Socio-Economic Impacts of Farin Ruwa Waterfall Ecotourism Development in Nasarawa State, Nigeria

Bashayi Obadiah, Bridget Angbashim, Francisca Jacob Dayang – November 2022- Page No.: 01-10

Tourism is a global scale industry with growing impact on the environment which provides new opportunities, when giving attention and developed can generate substantial economic benefits to a nation. Farin Ruwa waterfall has great ecotourism potentials that will contribute more to the socio-economic welfare of the inhabitants and the State but is yet to be fully developed. This study seeks to assess the socio-economic impacts of the waterfall on Farin Ruwa areas in Nasarawa State and examine the problems with the development of the area as attraction centre. Two communities were selected for this study with 3601 projected population from 1991 census to 2021. Yamane’s formula was used and sample size of 280 was drawn from Marhai community which constitute 107 sampled respondents and Massenge community which constitute 173 sampled respondents for the study. The descriptive survey research design was used for the study. Data were collected on a 5- point lykert scale through questionnaire administration in the area. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the Chi- square statistical tool was used in testing the hypothesis formulated while mean ranking method was used to find out the level of impacts. Findings from the study revealed that tourism will bring about positive socio-economic development to the area with 57% representing respondents that agreed to that while on the negative impacts, 54% agreed that tourism development bring negative impacts on the study area. The result of the first hypothesis tested showed that the calculated Chi-Square value of 86.318 was greater than the table value of 36.415, therefore, there is significant positive impact of tourism on the socio-economic development of the area while the second hypothesis shows that the calculated Chi-Square value of 11.651 was less than the table value of 36.415, therefore, there is no significant negative impact on the socio-economic development of area. The results of the mean ranking shows that economic growth and poverty reduction ranked first as the positive impacts of ecotourism development. The study also reveals the poor state of infrastructures and services provided in the areas such as roads, electricity supply and water supply at the site. The study recommends that Government, individuals and corporate organizations such as NGOs should take active part in the development of Farin Ruwa ecotourism to stimulate infrastructural development. Public-private partnership should be adopted for development and management of the ecotourism. Finally, Ministry of culture and tourism should provide the site with tourism facilities as well as making the centre a film village resort.

Page(s): 01-10                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 November 2022

 Bashayi Obadiah
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Isa Mustapha Agwai I Polytechnic, Lafia, Nigeria

 Bridget Angbashim
Department of Leisure and Tourism Management, Isa Mustapha Agwai I Polytechnic, Lafia, Nigeria

 Francisca Jacob Dayang
Department of Catering and Hospitality Management, Isa Mustapha Agwai I Polytechnic, Lafia, Nigeria

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Bashayi Obadiah, Bridget Angbashim, Francisca Jacob Dayang “Socio-Economic Impacts of Farin Ruwa Waterfall Ecotourism Development in Nasarawa State, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.01-10 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/01-10.pdf

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Efforts to Improve Cross-Cultural Competencies and Resiliency for Peacekeepers and Their Families in the United Nations Peacekeeping Mission in Lebanon (UNIFIL)

Ridha Ayu Rachmawati, I Dewa Ketut Kerta Widana, I Gede Sumertha Kusuma Yanca, Herlina Juni Risma Saragih – November 2022- Page No.: 11-20

The Government of the Republic of Indonesia carries out a free and active foreign policy, therefore the Government of Indonesia has always actively participated in efforts to maintain world peace under the banner of the United Nations. This study aims to analyze about: a) how Indonesia’s Participation in the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) Mission; b) Approach Program Through Cross-Cultural Competence for Peacekeepers in UNIFIL’s Mission; and c) Resilience Improvement Program for Peacekeepers and Their Families in UNIFIL Mission. The research method used is qualitative with data collection techniques through interviews with informants and literature studies. The results of the study prove that (1) Indonesia has actively participated in maintaining world peace which is the embodiment of the 4th Paragraph of the Preamble to the 1945 Constitution of the Republic of Indonesia (UUD NRI 1945). (2) These obstacles and challenges are caused by differences in Cross-Cultural Competence and Cultural Intelligence, both of which are closely related. Cultural Intelligence (Cultural Intelligence) consists of Mental Ability and Behavioral Ability. Mental abilities include metacognitive intelligence, cognitive intelligence, and motivational intelligence. Meanwhile, Behavioral Ability is behavioral intelligence. Cross-Cultural Competence can be improved through experience (experience), training (training), education (education), self-development (self-development); and (3) To increase the peacekeeper’s resilience, there are 4 (four) efforts, namely practical handling of stressors, cognitive or internal strategies, stress reduction supported by the situation and environment, and personal approach. There must be additional Cross-Cultural Competence training by the United Nations for peacekeepers (civil and military) in every UN peacekeeping mission around the world. The importance of creating a Family Resilience program for peacekeeper families, such as FOCUS in the United States, which can reduce stress levels and other problems so that the performance of peacekeepers in carrying out their duties becomes more qualified and effective in order to maintain international peace and security.

Page(s): 11-20                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 November 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61101

 Ridha Ayu Rachmawati
National Security Faculty, Republic of Indonesia Defense University, Indonesia

 I Dewa Ketut Kerta Widana
National Security Faculty, Republic of Indonesia Defense University, Indonesia

 I Gede Sumertha Kusuma Yanca
National Security Faculty, Republic of Indonesia Defense University, Indonesia

 Herlina Juni Risma Saragih
National Security Faculty, Republic of Indonesia Defense University, Indonesia

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Ridha Ayu Rachmawati, I Dewa Ketut Kerta Widana, I Gede Sumertha Kusuma Yanca, Herlina Juni Risma Saragih “Efforts to Improve Cross-Cultural Competencies and Resiliency for Peacekeepers and Their Families in the United Nations Peacekeeping Mission in Lebanon (UNIFIL) ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.11-20 November 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61101

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Public Participation Determinants and Implementation of Constituency Development Fund Projects for Public Schools in Kasipul Constituency, Homabay County- Kenya

Lawi Oloo Olwa, Dr. Andrew Nyang’au – November 2022- Page No.: 21-42

Constituency development fund in Kenya was introduced in the year 2003 which was later amended in 2007 through CDF Act. This Act stated that 2.5% of GDP be sent to constituency for development projects. Also the Act stated that 5% be used for administration purposes by the CDF board, 95 % to be allotted as follows: three quarters allotted equally among the 290 constituencies, 25% to poverty index constituencies. The purpose of the study was to determine the determinants of public participation and their effects on implementation of constituency development fund school projects in Kasipul constituency, Homabay County. It was guided based on the following objectives: To determine the effects of economic determinants of public participation on constituency development fund school projects, to find out the effects of social-cultural determinants of public participation on constituency development fund school projects, to examine the effects of political determinants of public participation on constituency development fund school projects and to measure the effects of technological determinants of public participation on constituency development fund school projects. The study was anchored on Agency theory and Resource based theory. The target population for the study was 183,340 consisting of CDF funds manager, locational chiefs, assistant chiefs, constituency development fund committee, government representatives, school heads in both primary and secondary schools and the general public. This study adopted a descriptive and correlational research designs. Stratification sampling technique was used to obtain a sample size for the study. The sample size for the study was 400. A five point Likert closed questionnaires was used to collect primary data. Piloting was done in Karachuonyo Sub County to test reliability. 40 closed questionnaires were issued to CDF projects managers, CDF committee members, local administration, sub-location, school heads, government representatives and project beneficiaries in Karachuonyo sub County to test Reliability. Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was used to determine the reliability of the research tool. Collected data was analyzed through mean, standard deviation and regression and correlation analyses. Analyzed data was presented in tables and figures. The study established that Schools in Kasipul constituency have enough infrastructure and facilities. In addition, the study found out that economic determinants had a positive and significant relationship with public participation in CDF school projects (r = .157, p =.002< 0.05). The study established that political determinants had a significant and positive effect on constituency development fund school projects r=.557 t=6.159, P=.000< 0.05. The study further found out that some projects initiated in schools by NG-CDF in Kasipul constituency conflicts social-cultural beliefs. The study concluded that NG-CDF school projects in Kasipul constituency were distributed according to the political support MP gets during general elections. Additionally, the study concluded that political determinants had a positive and significant relationship with public participation on CDF school projects. The study recommended that CDF school projects should be equitably and evenly distributed in Kasipul constituency without considering political support received or to be received but for the greatest common good of all people in Kasipul constituency. The study recommended that NG-CDF management in Kasipul constituency should provide technological means of receiving views from members of the public on the projects they intend to initiate in schools within Kasipul constituency. Technology would ensure timely dissemination of information to the public as well as views collection.

Page(s): 21-42                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 November 2022

 Lawi Oloo Olwa
Department of Management, School of Business and Economics, Mount Kenya University, Kenya

 Dr. Andrew Nyang’au
Department of Accounting and Finance, School of Business and Economics, Kisii University, Kenya

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Lawi Oloo Olwa, Dr. Andrew Nyang’au, “Public Participation Determinants and Implementation of Constituency Development Fund Projects for Public Schools in Kasipul Constituency, Homabay County- Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.21-42 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/21-42.pdf

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Some Problems of The Learning Society in Vietnam in The Current Period

Nguyen Phuoc Trong – November 2022- Page No.: 43-46

Learning is a remarkably complex process that is influenced by a wide variety of factors. As most parents are probably very much aware, observation can play a critical role in determining how and what children learn. As the saying goes, kids are very much like sponges, soaking up the experiences they have each and every day. Learning is an important process in human life. It is the process of accumulating knowledge, absorbing human knowledge to create one’s own education. Learning is also the practice of life skills such as communication, behavior, etc. Learning contributes to the growth of each person. In Vietnam, this Directive 11 of the Politburo has been issued, actively performing the tasks assigned by the Government in Decision 281/QD-TTg dated February 20, 2014 of the Prime Minister on the project “Promote the movement of lifelong learning in families, clans and communities until 2020”. The article focuses on clarifying the issue of social learning in Vietnam in the current period

Page(s): 43-46                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 November 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61102

 Nguyen Phuoc Trong
Ho Chi Minh City University of Food Industry, Vietnam

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Nguyen Phuoc Trong “Some Problems of The Learning Society in Vietnam in The Current Period ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.43-46 November 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61102

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Parental /Environmental Influences on the Traditional Childrearing Practices and Identity Development of Adolescents in Manyu

Egbe Gwendoline Arrika Epse Ayuk – November 2022- Page No.: 47-58

The objective of this study was to find out Parental/environmental influences on traditional child rearing practices and the identity development of adolescents in Manyu. To achieve this purpose, three specific research questions and three hypotheses were formulated and tested. To answer the research questions , a questionnaire was administered to a sample of 300 participants.. The data derived were subjected to descriptive and inferential analysis using SPSS Version 26.0. The findings revealed a significant relationship between traditional childrearing practices and identity development among adolescents in Manyu. four main theories ; the ecological systems theory of Urie Bronfenbrenner , the psychosocial theory of Erik Erikson, the socio-cultural theory of Lev Vygotsky and James Marcia’s theory of identity development, were adopted and reviewed. The network of theoretical, conceptual and empirical data reviewed indicated that wherever around the world, there exist traditional childrearing practices among adolescents in different peer groups and the peer group stands as one of the important social network support systems that enable adolescents to develop their identity. The research designs adopted for this study was the descriptive survey design (with the aid of a structured questionnaire as the main research instrument and an Interview Guide). The research was carried out in all the four sub divisions of the Manyu Division of the South west region of Cameroon. The population of the study was made up of adolescents, aged 11-24 in the schools that were operational. The sample size was made up of 300 adolescents, who were purposively and incidentally selected to suit the characteristics of the study. Data were analyzed both descriptively and inferentially. The results equally revealed that most adolescents perceive childrearing practices to have a positive influence on attitudes within the home environment (MRS=53.6%, n=2400). Greater parts of the adolescent population are positive to most statement that suggests good attitudes gotten within the home environments. In positively influencing identity development, childrearing practices within the home environment influence on most adolescent pushes them to be; sympathetic towards other sibling and peers (66.3%), neat and tidy (65.3%), and be good examples of their parent (64%). Therefore parents should foster good childrearing practices that existed in the past to suppress the negative ones coming from modernity. This includes constant speaking of the dialect with their children in order to build their identity, teaching them traditional values of the Manyu man such as respect, love, charity, honesty, solidarity and hard work. Above all adolescents should be guarded with care, understood and counseled often by a combination of the parents, the educational community and the society as a whole. This way, they will gain independence, imbibe these positive values and develop a positive identity and personality.

Page(s): 47-58                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 November 2022

 Egbe Gwendoline Arrika Epse Ayuk
University of Buea, Cameroon

 

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Egbe Gwendoline Arrika Epse Ayuk “Parental /Environmental Influences on the Traditional Childrearing Practices and Identity Development of Adolescents in Manyu” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.47-58 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/47-58.pdf

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Monitoring and Enforcement of Occupational Safety and Health Standard in Banana Plantations: Does Non-Compliance Pay?

Francis Evan L. Manayan – November 2022- Page No.: 59-64

Like other laws and regulations, enforcement of the Occupational Safety and Health Law does not happen without the compulsion from government authorities accompanied by work-site inspection and penalties. Becker and Stigler (1974) confirms that the aim of enforcement is to attain that desired degree of compliance with the rule of prescribed behavior, and the critical reason that prevents an entity from enforcing full compliance is that enforcement is costly. This study extends the classroom game conducted by Anderson and Stafford (2006) wherein it highlighted the business unit’s responses to changes in monitoring probability relative to changes in enforcement severity. The game was put into an actual setting of analyzing the dynamics of enforcement strategies in the context of banana plantations. This study confirmed that all business units that have been caught in the past will be inspected each day, and for those that never been caught will be selected at random for inspection. Also, it confirmed that having been caught as non-compliant generally does not result in more compliance unless past violations increase future fine or punishment. Though there was no significant increase in fines, the banana farms exhibited an increased level of compliance. This performance is suspected to be due to the banana plantations’ natural response to the successive results of inspections because of the recurring non-compliance.

Page(s): 59-64                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 November 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61103

 Francis Evan L. Manayan
University of Mindanao, Philippines

 

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Francis Evan L. Manayan “Monitoring and Enforcement of Occupational Safety and Health Standard in Banana Plantations: Does Non-Compliance Pay?” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.59-64 November 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61103

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Impact of Government Grant on Growth of Small and Medium Scale Enterprises in Nigeria (A Study of Some Selected SMEs Owners in Abeokuta, Ogun State)

Abayomi Olusegun OGUNSANWO, Gbenga Akanmu KAZEEM – November 2022- Page No.: 65-71

In this study, the effect of government incentives on the expansion of small and medium-sized businesses was evaluated. The study’s goals were to ascertain the effect of government grant availability, the effect of grant accessibility, and the sufficiency of grant on the expansion of small and medium-sized enterprises. The research design used in the study was a descriptive survey. The research instrument was a structured questionnaire. Three hundred and sixteen (316) SME owners made up the study’s population, and a sample size of one hundred and seventy seven (177) was chosen. Statistical Package for Social Sciences’ (SPSS) multiple regression analysis was used to assess the hypotheses developed for this study). The study’s conclusions showed a favorable association between government grant availability, accessibility, and sufficiency and the expansion of SMEs in Nigeria. This is clear from the fact that the p-value of the t statistic for the three independent variables is less than 5% (P=00.0000.05). The government should boost the different grants and resources made available for the operation and establishment of small and medium scale businesses in Nigeria, according to the results and recommendations. This will encourage more Nigerian small- and medium-scale business owners and operators.

Page(s): 65-71                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 November 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61104

 Abayomi Olusegun OGUNSANWO
Department of Business Administration and Management, Federal Polytechnic, Ilaro, Nigeria.

 Gbenga Akanmu KAZEEM
Department of Business Administration and Management, Federal Polytechnic, Ilaro, Nigeria.

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Abayomi Olusegun OGUNSANWO, Gbenga Akanmu KAZEEM “Impact of Government Grant on Growth of Small and Medium Scale Enterprises in Nigeria (A Study of Some Selected SMEs Owners in Abeokuta, Ogun State) ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.65-71 November 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61104

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Influence of Government Financial Allocation on the Performance of Public Selected Secondary Schools

Ezekiel Kibet Tanui, Dr. Jane Njoroge, Dr. Patrick Mbataru – November 2022- Page No.: 72-78

The main objective of this study was to determine the influence of fiscal policy on the performance of educational institutions in the North Rift region, specifically, in Nandi and Uasin Gishu Counties. The theories used to frame this work were the Resource Based View, Human Capital, and Contingency Theory. The study adopted an interpretive philosophical approach. The target population was 1,672 respondents from 278 public secondary schools. Using the Taro Yamane formulae, a 322-sample size was derived. The research used stratified sampling techniques. Self-administered questionnaires and interview schedules were used to collect quantitative and qualitative data. The study showed that financial policy influences the performance of public secondary schools. Public policy determines the government allocation to schools, the timing of the release of government funds, school fees revenue stream, and financial aid to needy students. The results also show that financial policy does influence the performance of educational institutions. The study recommends that both the national and county governments should ensure that the amount allocated to finance school programs is adequate considering the high enrolment rate due to the 100% transition policy. The National government should ensure that the disbursement of funds reaches the targeted schools within the stipulated time. The study recommends that the Ministry of Education should come up with appropriate strategies that ensure that the performance of the schools is not affected by unprecedented challenges brought about by pandemics such as COVID-19.

Page(s): 72-78                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 November 2022

 Ezekiel Kibet Tanui
Ph.D. Student Kenyatta University, Kenya

 

 Dr. Jane Njoroge
Kenyatta University, Kenya

 

 Dr. Patrick Mbataru
Kenyatta University, Kenya

 

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Ezekiel Kibet Tanui, Dr. Jane Njoroge, Dr. Patrick Mbataru “Influence of Government Financial Allocation on the Performance of Public Selected Secondary Schools” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.72-78 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/72-78.pdf

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Self & Portfolio Assessments as a Learning Evaluation System in Virtual Learning: A Case of Riau Province – Indonesia

Fadly Azhar, Hasnah Faizah, Putri Yuanita, Erni Erni, Auzar – November 2022- Page No.: 79-85

One of the major issues of designing self & portfolio assessments as a learning evaluation system is to help teachers assessing students’ works in virtual learning. So, through the application of this type of assessment system, it is expected that three parties: teachers, students, and parents will get involved proportionately in determining the aspects to be evaluated by each of them. In this descriptive quantitative study, this paper aimed at describing the application of self & portfolio assessments as a learning evaluation system in virtual learning within the elementary, lower and higher secondary school teachers in Riau Province-Indonesia. Findings show that out of 25 principles that the learning evaluation system has, the principle of ‘simple’ is at the lowest level (0.400 > 0.2242) while the principles of ‘accountable, objective, critical, innovative, creative, quality, apprreciation, students’ participation, and teachers’ participation are at the highest level of validity (0.888 > 0.2242); however, all of the principles are at the highest level of reliability (0.938). In terms of hypothesis testing, there is no positive and significant differences on the aspects of education units (0.335 > 0.05); regency (0.558 > 0.05); gender (0.928 > 0.05); and on the aspect of teaching experience (0.471 > 0.05). In conclusion, the teachers within Riau Province-Indonesia have shown their higher consent and approval on the application of the principles of self & portfolio assessments as a learning evaluation system in virtual learning in terms of validity and reliability as well as the aspects to be evaluated by teachers (80%), to be evaluated by students (10%) and to be evaluated by parents (10%).

Page(s): 79-85                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 November 2022

 Fadly Azhar
Faculty of Teacher Traning and Education Universitas Riau Indonesia, Indonesia

 Hasnah Faizah
Faculty of Teacher Traning and Education Universitas Riau Indonesia, Indonesia

 Putri Yuanita
Faculty of Teacher Traning and Education Universitas Riau Indonesia, Indonesia

 Erni Erni
Faculty of Teacher Traning and Education Universitas Riau Indonesia, Indonesia

 Auzar
Faculty of Teacher Traning and Education Universitas Riau Indonesia, Indonesia

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Fadly Azhar, Hasnah Faizah, Putri Yuanita, Erni Erni, Auzar “Self & Portfolio Assessments as a Learning Evaluation System in Virtual Learning: A Case of Riau Province – Indonesia ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.79-85 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/79-85.pdf

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Digital Marketing Techniques and Tools in Covid-19 era

Georgios Polydoros – November 2022- Page No.: 86-91

Internet is used today for many reasons, more than just exchanging information, but also for the development of businesses. The use of internet has become essential, providing countless benefits when used properly and applications that internet provides such as digital marketing are put to use.
In the past, the promotion and purchase of products and services was done only through the interaction of individuals and businesses and the vision of communicating through a “screen” with the aim of developing business readership seemed utopia. However, now through the development of technology, the concepts of e-commerce and digital marketing are growing more and more. This paper aims to investigate and present the use of digital marketing in businesses and how consumer’s habits toward shopping changed.

Page(s): 86-91                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 November 2022

 Georgios Polydoros
Department of Mathematics & Applied Mathematics, University of Crete, Greece

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Georgios Polydoros, “Digital Marketing Techniques and Tools in Covid-19 era” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.86-91 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/86-91.pdf

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Preparedness in Online Teaching and Learning

Christine M. Kahigi – November 2022- Page No.: 92-96

The COVID-19 pandemic has created the largest disruption of education systems in human history, affecting nearly 1.6 billion learners in more than 200 countries. Closures of schools, no, and other learning spaces have impacted more than 94% of the world’s student population. This situation challenged the education system across the world and forced educators to shift to the online mode of teaching overnight. Many academic institutions that were earlier reluctant to change their traditional pedagogical approach had no option but to shift entirely to online teaching-learning and assessment. The paper discusses the importance of online learning not just in times of crisis, but the need of the hour to innovate and implement online teaching as an alternative educational system. The lesson learned from the COVID-19 pandemic is that teachers and students/learners should be oriented on the use of different online educational tools. By looking at the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, & Challenges of e-learning modes, the importance and areas of preparedness have also been discussed.

Page(s): 92-96                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 November 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61105

 Christine M. Kahigi
Department of Educational Foundations, Arts and Social Studies
Faculty of Education, University of Nairobi, Kenya

 

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Christine M. Kahigi “Preparedness in Online Teaching and Learning” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.92-96 November 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61105

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Effectiveness of the Online Classes Implemented in The DWCL Graduate School of Business and Management During the Pandemic

Teresita Llanza-Nacion – November 2022- Page No.: 97-106

The study determined the effectiveness of the online classes implemented in the Graduate School in Divine Word College of Legazpi. Effectiveness was determined based on the perspectives of the students who are the recipients of the online classes in the graduate school along content and structure; modalities implemented; online platforms used; discussion of topics online; class interaction; performance-related activities; and grading system used. The students enrolled during the 2nd Semester, SY 2020-2021 and 1st Semester, SY 2021-2022 were the respondents of the study. Their decision to enroll in the graduate program offering in DWCL is influenced by the quality of education, which the school is known for, the Divinian Mantra, and the GSBM Management. Other reasons given why they pursue graduate studies is for personal development and career advancement. The online platforms used in the online classes are Google Classroom, Google Meeting, Zoom Meetings, FB Messenger Chat Groups and the class modalities implemented by the majority is mixed mode or the combination of synchronous and asynchronous classes, and the majority of the classes are synchronously met by the faculty members every class meeting schedule. All the areas covered to measure the effectiveness of the GSBM online classes were rated “Very Effective” with an over-all general weighted mean of 3.64. The recommendations to further improve the online classes include: the conduct of more Webinars for supplemental learning, the use of Zoom instead of Google Meet, the use of innovative strategies for online meetings, online team building activities, and the possibility of limited face to face in the future if the situation so allowed

Page(s): 97-106                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 November 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61106

 Teresita Llanza-Nacion
Department of Business and Management, Divine Word College of Legazpi, Philippines

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Teresita Llanza-Nacion “Effectiveness of the Online Classes Implemented in The DWCL Graduate School of Business and Management During the Pandemic ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.97-106 November 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61106

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Specialised Mathematical English as A Resource of Learning Secondary School Mathematics: A Case Study in L2 Classrooms

Nick Vincent Otuma, Robert Kati, Duncan Wasike – November 2022- Page No.: 107-115

Perhaps more than any other subject, teaching and learning mathematics depends on language. Mathematics is about relationships: relation between numbers, categories, geometric forms, variables and so on. In general, these relationships are abstract in nature and can only be realized and articulated through language. Even mathematical symbols must be interpreted linguistically. Thus, while mathematics is often seen as language free, in many ways learning mathematics fundamentally depends on language. For students still developing their proficiency in the language instruction, the challenge is considerable. Indeed research has shown that while many second speakers of English (L2) students are quickly able to develop a basic level of conversational English it takes several years do develop more specialised mathematical English. This paper reports findings of a study whose part of the objectives investigated how students construe specialised mathematical meanings from everyday words to express conceptual understanding of mathematics. The study employed multiple-case study design in three categories of schools, that is, Sub-County School (SCS), County School (CS) and Extra-County School (ECS). Data were collected by questionnaires, classroom observations and interviews. Findings indicate that students had challenges in interpreting mathematical meanings of ordinary vocabulary used in mathematics curriculum-they stated ordinary meanings of words instead of mathematical meanings. The paper recommends integration of mathematical language as a strand in the curriculum of mathematics in secondary schools in L2 context to assist learners attain conceptual understanding of mathematics.

Page(s): 107-115                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 November 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61107

 Nick Vincent Otuma
Kibabii University, Kenya

 Robert Kati
Kibabii University, Kenya

 Duncan Wasike
Kibabii University, Kenya

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Nick Vincent Otuma, Robert Kati, Duncan Wasike, “Specialised Mathematical English as A Resource of Learning Secondary School Mathematics: A Case Study in L2 Classrooms” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.107-115 November 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61107

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Undergraduates’ Perception, Knowledge and Attitudes Towards Global Warming in Ekiti State, Nigeria

Bilqees Olayinka ABDU-RAHEEM, & Aderonke Toyin ADEOSUN – November 2022- Page No.: 116-120

The study examined perception, knowledge and attitude towards global warming among undergraduates in Ekiti State, Nigeria. The descriptive research survey design was adopted in this study. The population consisted of all undergraduates in all the Universities in Ekiti State. The sample for this study comprised of 600 undergraduates which were selected from the three universities in Ekiti State. The sample was selected through multistage sampling procedure. A questionnaire designed by the researchers tagged “Global Warming Questionnaire (GWQ)” was used to collect relevant data for the study. The face and content validity of the instrument was determined by specialists in Social Studies and Tests and Measurement experts. The reliability of the instrument was ensured through test re-test method of reliability. The scores of the two tests were correlated using Pearson Product Moment Correlation Coefficient Analysis. The correlation coefficient of 0.82 was obtained which was good enough to make the instrument reliable. The responses obtained were collated and analysed using descriptive inferential statistics. The study revealed that the perception of global warming was good, knowledge was high while attitude was positive among undergraduates. It was also found that there was no significant relationship between perception and attitude towards global warning likewise between knowledge and attitude towards global warning among undergraduates. It was therefore recommended that curriculum planners should ensure periodic review of tertiary institution curriculum by updating new trends on global warming into the school curriculum so that undergraduates can be well-informed of fresh information associated with global warming.

Page(s): 116-120                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 November 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61108

 Bilqees Olayinka ABDU-RAHEEM
Department of Social Science Education, Faculty of Education, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria

 

 Aderonke Toyin ADEOSUN
Department of Social Science Education, Faculty of Education, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria

 

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Bilqees Olayinka ABDU-RAHEEM, & Aderonke Toyin ADEOSUN “Undergraduates’ Perception, Knowledge and Attitudes Towards Global Warming in Ekiti State, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.116-120 November 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61108

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Unveiling the Peril of Protest Votes: An Enlightenment to Guide Political Behavior in Liberia

Dr. Ambrues Monboe Nebo Sr. – November 2022- Page No.: 121-129

Considering the Liberian society as the contextual setting or background, this study interrogates protest votes as another form of political behavior. It employs the conceptual analysis approach categorized as one of the kinds of qualitative research methods. Using the frustration-aggression theory as its theoretical framework, the paper unveils the inherent peril or risk associated with protest votes unknown to registered voters. It sees protest votes as an emotional response due to the dissatisfaction with incumbent candidates to realize campaign promises. On the premise that frustration has the proclivity to affect logical reasoning, the paper equates dissatisfaction to frustration which has implications for protest votes. Based on this premise, which is empirical, the paper argues that evidenced by the clamor (“I am calling from the most abandoned district”, “2023 is coming”) ahead of the 2023 elections, the Liberian society might witness a cyclical or repeated phenomenon of previous election results prompting the increasing clamor.
The paper concludes whether the argument proffered herein is empirical or not, it does not take away the fact that protest vote is an emotional decision of voters’ dissatisfaction. As an emotional response influenced by frustration, it has the proclivity to affect their judgment during elections. For this reason, the paper cautions those making the clamor to be mindful because the frustration behind the inclination may result in illogical judgment. And finally, the paper clarifies that this caution is not in any clever or smart way to support and endorse the reelection of the incumbent leadership or candidates.

Page(s): 121-129                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 November 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61109

 Dr. Ambrues Monboe Nebo Sr.
African Methodist Episcopal University and University of Liberia, Liberia

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Dr. Ambrues Monboe Nebo Sr. “Unveiling the Peril of Protest Votes: An Enlightenment to Guide Political Behavior in Liberia ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.121-129 November 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61109

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The Seal of Good Local Governance in Digos City: Challenges and Opportunities

Josef F. Cagas, Garnette Mae V. Balacy – November 2022- Page No.: 130-139

This descriptive study aimed to explore the challenges and opportunities of the local government of Digos in its endeavor for the Seal of Good Local Governance (SGLG) and the Performance Challenge Fund (PCF). Mixed methods research design was employed, particularly the convergent parallel approach. The qualitative part constructed the enabling factors and areas for improvement in the implementation of the SGLG and PCF based on accounts of personnel of the City Government who were directly involved in the assessment and preparations, representatives of oversight government agencies relevant to the seven SGLG criteria and PCF project beneficiaries. The quantitative part described the level of perceptions on the contribution of the SGLG and PCF to improved local governance in the City based on a survey to the constituents. Thematic analysis and descriptive statistics were used to process the data. It was found that the enabling factors in the accomplishment of the SGLG award of Digos City were anticipation, articulation and delegation, while areas for improvement were risk aversion, information and data management, participation and devolution. The perception of the people of Digos City also revealed a high level of agreement (x=3.98, n=399) that the SGLG and PCF elicited improved local governance. Considering each criteria of the SGLG, it was found that the areas on financial administration and business friendliness and competitiveness have garnered very high levels of perception. Based on these findings, it was inferred that the challenges for Digos City for better implementation of the SGLG law in the future are risk management and increasing spaces for participation while the opportunities are implementation of e-governance and increasing capacity for decentralization.

Page(s): 130-139                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 November 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61110

  Josef F. Cagas
Masters in Public Administration, Student of the College of Science and Technology Education
University of Science and Technology of Southern Philippines Cagayan de Oro, Philippines

 Garnette Mae V. Balacy
Faculty member, Davao del Sur State College, Digos City, Philippines

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Josef F. Cagas, Garnette Mae V. Balacy, “The Seal of Good Local Governance in Digos City: Challenges and Opportunities” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.130-139 November 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61110

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Macroeconomic Determinants of Remittance for Bangladesh: A Gravity Model Approach

Md. Monir Khan, Ratna Khatun, Asif Ahmed, Sunita Rani Das – November 2022- Page No.: 140-147

A Gravity Model is used in this study to investigate the macroeconomic determinants of remittances for Bangladesh by using panel data of 10 host countries from 2002-2020. This paper not only uses Pooled OLS, REM and FEM models but also uses even more efficient econometric model, namely PCSE and IV regression model to explore the impact of the macroeconomic determinants of remittances for Bangladesh. This study finds that home country’s income level has significant impacts on remittances but not the host country’s income level. Private sector credit in the host nation affects remittances negatively but home country credit affects remittances positively. The transaction cost of remittances has adverse impact on remittances at the same time Religion affects remittances positively. Larger dependent population in home country reduces remittances similarly political stability in home country reduces remittances. Political instability in the host nation, on the other hand, is linked to an increase in remittances, indicating that migrants tend to send more money home when the host country is in upheaval. Policies aimed at lowering transaction costs, encouraging financial sector growth, and enhancing the business climate should be implemented to encourage remittances and optimize their economic benefit.

Page(s): 140-147                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 November 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61111

 Md. Monir Khan
Assistant Director, Monetary Policy Department, Bangladesh Bank, The Central Bank of Bangladesh, Bangladesh

 Ratna Khatun
Assistant Director, Research Department, Bangladesh Bank, The Central Bank of Bangladesh, Bangladesh

 Asif Ahmed
Assistant Director, Monetary Policy Department, Bangladesh Bank, The Central Bank of Bangladesh, Bangladesh

 Sunita Rani Das
Assistant Director, Monetary Policy Department, Bangladesh Bank, The Central Bank of Bangladesh, Bangladesh

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Md. Monir Khan, Ratna Khatun, Asif Ahmed, Sunita Rani Das “Macroeconomic Determinants of Remittance for Bangladesh: A Gravity Model Approach ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.140-147 November 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61111

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Influence of emotional dependency on spousal homicide among couples in Ndhiwa Sub-County, Homabay County, Kenya

Adera, Jane Onyango, Mokua, Gilbert Maroko – November 2022- Page No.: 148-154

The prevalence of spousal homicides arising from domestic violence is a devastating public health problem affecting today’s families. With an alarming trend of spousal homicides being experienced in Ndhiwa Sub-County in Homa Bay County today, little seems to have been done to bring to light the core factors associated with this problem. The objective of the study was to determine the extent to which emotional dependency predisposes couples to spousal homicide in Ndhiwa Sub-County. Quantitative method and phenomenological research design were applied. Target population encompassed 17,151 married men and 19,205 women, 29 local administrators and 10 religious leaders from the main denominations in the Sub-County. Slovin’s formula was used to obtain a sample of 396 respondents. Stratified random sampling was applied to select 174 male and 198 female spouses, while simple random was utilized to proportionately select 18 local administrators, and 6 religious leaders from the Sub-County’s six administrative zones. Quantitative data was obtained from married men and women through Partner’s Emotional Dependency Scale (SED). Interview guides were used to obtain qualitative data from local administrators and religious leaders. Piloting was carried out in Nyakach Koguta location in the neighboring Kisumu County, involving 40 participants, comprising of 12 men, 22 women, 5 community leaders and 1 religious leader. Analysis for quantitative data was done in descriptive statistics and reported in tables and figures. Hypotheses testing was performed in inferential statistics through simple regression coefficient, using t-test on SPSS version 26. Qualitative data was analyzed in thematic analysis and presented in narrative forms. From the results, a statistically significant relationship was established between emotional dependency and spousal homicide. The study recommended that government agencies needed to develop policies and frameworks aimed at improving mental health of families. There was need for regular workshops and seminars aimed at supporting couples deal with fears related to their dependency and strengthen their sense of identity. Further investigations may be done using different instruments. Further investigation may be required with additional information being obtained from other close family members as key informants.

Page(s): 148-154                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 November 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61112

 Adera, Jane Onyango
Department of Psychology, Mount Kenya University. Kenya

 

 Mokua, Gilbert Maroko
Department of Psychology, Mount Kenya University. Kenya

 

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Adera, Jane Onyango, Mokua, Gilbert Maroko “Influence of emotional dependency on spousal homicide among couples in Ndhiwa Sub-County, Homabay County, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.148-154 November 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61112

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Foreign Direct Investment and Employment Generation in Nigeria

Chinwe Ann Anisiobi, Callistus Tabansi Okeke, and Chinwe Monica Madueke – November 2022- Page No.: 155-160

FDI as a growth stimulating factor is seen as the largest source of external financing to developing countries and helps to ease capital constraints and contributes to output and employment generation. This paper examined the impact of foreign direct investment on employment generation in Nigeria within the period 1991 to 2021. The variables used in the study include employment rate, foreign direct investment, trade openness and real exchange rate. The paper used the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) model for its regression analysis. The data for the analysis was sourced from CBN statistical bulletin and world bank development indicator. The study finds that foreign direct investment and Trade openness have a positive impact on employment generation in Nigeria. Real exchange rate has a negative impact on employment generation in Nigeria. The paper finds that a short run relationship exists between foreign direct investment, real exchange rate, trade openness and employment generation in Nigeria. Based on the findings, the paper recommends that Government should make effort to attract more Foreign Direct Investment into the country to create more employment opportunities through Multi-National Corporations. The Government should encourage trade openness in order to enhance more Foreign Direct Investment in the country as it will increase the standard of living of the citizens by the provision of highly paid employment.

Page(s): 155-160                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 December 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61113

 Chinwe Ann Anisiobi
Department of Economics, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Awka, Nigeria

 

 Callistus Tabansi Okeke
Department of Economics, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Awka, Nigeria

 

 Chinwe Monica Madueke
Department of Economics, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Awka, Nigeria

 

[1] Adeolu, B. A. (2007). FDI and Economic Growth: Evidence from Nigeria. African Economic Research Consortium (AERC) Paper 165 Nairobi.
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[4] Akubueze, G.I. (2020). Foreign Domestic Investments on the performance of entrepreneurship development in South-East, Nigeria. International Journal of Innovative Social Sciences & Humanities Research, 8 (4), pp. 118-130.
[5] Aladelusi, K.B., & Olayiwola, H.O. (2021). Foreign direct investment and employmentgeneration in nigeria. Canadian Social Science, 17(1), 16 – 24.
[6] Babasanya, A.O. (2018). Foreign direct investment and employment generation in Nigeria. Journal of Economics and Sustainable Development, 9(4), pp. 42-47.
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[10] Ogunniyi, M. B., & Igberi, C. O. (2014). The Impact of Foreign Direct Investment on Poverty Reduction in Nigeria. Journal of Economics and Sustainable Development, 5(14), 73-83.
[11] Okafor, J. (2019). Accessing threshold issues in the impact of Foreign Direct Investment on economic growth: Evidence from Sub-Saharan African countries. Amity Journal of Economics, 4 (1), 49-64.
[12] Oke, S., & Olayemi, O. (2014). Foreign Private Investment, Capital Formation and Poverty Reduction in Nigeria. European Journal of Business and Social Sciences,2(10), 157-168.
[13] Okpe, I. J., & Abu, G. A. (2009). Foreign Private Investment and Poverty Reduction in Nigeria (1975 to 2003). Journal of Social Sciences, 205-211.
[14] Oloyede, B.B. (2014). Effect of Poverty Reduction Programmes on Economic Development Evidence from Nigeria. Arabian Journal of Business and Management Review, 4(1), 26-37.
[15] Olusanya, S.O. (2013). Impact of foreign direct investment inflow on economic growth in a pre and post deregulated Nigeria economy. A granger causality test (1970-2010). European Scientific Journal, 9(25): 335-355.
[16] Omoniyi, M.B. (2013). The Role of Education in Poverty Alleviation and Economic Development: A Theoretical Perspective and Counselling Implications. British Journal of Arts and Social Sciences, 15(2), 176-185.
[17] Omorogbe, V.O. (2007). Foreign Direct Investment and Poverty Reduction in Nigeria. Journal of Research in National Development, 5(2).
[18] Onu, A.J. (2012). Impact of Foreign direct investment of economic growth in Nigeria. Interdisciplinary Journal of contemporary Research in Business, vol. 4, No. 5
[19] Ozughalu, U.M., & Ogwumike, F.O. (2013). Can economic growth, foreign direct investment and exports provide the desired panacea to the problem of unemployment in Nigeria? Journal of Economics and Sustainable Development.
[20] Todaro, M.P., & Smith, S.C. (2003), Economic Development. Pearson Education Limited, 2003.
[21] Ugwuanyi, G.O., Efanga, U.O., & Okanya, O.C. (2020). Impact of Foreign Direct Investment on economic development in Nigeria. European Journal of Accounting, Auditing and Finance Research, 8 (3), 69-85.

Chinwe Ann Anisiobi, Callistus Tabansi Okeke, and Chinwe Monica Madueke “Foreign Direct Investment and Employment Generation in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.155-160 November 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61113

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Nandi Colonial Chieftaincy as Social Agency, 1902-1963

Boit John Kipchirchir, Prisca Tanui, Paul Opondo – November 2022- Page No.: 161-174

Upon annexing Kenya as a colony, the British colonial administration established different structures to support its political and economic agenda. One of those structures was the office of colonial chiefs. Among the Nandi of Kenya, indigenous leaders, especially the office of the Orkoiyot, were maintained where most of them were appointed as chiefs at the onset of colonial rule. However, the new appointees were no longer leaders derived from the traditional processes of the Nandi. Yet, the transformative role of these chiefs in Kenya during the colonial period cannot be overlooked as they were referred to as the agents of social change. Therefore, the study investigated the transformative role of colonial chiefs in Nandi, Kenya from 1902-1963. The study employed the Elite theory and Principal-Agent theories. The study adopted a descriptive survey research design. The target population comprised former colonial chiefs, Nandi community elders, current chiefs who knew the history of their office of chieftaincy in the community. The inclusion criteria comprised variables such as geographical distribution, age and command of historical knowledge of the Nandi colonial chiefs. Data was collected using a questioning guideline, interviews and secondary sources. Therefore, apart from the respondents, the primary sources included archival material on colonial and post-colonial chiefs as well as their roles, collected at the Kenya National Archives in Nairobi and Kakamega, and the information from the County Government offices. Oral interviews were tape-recorded. Secondary sources were obtained from research libraries in Kenya and subjected to content analysis. Data from the interviews and document analysis was analysed thematically. The themes were derived from the objectives of the study and from the reviewed literature. Data from the questionnaire was analysed using descriptive statistics. The results showed that that the Nandi colonial chiefs played significant roles in the social transformation of their people. These included introduction of education, health care and Christianity. From these results, more studies are needed to develop a comprehensive documentation of the contribution of colonial chiefs to different aspects of socio-economic and political transformation, such as security, tourism, agriculture, education, health care, transport infrastructure, politics, substance abuse-related issues and environmental conservation. Such a documentation will provide a reference point for evaluating contemporary leadership challenges in Kenya’s ongoing history.

Page(s): 161-174                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 December 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61114

 Boit John Kipchirchir
Kibabii University, P. O. Box 1699 -50200, Kenya

 Prisca Tanui
Department of History, Political Science and Public Administration, Moi University; P. O. Box 3900-30100, Eldoret, Kenya

 Paul Opondo
Department of History, Political Science and Public Administration, Moi University; P. O. Box 3900-30100, Eldoret, Kenya

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[18] Lagat, A. (1995). The Historical Process of Nandi Movement into Uasin Gishu District of the Kenya Highlands: 1906-1963 (Thesis Master of Arts). University of Nairobi, Department of History: University of Nairobi.
[19] Maiyo, J. K. (2019). Local Native Councils and the Development of Western Education among the Nandi of Kenya, 1923-1963 (B.Ed. Thesis). Mount Kenya University.
[20] Mamdani, M. (1996). Citizen and Subject: Contemporary Africa and the Legacy of Late Colonialism. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
[21] Masakhalia, A. E. (2011). Focus on Tribalism in Kenya. Open Democracy.
[22] Muiga, K. (2019, August 6). Colonialists didn’t fail to root out Africa’s tribal politics. They created it. African Arguments. Retrieved from https://africanarguments.org/2019/08/colonialism-tribal-ethnic-politics-africa/
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[24] Ngeno, K. R., Barasa, S. O., & Chang’ach, J. (2020). Political Ramification on Educational Policy in Colonial Kenya. International Journal of Research in Education Methodology, 11, 77-84.
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Boit John Kipchirchir, Prisca Tanui, Paul Opondo “Nandi Colonial Chieftaincy as Social Agency, 1902-1963” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.161-174 November 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61114

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The Emergence of Super Pension Fund Administrators and its Implication on the Pension Industry in Nigeria

ADEKUNLE Ayobami Ademola – November 2022- Page No.: 175-182

In the year 2004, the Federal Government of Nigeria put in place the new contributory pension scheme for both the public and private sectors employees in Nigeria. The new contributory pension scheme was established by the Pension Reform Act, 2004. Ten years later, another pension scheme called Pension Reform Act, 2014 which was intended to improve and enhance the earlier Pension Reform Act of 2004 was fashioned out. The two Pension Reform Acts were designed to address the problems of the old pension scheme, which was characterized then by failure or inability of many public sectors to regularly pay the pension liabilities of retiring workers. As a result, the new contributory pension scheme of 2004, there was need for government to seek for Fund Managers that will properly handle the money of the contributors. That is the main reason why we have Pension Fund Administrators and Pension Fund Custodians. The Government in her wisdom then set a regulatory Agency called the National Pension Commission. Recently the Pension Fund Administrators in Nigeria are merging together to form what an authority called New Super Pension Fund Administrators. This paper examined the emergence of Super Pension Fund Administrators and its implication on the pension industry in Nigeria. Secondary data from the National Pension Commission, the naira metrics and in depth interview from some pensioners were relied upon by the author. In April 2021, the National Pension Commission compelled all the Pension Fund Administrators to increase their minimum regulatory capital base from one billion naira to five billion naira. This has resulted into merging and acquisition in the pension industry in Nigeria. The new development has helped some Pension Fund Administrators to raise more funds for their operations, hence the term Super Pension Fund Administrator. The paper concluded that the emerging new trend has positive impact on the pension industry in Nigeria.

Page(s): 175-182                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 December 2022

  ADEKUNLE Ayobami Ademola
Department of General Education Studies, Adeleke University, Ede, Osun State, Nigeria

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ADEKUNLE Ayobami Ademola, “The Emergence of Super Pension Fund Administrators and its Implication on the Pension Industry in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.175-182 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/175-182.pdf

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Determinants of Gender Based Violence Against Women with Disabilities in Rwanda. A Case of Gakenke District

Védaste Habamenshi, & Dr. Sebastien Gasana – November 2022- Page No.: 183-199

Women and girls with disabilities are doubly discriminated by gender inequality and by their impairments. They are challenged by sexual abuse and violence perpetrated by intimate partners and/or non- partners. As none should be left behind, this present research analyzed the determinants of gender based violence against women with disabilities in Rwanda using a case of Gakenke District in order to provide recommendations tackling GBV against women with disability. The null hypothesis of the research was H0: Ignorance and social stigma are not the main drivers of gender based violence against women with disability in Gakenke district. The research was qualitative and the data was collected through a questionnaire and focus group discussions and computed using Microsoft Excel. A sample of 94 respondents was selected from a population of 1484 women and girls with disabilities. Other persons involved in the research are 64 local administrative leaders and staffs. The results of the study revealed that for rights awareness, the results indicate that 51.1% of women with disability are not aware of their rights/freedoms; and the society does not recognize women and girls with disability as having all those rights/ freedoms as affirmed by respondents at 98.8%. On social integration, the research found that the level of participation is too low. It ranges from 18% for public meeting to 3% in saving associations. On economic integration, the results indicate that 93.9% of women with disability do not run any economic activity; and have zero income per month. For the sexuality perception by the community, 96.3% of women with disability indicate that a marriage between a man without disability and a woman with disabilities is seen as an abnormal situation. Concerning the ability to self-defense, 87.8% prefer to remain at home and never travel for avoiding GBV. For duty bearers’ awareness, the results indicate that 46.3% of women with disability ignore them totally while 32.9% have a confused idea calling all of them leaders without clear categorizations. Based on these results, the null hypothesis was rejected; and the study accepted the alternative hypothesis. The research recommended synergy of all institutions such public, private and civil society as the foundation of GBV prevention and response among women with disability.

Page(s): 183-199                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 December 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61115

 Védaste Habamenshi
Researcher and Director of Operations at SACC Ltd, Rwanda

 Dr. Sebastien Gasana
Senior Lecturer in the Faculty of Social Sciences, Management and Development Studies, University of Technology and Arts of Byumba – UTAB., Rwanda

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Védaste Habamenshi, & Dr. Sebastien Gasana “Determinants of Gender Based Violence Against Women with Disabilities in Rwanda. A Case of Gakenke District ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.183-199 November 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61115

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Analysis of Public Service Motivation theory, Public Service Performance at the Meteorology, limatology, and Geophysics Agency in Papua and West Papua, Indonesia

Alexander Phuk Tjilen, Beatus Tambaip, Syahruddin, Ahmad Fakhri Fauzan Hadi – November 2022- Page No.: 200-204

Public service motivation is a form of motivation that civil employees should pay close attention to because it has an impact on their behavior and ability to deliver public services. The level of public service motivation can be identified through the theory proposed by James L. Perry, namely the Public Service Motivation (PSM) theory which consists of four variables, including Attraction to Policy Making (APM), Commitment to the Public Interest (CPI), Compassion (COM), and Self-sacrifice (SS). The use of quantitative research methods through filling out questionnaires and then analyzing the results with 10 indicator scales to measure the level of PSM with a total of 100 respondents.
Research results in public Service Motivation, the Attraction to Policy Making indicator, Commitment to the Public Interest indicator, and the Compassion indicator in the Public Service Motivation theory have a positive effect on the performance of public services by 0.778 with a significance level of 0.018. The variable confidence in placing the task above myself has a very good value and has a favorable impact on how well public services are performed, while the Self-Sacrifice (SS) indicator is an indicator that has no effect on the performance of public services.

Page(s): 200-204                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 December 2022

 Alexander Phuk Tjilen
Faculty of Social Science and Political Science, Universitas Musamus, Indonesia

 

 Beatus Tambaip
Faculty of Social Science and Political Science, Universitas Musamus, Indonesia

 

 Syahruddin
Faculty of Social Science and Political Science, Universitas Musamus, Indonesia

 

 Ahmad Fakhri Fauzan Hadi
Mahasiswa Program Studi Magister Administrasi Publik, FISIP, Universitas Musamus, Indonesia

 

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Alexander Phuk Tjilen, Beatus Tambaip, Syahruddin, Ahmad Fakhri Fauzan Hadi “Analysis of Public Service Motivation theory, Public Service Performance at the Meteorology, limatology, and Geophysics Agency in Papua and West Papua, Indonesia” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.200-204 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/200-204.pdf

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Community Service Learning as a New Discourse of Communion of Purpose for the Wellbeing of the Human Person

Dr. Betty Muthoni Njagi – November 2022- Page No.: 205-210

This study seeks to elucidate that community service ought to have communion of purpose for both the givers and recipients of the services. In communion, community relations run deep because community service is relational and promotes the wellbeing of the community members engaged in the service. Community service can become part of the social-economic system of a country through community service learning. This is a desktop study where secondary data from previous studies and various governments’ policies on community service were analyzed. The findings of the study are that indeed community service learning is a value-laden system that does have an input not only on the learners of Community Service but also on the wellbeing of the human person and the society at large. Living and practicing community service makes the members to thrive as it becomes a communal achievement that allows the individual human person to be treated with dignity and honor.
The study recommends Community Service learning to be aligned with sustainable development goals of Kenya to give the learners an experience of communion of purpose when serving the community.

Page(s): 205-210                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 03 December 2022

 Dr. Betty Muthoni Njagi
Catholic University of Eastern Africa, Nairobi, Kenya

 

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Dr. Betty Muthoni Njagi “Community Service Learning as a New Discourse of Communion of Purpose for the Wellbeing of the Human Person” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.205-210 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/205-210.pdf

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The Media, War and Conflict: How They Adversely Affect Conflict Rather Than Foster Resolution

Nyabuti Damaris Kemunto & Dr. Anita Kiamba – November 2022- Page No.: 211-219

Consider the relationship between war and the media by looking at how the media are involved in conflict, either as targets (war on the media) or as an auxiliary (war thanks to the media). Based on this distinction, four major developments can be cited that today combine to make war, above all, a media spectacle: photography, which opened the door to manipulation through stage-management; live technologies, which raise the question of journalists’ critical distance vis-à-vis the material they broadcast and can facilitate the process of using them; and pressure on the media and media globalization, which have led to a change in the way the political process is conducted and the way in which military officials propagandize; and, finally, the fact that censorship has fallen out of favor, prompting the government to come up with creative techniques to control journalists. In today’s conflict, the media frequently plays an important role. In essence, their role can take two distinct and opposing forms. Either the media participates actively in the conflict and bears responsibility for increased violence, or it remains independent and separate from the conflict, thereby contributing to conflict resolution and violence reduction. Whichever role the media plays in a given conflict, and in the phases before and after, is determined by a complex set of factors, including the media’s relationship with conflict actors and its independence from power holders in society. The purpose of this article is to examine and comprehend modern conflict, as well as the role of the media in exacerbating or alleviating violence.

Page(s): 211-219                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 03 December 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61116

 Nyabuti Damaris Kemunto
University of Nairobi, Kenya

 Dr. Anita Kiamba
University of Nairobi, Kenya

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Nyabuti Damaris Kemunto & Dr. Anita Kiamba “The Media, War and Conflict: How They Adversely Affect Conflict Rather Than Foster Resolution” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.211-219 November 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61116

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Special Needs Education: A Basic Human Need

Dr. Stephen Musila Nzoka – November 2022- Page No.: 220-224

I. INTRODUCTION

If a typically growing and developing child needs education to better its life in the process psychologically known as nature-nurture controversy, how much more will a child with a disability need education be it specially or regularly offered?
In fact, ‘specialty’ should refer to the facilities and equipment used by the learner with a special need to access education whilst education remains constant. Indeed, the end justifies the means. In any case, education equalizes opportunities, modifies human behaviour, makes a learner self-reliant while reducing the effects and stigma brought to bear by the various impairment all of which are mainly developmental. These disabilities are brought about by intellectual impairments, learning difficulties, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, speech and language disorders, emotional and behavioral disorders, visual impairments, autism spectrum disorders, physical impairments, multiple handicaps as well as those with gifts and talents. Consequently, early educational and medical interventions would be necessary to both minimize individual differences found in these people and render them productive, self-dependent and responsible members of society. I personally bear witness.

Page(s): 220-224                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 03 December 2022

  Dr. Stephen Musila Nzoka
Kenyatta University, Kenya

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Dr. Stephen Musila Nzoka, “Special Needs Education: A Basic Human Need” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.220-224 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/220-224.pdf

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A Critical Analysis of Democratic Elections as a Dimension of Peace and Legitimacy: A Case Study of the Liberian Electoral System (2005 – 2014)

Josiah F. Joekai, Jr. – November 2022- Page No.: 225-246

The purpose of the research was to do an in-depth analysis of elections with a focus on providing a clear understanding of democratic elections as a dimension of peace and legitimacy. The emphasis of the research was on the electoral system of Liberia and the measure of its contribution to the promotion of peace and legitimacy in the country from 2005 to 2014. The researcher used the qualitative research method, descriptive design, and questionnaires as data collection tools. The population of the research was five hundred fifty-five (555) representing the population of the workforce of the National Elections Commission of Liberia and the leaders of registered political parties. The sample size of the research was fifty-five (55) based on Purposive Sampling Techniques (Patton, 1990). The research showed that in spite of frequent elections conducted from 2005 to 2014, not many Liberians understand elections within the framework of the concept of democracy. Many are yet to understand or come to the full realization that there are roles, rights, and responsibilities of the individual citizen in democracy beyond ballot casting. The research further showed that 34.5% of respondents of the total of 55 respondents said the extent to which Liberians understand democracy as a model of governance is very little. This finding has implications for the attainment of genuine peace and legitimacy in Liberia. The researcher concluded that there is an urgent need for government to establish a national mechanism for a rolling public or civic education program that will deepen the understanding of the people on elections and democracy-related issues on a regular basis. In his conclusion, the researcher furthered that this gap is responsible for the reported limited understanding of the citizenry and if the principle of participation must be realized, then efforts have to be made to educate the citizenry on democratic values and principles.

Page(s): 225-246                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 03 December 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61117

 Josiah F. Joekai, Jr.
University of Liberia, Liberia

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Josiah F. Joekai, Jr. “A Critical Analysis of Democratic Elections as a Dimension of Peace and Legitimacy: A Case Study of the Liberian Electoral System (2005 – 2014) ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.225-246 November 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61117

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The Philosophy of Vocational Education in the Face of 4th Industrial Revolution: A Namibian National Training Authority Perspective

Natalia S. Intja, Gerson Sindano, Oiva S. Nauyoma – November 2022- Page No.: 247-250

In as much as VTC graduates should eventually become employers upon completion, the trainers of the trainees should ensure that the trainees are abreast with the paradigms shifts in the world called the 4IR to align their programmes offered to the new ways of doing things. For this promotion to happen, from the onset of the course, trainees should be equipped with necessary skills to navigate in the digital world and curb the digital divide so that they become digital natives. Despite this recognition, business proposal education and 4IR in the job market is not emphasised at every stage of vocational education and training system. This deficiency depletes the endeavours of aligning the TVET curriculum to the philosophy of the 4IR. This paper reviews the TVET curriculum under Office Administration from Rundu Vocational Training Centre and analysed the alignment of the course’ content and what is demanded in the workforce. This study involved secondary data collected in Kavango East region of Namibia (Rundu vocational training centre). Specifically, the data were collected from one VTC under the course of Office Administration level 2. The data were collected through the documentary review using desktop research. The secondary data (the Office Administration Level 2 study guide) published in 2001 were derived and reviewed. In the first instance, each unit was reviewed to deduce conclusions whether the course descriptors and content align with the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR). Second, all the study guide’s units were brought together in an analysis to see whether the overall units prepare trainees of Office Administration to conform with the current world trends. Data were then analysed using descriptive framework. The findings of the study suggest that the VET policy today is driven by the job market rather than the individual’s needs and aspirations.

Page(s): 247-250                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 December 2022

 Natalia S. Intja
Department of Language Development, University of Namibia, Rundu Campus, Namibia

 Natalia S. Intja
Department of Intermediate and Vocational Education, University of Namibia, Rundu Campus, Namibia

 Oiva S. Nauyoma
Department of Early Childhood Education and Care, University of Namibia, Rundu Campus, Namibia

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Natalia S. Intja, Gerson Sindano, Oiva S. Nauyoma “The Philosophy of Vocational Education in the Face of 4th Industrial Revolution: A Namibian National Training Authority Perspective ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.247-250 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/247-250.pdf

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The Relevance of Akan Traditional Folk-Games in the Primary Schools’ Curriculum: A Case Study of Asotwe Community

Edward Opoku and Peter Obeng – November 2022- Page No.: 251-265

This research looked at the relevance of Akan traditional games in the primary school curriculum at Asotwe community. The study was undertaken to identify, and describe the traditional games of Asotwe community on the basis of rules that governed them, facilities used, their significance to the individuals and the community as well as the socio-cultural settings within which they are performed. The researcher selected two primary schools at Asotwe community in the Ejisu Municipality for the study. The researchers used qualitative method approach and implemented the case study. Data were collected and analysed with the help of interviews and observation as research instruments. Seventeen (17) Akan traditional folk-games were collected through qualitative method approach and applied the case study strategy. Participants of ten (10) pupils, six teachers, and four (4) PTA/SMC were identified and interviewed. The games were sampled through purposive sampling techniques. The study revealed that traditional games were vital in encouraging desired skills, attitudes and values, improving physical fitness and health, as sources of fun, recreation and relaxation, traditions and cultures were reinforced and preserved. It was also concluded that children in the selected schools perform most traditional games and they learn them from their peers and from the environment in which they grow up. Arising from these findings, it is recommended that possible efforts need to be made to by the teachers and other agencies in charge of education to document, revive and popularise these traditional to be used in the basic school classroom. The researchers also recommended that some traditional games could be integrated into the formal programs of teaching and learning.

Page(s): 251-265                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 December 2022

 Edward Opoku
Department of Creative Arts, Berekum College of Education, Ghana

 Peter Obeng
Department of Creative Arts, Offinso College of Education, Ghana

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Edward Opoku and Peter Obeng “The Relevance of Akan Traditional Folk-Games in the Primary Schools’ Curriculum: A Case Study of Asotwe Community” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.251-265 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/251-265.pdf

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The Impact of Microcredit on the Living Standard of Loan Takers: A Study in Naogaon District, Rajshahi

S.M. Ashraf Hossain, & Md. Ashikur Rahman – November 2022- Page No.: 266-270

Microcredit is considered as an effective tool to improve the living standard of the poor. However, several empirical studies pointed out negative outcomes of microcredit as well. The primary objective of this study is therefore to investigate the impact of microcredit on the living standard of the loan receivers in terms of consumption expenditure. Raninagar and Kaliganj unions of Naogaon district, Rajshahi were chosen as the study areas for this study. Primary data was obtained through a structured questionnaire and was used for the quantitative analysis using the STATA software. In this study, 50 loan receivers from the two unions were selected as the sample size of the population. Ordinary Least Square (OLS) regression method is employed to examine the impact of microcredit on the monthly consumption expenditure of the loan receivers. Among the loan receivers, the study shows that 54% of the them are female, the majority of them fall into 50 & over age group, and 28% of their education level is SSC. The econometric result of this study has found statistically significant impact of microcredit loan on the monthly consumption expenditure of the loan receivers (p=0.049). In addition to this, saving and income of the loan receivers were also estimated as statistically significant. Based on the findings the study recommends micro finance institutions to increase the volume of the loans and offer saving services to the loan receivers in the study area. Further, the study recommends extended research to be carried out with a larger data set in the study area.

Page(s): 266-270                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 December 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61118

  S.M. Ashraf Hossain
Lecturer, Department of Economics, Varendra University, Rajshahi, Bangladesh

  Md. Ashikur Rahman
Department of Economics, Varendra University, Rajshahi, Bangladesh

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S.M. Ashraf Hossain, & Md. Ashikur Rahman, “The Impact of Microcredit on the Living Standard of Loan Takers: A Study in Naogaon District, Rajshahi” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.266-270 November 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61118

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Social Consciousness and Resistance to State Policies in Nigeria: An Appraisal of Class Analysis Theory

Chinedu P. Bosah, Ph.D – November 2022- Page No.: 271-279

Before the writing of Karl Marx the bourgeoisie recognized the existence of class struggle between the haves and have-nots: the exploiting and the exploited class. Social-consciousness therefore, is a cause and consequence of the class struggle. The struggle between classes is all part of the yearning of the dominated class for freedom, equality and justice in the process of production and distribution of material well-being of people. This struggle is a function of power and this can be understood within the context of the local situation, especially the material conditions of majority of Nigerians. The outcome of class struggle decides not only whether there is progress towards justice, equality and freedom but also how much progress. This injustice, domination, oppression, exploitation are social in character and impede social progress, and consequently generate opposition to themselves. Such opposition results in struggle to end their existence or ameliorate their consequences. In Nigeria this struggle takes the form of strikes, demonstrations and civil disobedience against perceived exploitative state economic policies. Since the State is the principal actor in the allocation of values in Nigeria, to what extent has this, awareness necessitated resistance to government policies? This paper therefore investigates how social consciousness has inspired resistance to State policies in Nigeria. Being qualitative in nature it makes use of descriptive analysis and founded on the class analysis theory. The study found out that Struggle for better economic conditions has increased class consciousness and resistance to exploitative state policies through strikes and demonstrations. They have also given credence that deprivation, alienation, exclusion and poverty seek expression. There is also the need to engage and address cries of marginalization through dialogue and visible action. Economic policies of government should also be examined and measured from their inclusiveness and sustainability.

Page(s): 271-279                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 December 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61119

 Chinedu P. Bosah, Ph.D
Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Nigeria

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Chinedu P. Bosah, Ph.D “Social Consciousness and Resistance to State Policies in Nigeria: An Appraisal of Class Analysis Theory ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.271-279 November 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61119

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Factors determining the Implementation of Accrual Basis of Accounting (ABA) in the Public Sector

Adegun, E. A, Olatunji, T.E, Alimi, A.A – November 2022- Page No.: 280-287

Accrual Basis of Accounting is the process whereby revenue is recorded when it is earned, and expenditure is recorded when the consequence in liabilities is known or when benefits are obtained.
This study adds to the current debate by looking at the elements that influence Accrual Basis of Accounting (ABA). This study analysed the factors determining implementation of ABA and the Quality of Financial Reporting in the Public Sector. The study adopted ex-post facto and exploratory research designs. Primary data through structured questionnaires were administered to the respondents from Accountant General’s Office, Auditor Generals’ Office, Ministry of Finance and Osun State Internal Revenue Service as well as the Public Accounts Committee of the State legislature were all used for the investigation. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to analyse the determinants of implementation of Accrual Basis of Accounting. Results from Principal Component Analysis (PCA) showed that the nine (9) components of Accrual Basis of Accounting (ABA) can be combined efficiently into two (2) factors i.e International Accounting Standards and System/Administrative factor explaining 81.3% of the total variance among the inter-correlations of the nine (9) components of accrual accounting with eigenvalues of 3.057 and 1.067 respectively while other factors were below 1.0 base rate. The result of mean ranking with a value of 3.82 and 3.66 revealed that the existence of the cost-expense-based budget and prevalence of the traditional bureaucratic model of management are the major barriers to implementation of ABA in the study area.
The study concluded that from the result of principal component analysis, the result indicated that out of the nine (9) itemized components (International Accounting Standards, System/administrative factor, High cost of personnel training, Costly implementation, Time consuming, High opportunity cost, Personal factors, Political factors and Low level of education and weak expertise) only the first two factors are prominent to this study. The sensitivity of the factors explained further that the components are categorized into International Accounting Standards and System/Administrative factor. It is therefore recommended that governments should provide the ministries, departments and agencies with necessary funding facilities and training towards implementing Accrual Based Accounting in their states.

Page(s): 280-287                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 December 2022

 Adegun, E. A
Adeleke University, Ede, Osun State, Nigeria.

 

 Olatunji, T.E
Department of Accounting, Faculty of Management Sciences, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Oyo State, Nigeria

 

 Alimi, A.A
Department of Accounting, Faculty of Management Sciences, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Oyo State, Nigeria

 

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[21] Udeh, F., and Sopekan, S. (2015). Adoption of IPSAS and the Quality of Public Sector Financial Reporting in Nigeria. Research Journal of Finance and Accounting www.iiste.org. 6 (20)

Adegun, E. A, Olatunji, T.E, Alimi, A.A “Factors determining the Implementation of Accrual Basis of Accounting (ABA) in the Public Sector” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.280-287 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/280-287.pdf

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Effects of ICT skills of Library Professionals on Users’ Patronage Promotion in Polytechnic Libraries in South West, Nigeria

ADEGBITE-BADMUS Tawakalit A., & ALABI Ismail O. – November 2022- Page No.: 288-295

The educational roles play by libraries to guarantee successful research and other activities of tertiary institutions cannot be overemphasized. Libraries play a central role in guaranteeing success of tertiary institutions and researches. The essential undertakings of libraries comprise collection development, reference services, document delivery, user education, provision of access to resources held by a library, other libraries or a group of libraries and access to electronic information resources. With the growth of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), libraries now make available cost effective and dependable access to information using information and communication technology tools which has enabled libraries to overcome barriers of distance and time. Introduction of ICT in libraries make accessible information from anywhere, anytime and any sources. Effective use of ICT for library functions and services requires skills in the use of ICT. This study examined the relationship between ICT skills possessed by the librarians in the Polytechnics Libraries in South-west, Nigeria. Descriptive survey method was used and questionnaire was employed to gather data from 94 librarians in the 10 selected federal and state-owned polytechnic libraries in southwest, Nigerian. The study revealed large percentage of the respondents 74 (70.5%) considered their ICT skills above average. The respondents regarded ICT as crucial to promotion of patronage of polytechnic libraries because ICT can be used to promote library to several users (m=4.33). It was also revealed that ICT can facilitate quick delivery of information and knowledge about library (m=4.21)

Page(s): 288-295                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 December 2022

 ADEGBITE-BADMUS Tawakalit A.
The Department of Library and Information Science, The Federal Polytechnic Ilaro Ogun State. Nigeria

 ALABI Ismail O.
The Department of Library and Information Science, The Federal Polytechnic Ilaro Ogun State. Nigeria

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ADEGBITE-BADMUS Tawakalit A., & ALABI Ismail O. “Effects of ICT skills of Library Professionals on Users’ Patronage Promotion in Polytechnic Libraries in South West, Nigeria ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.288-295 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/288-295.pdf

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Implementation of Integrity Zone Policy in Central Sulawesi Regional Police

Sirajuddin Ramly, Muhammad Basir, Sitti Chaeriah Ahsan – November 2022- Page No.: 296-302

This study aims to: 1) analyze the implementation of the integrity zone development in public services at the Central Sulawesi Regional Police; and 2) Analyze the supporting and inhibiting factors of implementation of the integrity zone development in public services at the Central Sulawesi Regional Police. The research was conducted with a qualitative approach. The research locations are within the Central Sulawesi Regional Police, which is focused on the Palu Police, Tolitoli Police; Banggai Police; and Polres Morowali Utara. Data collection techniques used interviews, observation, and documentation. Data analysis techniques using an interactive approach from Miles and Huberman consist of, data collection, condensation, data display, and verification or conclusion.
The results and discussion show: 1 The implementation of the integrity zone policy in public services at the Central Sulawesi Regional Police has been going well. According to Edward III’s theory, 4 (four) dimensions are used as indicators. Overall, everything is well implemented, namely; a) the communication dimension is carried out with intensive socialization with vertical and horizontal strategies, supported by detailed regulations and responsive implementor performance; b) The dimensions of human resources are adequate and have high motivation, while material resources in the form of buildings and equipment are also fulfilled; c) The dimensions of the disposition of the implementor are positive-responsive, have high motivation and high competence, and d) the dimensions of the bureaucratic structure are following SOP and are entirely under the coordination of the leadership; and 2) Supporting factors for the development of the Integrity Zone at the Central Sulawesi Regional Police, including Internal factors in the form of sufficient number and quality of implementing staff, implementors have competence, experience and high motivation, complete bureaucratic structure. The external factors are that focused, clear, and directed regulations are maximized. Meanwhile, the inhibiting factors include internal and external barriers. Internal barriers in the form of; SIM material availability and psychological factors.
Meanwhile, external obstacles are; power outages that can disrupt the smooth running of Polres services, especially for SIM, SKCK, and Lidik-Sidik satfung. The external factors are that focused, clear, and directed regulations are maximized. Meanwhile, the inhibiting factors include internal and external barriers. Internal barriers in the form of; SIM material availability and psychological factors. Meanwhile, external obstacles are; power outages that can disrupt the smooth running of Polres services, especially for SIM, SKCK, and Lidik-Sidik satfung. The external factors are that focused, clear, and directed regulations are maximized.
Meanwhile, the inhibiting factors include internal and external barriers. Internal barriers in the form of; SIM material availability and psychological factors. Meanwhile, external obstacles are; power outages that can disrupt the smooth running of Polres services, especially for SIM, SKCK, and Lidik-Sidik satfung.

Page(s): 296-302                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 December 2022

 Sirajuddin Ramly
Student of Doctoral Program of Social Sciences Study Program, Postgraduate Tadulako University

 Muhammad Basir
Lecturer of the Doctoral Program of the Social Sciences Study Program, Postgraduate Tadulako Universitas University

 

 Sitti Chaeriah Ahsan
Lecturer of the Doctoral Program of the Social Sciences Study Program, Postgraduate Tadulako Universitas University

 

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Sirajuddin Ramly, Muhammad Basir, Sitti Chaeriah Ahsan “Implementation of Integrity Zone Policy in Central Sulawesi Regional Police ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.296-302 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/296-302.pdf

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Social Capital Analysis for Creative Economy Actors in West Sumatra Tourist Destinations

Zusmelia Zusmelia, Ansofino Ansofino, Irwan Irwan, Jimi Rinald – November 2022- Page No.: 303-308

The focus of the study in this study is to analyze social capital for creative economy actors in the West Sumatra Tourism Destination area. The theory used in this study is the theory of social capital proposed by Lasser. The research combines two approaches which is called the mix method. This research was conducted in five areas in West Sumatra Tourism Destinations, namely Padang City, Bukittinggi City, Sawahlunto City, Pesisir Selatan Regency and Tanah Datar Regency. Data collection methods started from non-participant observation, in-depth interviews, document study collection and survey techniques. This research focuses on the creative economy sub-sector in the fields of craft, performing arts, music and culinary. The unit of analysis is at the level of individuals and groups of creative economy actors in the tourist destination area of West Sumatra. Qualitatively, data analysis uses Miles and Huberman’s model and qualitative approach uses descriptive statistics. The results of the study show that social capital is a factor in the development of a creative economy in the West Sumatra Tourism Destination Area. The strength of social capital is built by strengthening social networks in the form of cooperation in raw materials and marketing of products that have been produced. In addition, strengthening solidarity by having a sense of the same fate in arms fosters an attitude of mutual assistance to one another, mutual cooperation and a high sense of concern. So as to realize joint action by collaborating between creative economy actors including the import of raw materials and marketing of fellow creative economy actors in the West Sumatra Tourism Destination Area. The conclusion of this study is that social capital becomes a bridge or link in the development of the creative economy. The novelty of this research is social capital to strengthen creative economic development

Page(s): 303-308                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 06 December 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61120

 Zusmelia Zusmelia
Masters Program In Humanity Stydies, PGRI University West Sumatra, Padang City, Indonesia

 Ansofino Ansofino
Masters Program In Humanity Stydies, PGRI University West Sumatra, Padang City, Indonesia

 Irwan Irwan
Masters Program In Humanity Stydies, PGRI University West Sumatra, Padang City, Indonesia

 Jimi Rinald
Economic Education, PGRI Universiti West Sumatra, Padang City, Indonesia

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Zusmelia Zusmelia, Ansofino Ansofino, Irwan Irwan, Jimi Rinald “Social Capital Analysis for Creative Economy Actors in West Sumatra Tourist Destinations ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.303-308 November 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61120

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An analysis of the Design Technology curriculum implementation at Public Universities in Zimbabwe

Hahlani Onismo Stephen, Dr Bhukuvhani Crispen, Sithole Silas – November 2022- Page No.: 309-315

The qualitative study analysed the implementation of the Design Technology curriculum in the Zimbabwean public universities. The study was precipitated by the low uptake of the Design Technology curriculum by many public universities in the country after its introduction in 2015. The study analysed the challenges Public universities of Zimbabwe face in implementing the Design Technology curriculum. The study included one public university, 1 faculty Dean, 1 departmental chairperson and 10 Design Technology lecturers. Purposive sampling technique was used in the selection of the University and respondents who were lecturers, Dean and chairperson of the university department. Data were collected through Google Form questionnaires, interviews semi-structured observations and focus group discussions. The Concerns Based Adoption Model (CBAM) guided and informed the analysis of findings. Findings indicate that there is curriculum implementation infidelity that stems from lack of subject specific training and content, lack of lecturer participation in curriculum planning decisions, low student enrolment, poor funding, lack of collaboration, lack of resources and lack of staff development programs. The study recommends in-service training for lectures, lecturer involvement in curriculum planning decisions, teaching of the Design Technology curricula across all levels of education in the country, government and funding channels, engagement in collaborative activities with other universities and staff development workshops as strategies to ensure faithful implementation of the DT curricula.

Page(s): 309-315                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 06 December 2022

 Hahlani Onismo Stephen
Department of Art Design and Technology Education, Faculty of Science and Technology Education, National University of Science and Technology, Zimbabwe

 Dr Bhukuvhani Crispen
Research Innovation and Postgraduate Studies, Manicaland State University of Applied Sciences, Stair Guthrie Road, Fernhill, Private Bag 7001, Mutare, Zimbabwe

 Sithole Silas
Department of Technical Education, Robert Mugabe School of Education, Great Zimbabwe University, Zimbabwe

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Hahlani Onismo Stephen, Dr Bhukuvhani Crispen, Sithole Silas “An analysis of the Design Technology curriculum implementation at Public Universities in Zimbabwe” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.309-315 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/309-315.pdf

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Housing Aid: Co-op Ville’s Impact on Housing Initiatives for Typhoon Survivors

Jerryl Bless A. Gullez, Jesrael B. Boot, Aileen L. Casta, Arge F. Bitancur, Reymart O. Abude, Anjello L. Landayan, Asst. Prof. Michael S. Pechardo – November 2022- Page No.: 316-341

The study aims to assess the Co-op Ville of the Federation of Peoples’ Sustainable Development Cooperative (FPSDC). The purpose of this study is to showcase the experiences and stories of different typhoon survivors and how they changed after benefiting from a cooperative housing program. A qualitative case study was the research design used in this study. This method enabled the collection of a thorough analysis of the problem. To investigate and gather a comprehensive narrative, a collective method—a one-on-one interview—was employed. The information gathered was analyzed and data was presented to further explain the case. Findings of the study revealed that FPSDC’s housing program and the implementation of Co-op Ville demonstrates how cooperatives in the Philippines can effectively and efficiently create solutions for dealing with issues of housing. The findings showed that the cooperative had succeeded in creating sustainable communities for both typhoon survivors and those living in hazardous or life-threatening locations. Moreover, it is noticeable that the cooperative housing initiative had an impact on the lives of typhoon survivors and on the government side. Through the implementation of various considerations, programs, developments, and initiatives for its beneficiaries, the cooperative housing program was able to help the typhoon survivors in meeting their housing needs as well as in areas of livelihood, wellness, health, belongingness, esteem, and safety. Although there are still improvements to be made to the housing facility’s assets and infrastructure, a project like this could improve the overall housing issue in the country.

Page(s): 316-341                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 06 December 2022

  Jerryl Bless A. Gullez
Department of Cooperatives and Social Development, – College of Social Sciences and Development, Polytechnic University of the Philippines, Philippines

  Jesrael B. Boot
Department of Cooperatives and Social Development, – College of Social Sciences and Development, Polytechnic University of the Philippines, Philippines

  Aileen L. Casta
Department of Cooperatives and Social Development, – College of Social Sciences and Development, Polytechnic University of the Philippines, Philippines

  Arge F. Bitancur
Department of Cooperatives and Social Development, – College of Social Sciences and Development, Polytechnic University of the Philippines, Philippines

  Reymart O. Abude
Department of Cooperatives and Social Development, – College of Social Sciences and Development, Polytechnic University of the Philippines, Philippines

  Anjello L. Landayan
Department of Cooperatives and Social Development, – College of Social Sciences and Development, Polytechnic University of the Philippines, Philippines

  Asst. Prof. Michael S. Pechardo
Department of Cooperatives and Social Development, – College of Social Sciences and Development, Polytechnic University of the Philippines, Philippines

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Jerryl Bless A. Gullez, Jesrael B. Boot, Aileen L. Casta, Arge F. Bitancur, Reymart O. Abude, Anjello L. Landayan, Asst. Prof. Michael S. Pechardo, “Housing Aid: Co-op Ville’s Impact on Housing Initiatives for Typhoon Survivors” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.316-341 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/316-341.pdf

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Impact of the covid-19 Pandemic on the Shopping Behavior of University Students

Georgios Polydoros – November 2022- Page No.: 342-345

The covid-19 pandemic has evolved e-commerce and accelerated the existing trends in the adoption of e-commerce by a significant portion of consumers. The governments, in their effort to limit the spread of the virus, imposed quarantine and restrictive measures on the movements of citizens. Thus, consumers turned to online shopping to satisfy their purchasing needs.
This paper examines the behavior of Greek university students towards online and mobile shopping.
The paper mentions the new trends created by the pandemic in e-commerce globally and nationally.
The purpose of this work was to study the effect of the covid-19 pandemic on the purchasing behavior of university students in the island of Crete, Greece. For this reason, a Google Forms questionnaire was created.
The results of the survey showed that Greek university students increased their purchases through e-shopping and male students continued to purchase more than female students in the current era.

Page(s): 342-345                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 06 December 2022

 Georgios Polydoros
Department of Mathematics & Applied Mathematics, University of Crete, Greece

[1] Di Crosta, A., Ceccato, I., Marchetti, D., La Malva, P., Maiella, R., Cannito, L., et al. (2021). Psychological factors and consumer behavior during the COVID-19 pandemic. PLoS ONE, 16 (8): e0256095. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0256095
[2] eMarketer(2022).https://www.insiderintelligence.com/content/global-ecommerce-forecast-2022
[3] Keane, M.P., & Neal, T. (2020). Consumer panic in the COVID-19 pandemic. Journal of Econometrics, 220, 86 – 105.
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[7] Zwanka, J. R. & Buff, C. (2020). COVID-19 Generation: A conceptual framework of the consumer behavioral shifts to be caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Journal of International Consumer Marketing, 33(1), 58-67. doi: 10.1080/08961530.2020.1771646.

Georgios Polydoros “Impact of the covid-19 Pandemic on the Shopping Behavior of University Students ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.342-345 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/342-345.pdf

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Characteristics Associated with Sexual Dysfunctions Among Perimenopausal Women

M A Madura M Jayawardane, Prabath Randombage, Wedisha Gankanda, Ajith Fernando, Dewni Rathnapriya – November 2022- Page No.: 346-349

Background & Objectives
Menopause is a normal physiological phenomenon in the midlife of women. However, beyond that it causes many bio-psychological changes which results in reduction of quality of life. Sexual dissatisfaction leads among these changes.
Methodology
A descriptive cross-sectional study was done on 108 females above 36 years of age, who visited the gynecological clinic at Colombo South Teaching hospital. A self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection.
Results
Age of the study participants ranged from 38 to 83 years (Mean = 38.26 years: SD=13.58 years). Majority of the study participants had not observed any changes regarding their sexual desires (n=58:64.4%). Only 37.5% (n=12) had observed severe changes. Only 29.4 %( n=10) of the participants had observed severe changes in sexual satisfaction. 19.4 %( n=14) of the responded participants had experienced vaginal dryness during sexual activity. 13.8 %( n=10) of them had experienced severe sexual dryness during sexual activity. 24.5%(n=26) of the participants had experienced urinary incontinence during sexual activity. 46.15% of them had experienced severe incontinence. Majority of the participants who had observed changes in the sexual desire and satisfaction (N=24; 63.1%) had only received primary or secondary education.
Conclusion
Larger number of the study participants had experienced changes in their sexual desire during their perimenopausal age and the late menopausal age. Major changes of sexual desires are observed among middle aged women and age, social status and psychological factors affect these changes. Sexual satisfaction and activities commonly associate with the educational level of the study participants. The religion and ethnicity are not associated with sexual problems.

Page(s): 346-349                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 06 December 2022

 M A Madura M Jayawardane
Consultant Obstetrician and Gynaecologist, Senior Lecturer, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Sri Lanka.

 

 Prabath Randombage
Senior Registrar in Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Colombo South Teaching Hospital, Kalubowila, Sri Lanka.

 

 Wedisha Gankanda
Senior Registrar in Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Colombo South Teaching Hospital, Kalubowila, Sri Lanka.

 

 Ajith Fernando
Consultant Obstetrician and Gynaecologist, Senior Lecturer, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Sri Lanka.

 

 Dewni Rathnapriya
Research Assistant, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Sri Lanka.

 

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M A Madura M Jayawardane, Prabath Randombage, Wedisha Gankanda, Ajith Fernando, Dewni Rathnapriya “Characteristics Associated with Sexual Dysfunctions Among Perimenopausal Women” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.346-349 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/346-349.pdf

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An analysis of Kenya-Somalia Maritime Territorial Dispute in IR perspective

Waweru John Migui, Nyabuti Damaris Kemunto, Dr Anita Kiamba – November 2022- Page No.: 350-355

Kenya-Somalia relations have been strained for some time due to economic and maritime boundary disputes. The area under dispute is a region in the Indian Ocean region stretching for more than 100,000 square kilometers. It is not clear which country could be the rightful owner of the contested area. Furthermore, countries in the global arena have, over the years, gained economic interest in the region as it is rich in oil. These countries include United States, France, Italy, Norway, the United Kingdom, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates (UAE), Qatar, Turkey, and Italy. The International Court of Justice has been the main intermediary of the dispute between Kenya and Somali. However, The ICJ has faced a myriad of challenges in the dispute resolution. At last the International Court of Justice (ICJ) issued its long-awaited verdict in the case of Maritime Delimitation in the Indian Ocean (Somalia v Kenya) on the location of the maritime boundary between Somalia and Kenya on October 12, 2021. The study seeks to understand Kenya-Somalia Maritime Territorial Dispute. The objectives of the study is to analyze the role of the media in the Kenya-Somali maritime dispute and best mode of dispute settlement according to the provisions of Chapter VI of the UN Pacific Settlement of Disputes.

Page(s): 350-355                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 December 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61121

 Waweru John Migui
University of Nairobi, Kenya

 Nyabuti Damaris Kemunto
University of Nairobi, Kenya

 Dr Anita Kiamba
University of Nairobi, Kenya

[1] Aggrey Mutambo. (2020, November 30). Somalia recalls envoy, orders Kenyan ambassador out. The East African. https://www.theeastafrican.co.ke/tea/news/east-africa/somalia-recalls-envoy-3213734
[2] Al Jazeera. “Kenya-Somalia Maritime Boundary Dispute Explained | Kenya News | Al Jazeera,” March 14, 2021. https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2021/3/14/somalia-kenya-maritime-dispute-explained.
[3] AllAfrica. (2020, November 30). Kenya, Somalia in Diplomatic Row as Ambassadors Recalled. AllAfrica.Com. https://allafrica.com/view/group/main/main/id/00075939.html
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[16] Kadagi, N. I., Okafor-Yarwood, I., Glaser, S., & Lien, Z. (2020). Joint management of shared resources as an alternative approach for addressing maritime boundary disputes: The Kenya-Somalia maritime boundary dispute. Journal of the Indian Ocean Region, 16(3), 348-370.
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Waweru John Migui, Nyabuti Damaris Kemunto, Dr Anita Kiamba “An analysis of Kenya-Somalia Maritime Territorial Dispute in IR perspective ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.350-355 November 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61121

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SME Mentoring as a Vital Role for Empowerment: A Case Study in DKI Jakarta

Sabar Napitupulu, S Saiful – November 2022- Page No.: 356-359

The current paper provides an overview of the situation of SMEs in DKI Jakarta. The hope is to improve the economy of SMEs in DKI Jakarta. The method that the author applies is qualitative, searching academic literature and other related materials, focus group discussions to obtain feedback on the design of research reports, and a subjective approach to reviewing existing data and materials. The findings show that almost all SMEs in Indonesia should receive capital assistance from the government. For future research, the authors recommend continuing research by examining in depth the government program for SMEs in DKI Jakarta.

Page(s): 356-359                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 December 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61122

 Sabar Napitupulu
Senior Lecturer of STIE SWADAYA, DKI Jakarta, Indonesia

 S Saiful
Lecturer and Researcher of University in Indonesia

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[5] Hastuti Indra Sari, Sabar Napitupulu, Saiful S “Assisting SMEs in Indonesia through Universities in Indonesia as A Way Out of Empowering SMEs to Achieve Maximum Results” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-8, pp.563-568 August 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6826
[6] Hill, H. (2001). Small and medium enterprises in Indonesia: Old policy challenges for a new administration. Asian survey, 41(2), 248-270.
[7] Irjayanti, M., & Azis, A. M. (2012). Barrier factors and potential solutions for Indonesian SMEs. Procedia economics and finance, 4, 3-12
[8] Kusumawardhani, D., Rahayu, A. Y., & Maksum, I. R. (2015). The role of government in MSMEs: The empowerment of MSMEs during the free trade era in Indonesia. Australasian Accounting, Business and Finance Journal
[9] Rekarti, E., & Doktoralina, C. M. (2017). Improving business performance: A proposed model for SMEs.
[10] Sedyastuti, K. (2018). Analisis Pemberdayaan UMKM Dan Peningkatan Daya Saing Dalam Kancah Pasar Global. INOBIS: Jurnal Inovasi Bisnis Dan Manajemen Indonesia, 2(1), 117 – 127. https://doi.org/10.31842/jurnal-inobis.v2i1.65
[11] Sugeng, Adi Nur Rohman, Widya Romasindah, Saiful S “Regulatory and Policy Arrangement of The Textile Industry and National Textile Products for Clothing Resilience” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-9, pp.05-15 September 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.6901
[12] Sarwoko, E., & Frisdiantara, C. (2016). Growth determinants of small medium enterprises (SMEs). Universal Journal of Management, 4(1), 36-41.
[13] O’Dwyer, M., Gilmore, A. and Carson, D. (2009), “Innovative marketing in SMEs”, European Journal of Marketing, Vol. 43 No. 1/2, . https://doi.org/10.1108/03090560910923238
[14] Panjaitan, J. M., Timur, R. P., & Sumiyana, S. (2020). How does the Government of Indonesia empower SMEs? An analysis of the social cognition found in newspapers. Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies.
[15] Peel, D. (2004). Coaching and mentoring in small to medium sized enterprises in the UK: Factors that affect success and a possible solution. International Journal of Evidence Based Coaching and Mentoring, 2(1), 46-56.
[16] Sarwoko, E., & Frisdiantara, C. (2016). Growth determinants of small medium enterprises (SMEs). Universal Journal of Management, 4(1), 36-41.
[17] Machmud, A., & Hidayat, Y. M. (2020). Characteristics of Islamic entrepreneurship and the business success of SMEs in Indonesia. Journal of Entrepreneurship Education, 23(2), 1-16.

Sabar Napitupulu, S Saiful “SME Mentoring as a Vital Role for Empowerment: A Case Study in DKI Jakarta” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.356-359 November 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61122

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The Mediating Effect of Teamwork on The Relationship Between Empowering Leadership and Work Engagement of Teachers

Arnold Jr. Teorosio – November 2022- Page No.: 360-370

This study determines the mediating effect of teamwork on the relationship between empowering leadership and work engagement of teachers. This study employed quantitative non-experimental research design utilizing correlational technique. This was conducted at Davao del Norte Division in which there are 300 respondents in study, who respondent the three sets of modified questionnaires. A quantitative non-experimental research design was used and employed the validated questionnaire were the researcher reliable instrument. Mean scores were obtained in determining the level of empowering leadership, of which all the indicators rated very high which mean that empowering leadership of teachers was always manifested. Same as to work engagement of the teachers in which all the indicators rated very high which means that work engagement was always manifested. Teamwork also of the teachers were rated very high which means that teamwork of teachers in school was always manifested. The relationship between empowering leadership and work engagement was significant. Hence, the relationship between empowering leadership and teamwork and Teamwork and work engagement were all significant. Teamwork has a partial mediating effect between empowering leadership and work engagement

Page(s): 360-370                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 December 2022

DOI : 10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61123

  Arnold Jr. Teorosio
Department of Education, Philippines

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[2] Amundsen, S. and O.L Martinsen, ‘Empowering leadership: Construct clarification, conceptualization, and validation of a new scale’, The Leadership Quarterly, vol. 25, 2020, pp. 487-511.
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[15] Lake, D., Baerg, K., & Paslawski, T. Teamwork, Leadership and Communication: Collaboration Basics for Health Professionals. Brush Education, 2017.
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Arnold Jr. Teorosio, “The Mediating Effect of Teamwork on The Relationship Between Empowering Leadership and Work Engagement of Teachers” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.360-370 November 2022 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.47772/IJRISS.2022.61123

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Language and Religious Interplay of Nigeria’s in/Security Challenges on Selected Social Media Platforms

Priscilla Queen KPAREVZUA, and Henry Demenongo ABAYA – November 2022- Page No.: 371-378

Social media in the last decade has increasingly become a veritable platform where people vent their minds on varied social and national issues. That Nigeria is bedevilled with myriads of security challenges – from terrorism, to banditry, kidnappings and secessionists agitations amongst others is not in doubt. What require amplification however, are how language forms and religious sentiments, particularly on social media, aggravate and or dowse in/security challenges. Adopting M. A. K. Halliday’s Systemic Functional Semiotics (1978), this study examines selected social media platforms: Facebook, WhatsApp, Instagram, and Twitter to determine how language forms and religious sentiments combine with images to flame or mitigate in/security challenges in Nigeria. The study found that religious sentiments – both positive and negative transcend language forms that comment on issues of conflict in the social media, while positive sentiments attempt to build/enhance/galvanise human coexistence, negative sentiments. tend to engender acrimony and disaffection amongst people. These coupled with varied pictorial images greatly impact in/security situations in the country. An understanding multimodality as a feature of communication thus greatly enhances construction and deconstruction of text including issues of conflict.

Page(s): 371-378                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 December 2022

 Priscilla Queen KPAREVZUA
Department of English, University of Jos, Nigeria

 Henry Demenongo ABAYA
Department of English, University of Jos, Nigeria

[1] Alabi Taofeek Olanrewaju (2018) A Sociolinguistic Approach to Security Challenges and Sustainable National Development in Nigeria International Journal of English Literature and Social Sciences (IJELS) Vol-3, Issue-5, Sept -Oct, 2018 https://dx.doi.org/10.22161/ijels.3.5.5ISSN: 2456-7620 www.ijels.com
[2] Ayodeji Olukoju, et.al. (2018) Security Challenges and Management in Modern Nigeria Cambridge Scholars Publishing ISBN (10): 1-5275-1660-1 ISBN (13): 978-1-5275-1660-1
[3] Halliday, Michael A. K. 1978. Language as social semiotic. London: Edward Arnold.
[4] Halliday, Michael A. K. & Christian M. I. M. Matthiessen. 2004. An introduction to functional grammar, 3rd edn. London: Edward Arnold.
[5] Ogundepo Abimbola Olusola, et.al. (2017). Language, Communication and National Security. International Journal of Advanced Academic Research | Arts, Humanities & Education| ISSN: 2488-9849Vol. 3, Issue 8 (August 2017) Worldwide Knowledge Sharing Platform | www.ijaar.org
[6] Onifade Comfort, Imhonopi et.al (2013). Addressing the Insecurity Challenge in Nigeria: The Imperative of Moral Values and Virtue Ethics. Global Journal of HUMAN SOCIAL SCIENCE Political Science, Volume 13 Issue 2 Online ISSN: 2249-460x &Print ISSN: 0975-587X
[7] Okeke, Fidelia Azuka (2012). Language Can: Ensuring National Security through Effective Use of Language. An International Multidisciplinary Journal, Ethiopia Vol. 6 (4), (Pp. 216-233) Serial No. 27, October, 2012 ISSN 1994-9057 (Print) ISSN 2070–0083 (Online) DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/afrrev.v6i4.15

Priscilla Queen KPAREVZUA, and Henry Demenongo ABAYA “Language and Religious Interplay of Nigeria’s in/Security Challenges on Selected Social Media Platforms ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.371-378 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/371-378.pdf

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Strategies for Curbing Examination Malpractices: A Mediating Role of Gender

Justice Dadzie, Ruth Annan-Brew (PhD), John Ahorsu-Walker – November 2022- Page No.: 379-385

The purpose of the study was to examine the perception of teachers and students towards the efficiency of the techniques implemented to reduce examination malpractices in the Sekondi-Takoradi Metropolis. Two hypotheses were tested. The design for the study was a descriptive survey. The sample of the study comprised 280 invigilation teachers and 370 students from 10 public senior high schools in Sekondi-Takoradi. A 4-point rating scale questionnaire named “Stakeholders Perceptions of the Effectiveness of the Strategies for Curbing Examination Malpractice Questionnaire (SPESCEMQ)” was adapted. Means, standard deviation and, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was used for analysing data. The results of the study revealed that the strategies adopted for curbing pre-examination malpractice strategies were effective, but post-examination malpractices were slightly effective in Sekondi-Takoradi, Ghana.

Page(s): 379-385                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 December 2022

 Justice Dadzie
Department of Education and Psychology, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana

 Ruth Annan-Brew (PhD)
Department of Education and Psychology, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana

 John Ahorsu-Walker
Department of Education and Psychology, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana

[1] Adamu, H. (2013). Determinants of patient waiting time in the general outpatient department of a tertiary health institution in North Western Nigeria. Annals of medical and health sciences research, 3(4), 588-592.
[2] Asante-Kyei, K., & Nduro, K. (2014). Inclining Factors towards Exam Misconducts among Students in Takoradi Polytechnic, Ghana. Journal of Education and Practice, 5(22), 66-73.
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[4] Cornelius-Ukpepi, B. U., & Ndifon, R. A. (2012). Factors that influence exam misconduct and academic performance in primary science among primary six pupils in Cros River State, Nigeria. Journal of Education and Practice, 3, 59-68.
[5] Dzakadzie, Y. (2015). Stakeholders’ attitude towards exam misconducts in Senior High Schools in Volta Region of Ghana. African Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies, 8, 35-43.
[6] Joshua, M. T. (2008). Intervention strategies in curbing exam misconduct in schools: The role of government and teachers. Paper presented at Stakeholders Forum on Exam Misconduct, organized by Cross River State Ministry of Education, Calabar.
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[8] Leming, J.S. (2005). Cheating behaviour, subject variables, and components of the internal-external scale under high and low-risk conditions.
[9] Lobel, T.E, & Levanon, I. (2004). Gender difference in adolsescents’ cheating behaviour. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from http://www.academicjournals.org/ijpc/pdf/
[10] Maduabum, M.A; & Maduabum, C. I. (2003). Exam misconduct and standards: Reflection on society, institution, and teacher-related factors. Ankpa: Cuca Communications Ltd.
[11] Obo, F.E. (2008). Education stakeholders’ attitudes towards exam misconduct and their preferred intervention strategies in Cross River State secondary schools’ system, Nigeria. Unpublished Ph.D. Dissertation). University of Calabar, Cross River State.
[12] Olasehinde- Williams, F.A.O, Abdullahi, O.E & Owolabi, H.O. (2003). Relationship between background variables and cheating tendencies among students of a federal university in Nigeria. Retrieved July 19, 2011, from http://www.unillorin.edu.ng|journals|education|nijef.
[13] Olatoye, R.A. (2006). Checking the menace of exam misconduct: A call for more teaching and learning in schools. Retrieved October 15, 2010, from http://www.naere.org/journal/volums,/nco.1.
[14] Oluwatelure, F.A. (2008). Perception of academic integrity violation and exam issues by selected members of the university community. Pakistan Journal of Social science, 5 (7), 680-690.
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[16] Onuka, O. U., & Durowoju, O. E. (2013). Stakeholders’ role in curbing exam misconduct in Nigeria. International Journal of Economy, Management and Social Sciences, 6, 342- 348.
[17] Onyechere, I. (2005). Exam ethic handbook. Lagos: Exam Ethics project.
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[20] Yayra, A. (2015). Une infirmière qu’il fait bon connaître: Amenudzie Yayra. Canadian Oncology Nursing Journal/Revue canadienne de soins infirmiers en oncologie, 25(1), 124.

Justice Dadzie, Ruth Annan-Brew (PhD), John Ahorsu-Walker “Strategies for Curbing Examination Malpractices: A Mediating Role of Gender” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.379-385 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/379-385.pdf

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An Investigation in to The Awareness of The Labour Act in Ghanaian Public University – The Case C. K. Tedam University of Technology and Applied Sciences

Michael Adusei Boadu, PhD – November 2022- Page No.: 386-390

The purpose of this study is to investigate into the awareness of the Labour Act, 2003 (Act 651). Questionnaires and semi-structured interview were used to solicit both qualitative and quantitative data from the Upper East Region, Navrongo of C. K. Tedam University of Technology And Applied Sciences. The study revealed that 71 (46%), were not aware of the existence of the Act. The study concludes that awareness of the Labour Act at CKT-UTAS is not up to the level expected. It is also recommended that management should institute annual labour week observation to educate employees; staff should be encouraged to acquire copies the Labour Act. The National Labour Commission should established regional and district offices to intensify labour inspections.

Page(s): 386-390                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 December 2022

  Michael Adusei Boadu, PhD
C.K. Tandem University of Technology and Applied Sciences (CKT-UTAS), Ghana

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Michael Adusei Boadu, PhD, “An Investigation in to The Awareness of The Labour Act in Ghanaian Public University – The Case C. K. Tedam University of Technology and Applied Sciences” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.386-390 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/386-390.pdf

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Socio-Economic Impact of COVID-19 on Vulnerable Urban Women in The Informal Sector: A Case of Gweru Urban

A. Moyo (PhD), S. Mhembwe (PhD) – November 2022- Page No.: 391-396

The COVID-19 pandemic has had far reaching adverse impact across the socio-economic livelihoods and subsequently, the wellbeing of the majority of the population in Zimbabwe. The informal sector which is largely dominated by females was negatively impacted due to the tightening of lock downs and travel restrictions as the government responds to the pandemic. The impact led to fragility and conflict where social cohesion was undermined and institutional capacity limited. This paper focuses on the socio-economic impact of COVID-19 on vulnerable urban women. The study took a qualitative approach and was also based on a systematic review of secondary data sources like reports from national and international organizations, journal articles and policy reports. The study finds out that due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the subsequent regulations imposed by the government restricting interprovincial travelling, women entrepreneurs who relied on informal trading were adversely impacted by the measures. The study also observed that the lockdown measures which were imposed to minimize the contagion of the COVID-19 virus ironically granted greater freedoms to women abusers who were stuck with their victims at home. The respondents testified that with the inception of the pandemic and the subsequent lockdown measures, there was an increase in domestic violence cases for most women in communities studied. The study also observed that the pandemic worsened the socio-economic vulnerability for women who lost their livelihoods due to the pandemic. Thus, the study submits that the pandemic did not only cause an increase in gender-based violence for women, but it also disconnected most women from their respective support networks. The study therefore recommends local authorities to have safety nets in place for the vulnerable women especially those who survive on informal trading so as to sustain their livelihoods whenever there are outbreaks of pandemics of such a magnitude as the COVID-19 pandemic. It is further recommended that, the government must establish a fund to assist especially the female entrepreneurs in the informal sector to recover from loses incurred due to COVID-19 induced lock downs.

Page(s): 391-396                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 08 December 2022

 A. Moyo (PhD)
Midlands State University, Gender Institute, Gweru, Zimbabwe

 S. Mhembwe (PhD)
Midlands State University, Gender Institute, Gweru, Zimbabwe

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A. Moyo (PhD), S. Mhembwe (PhD) “Socio-Economic Impact of COVID-19 on Vulnerable Urban Women in The Informal Sector: A Case of Gweru Urban ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.391-396 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/391-396.pdf

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Cultural Values and Entrepreneurship Development

Ezinwo, Iheanyi Ogbakiri*, Gogo, Israel Daminabo and Oriji, Omunakwe Allwell – November 2022- Page No.: 397-401

This opinion paper examined the relationship between cultural values and entrepreneurship development. However, the specific objectives included to examine the relationship between power distance and entrepreneurship development; uncertainty avoidance and entrepreneurship development; individualism and entrepreneurship development; masculinity and entrepreneurship development as well as the relationship between and long – term orientation and entrepreneurship development. In other to achieve this objective, the paper employed survey of literature and qualitative content analysis. The findings of the study showed that there is a relationship between cultural values dimensions of power distance, individualism, uncertainty avoidance, masculinity, long- term orientation and entrepreneurship development. The paper concludes that the general tendencies of a society may either foster or discourage skills development programs, self employment, new venture creation and support for existing businesses. Based on the findings, the study recommended that, in cases where certain values of a society are perceived to be discouraging entrepreneurial activities, a mix of approaches that will furnish the people with new information, experiences and skills can be inteoduced to change the mindset of the people towards achievement motivation and new venture creation

Page(s): 397-401                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 08 December 2022

 Ezinwo, Iheanyi Ogbakiri
Department of Management, Entrepreneurship Option, Ignatius Ajuru University of Education, Rumuolumeni, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

 Gogo, Israel Daminabo
Department of Management, Entrepreneurship Option, Ignatius Ajuru University of Education, Rumuolumeni, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

 Oriji, Omunakwe Allwell
Department of Management, Entrepreneurship Option, Ignatius Ajuru University of Education, Rumuolumeni, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

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Ezinwo, Iheanyi Ogbakiri*, Gogo, Israel Daminabo and Oriji, Omunakwe Allwell “Cultural Values and Entrepreneurship Development” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.397-401 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/397-401.pdf

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Entrepreneurial University: Assessing the Concept in Zimbabwean State Universities Harare, Zimbabwe

Makanzwa Mercy Masunda, Patience Hove, John Marumbwa, Mlisa Jasper Ndlovu – November 2022- Page No.: 402-413

The world over universities are taking a new trajectory, evolving from their tripartite mission of teaching and learning, research and community service to be at the forefront of innovation and entrepreneurship. This evolution forces integration of social and economic development into the university curriculum and propels the transformation from a conventional university to an entrepreneurial one. The aim of study was to assess how far state universities have become entrepreneurial and innovative. The data was collected in 2022 with an entrepreneurial self-assessment survey that was based on the HEInnovate framework, an entrepreneurial university evaluation tool that provides a guiding framework of key pillars of individual and organisational capacities required of a university to be entrepreneurial. Out of the 13 state universities in the country, responses were obtained from 11 institutions. The analysis concentrated on the assessments of the eight dimensions of entrepreneurial and innovative capacities. The top three dimensions are digital transformation and capability (mean of 3.73), university business/external relationships for knowledge (mean of 3.64), and leadership and governance (mean of 3.55) while the bottom three are measuring the impact of their entrepreneurial efforts (mean of 3.36), organizational capacity, people and incentives (mean of 3.14) and entrepreneurial development in teaching and learning (mean of 2.97). The researchers strongly recommend Zimbabwean state universities to work very hard to rectify the negative dimensions before one can say they have become entrepreneurial and innovative

Page(s): 402-413                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 08 December 2022

  Makanzwa Mercy Masunda
Harare Institute of Technology, Technopreneurship Development Centre, Zimbabwe

  Patience Hove
University of Zimbabwe P. O. Box MP 167, Mt Pleasant Harare, Harare, Zimbabwe

  John Marumbwa
Dept of Management Studies, Great Zimbabwe University Masvingo, Zimbabwe

  Mlisa Jasper Ndlovu
Dept of Business Management, National University of Science and Technology, Zimbabwe

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[36] Solent University What Does Knowledge Exchange Look Like ? https://www.solent.ac.uk/research-innovation-enterprise 09/01/2022)
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Makanzwa Mercy Masunda, Patience Hove, John Marumbwa, Mlisa Jasper Ndlovu, “Entrepreneurial University: Assessing the Concept in Zimbabwean State Universities Harare, Zimbabwe” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.402-413 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/402-413.pdf

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Accessing The Role of Local Culture in Community Development

Olanipekun Olubunmi Adebola, Kayode Gladys Modupe, and Adedokun Mary Olufunke – November 2022- Page No.: 414-418

Culture is communication and value shared. It involves symbols, heroes and rituals and more importantly values and norms that can shape people’s lives towards their own development and the development of communities. Culture which can be referred to as the cumulative deposit of knowledge, experience, beliefs, values and attitudes has not always been really appreciated and acknowledged as playing any meaningful role in the process of community development. This paper examined what role culture is expected to play in the development of individuals and communities. In its role in community development, local cultures contributes to building a sense of local identity and solidarity, thereby, serving as a viable tool in shaping the effectiveness of development options in communities. The paper found among others that cultural life is among the most important factors determining the satisfaction of the life of the people and that people value social relationships which is fostered by the culture of the people, which builds up into personal and community development. It was also found that culture would awaken creativity, which leads to economic buoyancy of individuals and communities. Engaging local culture for development would enhance mobilization of people towards participation in community development and this will influence quality of life, welfare of the community members and sustainability of communities. It is recommended that leaders of community should mobilize people for cultural engagements and government should include activities in curriculum of schools

Page(s): 414-418                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 08 December 2022

 Olanipekun Olubunmi Adebola
Department of Adult Education and Community Development, Faculty of Education, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria

 Kayode Gladys Modupe
Department of Adult Education and Community Development, Faculty of Education, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria

 Adedokun Mary Olufunke
Department of Adult Education and Community Development, Faculty of Education, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria

[1] Adedokun, M.O. (2020) A handbook of community development. Lagos, Honey Crown Educational Publishers
[2] Adedokun,M.O. (2011) Education for maintenance culture in Nigeria: Implication for community development. International Journal of Sociology and Anthropology 3(8), 290-294
[3] Adedokun,M.O. (2011) Attitudes of students to adult education as a course of study: A case study of the Ekiti State University. European Scientific Journal 8(1) 65-72
[4] Adedokun,M.O. (2011) “ Community participation in Community Development” in Borode, M (ed) (2011) Integrated Approach to Adult and Non- Formal Education. Lagos, Frontline Publishers
[5] Adekola, G. (2005) Analysis of the selected demographic and socio cultural factors influencing participation in urban dwellers in solid waste management in Ibadan, University of Ibadan. Unpublished Ph.D Thesis
[6] Anyanwu, C.N. (1992) Community Development: The Nigerian experience Ibadan, Gabesther Educational Publishers
[7] Christenson, J.A. and Robbinson,J.W. (1989) Community development in Perspective. Iowa, Iowa State University Press
[8] Definition of Culture (2022) people.tamu.edu/choudbury/culture.htm Acessed 20 February, 2022
[9] Egenti, M.N (2005). Community Development and Adult Education Practice in Nigeria: Lagos, Vita-Nasco and Company
[10] Flora, C.B., Flora, J.D. & Swanson, L.E (1992) Rural Communities: Legacy Change. Boulder,Colorado, West View Press
[11] Friedman, J. (1996) Rethinking poverty: Empowerment and citizen’s rights. International social Science Journal 148: 161-172
[12] Harrison, L, Huntington, S.& Samuel, P.C. (eds) (2000) Culture Matters: How Values Shape Human Progress, New York; Basic Books
[13] Majuere, F. (2017) The application of Riga for the title of the European Capital of culture https://riga2014.org/files/pdf/gramate/ekg_book_2009_full_eng_publish_pdf Accessed 13March, 2022
[14] Ogunbiyi, D.O. (1995). Community Development. Principles and Practice. Ijebu-Ode: Opeyemi Press
[15] Rakodi, C. (1991) Developing institutional capacity to meet the housing needs of the urban poor: Experience in Kenya, Tanzania and Zambia. Cities 8, 228- 245
[16] Tjarve, B. & Zemite, L. (2016) The role of cultural activities in community development. Acta Univarsitatis Agriculturarae et Silviculturae Mendelinae Brynensis. 64 (6) 2151-2160
[17] William, L. (2004) Culture and community development: Towards new conceptualizations and practice. Community Development Journal 39 (4)345-359.

Olanipekun Olubunmi Adebola, Kayode Gladys Modupe, and Adedokun Mary Olufunke “Accessing The Role of Local Culture in Community Development ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.414-418 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/414-418.pdf

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Guava Forests and Other Wild Fruits: A Panacea to Human-Wildlife Conflict, Deforestation and Climate Change in Zimbabwe’s Rusape – Matsika Area

Mandevere Benjamin PhD – November 2022- Page No.: 419-422

The objective of the study was to examine and explain the role of wild Guava tree in the periphery of cultivated communal land of Matsika area of Rusape, Zimbabwe in protecting crops and preserving forests. Interviews and field observations were employed as data gathering tools. Secondary data from literature and other records were also consulted. Findings revealed that local people preserve trees on the periphery of their fields to ensure that the Guava fruits and other wild fruit trees provide food to wild animals that destroy their crops. This forms a sustainable forest management system and an almost absolute solution to the human wildlife conflict as well as deforestation. During the rain season when baboons and monkeys are caught between the crops in the fields and the buffer of the guavas forest at the periphery of the fields, the crops are protected. The only available solution to ensuring a good harvest by farmers is by ensuring that the guava and other fruit trees are not cut or burnt as these provide the much-needed food for baboons, monkeys as well as villagers. This dual solution to deforestation and human wildlife conflict cannot be underestimated. For the good of their crops villagers go a long way in ensuring that every fruit tree around their arable land is protected and should not for any reason be cut or burnt. This in a nutshell has contributed significantly to the restoration of forest and adaptation to climate change. Forests are critical to the survival of humanity and the regulation of climate. It is therefore recommended that there be public private partnership (PPP) in preserving forests. That environmental and forest management institution educate the public on the use of alternative sources of energy and spare forest at all societal levels.

Page(s): 419-422                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 08 December 2022

 Mandevere Benjamin PhD
Environmental Management, University of South Africa (UNISA), Zimbabwe

 

[1] FAO 2021 Addressing the human – wildlife Conflict to Improve people’s livelihoods http://www.fao.org/forestry/wildlife
[2] Kupcak. V. 2011 Regional Importance and Forestry for Rural Development. Acta univ.agric.et silvic. Mendel. Brun.,2011, LIX, No.4, pp137 -142
[3] Mekonen. S. 2020 Coexistence between human and wildlife: the nature, causes and mitigations of human wildlife conflicts around Bale Mountains National Park Southeast Ethiopia. BMC ecology, 20 (1), 1 – 9.
[4] Seppala, R., Buck, A., Katila, P. (eds). 2009. Adaptation of forests and people to climate change: A global assessment report IUFRO World Series Vol. 22. IUFRO, Vienna. 224 p.

Mandevere Benjamin PhD “Guava Forests and Other Wild Fruits: A Panacea to Human-Wildlife Conflict, Deforestation and Climate Change in Zimbabwe’s Rusape – Matsika Area” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.419-422 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/419-422.pdf

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Employment in the Informal Economy: A Sociological Study of Informal Sector and Street Vending Activists in the Period of COVID-19 Pandemic at Gopalganj Sadar, Bangladesh

Md. Majnur Rashid, Md. Maharaj, Sohani Farha – November 2022- Page No.: 423-431

Informal sector and businesses activities are directly dependent on Covid-19. It has been observed that there is influx of population as well as natural population growth which created tremendous problem in providing services by the different urban public agencies as well as providing employment opportunities for the ever increasing population. As a result, the new migrants are compelled to work in the informal sector where there are fewer requirements of capital and other supporting services and Covid-19 is impediment. Gopalganj is the still rising city of Bangladesh where most of the population is the migrants from the neighboring districts. The present study has been conducted with an aim to find out the socio-economic status, forms and structure, distribution pattern and Covid-19 risk of informal sector business activities in Gopalganj Sadar, Bangladesh. The study shows that, most of the young people are engaged in the informal sector business activities. The study revealed three types of informal- trade food, services and others. The trade food activities dominate the informal sector in the Gopalganj Sadar. It has been observed that, few numbers of women engaged in the informal sector are engaged in trade food. It also observed that informal worker faced covid-19 risks. Most of the informal sector business activities have been developed with their own capital and few people received institutional loan so far. The reasons for selecting the location for the informal sector business activities are availability of space, availability of customers, demand for the particular type of activity etc. In this sector service is sold instead of any product and obviously at low cost. There are some services that are available only in informal sector.

Page(s): 423-431                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 08 December 2022

 Md. Majnur Rashid
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University, Gopalganj-8100, Bangladesh

 Md. Maharaj
Department of Sociology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University, Gopalganj-8100, Bangladesh

 Sohani Farha
MSS, Department of Political Science, Eden Mohila College under University of Dhaka, Bangladesh

[1] Akharuzzaman, M. & Atsushi, D. (2010). Public Management for Street Vendor Problems in Dhaka City, Bangladesh. Proceedings of the International Conference on Environmental Aspects of Bangladesh (ICEAB10), 10-11 September, Japan.
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[13] Khan, M. S. I., A. Sayeed, A. Akter, M. A. Islam & S. Akter (2018). Food safety and hygiene practices of vendors during chain of street food production in Barisal city. Food Safety and health, 1(1), 57-65.
[14] Losby, J. L., Else, J. F., Kingslow, M. E., Edgcomb, E. L., Malm, E. T., & Kao, V. (2002). Informal economy literature review. ISED Consulting and Research, 1, 55.
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[18] Parvez, M., Al-Mamun, M., Rahaman, M., Akter, S., Fatema, K., Sadia, H., & Intesar, A. (2023). COVID-19 in Bangladesh: A systematic review of the literature from march 2020 to march 2021. Journal of Global Business Insights, 8(1), 1-15. doi: 10.5038/2640-6489.8.1.1186
[19] Rahman S.M.A. & M. Junayed (2017). Livelihood sustainability of street vendors: A study in Dhaka city. Conference paper.
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Md. Majnur Rashid, Md. Maharaj, Sohani Farha “Employment in the Informal Economy: A Sociological Study of Informal Sector and Street Vending Activists in the Period of COVID-19 Pandemic at Gopalganj Sadar, Bangladesh ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.423-431 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/423-431.pdf

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Poverty and Environmental Sustainability: A Case Study of Gwagwalada Area Council, FCT, Abuja

Ekpo, C. G. and Haruna, I. O. – November 2022- Page No.: 432-438

This study assessed the effects of poverty on environmental sustainability in Gwagwalada Area Council, Abuja. The study was anchored on three research questions. The survey research design was adopted for the study. The entire inhabitants of the Area Council made up the population of the study. One hundred and forty-three (143) respondents were randomly selected from five communities within the Area Council to constitute the sample size of the study using the simple random sampling procedure. Instrument for data collection for the study was titled: Poverty and Environmental Sustainability Assessment Scale Questionnaire (PESASQ). It was constructed on a 4-point Likert scale format. The descriptive statistics of frequency count, mean, and simple percentage were used for analyzing data and answering the research questions. The study revealed that deforestation, climate change, and depletion of natural resources are caused by poverty in Gwagwalada Area Council, Abuja. It was recommended that inhabitants of Gwagwalada Area Council should be sensitized both formally and informally on the effects of poverty on environmental sustainability by means of environmental education, and government should be more concerned about sustaining environmental resources, hence, alleviating poverty among citizenry is a sine qua non.

Page(s): 432-438                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 08 December 2022

 Ekpo, C.G.
Department of Science and Environmental Education, University of Abuja, Nigeria

 Haruna, I. O.
Department of Science and Environmental Education, University of Abuja, Nigeria

[1] Abuchow, J. (2015). The effects of poverty on environmental sustainability: the case study of the Kassena-Nankana west district, Upper East Region. Unpublished Master Dissertation of Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana.
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[3] Daka, T. (2020). FG presents SDGs voluntary national review report to UN today. Retrieved from https://guardian.ng/news/fg-presents-sdgs-voluntary-national -review-report-to-un-today/
[4] Duran, D. C., Artene, A., Gogana, L. M. & Duran, V. (2015). The objectives of sustainable development: Ways to achieve welfare. Retrieved from www.sciencedirect.com
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[6] Etongo, D., Djenontin, I. N. S. & Kanninen, M. (2016). Poverty and environmental degradation in southern Burkina Faso: An assessment based on participatory methods. Retrieved from www.mdpi.com/journal/land
[7] Federal Government of Nigeria (2017). Implementation of the SDGs: A national voluntary review. Retrieved from https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/content/documents/16029Nigeria. pdf
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[10] Nzeh, C. E. P. (2012). Economic analysis of deforestation in Enugu State, Nigeria. PhD Thesis Submitted to the Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Nigeria, Nsukka.
[11] Odogwu, (2018). Assessing SDGs implementation in Nigeria. Retrieved from https://punchng.com/assessing-sdgs-implementation-in-nigeria/
[12] Oduwaye, L. & Lawanson, T. O. (2012). Poverty and environmental degradation in the Lagos Metropolis. Retrieved from http://elring.org/Poverty%20And%20Environmental%20 Degradation%20In%20The%20Lagos%20Metropoli
[13] Roche, M. Y., Hans, V., Agbaegbu, C., Taylor, B., Manfred, F. & Oladipo, E. O. (2020). Achieving sustainable development goals in Nigeria’s power sector: Assessment of transition pathways. Climate Policy, 20(7), 846 – 865.
[14] Touray, A. (2014). How poverty lead to environmental degradation? Common rural and urban environmental problems. Retrieved from https://visionaryfoundation.wordpress.com /2014/11/11/how-poverty-lead-to-environmental-degradation-common-rural-and-urban-environmental-problems/
[15] Uneke, C. & Ibeh, L. (2012). Impacts of deforestation on malaria in South-Easter Nigeria: The epidemiological, socio-economic and ecological implications. The Internet Journal of Third World Medicine, 8(1), 1 – 7.

Ekpo, C. G. and Haruna, I. O. “Poverty and Environmental Sustainability: A Case Study of Gwagwalada Area Council, FCT, Abuja” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.432-438 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/432-438.pdf

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Influence of Book-Keeping Practices on Financial Performance of Micro Enterprises (MEs) in Informal Settlements of Kisumu City, Kenya

Collins Amimo Lumumba, Dr. Fredric Aila – November 2022- Page No.: 439-447

Book keeping practices including the maintenance of sales and purchases books, cash/bank reconciliation practices, and maintenance of cash book among others, are financial control mechanisms relevant for enhancing business performance. However, while Micro Enterprises (MEs) constitute over 80% of total small enterprises across the globe, their rates of failure is also high (at 50 – 70%). In Kisumu city of Kenya where over 60% of the total inhabitants reside in informal settlements served by micro enterprises, over 70% of them collapsed within under 4 years in operation. This questions the effectiveness of book keeping practices in this circumstance. This paper explores the influence book keeping practices on the performance of MEs in informal settlements of Kisumu City, Kenya. Specific objectives were to explore the influences of sales and purchases books, cash/bank reconciliation practices, and maintenance of cash book on performance of MEs in the area. Decision usefulness theory was used to guide the study. Correlational research design was adopted on 360 sampled traders from 3660 targeted traders through Yamane’s formula, from whom primary data was collected via structured questionnaire. Regressions analysis was used to compare the relationship between book keeping practices and financial performance of MEs. The study found that book-keeping practices: maintenance of cashbooks (r=0.431), sales/purchases books (r=0.504) and bank reconciliation (r=0.491) have significant relationship with financial performance of MEs in the informal settlements. Cumulatively, approximately 46.9% of financial performance of MEs is attributed to the book-keeping practices under study. It is therefore concluded that with the enhanced book keeping practices, the MEs operating in informal settlements would gain adequate capital to remain solvent over time.

Page(s): 439-447                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 09 December 2022

 Collins Amimo Lumumba
Maseno University, Kenya

 Dr. Fredric Aila
Maseno University, Kenya

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Collins Amimo Lumumba, Dr. Fredric Aila “Influence of Book-Keeping Practices on Financial Performance of Micro Enterprises (MEs) in Informal Settlements of Kisumu City, Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.439-447 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/439-447.pdf

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Educational Setbacks: It’s Implication on the Quality Administration of Higher Institutions in Rivers State

Isi, Fortune Ihuoma PhD – November 2022- Page No.: 448-450

The study investigated the causes of educational setbacks in Nigeria, despite the efforts of the National Universities Commission (NUC) the educational system is still experiencing some setbacks, hence this research. National Universities Commission (NUC) is a regulatory agency for universities education in Nigeria whose major function is relentlessly guaranteeing the subjective and efficient and effective development of higher education to meet global relevance and competitiveness. Some of the causes of setbacks in education are poor learning environment, examination malpractices, strike actions, insecurity, poor educational foundation, dilapidated facility, high demand of tertiary education etc. the study revealed that strict adherence to NUC admission policy, Employing qualified teacher, post accreditation exercise and so on. The study recommended among others that on job training for staff of the universities can improve the quality, post accreditation exercise will keep the university under check and admission of qualified students therefore universities are encouraged to present themselves the way they are, employ qualify staff and admit students based on merit following the NUC guideline.

Page(s): 448-450                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 09 December 2022

  Isi, Fortune Ihuoma PhD
Department of Educational Management, Faculty of Education, Ignatius Ajuru University of Education, Rumuolumeni, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

[1] Ajemba, H, E., Ahmed, F.M., Ogunode, N.J. & Olatunde- Aiyedun, T.G (2021). Problems facing science teachers in public secondary schools in Nigeria and way forward. International journal of discoveries and innovation in applied sciences 1(5)
[2] Birabil, S.T & Ogeh, and O.W. (2020) Education in Nigeria: challenges and way forward international Journal of Research and reflection 8(1)
[3] Ekpo, C.G. & Aiyedun, T.G. (2018). Environmental Education: Essential tool for the attainment of sustainable development goals in the 21st century Nigeria. The Researcher: A Journal of Contemporary Educational Research, I (I), 124-I 42.
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[5] Ojelade, I.A., Arcgbesola, B.G., Ekele, A., & Aiyedun, T.G. (2020). Effects of Audio-Visual Instructional Materials on Teaching Science Concepts in Secondary Schools in Bwari Area Council Abuja, Nigeria. The Environmental Studies Journal (TESJ), 3, (2)
[6] Onimode, B, (2000). The funding of higher education in Nigeria. Paper presented at the 10th general assembly of the SSCN on social science research and public policy in Nigeria
[7] Ogunode, N.J., Olatunde-Aiyedun, T.G. & Akin-Ibidiran, T.Y. (2021). Challenges preventing effective supervision of universal basic education programme in Kuje Area Council of FCT, Abuja, Nigeria. Middle European Scientific Bulletin,
[8] Ogunode, N.J., Somadina, O. I.., Yahaya, D.M. & Olatunde-Aiyedun, T.G. (2021). Deployment of ICT facilities by Post-Basic Education and career development (PBECD) during Covid-19 in Nigeria: Challenges and way forward. International Journal of Discoveries and Innovations in Applied Sciences, 1(5),
[9] Olatunde-Aiyedun, T.G., Ogunode, N.J. & Eyiolorunse-Aiyedun, C.T. (2021). Assessment of virtual learning during covid-19 lockdown in Nigerian public universities. Academicia Globe: Inder science Research, 2 (5)
[10] Orji, N.O., Ogar, SJ. &Aiyedun, T.G. (2018). Influence of jigsaw-based learning strategy on academic achievement of upper basic students’ in Basic Science in Etim-Ekpo of Akwaibom State. Abuja Journal of Arts and Social Science Education (AJASSE), 1(1)1-12.
[11] Okojie, J.A (2013). The challenge of mandate delivery in the Nigerian universities commission. A special address presented at the retreat for university administrators. Obudu, cross Rivers State
[12] Vlasceanu, L. (2004). Quality assurance and accreditation: a glossary of basic terms and definitions. Buchares: UNESCO-CEPES publishers

Isi, Fortune Ihuoma PhD, “Educational Setbacks: It’s Implication on the Quality Administration of Higher Institutions in Rivers State” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.448-450 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/448-450.pdf

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Implementation of Semarang City Regulations Number 5 Year 2014 on the Handling of Street Children, Households, and Beggers in the City of Semarang. (Study at PGOT Social Service Orphanage – Mardi Utomo Semarang)

Dyah Listyarini, Siti Malikhatun Badriyah – November 2022- Page No.: 451-456

The implementation of the Semarang City Regional Regulation and the rehabilitation of street children, homeless people and beggars in Semarang City have been carried out well. This handling is carried out in collaboration between the Semarang City Civil Service Police Unit and the Central Java Provincial Social Service, because the presence of street children, homeless people and beggars will cause social problems and increase the number of poverty. The handling of these problems is because the Semarang City Government always maintains and maintains public order and enforces the Semarang City Regional Regulations, so that Semarang City becomes a safe, orderly, smooth and healthy city. The research approach used in this research is normative juridical and empirical juridical.

Page(s): 451-456                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 09 December 2022

 Dyah Listyarini
Universitas Diponegoro, Indonesia

 Siti Malikhatun Badriyah
Universitas Diponegoro, Indonesia

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[17]. Wikipedia. (n.d.). Semarang City (Kota Semarang). https://id.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kota_Semarang

Dyah Listyarini, Siti Malikhatun Badriyah “Implementation of Semarang City Regulations Number 5 Year 2014 on the Handling of Street Children, Households, and Beggers in the City of Semarang. (Study at PGOT Social Service Orphanage – Mardi Utomo Semarang) ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) volume-6-issue-11, pp.451-456 November 2022 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-6-issue-11/451-456.pdf

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