Statistical Analysis of Diabetes Mellitus and Viral Hepatitis B and/or C Among Asymptomatic Subjects in Taraba State Nigeria

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International Journal of Research and Innovation in Applied Science (IJRIAS) | Volume VII, Issue III, March 2022 | ISSN 2454–6194

Statistical Analysis of Diabetes Mellitus and Viral Hepatitis B and/or C Among Asymptomatic Subjects in Taraba State Nigeria

Tomen Ezekiel Agu1, Obed Tiwah John2,4*, Philips U. Aiyagbonrhule3, Tomen Egbe Agu5,

IJRISS Call for paper

Samson Ozulonye Ogbuagada4,6, Nasiru Yakubu4

1Department of Family Medicine, Dalhatu Araf Specialist Hospital, Lafia Nasarawa State, Nigeria

2Center for Initiative and Development Taraba, Nigeria

3Department of Nursing Sciences, School of Nursing & Midwifery, Jalingo, Nigeria

4Department of Statistics and Operations Research, Modibbo Adama University of Technology, Yola, Adamawa State, Nigeria

5Department of Public Health, Taraba State University, Jalingo – Nigeria

6Federal University, Wukari, Taraba State, Nigeria

Abstract: Hepatotropic viruses (HBV and HCV) and glucose metabolism disorder (Prediabetes Mellitus (Pre-DM) or Diabetes mellitus (DM)) are serious public health challenge. The triple are reported to be among the fastest growing diseases around the world. Little studies have been carried on the coinfections of these diseases. This study sought to determine the prevalence of hepatotropic viruses and glucose metabolism disorder and coinfections between the diseases.
Methods: This was a cross-sectional analysis performed among 138 randomly selected asymptomatic subjects in Taraba State using Cohcran’s formular for determining sample size. Descriptive statistics, Chi-square test of association were used with the help of Microsoft excel 2016, SPSS version 25 and Minitab version 17. Specimen collection and laboratory analysis were carried out inline with WHO guidelines by well trained and qualified laboratory staff of CFID.
Results: The overall prevalence of HBV, HCV and glucose metabolism disorder recorded in the study were 8.7%, 15.2% and 4.3%. However, 9.4% of the subjects screened were prediabetic, 0.7% of the subjects were coinfected with HBV and DM, 0.7% were also coinfected with HCV and DM. None of the subjects were coinfected with the triple infections (HBV+HCV+DM). No statistically significant association was observed between glucose metabolism disorder and hepatotropic viruses. The demographic variables tested (gender and age) were not significantly associated with glucose metabolism disorder. However, age was statistically associated with one of the hepatotropic viruses (HCV).
Conclusion: This study recorded high prevalence of hepatotropic viruses (HBV = 8.7% and HCV = 15.2%) and glucose metabolism disorder (Pre-DM = 9.7% and DM = 4.3%).
A bracket of 0.7% asymptomatic subjects were both coinfected with (HBV + DM) and (HCV+DM). None of the subjects had all the triple infections (HBV+HCV+DM) and no statistical association was observed between glucose metabolism disorder and hepatotropic viruses. Statistical association was observed between some demographic variables (age and HCV) but none of such association was observed between hepatotropic viruses and DM or demographic variables (Age and gender) and glucose metabolism disorder. Findings from this study indicates an immediate need for intervention due to the increase of the diseases (HBV,HCV and pre-DM).

Keywords: glucose metabolism disorder, hepatotropic viruses and Coinfection

I. INTRODUCTION

Diabetes can simply be defined as the impairment of glucose metabolism characterized by hyperglycemia which can either be due to insulin deficiency or insensitivity [1]. Diabetes mellitus (DM) and pre-diabetes mellitus (pre-DM) are two common glucose metabolism disorders that predominantly affect adults [2]. This condition is only manageable through nutrition and hormone supplements with constant monitoring of glucose levels. The disease has been reported to be one of the fastest growing diseases around the world and has been estimated by the International Diabetes Federation that there are now 425 million adults aged 20–79 with diabetes worldwide, including 212.4 million who are undiagnosed [3].