Speciation Distribution of Heavy Metals in Dutsen-Soyaya Shooting Range soil within the Nigerian Army Base Camp, Kachia, Kaduna State, Nigeria

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International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) | Volume VI, Issue X, October 2021|ISSN 2454-6194

Speciation Distribution of Heavy Metals in Dutsen-Soyaya Shooting Range soil within the Nigerian Army Base Camp, Kachia, Kaduna State, Nigeria

Aghanwa, C.I.1*, Nwaedozie, J.M.2 and Chukwu,J.U.3
1Department of Pure and Industrial Chemistry, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria
2Department of Chemistry, Nigerian Defence Academy, Kaduna State, Nigeria
3Department of Pure and Industrial Chemistry, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Enugu State, Nigeria
*Corresponding Author

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Abstract: In soil, heavy metals can be found in large quantities. Anthropogenic activities raise heavy metal concentrations in the soil, which are readily assimilated by food crops. Military training exercises such as shooting in a shooting range with bullets containing a mixture of heavy metals raise the concentration above the baseline over time, affecting military personnel and crops alike negatively. It is critical to determine the effect of shooting via military artillery operations on the soil heavy metal concentrations, mobility, and bioavailability on the shooting range by analyzing soil samples collected from selected areas of the shooting location. The speciation of heavy metals (Copper (Cu), Manganese (Mn), Nickel (Ni), Lead (Pb), Arsenic (As), Chromium (Cr), Cobalt (Co) and Zinc (Zn)) distributed in the Dutsen-Soyaya Shooting range soil within the Nigeria Army Base Camp, Kachia, Kaduna State, Nigeria was investigated. The concentration of these metals after undergoing sequential extraction procedures was analysed using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. The distribution fractions of these metals in the shooting range soil were as follows: Co: Residual > Organic > Fe – Mn Oxide > Bound to carbonate > Exchangeable. As: Fe – Mn Oxide > Residual > Organic > Bound to carbonate > Exchangeable. Cr: Exchangeable > Fe – Mn Oxide > Bound to carbonate > Organic > Residual. Ni: Fe – Mn Oxide > Exchangeable > Bound to carbonate > Residual > Organic. Mn: Residual > Fe – Mn Oxide > Bound to carbonate > Organic > Exchangeable. Pb: Residual > Organic > Fe – Mn Oxide > Exchangeable > Bound to carbonate. Zn: Fe – Mn Oxide > Bound to carbonate > Residual > Organic > Exchangeable. Cu: Residual > Bound to carbonate > Fe – Mn Oxide > Exchangeable > Organic. Although the total concentration of some of these metals (Co, As, Cr, Mn, Pb and Ni) were above the permissible limits by WHO standards, the toxic metals speciation showed that they were mostly predominantly concentrated in the non-bioavailable fractions of the shooting site soils.

Keywords: Dusten-Soyaya, Heavy metals, Shooting site and Speciation,