Comparative Effects of Different Manure on Growth and Yield of Okra (Abelmuscus esculentus L. Moench)

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International Journal of Research and Scientific Innovation (IJRSI) | Volume VII, Issue VIII, August 2020 | ISSN 2321–2705

Comparative Effects of Different Manure on Growth and Yield of Okra (Abelmuscus esculentus L. Moench)

Aderemi, F.T.1, Aderemi, A.M.2, Elesho, R.O.2, Aluko, A.K.1, Oyeleke O.S2
1Horticulture and Landscape Technology Department, Federal College of Forestry, Ibadan, Nigeria
2Agricultural Technology Department, Federal College of Forestry, Ibadan, Nigeria

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Abstract: This study evaluated the comparative effects of the organic fertilizer (poultry manure, cow dung and composted manure) on okra (Abeloamoschus exclulentus) at Research Farm of Federal College of Forestry, Jericho, Ibadan, Nigeria, latitude 7°26N and longitude 3°36E. Three manures were used for this work (composted, cow dung and poultry manure), the manures were dried under intense sunlight and ground into powdery form and incorporated into topsoil in a polythene bag and watered to allow commencement of mineralization and germination fourteen (14) before planting. The experimental design was completely randomized design (CRD) with 4 treatments and 4 replicates. Composted manure gave the highest mean value of 35.6, 6.16, 0.67 and 15.713 for plant height, number of leaves, stem girth and fruit weight respectively. The control has the lowest mean value for all the experimental test carried out. The study revealed that okra responded well to the application of composted manure, cow dung and poultry manure and recommended to farmers in their cropping system for improved yields.

I. INTRODUCTION

Okra (Abelmoschus exculentus) is an important vegetable grown in Nigeria and ranks third in production area following tomato and onion (Grubben, 1999). Okra contains vitamins A. B. Complex and C; it is rich in iron and Calcium and is higher than many vegetables in thiamin, riboflavin and niacin (Rice et al., 1991). The stem can be used in making rope and paper, while the young pod is used in cooking soup (Raemakers 2001; George, 2005). The foliage provides a good source of fodder to livestock (Ahmed et al., 2006). Okra is an important soup condiment in Nigeria and it forms part of the Nigerian curry dishes. It is rich in vitamins, minerals and research has revealed that it several medicinal values (Seran et al., 2010). Okra is adaptable and will grow in most soils though it perform best in well-drained soil that is rich in organic matter and the soil should be ideally be on acidic side, with pH between 5.8 and 7.0.