Mother’s Knowledge and Attitudes about KADARZI with Toddler Nutritional Status

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International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) |Volume VIII, Issue IV, April 2023|ISSN 2454-6194

Mother’s Knowledge and Attitudes about KADARZI with Toddler Nutritional Status

Rizki Maulidya*, Elvi Maisara, Khayatol Fadhilah, Shaburin Syakur, Yusri
STIKes Muhammadiyah Lhokseumawe, Aceh, Indonesia
*Corresponding Author
DOI: https://doi.org/10.51584/IJRIAS.2023.8408
Received: 11 March 2023; Accepted: 29 March 2023; Published: 30 April 2023

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Abstract: Housewives’ knowledge about KADARZI is essential to improving the nutritional status of toddlers aged 1–5. Toddlers at that age are especially vulnerable to nutritional issues like malnutrition. The purpose of this study was to see the relationship between mothers’ knowledge and attitudes about nutritionally conscious families KADARZI and the nutritional status of toddlers. This study used an analytical survey research design with a cross-sectional approach. Sampling using purposive sampling techniques in 103 respondents of children under five aged 1-5 years. Data collection using questionnaires is followed by data analysis using chi-square tests. Data collection using questionnaires with data analysis using chi-square tests. The results obtained that of the 103 respondents of housewives who have toddlers, 64 of them predominantly have knowledge of good KADARZI with good nutritional status totaling 63 people (98.4%) and poor nutritional status totaling very few only 1 person (1.6%). Furthermore, after conducting statistical tests with bivariate analysis, a p-value of 0.001 was obtained, which showed a p-value of 0.001 < α (0.05), which means that there is a relationship between knowledge about KADARZI and nutritional status in toddlers. Then, the relationship between attitudes about KADARZI and the nutritional status of toddlers with a total of 103 respondents among housewives was obtained from 73 respondents, among whom predominantly had a positive attitude about (KADARZI) with good nutritional status in toddlers totaling 62 people (84.9%) and malnutrition status totaling 11 people (15.1%). After conducting statistical tests with bivariate analysis, a p-value of 0.002 < α (0.05) was obtained, so it can be concluded that there is a relationship between attitudes about (KADARZI) and nutritional status in toddlers.

Keywords: Knowledge, Attitude, Nutritional status of toddlers

I. Introduction

Nutrition is one determinant of the quality of human resources. The decline in the quality of human resources at a young age will result in the loss of most of the potential for nation-building. Malnutrition results in a decrease in the level of intelligence of the child, because nutrition at the beginning of life will affect the quality of the next life. Malnutrition in toddlers will have an impact in the short and long term. In the short term, it is impaired brain development, intelligence, impaired physical growth and metabolic disorders in the body. Meanwhile, in the long run, the bad consequences that can be caused are decreased cognitive ability and learning achievement, decreased immunity so that it is easy to get sick, and a high risk for the emergence of heart and blood vessel disease, cancer, stroke, and disability in old age (Kementerian Kesehatan RI, 2018).

Data obtained from the World Health Organization (WHO) shows that malnutrition is the leading cause of death for toddlers in the world, such as in sub-Saharan Africa by as much as 28%, Latin America by as much as 7%, and Asian toddlers by as much as 50%. WHO also stated that in developing countries in 2017, there were 14% of children under five who were underweight. Based on WHO data in 2017, more than half of the under-five deaths were caused by preventable and treatable diseases through simple and affordable interventions. Malnourished children, especially those with acute malnutrition, have a higher risk of death. Factors related to nutritional status contribute to approximately 45% of deaths in children under the age of 5 years (World Health Organization, 2017).