A Conceptual Framework for Adopting Islamic Banking and Finance in Libya

Ibrahim Khalifa Mohamed Elghwail, Besar Bin Ngah, Fahd Mohammed Obad, Al-Harath Abdulaziz Mohammed Ateik- April 2023 Page No.: 01-10

The main objective of the current study is conceptualizing a framework about the factors that affect the Islamic Banking and Finance adoption (IBF) in Libya, namely; Knowledge and Awareness, Attitude, Subjective Norms, Perceived behavioural control, and Religiosity. The researcher will utilize quantitative research methods. Primary data was collected from Beneficiaries of financial services in Libya who are anticipated to use IBF are the focus of the present research project’s population targeting efforts. A total of 30 respondents were selected for this study. The researcher has found that all of the developed items in the survey questionnaire have scored a sufficient level of Reliability and Validity. Therefore, these results stressed that this framework can be used in an empirical study to extract further results on the relationship between the variables.

Page(s): 01-10                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 19 April 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8401

 Ibrahim Khalifa Mohamed Elghwail
Al MDINAH International University Malaysia (MEDIU)

 Besar Bin Ngah
Al MDINAH International University Malaysia (MEDIU)

 Fahd Mohammed Obad
Al MDINAH International University Malaysia (MEDIU)

 Al-Harath Abdulaziz Mohammed Ateik
Al MDINAH International University Malaysia (MEDIU)

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Ibrahim Khalifa Mohamed Elghwail, Besar Bin Ngah, Fahd Mohammed Obad, Al-Harath Abdulaziz Mohammed Ateik “A Conceptual Framework for Adopting Islamic Banking and Finance in Libya ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-8-issue-4, pp.01-10 April 2023  DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8401

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Contribution of Muslim Women in Writing Field: A Survey Based on the Noorul Ain Najmul Husain Works

M.N.F. Farhana, M.N.P. Rifasha, P.M.A. Aleeshan, Mohamed Haniffa Mohamed Nairoos- April 2023 Page No.: 11-16

In the 21st century, the media is an instrument of vigilance. Historically, women’s contribution to the media has been marginal. In the 21st century, women’s contributions in the media industry began to increase after various struggles. As a result women are participating in various media activities. And although women have contributed massively to the success of modern media, men’s contribution to the media industry is greater than that of women. Moreover, many studies show that the contribution of women has not reached a significant level compared to the contribution of men. Nevertheless, the contributions of women can be particularly observed in the media industry in Sri Lanka. In this background, Kalapusanam Nurul Ain Najmul Husain is seen as one of the Muslim women writers in Sri Lanka not only in the field of poetry, but can also her contribution be seen in various fields like novels, short stories, magazines and newspapers. In this way, this research is a review with the main objective to identify the writing personalities of Kalapusanam Nurul Ain Najmul Husain. And, the study is qualitative and secondary data were used to achieve the task. Particularly the data has been reviewed through books, magazines, journals, internet articles, videos and presented through the narrative method. The study reveals that the personality is a famous writer in various fields such as newspapers, articles, magazines, poetry and short stories. Therefore, we hope that our study will identify the literary contribution of Kalapusanam Nurul Ain Najmul (Husain) and by reading such literary contribution, Muslim women in Sri Lanka will inspire future generations to follow the knowledge of the literary field.

Page(s): 11-16                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 23 April 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8402

 M.N.F. Farhana
Department of Islamic Studies, Faculty of Islamic Studies & Arabic Language, SEUSL

 M.N.P. Rifasha
Department of Islamic Studies, Faculty of Islamic Studies & Arabic Language, SEUSL

 P.M.A. Aleeshan
Department of Islamic Studies, Faculty of Islamic Studies & Arabic Language, SEUSL

 Mohamed Haniffa Mohamed Nairoos
Senior Lecturer, Department of Islamic Studies, Faculty of Islamic Studies & Arabic Language, SEUSL.

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M.N.F. Farhana, M.N.P. Rifasha, P.M.A. Aleeshan, Mohamed Haniffa Mohamed Nairoos “Contribution of Muslim Women in Writing Field: A Survey Based on the Noorul Ain Najmul Husain Works ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-8-issue-4, pp.11-16 April 2023  DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8402

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Influence of Physico-functional Characteristics and Germination Effect on Gelation Property of Flour/Isolates from Two Varieties (DAS & BS) of Nigerian Cultivated Solojo Cowpea (Vigna Unguiculata L. Walp)

Olubamike A. ADEYOJU, Henry O. CHIBUDIKE, Bolanle O. OLUWOLE, Kayode O. ADEBOWALE and Chinedum E. CHIBUDIKE- April 2023 Page No.: 17-28

Influence of Physico-functional Characteristics and Germination Effect on Gelation Property of the floor and isolates from the two varieties (DAS & BS) of Nigeria cultivated solojo cowpeas were investigated. Results show that germination improved the gelation capacity of the FFDAS as it brought the Least Gelation Concentration (LGC) from 4%w/v to 2%w/v except for 6 h and 72 h germination; likewise, FFBS had its LGC improve with germination from 4%w/v to 2%w/v, except for 6 h. The protein isolates of DAS and BS also had improved LGC with germination, going from 14%w/v to 6%w/v and 16%w/v to 8%w/v respectively. Gelation property of raw (native/ control) and germinated Dark-ash Solojo Cowpea (FFDAS, DFDAS, FFBS and DFBS flours; DAS and BS protein isolate) was influenced by germination and physico-functional characteristics. The four flour samples, FFDAS, DFDAS, FFBS and DFBS as well as the two protein isolates exhibited some variations in gelation property. The protein isolates gave stiff paste instead of regular gel, going from, DAS, 18 – 4% and BS, 18 – 6%. Disparity in gelling properties observed, may be as a result of the proportion of diverse components for example proteins, fat and carbohydrate in the various legume flours. The prevalent charges on the exterior of the proteins, which is affected by pH, causes variation in the balance between the polar and non-polar residues, thereby bringing about differences in gelation.

Page(s): 17-28                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 26 April 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8403

 Olubamike A. ADEYOJU
Production, Analytical and Laboratory Management, Federal Institute of Industrial Research, Oshodi, F.I.I.R.O., Lagos-Nigeria

 Henry O. CHIBUDIKE
Department of Chemical, Fiber and Environmental Technology, Federal Institute of Industrial Research, Oshodi, Lagos-Nigeria

 Bolanle O. OLUWOLE
Department of Food Technology, Federal Institute of Industrial Research Oshodi, FIIRO, Lagos-Nigeria

 Kayode O. ADEBOWALE
Department of Chemistry, Industrial Unit, University of Ibadan, Ibadan-Nigeria

 Chinedum E. CHIBUDIKE
Department of Planning, Technology Transfer and Information Management, Federal Institute of Industrial Research, Oshodi, Lagos-Nigeria

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Olubamike A. ADEYOJU, Henry O. CHIBUDIKE, Bolanle O. OLUWOLE, Kayode O. ADEBOWALE and Chinedum E. CHIBUDIKE “Influence of Physico-functional Characteristics and Germination Effect on Gelation Property of Flour/Isolates from Two Varieties (DAS & BS) of Nigerian Cultivated Solojo Cowpea (Vigna Unguiculata L. Walp) ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-8-issue-4, pp.17-28 April 2023 DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8403

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Industrial Propagation of Phalaenopsis sp. by Bioreactor Technique

Tran Van Minh- April 2023 Page No.: 29-39

Protocorm like bodies (PLB) were used as planting materials. Somatic embryo callus were initiated on medium supplemented with NAA (1mg/l) or 2.4D (1mg/l). Somatic cell suspension were cultured for initiation and for proliferation. on medium MS supplemented with NAA (1mg/l) and NAA (0.5mg/l). The volume of somatic cell suspension for bioreactor cultivation was 20%. Somatic embryo suspension were cultured in bioreactor for initiation and proliferation on the medium MS supplemented with NAA (0.5mg/l). Embryogenic suspension was stimulated on the medium MS supplemented with BA (0.5mg/l) + NAA (0.1mg/l). In vitro shoots of phalaenopsis were regeneration on the medium MS supplemented with BA (0.5mg/l) + NAA (0.1mg/l). Plantlets were enhanced growth and development in immersion-bioreactor cultivation by sinking/rising floated 1min/4hrs. Temperature, light intensity and stirring in stirring-bioreactor cultivation were favored at 26+2oC, 11,1-22,2μmol/m2/s, and 30rpm. Micropropagation of phalaenopsis sp. by bioreactor technique was set up to produce 7,580 plantlets per one liter of somatic embryogenesis.

Page(s): 29-39                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 April 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8404

 Tran Van Minh
Production, Analytical and Laboratory Management, Federal Institute of Industrial Research, Oshodi, F.I.I.R.O., Lagos-Nigeria

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Tran Van Minh “Industrial Propagation of Phalaenopsis sp. by Bioreactor Technique ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-8-issue-4, pp.29-39 April 2023 DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8404

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Mathematical Model and Simulation of Blood Flow Dynamics in Renal Interlobar Artery of Patients with Human immunodeficiency Virus

Abubakar, U., Ugwu, A. C., Tivde, T. and Mbah, GCE- April 2023 Page No.: 40-54

Mathematical models were developed considering wall movement, blood pulsation and flow dynamics of the blood in the interlobar artery. The formulated models were based on the fact that the motion of blood vessel wall is not only influenced by pulsation, but also other physiological processes like heartbeat, breathing, and body posture. The Newton’s second Law of motion was employed in assembling the forces acting on the interlobar artery. The wall shear stress (WSS) was studied alongside, arterial walls to study the actual flow dynamics and investigate the blood flow behaviour. The results of the study were presented on both two – dimensional (2D) and three (3D) – dimensional graphs showing a more realistic interaction between the arterial wall and the blood flow in patients with HIV/AIDS. It was deduced that the blood flow velocity decreased with time across the varying frequency from 0.20Hz to 0.50Hz in the interlobar arterial channel.

Page(s): 40-54                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 April 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8405

 Abubakar, U.
Department of Radiography, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria

 Ugwu, A. C.
Department of Radiography and Radiological Sciences, Nnamdi Adzikiwe University, Awka, Nigeria

 Tivde, T.
Department of Mathematics, Joseph Sarwuan Tarka University, Makurdi, Nigeria

 Mbah, GCE
Department of Mathematics, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria

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Abubakar, U., Ugwu, A. C., Tivde, T. and Mbah, GCE “Mathematical Model and Simulation of Blood Flow Dynamics in Renal Interlobar Artery of Patients with Human immunodeficiency Virus ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-8-issue-4, pp.40-54 April 2023 DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8405

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A Study of The Hole Barrier of Kanthal on Silicon Using Current – Voltage Characteristics

S. P. Kashinje- April 2023 Page No.: 55-61

We report fabrication of a kanthal pSi diode and a study of its hole barrier by Current – Voltage characteristics. The diode fabrication was done by sputter-depositing a kanthal film on a single crystalline p – type Si in the <111> orientation. Kanthal is a metal alloy consisting of 70.6% Iron, 24.1% Chromium, 4.8% Aluminum and 0. 5% Co. The hole barrier on kanthal was determined by I – V characteristics to be ФBh=0.66±0.03 eV. The Rutherford Back Scattering Analysis shows that the composition of the sputtered kanthal films and the parent target are the same.

Page(s): 55-61                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 April 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8406

 S. P. Kashinje
St. Joseph University in Tanzania, College of Engineering and Technology (SJCET), P. O. Box 11007, Dar Es Salaam, TANZANIA

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S. P. Kashinje “A Study of The Hole Barrier of Kanthal on Silicon Using Current – Voltage Characteristics ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-8-issue-4, pp.55-61 April 2023 DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8406

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Linear models for Predicting body weight in crossbred chickens

U.C. Isaac, A. I. Adeolu- April 2023 Page No.: 62-70

Prediction of body weight with linear body measurements of 531day-old crossbred chickens was determined by stepwise regression analysis for mixed sexes at 4 and 8 weeks and separate sexes at 12, 16 and 20 weeks. Shank length was the best single predictor of body weight in Isa Brown x naked neck (IBxNa) at 4 weeks (coefficient of determination, R2 = 65%) and in feathered x Isa Brown (FxIB) at 8 weeks (R2 = 96%). In males, body weight was best predicted by drumstick length (DL) in IBxNa (R2 = 90%) at 12 weeks and in Isa Brown x frizzle feathered (IBxF) at 16 (R2 = 85%) and 20 (R2 = 81%) weeks. The best single predictors of body weight in females were body length (BL) (R2 = 91%), body girth (BG) (R2 = 90%) and body width (BW) (R2 = 90%) in naked neck x Isa Brown (NaxIB) at 12, 16 and 20 weeks, respectively. The best partial predictors of body weight were BG and wing length at 4 weeks (R2 =97%) and BG, BL and keel length (KL) at 8 weeks (R2 =97%) in IBxF; BW and DL (R2 =76%) in normal feathered x Isa Brown (NxIB) males at 16 weeks and BW and DL (R2 =97%) in NxIB females at 20 weeks. The higher R2 values obtained in the models for females made prediction of their body weight more accurate than that of the males. In general, the R2 of mixed sexes ranged from 50-97% and 62-97% at 4 and 8 weeks and for males and females, it ranged from 50-90% and 57-91%; 51-85% and 53-90%; 49-81% and 51-90% at 12, 16 and 20 weeks, respectively. Body weight was best predicted at 8 weeks, and irrespective of genotype, sex and age, the best predictors in single or partial state were BG, BL, KL, BW and DL.

Page(s): 62-70                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 April 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8407

 U.C. Isaac
Department of Animal Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, P.M.B. 5025, Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria.

 A. I. Adeolu
Department of Agriculture (Animal Science Programme), Alex Ekwueme Federal University, Ndufu-Alike Ikwo, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria.

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U.C. Isaac, A. I. Adeolu “Linear models for Predicting body weight in crossbred chickens ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-8-issue-4, pp.62-70 April 2023 DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8407

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Mother’s Knowledge and Attitudes about KADARZI with Toddler Nutritional Status

Rizki Maulidya*, Elvi Maisara, Khayatol Fadhilah, Shaburin Syakur, Yusri- April 2023 Page No.: 71-77

Housewives’ knowledge about KADARZI is essential to improving the nutritional status of toddlers aged 1–5. Toddlers at that age are especially vulnerable to nutritional issues like malnutrition. The purpose of this study was to see the relationship between mothers’ knowledge and attitudes about nutritionally conscious families KADARZI and the nutritional status of toddlers. This study used an analytical survey research design with a cross-sectional approach. Sampling using purposive sampling techniques in 103 respondents of children under five aged 1-5 years. Data collection using questionnaires is followed by data analysis using chi-square tests. Data collection using questionnaires with data analysis using chi-square tests. The results obtained that of the 103 respondents of housewives who have toddlers, 64 of them predominantly have knowledge of good KADARZI with good nutritional status totaling 63 people (98.4%) and poor nutritional status totaling very few only 1 person (1.6%). Furthermore, after conducting statistical tests with bivariate analysis, a p-value of 0.001 was obtained, which showed a p-value of 0.001 < α (0.05), which means that there is a relationship between knowledge about KADARZI and nutritional status in toddlers. Then, the relationship between attitudes about KADARZI and the nutritional status of toddlers with a total of 103 respondents among housewives was obtained from 73 respondents, among whom predominantly had a positive attitude about (KADARZI) with good nutritional status in toddlers totaling 62 people (84.9%) and malnutrition status totaling 11 people (15.1%). After conducting statistical tests with bivariate analysis, a p-value of 0.002 < α (0.05) was obtained, so it can be concluded that there is a relationship between attitudes about (KADARZI) and nutritional status in toddlers.

Page(s): 71-77                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 30 April 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8408

 Rizki Maulidya
STIKes Muhammadiyah Lhokseumawe, Aceh, Indonesia

 Elvi Maisara
STIKes Muhammadiyah Lhokseumawe, Aceh, Indonesia

 Khayatol Fadhilah
STIKes Muhammadiyah Lhokseumawe, Aceh, Indonesia

 Shaburin Syakur
STIKes Muhammadiyah Lhokseumawe, Aceh, Indonesia

 Yusri
STIKes Muhammadiyah Lhokseumawe, Aceh, Indonesia

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Rizki Maulidya*, Elvi Maisara, Khayatol Fadhilah, Shaburin Syakur, Yusri “Mother’s Knowledge and Attitudes about KADARZI with Toddler Nutritional Status ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-8-issue-4, pp.71-77 April 2023 DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8409

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Process system integration

Jelenka Savkovic Stevanovic- April 2023 Page No.: 78-82

Process engineering today is concerned with the understanding and development of systematic procedures for design and optimal operation and control of the chemical process systems. This work motivated by the need to provide a more flexible than existing approaches framework for changes in chemical process engineering in particular, and for predicting the behavior of process systems in general. Integrated method of the process systems development make possible seeking out the most adequate model for simulation of real process design and optimization, that leads to improving current and development a new processes. The study state plant simulation model and dynamic simulation model make significant tools for observation behavior of the process. Comparative study of different processes can established more concurrent process alternatives.

Page(s): 78-82                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 01 May 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8410

 Jelenka Savkovic Stevanovic
Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy Belgrade University, Karnegijeva 4, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia

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Jelenka Savkovic Stevanovic “Process system integration ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-8-issue-4, pp.78-82 April 2023 DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8410

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Combined Effect of Doses of Fertilizer and Different Densities on Agronomic Parameters of Rice (Oryza sativa (L.)) Adapted in Humid Area in The Valley of Benoué, Cameroon

Philémon Kaouvon; Dikko Haicha; Bertrand Wang-Bara; Cyrille Woulbo Biyack; Yvonne Djeoufo- April 2023 Page No.: 83-91

The study was conducted on July 2021, at the Institute of Agricultural Research for Development (IRAD). The main objective of the study was to determine the dose of mineral fertilizers and densities which respond well to the rice culture, variety Nerica L36 in a humid area of the valley of Benoué. Fertilizers doses were: T1 (0 kg NPKSB+100 Kg Urea/ha); T2 (150 kg NPKSB+100 Kg Urea/ha); T3 (200 kg NPKSB+100 Kg Urea/ha; T4 (250 kg NPKSB+100 Kg Urea/ha). Three densities were considered: De1= 20 cm x 20 cm; De2= 25cm x 25cm; De3= 30 cm x 30 cm. The experimental design was a split-plot, with two factors in three replications: Factor 1 concerning fertilizers doses and Factor 2 relating to densities. Evaluation parameters were: the height of plant, the number of tillers, the number of panicle/plants, length of panicles, heading date at 80 % and maturity date. Harvest data collected were: the number of grains/panicles, weight of 1000 grains, potential yields. The results showed that the effect of different amounts especially doses 2, 3 and 4 were highly significant (P≤0.05) in influencing the height of plant, number of tillers, number of panicles/plants, length of panicles for all densities. These densities were considered suitable for growing aspect of rice. On the other hand, the densities 1 and 2 were suitable for the element of heading date at 80 % for the doses 1 and 2, maturity date with dose 1. However, yield aspects were most significant (P≤0.05) with the dose 2, 3 and 4 on a number of grains/panicles and potential yield especially, which permit us to deduce that densities 1, 2 and 3 were suitable for these yield parameters

Page(s): 83-91                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 01 May 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8411

 Philémon Kaouvon
Institute of Agricultural Research for Development (IRAD) Garoua, Cameroon.

 Dikko Haicha
Institute of Agricultural Research for Development (IRAD) Garoua, Cameroon.

 Bertrand Wang-Bara
Institute of Agricultural Research for Development (IRAD) Garoua, Cameroon.

 Cyrille Woulbo Biyack
Institute of Agricultural Research for Development (IRAD) Wakwa, Cameroon

 Yvonne Djeoufo
Institute of Agricultural Research for Development (IRAD) Maroua, Cameroon

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Philémon Kaouvon; Dikko Haicha; Bertrand Wang-Bara; Cyrille Woulbo Biyack; Yvonne Djeoufo “Combined Effect of Doses of Fertilizer and Different Densities on Agronomic Parameters of Rice (Oryza sativa (L.)) Adapted in Humid Area in The Valley of Benoué, Cameroon ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-8-issue-4, pp.83-91 April 2023 DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8411

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Reduction of Active and Reactive Power Losses on Transmission Lines using SSSC

J.I Uzor, D. C. Oyiogu, C.O. Ikaraoha- April 2023 Page No.: 92-108

This paper discusses a comprehensive study on reduction of power (active and reactive) losses in transmission lines using a second generation FACTS device, Static Synchronons Series Compensator (SSSC). Modern restructured power systems sometimes operate with heavily loaded lines resulting in power losses and higher voltage deviations, which may lead to mal-operation of power system and eventual collapse of the system. This is mainly due to continuous and uncertain growth in demand for electrical power. The paper presents a methodology to solve the problem of power losses in the Nigerian 28 – bus power system by incorporating Static Synchronons Series Compensator in the network using Newton-Rahson power flow algorithm. Simulation of power flow solution without and with the FACTS device was done using a Matlab software. The results showed that the maximum power (active and reactive) loss in the system without SSSC occurred in the transmission line connecting bus 17 (Jebba) to bus 23(Shiroro) and a 19.32% loss reduction was obtained on the line after the incorporation of the SSSC FACTS device giving a power saving of 80.68%. The total system active and reactive power losses before the application of SSSC was 205.183MW and 1594.683MVAR respectively. However, when the FACTS device was applied at the weak buses the total system active and reactive power losses reduced to 144.571MW and 1136.863MVAR respectively giving a percentage loss reduction in active and reactive power of 29.54% and 28.71% respectively resulting in a power saving of 70.46% and 71.29%. Hence, more power was available in the network when compared to the base case due to the installation of SSSC. Also an improvement in the voltage magnitude at the weak buses and other buses were noticed as they were all maintained at 1.0 PU.

Page(s): 92-108                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 01 May 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8412

 J.I Uzor
Department of Electrical Engineering, Temple Gate Polytechnic Aba, Nigeria

 D. C. Oyiogu
Department of Electrical Engineering, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Awka, Nigeria

 C.O. Ikaraoha
Department of Electrical Engineering, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Awka, Nigeria

1. Aborisade, D.O., Adebayo, I.G. and Oyesina, K.A. (2014).A Comparism of Voltage Enhancement and Loss Reduction Capabilities of STATCOM and SSSC FACTS controllers.American Journal of Engineering Research (AJER), Vol. 03, Issue 01, Pp. 96-105.
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J.I Uzor, D. C. Oyiogu, C.O. Ikaraoha “Reduction of Active and Reactive Power Losses on Transmission Lines using SSSC ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-8-issue-4, pp.92-108 April 2023 DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8412

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Incidences and Trend of Marine Accident Fatalities in Various River Routes Connecting the Major Sea Ports of Nigeria

Ogboeli, Goodluck, Prince, Iyama, William Azuka and Onuegbu, Williams- April 2023 Page No.: 109-122

The study investigated the incidences and trends of marine accident fatalities in various river routes connecting the major sea ports in Nigeria. This was necessitated by the various cases of deaths, drop in government revenue and presence of wrecks from abandoned boats and ships in the coastal waters. The cross-sectional survey research design was adopted relying on both primary, secondary data and the use hypothesis to draw conclusions. Primary data was got through acquisition from satellite imageries from the loading and exit point of various river routes and designed questionnaires distributed while secondary data such as accident and disaster occurrence was collected several marine sector regulatory agencies in charge of the marine sector for a period of thirty (30) years (1989 to 2018). The study showed that river route incidence is dependent primarily on the population of the destination route and its frequency of usage. Although, other factors such as poor visibility, channel width and sharp bends, inaccurate meanders and over speeding increased its probability of occurrences. Study also found that areas without alternative transport route experienced high incidences of boat accidents compared to areas with road transport exits that suffer exorbitant fair and proximity challenges. There was no statistically significant relationship between the length of the water route and the frequency of incidence (r=0.006; p>0.05). Hence study recommends that Security agencies in charge of maritime routes should be equipped with modern surveillance gadgets, combatant firearm, and warships to enhance maritime security and other response operations.

Page(s): 109-122                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 03 May 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8413

 Ogboeli, Goodluck, Prince
Institute of Geosciences and Environmental Management, Rivers State University, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

 Iyama, William Azuka
Institute of Geosciences and Environmental Management, Rivers State University, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

 Onuegbu, Williams
Institute of Geosciences and Environmental Management, Rivers State University, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

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Ogboeli, Goodluck, Prince, Iyama, William Azuka and Onuegbu, Williams “Incidences and Trend of Marine Accident Fatalities in Various River Routes Connecting the Major Sea Ports of Nigeria ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-8-issue-4, pp.109-122 April 2023 DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8413

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Experimental Analysis of Gaseous Emission in 2-Stroke Single Cylinder Engine Using Ethanol Gasoline Blends

Nwafor Uzoma and Mohammed Moore Ojapah- April 2023 Page No.: 123-136

The emission of Unburnt Hydrocarbon (UHC), Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx), Carbon Monoxide (CO), and Carbon Dioxide (CO2) from internal combustion engine have been seen to cause negative environmental impact and a major source of greenhouse effect. This paper provides a better understanding and strategies for use of biofuel ethanol as a blend with gasoline to reduce emissions in 2-stroke engine small power generaor. An experimental study on a single cylinder domestic portable power generating set of fixed speed has been used with gasoline ethanol blends in ratio of 100% gasoline (E0), 50% gasoline ethanol blends (E50) and 100% ethanol (E100) under varying engine loads. The results showed that the CO and HC emission decreases as a result of the leaning effect caused by the ethanol addition. The CO2 emission was also observed to increase because of the improved combustion as a result of leaning effect of ethanol addition, in particular the E100. The NOx emission for E100 shows the most interesting result of decreasing from idle load to zero at the maximum load.

Page(s): 123-136                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 03 May 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8414

 Nwafor Uzoma
Mechanical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Port Harcourt Nigeria

 Mohammed Moore Ojapah
Mechanical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Port Harcourt Nigeria

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Nwafor Uzoma and Mohammed Moore Ojapah “Experimental Analysis of Gaseous Emission in 2-Stroke Single Cylinder Engine Using Ethanol Gasoline Blends ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-8-issue-4, pp.123-136 April 2023 DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8414

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Interactions of Ascorbic Acid with Intermittent Preventive Treatment with Sulphadoxine Pyrimethamine in Parturients and their Controls

Chukwu Leo Clinton; Ekenjoku Azubuike John; Olisa Chinedu Lawrence; Ogabido Chukwudi Anthony; Ramalan Aliyu Mansur; Okoye Innocent Chukwuemeka; Nwankwo Malarchy Ekwunife; Ezeigwe Chijioke Ogomegbunam; Chukwuka Benjamin Uzodinma, Nweze Sylvester Onuegbunam- April 2023 Page No.: 137-145

Background: Malaria deaths in the world have remained worrisome for many decades to centuries now. The issue of its prevention pre pregnancy, during pregnancy and post pregnancy periods needs continuous emphasis especially in our endemic areas. This will help us achieve the desired goals of eliminating malaria menace in Sub-Saharan Africa. The benefits of malaria prevention in helping to reduce the problems of malaria in pregnancy though proven needs continuous emphasis. The problems of prolonged maternal malaria illnesses especially if left untreated during pregnancy may include but not limited to preterm labours / births, pregnancy anaemias, small for date babies, high rates of admissions into special care baby units (SCBU) and intrauterine deaths. The above have been greatly reduced by concurrent practice of preventive measures like the now in use, Intermittent Preventive Treatment with Sulphadoxine Pyrimethamine (IPT-SP). It has also been noted that optimal levels of antioxidant status like Ascorbic acid (Vitamin C), Superoxide Dismutase, Glutathione Peroxidase have shown great promises in assisting our pregnant women enjoy uneventful pregnancies as well as avert most other pregnancy associated problems. Top on the list of which are maternal and neonatal anaemias, preterm labours and births, intrauterine growth restrictions (IUGR), increased admissions into special care baby units and even neonatal deaths to mention but a few.
Objectives: This study made a comparative assessment of the plasma Ascorbic acid levels in parturients who judiciously received IPT-SP during their current confinements and their controls.
Method: We carried out this study at the Federal Medical Centre (FMC) which is located in Owerri, the state capital of Imo state Nigeria. Owerri is noted to have a typical malaria endemic setting as with most parts of our African sub rejoin. Ethical certification was sought for and obtained from the ethics committee of the hospital enabling the commencement of a longitudinal participant recruitment after adequate counseling and informed consent. This involved both groups. The study was a laboratory based, cross-sectional descriptive study that involving 296 participants that satisfied set out inclusion criteria for one of the groups as allotted. Participants were followed up following recruitment throughout their antenatal course till delivery. This enabled a dutiful collection of blood samples for the estimation of Ascorbic acid. Vitamin C estimation was done using the Omaye, Turabull & Sanberlish method, 1979. The methodology principle is based on the fact that Ascorbic acid is oxidized by copper to form dehydroascorbic acid. The product when treated with 2, 4 dinitrophenyl hydrazine forms tris 2, 4 dinitrophenyl hydrazone which undergoes rearrangement to form a product with the absorption maximum at 520 nm in spectrophotometer.
Data analysis: Computer Software Package for Social Science (SPSS) version 20.0 (SPSS, Chicago) was used to analyze obtained data. The descriptive statistics (mean, standard deviation, range, percentages etc) were determined for continuous variables, while a P-value less than (<0.05) at 95% confidence interval was considered statistically significant.
Result: The mean ascorbic acid value was lower among the study group than the control. Mean ascorbic acid value for the study group was 1.75 ± 0.67 while the minimum and maximum serum ascorbic acid levels were 0.064 and 3.29 respectively. From the control group, the mean ascorbic acid level was 2.03 ± 0.68 while the minimum and maximum serum ascorbic acid levels were 0.056 and 3.75 respectively. From the results above, the mean difference of 0.28 was found to be statistically significant with (p value= 0.001) with an odds ratio of 0.54 (95% CI =0.380 – 0.771).

Page(s): 137-145                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 May 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8415

 Chukwu Leo Clinton
College of Medicine, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Awka Nigeria

 Ekenjoku Azubuike John
Dept. of Pharmacology & Therapeutics. Coll. of Medicine & Health Sciences, Abia State University Uturu, Nigeria

 Olisa Chinedu Lawrence
Dept. of Pharmacology & Therapeutics, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi, Nigeria

 Ogabido Chukwudi Anthony
Dept. of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi Campus, Nigeria

 Ramalan Aliyu Mansur
Dept. of Internal Medicine, Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital / Bayero University Kano, Nigeria

 Okoye Innocent Chukwuemeka
Dept. of Medicine, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Awka Campus Nigeria

 Nwankwo Malarchy Ekwunife
Dept. of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi Campus, Nigeria

 Ezeigwe Chijioke Ogomegbunam
Dept. of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi Campus, Nigeria

 Chukwuka Benjamin Uzodinma
Dept. of Pharmacology. Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Awka, Nigeria

 Nweze Sylvester Onuegbunam
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Enugu State University College of Medicine (ESUCOM), Enugu Nigeria

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Chukwu Leo Clinton; Ekenjoku Azubuike John; Olisa Chinedu Lawrence; Ogabido Chukwudi Anthony; Ramalan Aliyu Mansur, Okoye Innocent Chukwuemeka; Nwankwo Malarchy Ekwunife; Ezeigwe Chijioke Ogomegbunam; Chukwuka Benjamin Uzodinma, Nweze Sylvester Onuegbunam. Interactions of Ascorbic Acid with Intermittent Preventive Treatment with Sulphadoxine Pyrimethamine in Parturients and their Controls. international journal of research and innovation in applied science (ijrias). Volume viii. Issue iv. Issn. No 2454-6194. April 2023 page no. 137-145

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Comparative Study of Total Antioxidant Capacity (TAC) Levels of Pregnant Women on Intermittent Preventive Treatment with Sulphadoxine Pyrimethamine and their Controls in Malaria Endeminicity

Chukwu Leo Clinton; Ekenjoku Azubuike John; Olisa Chinedu Lawrence; Ogabido Chukwudi Anthony; Ramalan Aliyu Mansur; Okoye Innocent Chukwuemeka, Chukwuka Benjamin Uzodinma; Ezeigwe Chijioke Ogomegbunam; Nwankwo Malarchy Ekwunife, Nweze Sylvester Onuegbunam- April 2023 Page No.: 146-155

Background: The issue of malaria prevention in endemic areas during antenatal periods needs continuous emphasis so as to achieve its desired goals. Its roles in reducing the problems of malaria in pregnancy has been proven. The problems of anaemia in pregnancy, preterm labours, small for gestational age babies have been greatly reduced by adequate practice of Intermittent Preventive Treatment with Sulphadoxine Pyrimethamine (IPT-SP). It is also advocated that optimal levels of antioxidants like Total Antioxidant status (TAC/TAS) is necessary to assist pregnant women enjoy uneventful pregnancies as well as avert other problems associated with pregnancy. Such problems may include preterm births, neonatal anaemias, intrauterine growth retardations (IUGR), increased admissions into special care baby units and even neonatal deaths.
Objectives: We have comparatively studied the plasma Total Antioxidant Capacity / Status levels in parturients who received intermittent preventive treatment with sulphadoxine pyrimethamine (IPT-SP), and their controls during current confinements.
Method: This study was carried out at the Federal Medical Centre (FMC), Owerri Nigeria. Owerri, the capital of Imo state Nigeria and has a typical malaria endemic setting as seen in most parts of Sub-Saharan Africa. Ethical clearance and subsequent certification were obtained from the ethics committee of FMC Owerri enabling the commencement of the longitudinal recruitment of participants. This was after an adequate counseling and informed consent involving both groups. As a laboratory based, cross-sectional descriptive study, it involved 296 participants who clearly satisfied the inclusion criteria for either the study or control groups as allotted longitudinal. Participants were followed up after recruitment through their entire antenatal course till delivery to enable collection of blood samples for the estimation of Total Antioxidant Status/Capacity which was done using the Ferric Reducing Ability of Plasma, FRAP; by (Benzie and Strain, 1996). The methodology principle is based on the fact that at low pH, antioxidant power causes the reduction of ferric tripyridyl triazine (Fe III TPTZ) complex to ferrous form (which has an intense blue colour) that can be monitored by measuring the change in absorption at 593nm. FRAP values are obtained by comparing the absorbance change at 593 nm in mixture (test), with those containing ferrous ion in known concentration (Standard).
Data analysis: The data obtained was analysis using the computer Software Package for Social Science (SPSS) version 20.0 (SPSS, Inc, 2007, Chicago) while the descriptive statistics (mean, standard deviation, range, percentages etc) were determined for continuous variables. P-value less than (<0.05) at 95% confidence interval was considered statistically significant.
Result: The mean serum level of total antioxidant status (TAS) in the study group was 846.55 umol/l while the minimum and maximum serum Total antioxidant status were 706 and 991 umol/l respectively. For their controls, the mean serum level of Total antioxidant status was 833.70 umol/l. However, the minimum and maximum serum Total antioxidant statuses were 291 and 1065 umol/l respectively. The difference was not statistically significant (p= 0.167) with odds ratio 1.00 (CI of 95% 0.997-1.006).

Page(s): 146-155                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 May 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8416

 Chukwu Leo Clinton
College of Medicine, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Awka Nigeria

 Ekenjoku Azubuike John
Dept. of Pharmacology & Therapeutics. Coll. of Medicine & Health Sciences, Abia State University Uturu, Nigeria

 Olisa Chinedu Lawrence
Dept. of Pharmacology & Therapeutics, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi, Nigeria

 Ogabido Chukwudi Anthony
Dept. of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi Campus, Nigeria

 Ramalan Aliyu Mansur
Dept. of Internal Medicine, Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital / Bayero University Kano, Nigeria

 Okoye Innocent Chukwuemeka
Dept. of Medicine, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Awka Campus, Nigeria

 Chukwuka Benjamin Uzodinma
Dept. of Pharmacology. Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Awka, Nigeria

 Ezeigwe Chijioke Ogomegbunam
Dept. of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi Campus, Nigeria

 Nwankwo Malarchy Ekwunife
Dept. of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi Campus, Nigeria

 Nweze Sylvester Onuegbunam
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Enugu State University College of Medicine (ESUCOM), Enugu Nigeria

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Chukwu Leo Clinton; Ekenjoku Azubuike John; Olisa Chinedu Lawrence; Ogabido Chukwudi Anthony; Ramalan Aliyu Mansur; Okoye Innocent Chukwuemeka, Chukwuka Benjamin Uzodinma; Ezeigwe Chijioke Ogomegbunam; Nwankwo Malarchy Ekwunife,Nweze Sylvester Onuegbunam. Comparative Study of Total Antioxidant Capacity (TAC) Levels of Pregnant Women on Intermittent Preventive Treatment with Sulphadoxine Pyrimethamine and their Controls in Malaria Endeminicity. international journal of research and innovation in applied science (ijrias). Volume viii. Issue iv. Issn. No 2454-6194. April 2023 page no. 146-155

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Comprehensive Review on Advanced Adversarial Attack and Defense Strategies in Deep Neural Network

Oliver Smith, Anderson Brown- April 2023 Page No.: 156-166

In adversarial machine learning, attackers add carefully crafted perturbations to input, where the perturbations are almost imperceptible to humans, but can cause models to make wrong predictions. In this paper, we did comprehensive review of some of the most recent research, advancement and discoveries on adversarial attack, adversarial sampling generation, the potency or effectiveness of each of the existing attack methods, we also did comprehensive review on some of the most recent research, advancement and discoveries on adversarial defense strategies, the effectiveness of each defense methods, and finally we did comparison on effectiveness and potency of different adversarial attack and defense methods. We came to conclusion that adversarial attack will mainly be blackbox for the foreseeable future since attacker has limited or no knowledge of gradient use for NN model, we also concluded that as dataset becomes more complex, so will be increase in demand for scalable adversarial defense strategy to mitigate or combat attack, and we strongly recommended that any neural network model with or without defense strategy should regularly be revisited, with the source code continuously updated at regular interval to check for any vulnerability against newer attack.

Page(s): 156-166                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 05 May 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8418

 Oliver Smith
University of Western Australia, Crawley WA 6009, Australia

 Anderson Brown
University of Western Australia, Crawley WA 6009, Australia

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Oliver Smith, Anderson Brown “Comprehensive Review on Advanced Adversarial Attack and Defense Strategies in Deep Neural Network ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-8-issue-4, pp.156-166 April 2023 DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8418

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Understanding Kenyan Politics: The Case of Deputy Presidency from 1963 to 2022

Tinashe Gumbo- April 2023 Page No.: 167-173

According to Kenyan Constitution (2010, Section 147), the duties of the Deputy President (previously Vice President) include assisting the President with administrative tasks, representing the President in international forums, and filling any vacancies that may occur in the event that the current President passes away, is impeached, or is found guilty. The Deputy President is thus the second-highest political official in Kenya. Hence, the Vice President is Kenya’s second-highest elected office. He or she is the President’s assistant. Yet, since independence, there have consistently been disputes in Kenya between the State Presidents who have led the country successively and their deputies. This article attempts at finding the root that defines the disputes. The article also argues that while the Kenyans changed their constitution in 2010, the issue did not improve, instead, it became worse since the Deputy President is now being protected by the constitution from being dismissed by the President. Thus, continued friction has a serious impact on the lives of ordinary people. The article is hinged on desk review and some insights observed by the author as an “outsider” who resided in that country. The article is a modification of the essay developed and shared in public through the author’s blog in 2022 as Kenya prepared for its general elections. The feedback received from the readers further shaped the article in its current form. The article takes a historical approach as it tracks the key events from 1963 to 2022 with regard to the two offices in Kenya. It concludes that the problem emanated from ambitious deputies but was also amplified by the insecurities felt by the successive Presidents. The article recommends a review of the constitution to allow members of the public to decide on the fate of a deputy president in extreme cases.

Page(s): 167-173                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 05 May 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8417

 Tinashe Gumbo
All Africa Conference of Churches

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Tinashe Gumbo “Understanding Kenyan Politics: The Case of Deputy Presidency from 1963 to 2022 ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-8-issue-4, pp.167-173 April 2023 DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8417

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Cannabis sativa: Botany, Cross Pollination and Plant Breeding Problems

Ravindra B. Malabadi, Kiran P. Kolkar, Raju K. Chalannavar, Lavanya L, Gholamreza Abdi- April 2023 Page No.: 174-190

This review paper highlights about the Cannabis botany, problems of cross pollination, lack of Germplasm collection and absence of Genebank facilities have been discussed. Cannabis is a dioecious species, meaning that male and female flowers are borne on separate plants. The risk of cross-pollination in Cannabis is one of the unique major challenge in Cannabis industry. More research can be conducted to assess the risk of cross-pollination in Cannabis and policy should be created to mitigate that risk. Cannabis research work remains years behind than other crops because of the long legacy of prohibition and stigmatization. However, lack of public germplasm repositories remains an unresolved problem in the Cannabis industry. Therefore, accessible germplasm resources are crucial for long-term economic viability, preserving genetic diversity, breeding, innovation, and long-term sustainability of the Cannabis crop. Germplasm accessions are the building blocks for breeding of new cultivars. However, there are no public seed or Clonal gene banks for Medical Cannabis sativa (marijuana or drug type). On the other hand there are some public hemp collections. Despite its economic, medicinal, and societal importance, Medical Cannabis sativa (marijuana or drug type) is missing from the list of available species in public Genebanks and only exist as private collections. Most of the Cannabis varieties in the market today are hybrids (700 hybrid strains) with both Cannabis sativa and Cannabis indica genetics. Hence there should be a public Cannabis Genebanks to play a fuller and more effective role in conservation, sustainable use, and exchange of Cannabis genetic resources.

Page(s): 174-190                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 05 May 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8419

 Ravindra B. Malabadi
Department of Applied Botany, Mangalore University, Mangalagangotri-574199, Mangalore, Karnataka State, India

 Kiran P. Kolkar
Department of Botany, Karnatak Science College, Dharwad-580003, Karnataka State, India

 Raju K. Chalannavar
Department of Applied Botany, Mangalore University, Mangalagangotri-574199, Mangalore, Karnataka State, India

 Lavanya L
Department of Biochemistry, REVA University, Bangalore -560064, Karnataka state, India

 Gholamreza Abdi
Department of Biotechnology, Persian Gulf Research Institute, Persian Gulf University, Bushehr, 7516, Iran

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Ravindra B. Malabadi, Kiran P. Kolkar, Raju K. Chalannavar, Lavanya L, Gholamreza Abdi “Cannabis sativa: Botany, Cross Pollination and Plant Breeding Problems ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-8-issue-4, pp.174-190 April 2023 DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8419

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Acceptance of the Covid-19 Vaccine to Nurses at the Lhokseumawe City Health Center

Mursal, Meutia Zuhra, Fitri Yani, Novia Rizana, Nanda Fitria, Afriyanti- April 2023 Page No.: 191-194

Nurses who stand at the front lines in providing health services to the community have a high risk of contracting the Covid-19 disease, so nurses become the main priority group in receiving the Covid-19 vaccine. This study aims to determine the description of the acceptance of the Covid-19 vaccine to nurses at the Lhokseumawe City Health Center. This study used a descriptive research design. The population in this study was all nurses who worked in all Public Health Centers in Lhokseumawe City, amounting to 258 people. Sampling using total sampling with a sample of 258 respondents.The data collection technique used a checklist sheet for the Covid-19 vaccination coverage for nurses at the Lhokseumawe City Health Center. The results of the univariate data analysis showed that the majority of Covid-19 vaccine receipts to nurses in Lhokseumawe City were in the complete category, namely 214 people (82.9%), while the Covid-19 vaccine receipts were in the incomplete category, namely 44 people (17.1%).The majority of nurses at the Lhokseumawe City Health Center received a complete Covid-19 vaccination. So it is recommended that respondents who have not received the complete Covid-19 vaccine can immediately take the next dose of the Covid-19 vaccine to increase their immunity from the coronavirus.

Page(s): 191-194                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 05 May 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8420

 Mursal
STIKes Muhammadiyah Lhokseumawe, Aceh, Indonesia

 Meutia Zuhra
STIKes Muhammadiyah Lhokseumawe, Aceh, Indonesia

 Fitri Yani
STIKes Muhammadiyah Lhokseumawe, Aceh, Indonesia

 Novia Rizana
STIKes Muhammadiyah Lhokseumawe, Aceh, Indonesia

 Nanda Fitria
STIKes Muhammadiyah Lhokseumawe, Aceh, Indonesia

 Afriyanti
STIKes Muhammadiyah Lhokseumawe, Aceh, Indonesia

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Mursal, Meutia Zuhra, Fitri Yani, Novia Rizana, Nanda Fitria, Afriyanti “Acceptance of the Covid-19 Vaccine to Nurses at the Lhokseumawe City Health Center ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-8-issue-4, pp.191-194 April 2023 DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8420

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Performance Evaluation of Local Binary Patterns LBP for Copy-Move Forgery Detection in Digital Images: A Comparative Study

Hlaing Htake Khaung Tin- April 2023 Page No.: 195-202

Copy-move forgery is a type of image tampering that involves copying a portion of an image and pasting it to another part of the same image with the intention of deceiving the viewer. In recent years, many approaches have been proposed to detect copy-move forgery, including those based on local binary patterns (LBP). In this paper, we perform a comprehensive evaluation of LBP-based methods for copy-move forgery detection using a dataset of 50 digital images. We compare the performance of four LBP-based methods, namely LBP, SIFT and SURF using metrics such as accuracy, precision, recall, and F1-score. Our results show that LBP outperforms the other methods in terms of accuracy and F1-score, while SIFT has the highest precision and recall. We also investigate the effect of various parameters, such as patch size and threshold values, on the performance of LBP. Our study provides valuable insights into the strengths and weaknesses of LBP-based methods for copy-move forgery detection, which can guide future research in this area. This study evaluates the performance of Local Binary Patterns (LBP) for detecting copy-move forgery in digital images. LBP is a widely used feature extraction technique in image processing and has been applied to various computer vision tasks, including forgery detection. The comparative study involves analyzing the accuracy, precision, recall, and F1-score of LBP and other popular forgery detection techniques, including SIFT and SURF, using a dataset of 50 digital images. The results show that LBP performs better than the other techniques, achieving an accuracy of 96.6%, precision of 94.0%, recall of 100%, and F1-score of 96.9%. This study provides useful insights for researchers and practitioners in the field of forgery detection, particularly for those interested in using LBP as a feature extraction technique.

Page(s): 195-202                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 09 May 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8421

 Hlaing Htake Khaung Tin
Faculty of Information Science, University of Information Technology, Myanmar

1. Arora, S., & Yadav, S. (2015). A Novel Approach for Copy-Move Forgery Detection Based on Local Binary Pattern Features and SIFT Descriptor. International Journal of Scientific Research, 4(9), 129-132.
2. P. Mohanta et al. (2019)”A Comparative Study of Feature Extraction Techniques for Copy-Move Forgery Detection”.
3. M. F. Akbar et al. (2016). A copy-move forgery detection technique based on SURF feature extraction and KD-tree. Multimedia Tools and Applications, 75(20), 12825-12851.
4. S. Singh et al. (2015)”Performance Evaluation of Feature Extraction Techniques for Copy-Move Forgery Detection in Digital Images”.
5. M. Chen et al. (2017). Copy-move forgery detection based on a SURF-LBP combined approach. Signal, Image and Video Processing, 11(6), 1067-1074.
6. H. Li et al. (2017). Copy-move forgery detection based on the integrated features of LBP and SIFT. Multimedia Tools and Applications, 76(15), 15503-15522.
7. H. Singh et al. (2017)”A Comparative Study of Feature Extraction Techniques for Copy-Move Forgery Detection”.
8. Rahmatizadeh, G., Sadeghi, M. T., & Rabiee, H. R. (2013). Copy-Move Forgery Detection Using Rotation Invariant Features Based on Local Binary Patterns. Journal of Visual Communication and Image Representation, 24(7), 921-932.
9. A. Jain and A. Mishra (2016)”Copy-Move Forgery Detection using SIFT Algorithm”.
10. Yousefi, M. R., & Jafari, A. (2015). Copy-Move Forgery Detection Based on Local Binary Patterns and Robust Keypoints Matching. International Journal of Advanced Computer Science and Applications, 6(2), 175-183.
11. S. Saxena et al. (2018)”Copy-Move Forgery Detection using SIFT Features and its Variants: A Comprehensive Review”.
12. S. Saha and S. Sarkar. (2019). A comparative analysis of SIFT and SURF for copy-move forgery detection. Multimedia Tools and Applications, 78(5), 5915-5936.
13. Hlaing Htake Khaung Tin, Si Thu, J.Samuel Manoharan (2022). “Copy Move Forgery Detection for Digital Image Forensics using Edge Detection and Color Auto-Correlogram” Published in International Journal of Trend in Research and Development (IJTRD), ISSN: 2394-9333, Volume-9 | Issue-2.
14. S. S. Rathore and B. K. Panigrahi. (2015). A copy-move forgery detection technique using DWT and SIFT. International Journal of Signal Processing, Image Processing and Pattern Recognition, 8(1), 103-114.
15. Yousefi, M. R., & Sadeghi, M. T. (2016). Copy-Move Forgery Detection Using Local Binary Pattern and Zernike Moments. Journal of Multimedia Tools and Applications, 75(4), 1917-1934.
16. Zhang, Y., Wang, W., Jia, Z., & Zhang, D. (2012). Copy-Move Forgery Detection Using Multi-scale Local Binary Pattern and Entropy Features. Journal of Information Hiding and Multimedia Signal Processing, 3(2), 87-94.

Hlaing Htake Khaung Tin “Performance Evaluation of Local Binary Patterns LBP for Copy-Move Forgery Detection in Digital Images: A Comparative Study ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-8-issue-4, pp.195-202 April 2023 DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8421

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The Beneficial Effect of The Yeast Enriched with Nano Zinc Particles on Mineral Status of Grape Seedlings

Rasha, S. Abdel-Hak, Shimaa, R. Hamed, Saleh, M.M.S., Merwad, M.A.- April 2023 Page No.: 203-211

This investigation included two integrated experiments, the first one is the microbiological experiment that carried out in Microbial Biotechnology Department, NRC, Cairo, Egypt, where multiple incorporation strategies were used for production zinc oxide Nanoparticles by enrichment of yeast with zinc including; (1): In the first procedure, zinc was added to the liquid medium just after the yeast was inoculated (growth phase), (2): For integration, it was added after 24 h of incubation (non-growth phase) in the second procedure. The obtained results showed that the first method (growth phase) was adopted in order to reduce the chance of medium contamination. Zinc sulphate has no passive effect on yeast cell biomass. The second experiment is horticultural one which was done in National Research Centre greenhouse on Flame seedless grape seedlings which included five treatments as follows: control (spraying with water only), frozen yeast enriched with zinc (as foliar spray), active yeast enriched with zinc (as foliar spray), frozen yeast enriched with zinc (as soil application) and active yeast enriched with zinc (as soil application). When zinc content in the grape leaves as ppm was examine after 15 days, the results showed that active fresh yeast enriched with zinc that treated as foliar spray recorded the highest rate of zinc in grape leaves (180 ppm), followed by active fresh yeast enriched with zinc as soil application which recorded 170.8 ppm. On the other hand, the untreated plants (control) showed the lowest value of zinc in the leaves (91.6 ppm) when compared with the other treatments.

Page(s): 203-211                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 10 May 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8422

 Rasha, S. Abdel-Hak
Pomology Dept., Biological and Agricultural Research Institute, National Research Centre El-Buhouth St., Dokki, Cairo, Egypt

 Shimaa, R. Hamed
Microbial Biotechnology Dept., Biotechnology Research Institute, National Research Centre El-Buhouth St., Dokki, Cairo, Egypt

 Saleh, M.M.S.
Pomology Dept., Biological and Agricultural Research Institute, National Research Centre El-Buhouth St., Dokki, Cairo, Egypt

 Merwad, M.A.
Pomology Dept., Biological and Agricultural Research Institute, National Research Centre El-Buhouth St., Dokki, Cairo, Egypt

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Rasha, S. Abdel-Hak, Shimaa, R. Hamed, Saleh, M.M.S., Merwad, M.A. “The Beneficial Effect of The Yeast Enriched with Nano Zinc Particles on Mineral Status of Grape Seedlings ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-8-issue-4, pp.203-211 April 2023 DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8422

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Improving Concrete Strength with Bamboo (Bambuseae) Fibers

Rey Avila Mangarin, Rex Normandy Pagas, Keith Cyruz Chua- April 2023 Page No.: 212-216

This research study aims to determine the effectiveness of using the Bamboo (Bambuseae) Fibers as medium for enhancing the durability and strength of the concrete and compare it to the common ones without fibers. This study utilized the experimental approach in quantitative research to ensure the fairness of the result. The study was conducted in Sto. Tomas National High School last September 2018. To test the effectiveness of the fiber to the concrete, the researchers conducted a 6-feet drop test along with the ones without fibers. The data gathered were analyzed using Chi- square test to determine the significant effect of the bamboo fiber in enhancing the concrete cement. It was found out that the concrete with fiber is more durable than the ones without fibers after the Drop test. This study encourages the use of bamboo fibers to enhance the strength and durability of the concrete.

Page(s): 212-216                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 10 May 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8423

 Rey Avila Mangarin
Associate Professor, The University of Mindanao

 Rex Normandy Pagas
Student, Sto.Tomas National High School

 Keith Cyruz Chua
Student, Sto.Tomas National High School

1. Dewi, Sri & Wijaya, Ming & Remayanti, Christin. (2017). the use of bamboo fiber in reinforced concrete beam to reduce crack. AIP Conference Proceedings. 1887. 020003. 10.1063/1.5003486. Retrieved on September 24, 2018 from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/320128561 the use of bamboo fiber in reinforced concrete beam to reduce crack
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Rey Avila Mangarin, Rex Normandy Pagas, Keith Cyruz Chua “Improving Concrete Strength with Bamboo (Bambuseae) Fibers ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-8-issue-4, pp.212-216 April 2023 DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8423

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Capacity Building Needed by Retirees in Snail Production for Poverty Alleviation in Benue State, Nigeria

Gbeyongu Frederick Terkimbi, Ngbongha Innocent Okpa, Onu Deborah Ogbene, and Dahiru Daniel Ada- April 2023 Page No.: 217-226

This paper focused on capacity building needed by retirees in snail production in Benue state, Nigeria. Four objectives with corresponding research questions guided the study with hypotheses tested at 0.05 level of significance. The study adopted a descriptive survey research design with a sample of one hundred and twenty (120) respondents for data collection. Instrument titled: Capacity Building for Retirees in Snail Production (CBRSP) was structured by the researcher from the literature reviewed and face validated by three experts. The internal consistency of the instrument was determined using cronbach alpha with a coefficient of 0.82 obtained. The data collected was analyzed using frequency, mean and standard deviation to answer research questions while Chi square was used to test the null hypotheses at 0.05 level of significance. It was observed that twelve (12) capacities in rearing snails, ten (10) in harvesting snail products, seven (7) capacities in poverty alleviation and thirteen (13) constraints faced by retirees were all needed for effective snail production in Benue State. It was recommended amongst others that seminars, symposium and workshops be organized by Government and Non-Governmental Organizations to train their workforce in snail production before proceeding to retire them so that they can have a skill and be useful to themselves and the society after retirement.

Page(s): 217-226                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 11 May 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8424

 Gbeyongu Frederick Terkimbi
Department of Agricultural Education, College of Agricultural and Science Education, Federal University of Agriculture, Makurdi, Nigeria

 Ngbongha Innocent Okpa
Department of Agricultural Education, College of Agricultural and Science Education, Federal University of Agriculture, Makurdi, Nigeria

 Onu Deborah Ogbene
Department of Agricultural Education, College of Agricultural and Science Education, Federal University of Agriculture, Makurdi, Nigeria

 Dahiru Daniel Ada
Department of Agricultural Education, College of Agricultural and Science Education, Federal University of Agriculture, Makurdi, Nigeria

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22. Cobbina J.R., Adri V, and Ben O. Snail farming “production, processing, and marketing” Digigrafi wageningen publishers Netherlands pp 25-52, 2008.

Gbeyongu Frederick Terkimbi, Ngbongha Innocent Okpa, Onu Deborah Ogbene, and Dahiru Daniel Ada “Capacity Building Needed by Retirees in Snail Production for Poverty Alleviation in Benue State, Nigeria ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-8-issue-4, pp.217-226 April 2023 DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8424

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Elderly Knowledge about Personal Hygiene

Ida Suryawati, Safrina Edayani, Mariyati, Nanda Fitria, Laila Rahmi Asza- April 2023 Page No.: 227-231

Increasing life expectancy in the elderly causes various health problems, one of which is the inability to maintain personal hygiene. The purpose of this study was to determine the picture of elderly knowledge about personal hygiene. The research design used is descriptive. The population in this study was the elderly, numbering 330 people. The sampling technique uses stratified random sampling with a sample of 100 respondents. Data collection using questionnaires and data analysis techniques using univariate analysis. Based on the results of the study, it was found that the majority of respondents had knowledge about personal hygiene with good categories (44.0%), knowledge with sufficient categories about personal hygiene (32%) and knowledge in the category less about personal hygiene (24%). Therefore, the results of the study indicate that the elderly have knowledge in the category of good personal hygiene.

Page(s): 227-231                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 11 May 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8425

 Ida Suryawati
STIKes Muhammadiyah Lhokseumawe, Aceh, Indonesia

 Safrina Edayani
STIKes Muhammadiyah Lhokseumawe, Aceh, Indonesia

 Mariyati
STIKes Muhammadiyah Lhokseumawe, Aceh, Indonesia

 Nanda Fitria
STIKes Muhammadiyah Lhokseumawe, Aceh, Indonesia

 Laila Rahmi Asza
STIKes Muhammadiyah Lhokseumawe, Aceh, Indonesia

1. Akbar, Y., Mursal, Hayatun, T., & Rizana, N. (2021). Tingkat kualitas hidup pasien luka kaki diabetik. Jurnal Keperawatan, 19(2), 55–65.
2. Allegranzi, B., Memish, Z. A., Donaldson, L., & Pittet, D. (2009). Religion and culture: Potential undercurrents influencing hand hygiene promotion in health care. American Journal of Infection Control, 37(1), 28–34. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajic.2008.01.014
3. Chairil, & Hardiana. (2017). Gambaran Perilaku Personal Hygiene Pada Lansia Di Upt Pstw Khusnul Khotimah Pekanbaru. Photon: Jurnal Sain Dan Kesehatan, 8(01), 29–36. https://doi.org/10.37859/jp.v8i01.524
4. Dian Fera & Arfah Husna. (2018). Volume V, Nomor 9, tahun 2018 Hubungan Dukungan Keluarga Dengan Kemandirian Lansia… Dian Fera, Arfah Husna. Jurnal Fakultas Kesehatan Masyarakat, V(9), 159–165.
5. Erdhayanti, S., & Kartinah. (2011). Hubungan Tingkat Pengetahuan Lansia Dengan Perilaku Lansia Dalam Pemenuhan Personal Hygiene Di Panti Wreda Darma Bakti Pajang Surakarta. Hubungan Tingkat Pengetahuan Lansia, 44–51.
6. Mariani, A., Seweng, A., Ruseng, S. S., Moedjiono, A. I., Abdullah, T., Anshary, A., Nur, R., Basir, M., Mahfudz, & Sabir. (2021). The relationship between knowledge and personal hygiene and the occurrence of sexually transmitted diseases at the Community Health Center Talise, Palu. Gaceta Sanitaria, 35, S164–S167. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gaceta.2021.10.016
7. Nagoklan Simbolon. (2019). Hubungan Pengetahuan Lansia dengan Personal Hygiene di Desa Lestari Indah Kecamatan Siantar Kabupaten Simalungun. Sintaks, 1, 616–623.
8. Novianty, N., Syarif, S., & Ahmad, M. (2021). Influence of breast milk education media on increasing knowledge about breast milk: Literature review. Gaceta Sanitaria, 35, S268–S270. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gaceta.2021.10.031
9. Pereira, J. O., Ariani, N. L., & Adi, R. C. (2018). Gambaran Perilaku Personal Hygiene Pada Lansia di Desa Suwaru Kecamatan Pagelaran Kabupaten Malang. Jurnal Nursing News, 3(3), 776–784.
10. Pra, P., Di, L., Bojonggede, P., Oktaviani, E., Prastia, T. N., & Dwimawati, E. (2022). Faktor-Faktor Yang Berhubungan Dengan Kejadian Hipertensi. 5(2), 135–147.
11. Safir, N., Mursal, M., Akbar, Y., & Abrar, A. (2021). Tingkat Pengetahuan Perawat tentang Lima Momen Kebersihan Tangan. Lentera : Jurnal Ilmiah Kesehatan Dan Keperawatan, 4(2), 80–86. https://doi.org/10.37150/jl.v4i2.1443
12. Soleman, S. R., Mongkau, F. M., & Ekasuryadinata, I. B. (2021). Analisis Pengetahuan Lansia Terhadap Pemenuhan Personal Hygiene Di Puskesmas Werdhi Agung. Coping: Community of Publishing in Nursing, 9(1), 74. https://doi.org/10.24843/coping.2021.v09.i01.p10
13. Utami, G. N. M., Widyanthari, D. M., & Suarningsih, N. K. A. (2021). Hubungan Self-Management Dengan Kualitas Hidup Lansia Hipertensi. Coping: Community of Publishing in Nursing, 9(6), 712. https://doi.org/10.24843/coping.2021.v09.i06.p10
14. Zivich, P. N., Gancz, A. S., & Aiello, A. E. (2018). Effect of hand hygiene on infectious diseases in the office workplace: A systematic review. American Journal of Infection Control, 46(4), 448–455. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajic.2017.10.006

Ida Suryawati, Safrina Edayani, Mariyati, Nanda Fitria, Laila Rahmi Asza “Elderly Knowledge about Personal Hygiene ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-8-issue-4, pp.227-231 April 2023 DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8425

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Quality of groundwater from five different locations in Badagry Local Government Area of Lagos State, Nigeria

Olusegun Samuel Tunde, Fadimu Oladayo Kehinde, Olokode Hammed Adeyinka, Nwadike Solomon Chukwuka- April 2023 Page No.: 232-235

This study was carried out to investigate the quality of groundwater from five different locations in Badagry Local Government Area of Lagos State, Nigeria. Fifty borehole water samples were collected and analyzed to ensure safe and continuous consumption by residents in the communities. The investigated physico-chemical parameters include: p H, alkalinity, total hardness, and anions (nitrate, sulphate and chloride). The presence of metals such as Cu, Cr, Cd and Pb, were also determined, using Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS).
The highest mean concentrations values for alkalinity, total hardness, calcium, magnesium, chloride, sulphate, nitrate, cadmium, chromium, copper, and lead were: 137.5,155.2,129.00,43.10,42.39,2.68,20.980.0167,0.0145,0.42 and 0.016 mg/L respectively. The highest pH was also observed to be 7.34. Of all the measured parameters, two of the five distinct locations did not fall within the WHO/NAFDAC permissible limits. The Results of this research activity have therefore shown that all the water samples fell within the physicochemical standard limits for drinking water, but are not recommended for drinking purposes, as they all contain one or more of the trace elements.

Page(s): 232-235                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 12 May 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8426

 Olusegun Samuel Tunde
Department of Chemistry, Lagos State University, Lagos-Nigeria
Department of Pharmacy, School of Health and Applied Sciences, Institut Superieur Bilingue Libre Du Togo (IBLT) University.

 Fadimu Oladayo Kehinde
Department of Biochemistry, Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta-Nigeria
Department of Pharmacy, School of Health and Applied Sciences, Institut Superieur Bilingue Libre Du Togo (IBLT) University.

 Olokode Hammed Adeyinka
Department of Pharmacy, School of Health and Applied Sciences, Institut Superieur Bilingue Libre Du Togo (IBLT) University.

 Nwadike Solomon Chukwuka
Department of Pharmacy, School of Health and Applied Sciences, Institut Superieur Bilingue Libre Du Togo (IBLT) University.

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3. Olushola M. Awoyemi, Albert C. Achudume, Aderonke A. Okoya [2014]. The Physicochemical Quality of Groundwater in Relation to Surface Water Pollution in Majidun Area of Ikorodu, Lagos State, Nigeria. American Journal of Water Resources, (2). 127
4. Ogundele, O. and Mekuleyi, G. O. (2018). Physico-chemical properties and heavy metals discharged from two industries in Agbara, Lagos State, Nigeria International Research Journal of Public and Environmental.Health, 5 (3): 32-37.
5. Khodapanah L, Sculaiman W., Khodapanah N (2009). Groundwater quality assessment for different purposes in Eshtehard district, Tehran, Iran. European Journal Scientific Research. 36(4):543−553.
6. APHA, 1992. Standard Methods for Examination of Water and Wastewater. 18th Edn., American PublicHealth Association.
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9. Anyanwu E.D, Onyele O.G (2018). Occurrence and concentration of heavy metals in rural spring in southeastern Nigeria. Journal of Applied Science and Environmental Management. 1474-75.
10. David Adeyemi, Emmanuel Olafadehan and Chimezie Anyakora (2015). Assessment level of Physicochemical properties and trace metals of water samples from Lagos, Nigeria. International Journal of Advanced Research in Biological Sciences.169.
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12. Anyanwu E.D, Onyele O.G (2018). Occurrence and concentration of heavy metals in rural spring in southeastern Nigeria. Journal of Applied Science and Environmental Management. 1474-75.

Olusegun Samuel Tunde, Fadimu Oladayo Kehinde, Olokode Hammed Adeyinka, Nwadike Solomon Chukwuka “Quality of groundwater from five different locations in Badagry Local Government Area of Lagos State, Nigeria ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-8-issue-4, pp.232-235 April 2023 DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8426

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Medical Cannabis sativa (Marijuana or drug type): Psychoactive molecule, Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC)

Ravindra B. Malabadi, Kiran P. Kolkar, Raju K. Chalannavar, Lavanya L, Gholamreza Abdi- April 2023 Page No.: 236-249

This review paper highlights about Medical Cannabis sativa (Marijuana or drug type) containing psychoactive molecule, Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) as a part of educational awareness programme in India. Cannabis sativa and Cannabis indica were originally a native of India growing as a wild notorious noxious weed in the Indian Himalayan region. Marijuana (Charas, Ganja and Bhang in India) is a mind-altering (psychoactive) drug, produced by the Cannabis sativa plant. Marijuana (Charas, Ganja or Bhang drink in India) is an illicit drug containing very high levels (25-35%) of narcotic psychoactive molecule, Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) is banned and prohibited in India. Import, export, local sales and cultivation of Cannabis are illegal and prohibited in India. Phytocannabinoids (Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol-Δ9-THC, and Cannabidiol- CBD) have attained a global attention recently due to the therapeutic potentials in Parkinson’s disease, Schizophrenia, cancers, pain, anxiety, depression other neurological disorders as well as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of Epidiolex for Dravet syndrome and Lennox-Gauss Syndrome. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) is known as the substance that makes a person feel a “high,” while Cannabidiol (CBD) often promotes a feeling of relaxation. However, the adverse effects of Marijuana (medicinal cannabis) comes from studies of recreational users of marijuana led to the impaired short-term memory; impaired motor coordination; altered judgment; and paranoia or psychosis at high doses. The quality control of Cannabis products, contamination and adulteration of Cannabis products in Cannabis industry is another major issue. Therefore, a detailed study with clinical trials is warranted and this knowledge should be shared and explained to the customers.

Page(s): 236-249                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 12 May 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8428

 Ravindra B. Malabadi
Department of Applied Botany, Mangalore University, Mangalagangotri-574199, Mangalore, Karnataka State, India

 Kiran P. Kolkar
Department of Botany, Karnatak Science College, Dharwad-580003, Karnataka State, India.

 Raju K. Chalannavar
Department of Applied Botany, Mangalore University, Mangalagangotri-574199, Mangalore, Karnataka State, India

 Lavanya L
Department of Biochemistry, REVA University, Bangalore -560064, Karnataka State, India

 Gholamreza Abdi
Department of Biotechnology, Persian Gulf Research Institute, Persian Gulf University, Bushehr, 75169, Iran

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Ravindra B. Malabadi, Kiran P. Kolkar, Raju K. Chalannavar, Lavanya L, Gholamreza Abdi “Medical Cannabis sativa (Marijuana or drug type): Psychoactive molecule, Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-8-issue-4, pp.236-249 April 2023 DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8428

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The Rise of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning in HealthCare Industry

Destiny Ogaga, Haoning Zhao- April 2023 Page No.: 250-253

In this study, we examine some of the recent advancement in health care system as regards the rise of artificial intelligence. We analyzed background knowledge and review many literatures to examine some real world application of artificial intelligence for treatment, diagnoses, and prediction of diseases.
As healthcare industries continues to embrace artificial intelligence to improve the quality of healthcare services, machine learning for prediction and diagnoses of treatment. All together, these create a new window of opportunities as well as challenges to overcome. We dived into how healthcare industry had been affected by the rise of AI technologies, what technologies are used and how they function, the limitations of AI technologies in healthcare, the future prospects of AI technologies in healthcare as it continue to advance and mature, and also the social and ethical implications of AI in healthcare system. There is clear evidence that continuous advancement of AI and machine learning will raise the operational efficiency of healthcare and its allied providers.

Page(s): 250-253                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 15 May 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8429

 Destiny Ogaga
University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield. United Kingdom

 Haoning Zhao
Shandong University, Licheng District. China

1. Chung J., What Should We Do About Artificial Intelligence in Health Care? Retrieved from https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/ papers.cfm?abstract_id=3113655 (2018)
2. Kiseleva A., AI as a Medical Device: Is It Enough to Ensure Performance Transparency and Accountability in Healthcare? Retrieved from https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm? abstract_id=3504829 (2019)
3. https://masaar.net/en/negative-effects-of-artificial-intelligence/#:~:text=This%20paper%20sheds%20light%20on,paper%20will%20discuss%20in%20detail
4. https://www.managedhealthcareexecutive.com/view/limits-ai-healthcare
5. Ige, T., & Adewale, S. (2022a). Implementation of data mining on a secure cloud computing over a web API using supervised machine learning algorithm. International Journal of Advanced Computer Science and Applications, 13(5), 1–4. https://doi.org/10.14569/IJACSA.2022.0130501
6. Ige, T., & Adewale, S. (2022b). AI powered anti-cyber bullying system using machine learning algorithm of multinomial naïve Bayes and optimized linear support vector machine. International Journal of Advanced Computer Science and Applications, 13(5), 5–9. https://doi.org/10.14569/IJACSA.2022.0130502
7. https://www2.deloitte.com/us/en/pages/life-sciences-and-health-care/articles/future-of-artificial-intelligence-in-health-care.html
8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6616181/
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10. Ige, T., Kolade, A., Kolade, O. (2023). Enhancing Border Security and Countering Terrorism Through Computer Vision: A Field of Artificial Intelligence. In: Silhavy, R., Silhavy, P., Prokopova, Z. (eds) Data Science and Algorithms in Systems. CoMeSySo 2022. Lecture Notes in Networks and Systems, vol 597. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-21438-7_54
11. Tosin Ige, William Marfo, Justin Tonkinson, Sikiru Adewale and Bolanle Hafiz Matti, “Adversarial Sampling for Fairness Testing in Deep Neural Network” International Journal of Advanced Computer Science and Applications (IJACSA), 14(2), 2023. http://dx.doi.org/10.14569/IJACSA.2023.0140202
12. Yoon, S.; Lee, D. Artificial Intelligence and Robots in Healthcare: What are the Success Factors for Technology-based Service Encounters? Int. J. Healthc. Manag. 2019, 12, 218–225. [CrossRef]
13. Safavi, K.; Kalis, B. How AI can Change the Future of Health Care. Harv. Bus. Rev. 2019. Available online: https://hbr.org/ webinar/2019/02/how-ai-can-change-the-future-of-health-care (accessed on 15 June 2020).
14. Rigby, M. Ethical Dimensions of Using Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare. AMA J. Ethics 2019, 21, E121–E124.
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16. Vijai, C., and Worakamol Wisetsri. “Rise of artificial intelligence in healthcare startups in India.” Advances In Management 14.1 (2021): 48-52.

Destiny Ogaga, Haoning Zhao “The Rise of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning in HealthCare Industry ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-8-issue-4, pp.250-253 April 2023 DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8426

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Assessment of Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission of HIV/AIDS among Student Nurses in Bauchi State College of Nursing and Midwifery, Nigeria

Dr Mahmood Danasabe, Mrs Rakiya Saleh, Mr. Bappah Baba Waziri, Muhammad Adamu- April 2023 Page No.: 254-268

Women with pregnancy that are having human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV) infection have a greater chance of transmitting the virus to their children. Majority of the transmission happens during pregnancy, labour and delivery and during lactation. The health workers, especially, nurse/midwife play a crucial part in prevention of mother to child transmission. The adequate knowledge, attitude and practices of the student nurses assumed to predict effective and efficient prevention of the transmission of the virus. This research assessed the knowledge, attitude and practice of student nurses/midwives in the State college of nursing and midwifery Bauchi towards the prevention of mother-to-child-transmission (PMTCT) of HIV/AIDS. The study is a descriptive cross-sectional survey with a sample of fifty students’ nurses’/midwives participated in the study analysis. Data was collected through a self-modified questionnaire that measured knowledge, attitude and practices based on percentage. Analysis was done using descriptive statistics of frequency count and percentages in answering the research questions. The mean age of respondents was 26 ± 2 years. The result of the study shows that many students nurses have low information on PMTCT. However, many sources of information did not indicate significantly to improved knowledge of the participants as shown by their low knowledge on PMTCT of HIV (66.7%). The study further reveals a general negativism in the attitudes (41.8%) of respondents towards prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV. Greater percentage of the respondents showed a negative attitude towards pregnant women living with HIV/AIDS. The practice of PMTCT was generally very low (56.6%). This study demonstrates that nurses in State college are insufficiently informed on practical issues in the prevention of MTCT of HIV. Hence, are weak to play an effective role in this important aspect of prevention of HIV. Sensitization, capacity building and appropriate clinical settings remain essential for significant outcomes.

Page(s): 254-268                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 15 May 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8430

 Dr Mahmood Danasabe
Psychology Department, Federal University, Gashua, Nigeria

 Mrs Rakiya Saleh
Aliko Dangote College of Nursing and midwifery, Bauchi state, Nigeria

 Mr. Bappah Baba Waziri
Adamu Adamu College of Nursing and midwifery, Federal Medical Centre, Azare, Nigeria.

 Muhammad Adamu
Adamu Adamu College of Nursing and midwifery, Federal Medical Centre, Azare, Nigeria

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Dr Mahmood Danasabe, Mrs Rakiya Saleh, Mr. Bappah Baba Waziri, Muhammad Adamu “Assessment of Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission of HIV/AIDS among Student Nurses in Bauchi State College of Nursing and Midwifery, Nigeria ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-8-issue-4, pp.254-268 April 2023 DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8430

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Molecular Characterization of Lactic Acid Producing Bacteria Isolated from Tiger nut (Cyperus esculentus L) tuber and Soybean (Glycine max L) seeds

Abu, M. A., Amakoromo, E. R. and Eruteya, O. C.- April 2023 Page No.: 269-275

Lactic acid-producing bacteria (LAB) are a diverse group of bacteria which play a crucial role in fermentation processes. They produce lactic acid a primary product of fermentation, by exploiting food substances like carbohydrates proteins and lipids, leading to the production of secondary metabolites such as alcohols, aldehydes, acids, esters and Sulphur. The aim of this study was to characterize lactic acid bacterial isolated from tiger nut tubers (Cyperus esculentus L) and soybean seeds (Glycine max L), using 16S rRNA gene. Lactic acid production was determined by titrimetric method from 0 to 48h. Four of the ten isolates, identified as: Lactobacillus plantarum strain AMA2A, L. fermentum strain AMA5, L. buchneri strain AMA11 and L. plantarum strain AMA14 produced percentage lactic acid of 1.27, 0.93, 0.86 and 0.92 respectively after 48h. This study has demonstrated that the lactic acid producing bacteria namely: Lactobacillus plantarum AMA2A, Lactobacillus fermentum AMA5, Lactobacillus buchneri AMA11 and Lactobacillus plantarum AMA14 could be isolated from tiger nut and soybean since these substrates contain sufficient ingredients or nutrients which serve as enabling environments for their proliferation

Page(s): 269-275                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 19 May 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8431

 Abu, M. A.
Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, University of Port Harcourt, Choba, Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria.

 Amakoromo, E. R.
Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, University of Port Harcourt, Choba, Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria.

 Eruteya, O. C.
Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, University of Port Harcourt, Choba, Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria.

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Abu, M. A., Amakoromo, E. R. and Eruteya, O. C. “Molecular Characterization of Lactic Acid Producing Bacteria Isolated from Tiger nut (Cyperus esculentus L) tuber and Soybean (Glycine max L) seeds ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-8-issue-4, pp.269-275 April 2023 DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8431

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Performance And Emission Test on A Single Cylinder Compression Ignition Engine Using Neem Oil Blends by Sonication

Dr. V. Kumar, Dr. Partha Sarathi Chakraborty, Dr. Dulal Krishna Mandal, Dr. Nallusamy- April 2023 Page No.: 276-301

The transportation segment is the single biggest customer of oil determined vitality. Generally, fluid hydrocarbons have developed as the essential transportation fuel in light of their high vitality content per unit volume and as a result of the effortlessness of fluid fuel dealing with and conveyance frameworks rather than those required for strong or vaporous energizes. Thus, our present day transportation control plants have been intended to utilize fluid powers and oil refiners have, through a transformative procedure, been fitting to meet the prerequisites of cylinder motors. This fitting of the fuel to meet motor necessities must be reevaluated. As a transitional procedure, other vitality sources must be looked for which can be utilized as a part of altered cylinder motors. This transitional procedure could most recent a very long while as new but unclear, transportation frameworks are produced.

Page(s): 276-301                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 20 May 2023

DOI: 10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8432

 Dr. V. Kumar
Department of Mechanical Engineering, SRM Institute of Science and Technology, Vadapalani, India

 Dr. Partha Sarathi Chakraborty
Department of Adult, Continuing Education & Extension, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, India.

 Dr. Dulal Krishna Mandal
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, India.

 Dr. Nallusamy
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, India.

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Dr. V. Kumar, Dr. Partha Sarathi Chakraborty, Dr. Dulal Krishna Mandal, Dr. Nallusamy “Performance And Emission Test on A Single Cylinder Compression Ignition Engine Using Neem Oil Blends by Sonication ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) volume-8-issue-4, pp.276-301 April 2023 DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8431

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