid – 19: The Great Reset. Forum Publishing, Cologny/Geneva Switzerland.
[24] Szoltyzek, Jacek. (2020). Mobility in Post – Pandemic City: Subjective Considerations Based on Observations and The Plague by Albert Camus. Journal of Regional and City Planning. Vol. 31, no. 3, page. 301-317. doi: 10.5614/jpwk.2020.31.3.5.
[25] Vallejo, B., & Ong, R. (2020). Policy responses and government science advice for the COVID 19 pandemic in the Philippines. Progress in Disaster Science. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pdisas.2020.100115.
[26] Wagner, Stephen I. (2020) “Rereading Albert Camus’ The Plague During a Pandemic: Of Plagues and Nazis: Camus’ Journey from Moral Nihilism,” The Journal of Social Encounters: Vol. 4: Iss. 2, 103-106. Available at: https://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/social_encounters/vol4/iss2/10.
[27] World Health Organization. Health Emergency Dashboard. Covid – 19 Homepage. https://covid19.who.int/region/wpro/country/ph. https://covid19.who.int/
[28] Zizek, S. (2020). Pandemic: Covid – 19 shakes the world. OR Books, London.

Melchor L. Cuizon, Nympha C. Cuizon, “Life in a Pandemic: Some Reflections from The Plague (1947) and the COVID-19 Pandemic” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.382-385 January 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6124

Download PDF

pdf

The Work of Attracting Vietnamese Intellectuals Abroad in the Innovate Period in Vietnam

Dr. Nguyen Thi Hong Mai, Dr. Mai Quoc Dung – January 2022- Page No.: 386-391

Inheriting and promoting the long and fine tradition of the nation that considers “genius as the national spirit”, Vietnam has adopted appropriate guidelines and policies to gather, unite, build and develop strongly promote the role of intellectuals, including Vietnamese intellectuals abroad, creating conditions and motivation for them to freely research, create and contribute. The results achieved in the work of attracting and promoting the resources of Vietnamese intellectuals abroad in the past time have confirmed the right direction of Vietnam, but there are still limitations barrier. That situation needs to be frankly recognized, in order to set out appropriate policies, further promote the achieved results, and overcome limitations and barriers.

Page(s): 386-391                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 08 February 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6125

 Dr. Nguyen Thi Hong Mai
Ho Chi Minh National Academy of Politics, Vietnam

 Dr. Mai Quoc Dung
Ho Chi Minh City University of Food Industry, Vietnam

[1] Communist Party of Vietnam (1993). Resolution No. 08 NQ/TW on the Work of mobilizing overseas Vietnamese.
[2] Communist Party of Vietnam (2004). Resolution No. 36-NQ/TW on Working with overseas Vietnamese.
[3] Communist Party of Vietnam (2008). Resolution No. 27-NQ/TW on Building a contingent of intellectuals in the period of accelerating industrialization and modernization of the country.
[4] Communist Party of Vietnam (2015). Directive No. 45-CT/TW on Continuing to accelerate the implementation of Resolution No. 36 of the IX Politburo on work with overseas Vietnamese in the current situation new.
[5] Communist Party of Vietnam (2019). Resolution No. 52-NQ/TW on a number of Undertakings and policies to actively participate in the Fourth Industrial Revolution.
[6] Dan T.T.D. (1997). Overseas Vietnamese, National Political Publishing House, Hanoi.
[7] Diep T. (2020). 5 years of implementing Directive 45-CT/TW: Attracting overseas intellectual resources, https://baotintuc.vn/thoi-su/5-nam-thuc-hien-chi-thi -45cttw-thu-hut-nguon-luc-tri-thuc-kieu-bao-20201127102649373.htm
[8] Dung M.Q. (2018). Overseas Vietnamese are an integral part and resource of the Vietnamese ethnic community, Journal of Education and Society, pp. 85-88
[9] Dung M.Q. (2021). Promoting the intellectual resources of overseas Vietnamese in the process of building a Constructive Government, Journal of Political Theory, pp. 81-85.
[10] Government of Vietnam (2014). Decree No. 87/2014/ND-CP Regulating the attraction of individuals in science and technology activities who are overseas Vietnamese and foreign experts to participate in scientific activities and technology in Vietnam.
[11] Government of Vietnam (2020). Decree No. 27/2020/ND-CP in which amending and supplementing a number of articles of the Government’s Decree No. 87/2014/ND-CP on attracting individuals to work science and technology activities are overseas Vietnamese and foreign experts participating in science and technology activities in Vietnam.
[12] Linh K. (2020). Promoting work for overseas Vietnamese in the new situation, https://dangcongsan.vn/nguoi-viet-nam-o-nuoc-ngoai/day-manh-cong-tac-doi-voi-nguoi-viet-nam-o-nuoc-ngoai-trong-tinh-hinh-moi-568517.html
[13] Ngoc D. (2020). “5 things missing” in attracting overseas intellectuals, https://nld.com.vn/thoi-su/5-cai-thieu-trong-thu-hut-tri-thuc-kieu -bao-20201127065348475.htm
[14] Thang V. (2020). Attracting overseas intellectuals in “key spear” fields, http://daidoanket.vn/thu-hut-tri-thuc-kieu-bao-o-cac-linh-vuc- mui-nhon-525085.html
[15] Vui T.T. (2017). Policy of the Party and State towards overseas Vietnamese in the innovate period, Political Theory Publishing House.

Dr. Nguyen Thi Hong Mai, Dr. Mai Quoc Dung , “The Work of Attracting Vietnamese Intellectuals Abroad in the Innovate Period in Vietnam” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.386-391 January 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6125

Download PDF

pdf

Does External Debts Promote Sustainable Economic Development in Developing Countries?

James Daniel Chindengwike- January 2022- Page No.: 392-400

External debts is one of the major sources of revenue to developing nations that normally do not have an enough industrial support and is illustrated by a small human development index. The aim of this paper is to test whether external debts promote sustainable economic development in developing countries or not. The study opted a time series data research design where by secondary data were used. This study used economic data from 1999-2020 financial years (Quarterly data). The study involved 80 observations. Kenya was purposively sampled to be used as research area of this study. The data collected from different reliable sources which included the International Financial Statistics (IFS), World Bank’s Statistical Database, The Treasury of Kenya, Ministry of Devolution and Planning and the Kenya National Bureau of Statistics. The results of the study revealed that there is long – term associations between external debts and sustainable economic development with P- Value of 0.0001. Another finding revealed that there is statistical significantly in all other macro-economic variables in the predictable direction with P- Value of 0.0011, except broad inflation and money that have vague signs. In short-run revealed that external debts affect statistically significance economic development with a negative direction P- Value of 0.0064. The study recommends that the government should think about adopting other sources of finance articulate via taxation and reduce borrowing outside to minimize assistance from developed nations. The government should also assign extra resources to savings in human capital education as efficiently labor has the effect of promoting sustainable economic development crosswise all models in the short run. Particularly population expansion rate should be proscribed through increasing utilize of social services such as family planning or sensitization to reduce support pressure on imperfect resources which deject economic development.

Page(s): 392-400                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 10 February 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6126

 James Daniel Chindengwike
,Department of Finance, Accounting and Economics, Faculty of Commerce and Business Studies, St. John’s University of Tanzania – Dodoma, Tanzania

[1] Dalton, P. S., Ghosal, S., & Mani, A., “Poverty and Aspirations Failure,” The Economic Journal, vol. 26, no. 590, pp. 165-188, 2016.
[2] Darma, N. A., “The Impact of Nigeria’s Debt Stock and its Servicing on Social ServicesProvision:1980-2010,” Journal Developing Country Studies, vol.4, no.10, pp. 187-19, 2014.
[3] Girma, P. H., “The Impact of Foreign Aid on Economic Growth: Empirical Evidence from Ethiopia (1974-2011) Using ARDL Approach, “Journal of Research in Economics and International Finance (JREIF), vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 1-12, 2015.
[4] Irungu, J., “Household food security in semi-arid Africa, the contribution of participatory adaptive research and development to rural livelihoods in Eastern Kenya,” Journal of Food Policy, vol. 24, no.4, pp. 363-390, 2016.
[5] Kanbur, R., “The Economics of International Aid,” Handbook of the Economics of Giving, Altruism and Reciprocity, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 1559-1588, 2016.
[6] Lin, J. Y., “New Structural Economics: A Framework for Rethinking Development 1,” The World Bank Research Observer working Paper, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 193-221, 2011.
[7] Matelis, A., & Huettinger, M., “Effects of external financial debt on various economic sectors in Latin America, “Master’s Thesis, ISM University of Management and Economics, pp. 5-39, 2014.
[8] Najeb, M., “A Contribution to the Theory of Economic Growth: Old and New.” Journal of Economics and International Finance, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 20- 47, 2014.
[9] Nwanne, T. F. I., & Richard, E. O., Assessing the Effect of External Debt Servicing andReceipt on Exchange Rate in Nigeria., “International Journal of Economics and Finance, vol.7, no. 9, pp. 225- 278, 2015.
[10] Okonkwo, C. S., &Odularu, G. O., External Debt, Debt Burden and Economic Growth Nexus: Empirical Evidence and Policy Lessons from Selected West African Countries,” International Journal of Economics &Business Studies, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 23-86, 2013.
[11] Refaei, R., & Sameti, M., “Official Development Assistance and Economic Growth inIran, International Journal of Management, Accounting and Economics, vol. 2, no.1, pp. 125-13, 2015.
[12] Seiber,M.J., “InternationalBorrowingbyDevelopingCountries:PergamumPolicyStudieson International Development. Elsevier Publisher, vol 2, no.1 pp. 2-9, 2013.
[13] Sulaiman ,L.A.,&Azeez, B.A., “Effect of External Debt on Economic Growth of Nigeria,” Journal of Economics and Sustainable Development, vol. 3, no. 8, pp.71-79, 2012.
[14] Tasew, P. H., “The Impact of Foreign Aid on Economic Gowth: Empirical Evidence from Kenya (1974-2011) usingARDLapproach.JournalofResearchinEconomicsandInternationalFinance(JREIF), vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 1-12, 2015.
[15] Tavakol, M., & Dennick, R., “Making Sense of Cronbach’s Alpha, “International Journal of Medical Education, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 53-55, 2011.
[16] Uma, K., Eboh, F., & Obidike, P., “Debt and Debt Service: Implications on Nigerian Economic Growth,” Asian Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 42-54, 2013.
[17] Yusuf, S and Said, O.A., “Public Debt and Economic Growth: Evidence from Tanzania,” Journal of Economics, Management and Trade, vol. 21, no. 7, pp. 1-1, 2018
[18] Tyagi Ruchi., Vishwakarma S., Alexandrovich Z.S., Mohammed S. (2020). ICT Skills for Sustainable Development Goal 4. In: Leal Filho W., Azul A.M., Brandli L., Özuyar P.G., Wall T. (eds) Quality Education. Encyclopedia of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Springer, Cham. DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-95870-5_39
[19] Tyagi R., Vishwakarma S., Yadav S.S., Stanislavovich T.A. (2021) Community Self-Help Projects. In: Leal Filho W., Azul A.M., Brandli L., Lange Salvia A., Özuyar P.G., Wall T. (eds) No Poverty. Encyclopedia of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-95714-2_28
[20] Tyagi R., Vishwakarma S., Singh K.K., Syan C. (2020) Low-Cost Energy Conservation Measures and Behavioral Change for Sustainable Energy Goal. In: Leal Filho W., Azul A.M., Brandli L., Lange Salvia A., Wall T. (eds) Affordable and Clean Energy. Encyclopedia of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-71057-0_155-1
[21] Tyagi R., Vishwakarma S., Rishi M., Rajiah S. (2021) Reducing Inequalities Through Education and Skill Development Courses. In: Leal Filho W., Azul A.M., Brandli L., Lange Salvia A., Özuyar P.G., Wall T. (eds) Reduced Inequalities. Encyclopedia of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-71060-0_102-1
[22] Tyagi, Ruchi K and Vasiljevien, Nijole (2013) The case of CSR and irresponsible management practices. Competitiveness Review. 23(4/5):372-383. https://doi.org/10.1108/CR-03-2013-0031. Available online at https://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.1108/CR-03-2013-0031/full/html
[23] Tyagi R. (2012) Meerut Embroidery Cluster: A Case Study. South Asian Journal of Business and Management Cases. 1 (2): 185-202. SAGE Publications Sage India: New Delhi, India. Available online at https://doi.org/10.1177/2277977912459445
[24] Vishwakarma, S. and Tyagi, R. (2017), “post-reforms training needs of frontline managers in Indian power distribution companies: A top managers’ perspective”, International Journal of Energy Sector Management. 11(3): 416-425.https://doi.org/10.1108/IJESM-02-2016-0001. Accessed at https://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.1108/IJESM-02-2016-0001/full/html

James Daniel Chindengwike, “Does External Debts Promote Sustainable Economic Development in Developing Countries?” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-1, pp.392-400 January 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6126

Download PDF

pdf